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BASEBALL JOE

I IN THE

WORLD SERIES



LESTER CHADWICK



'



TO OUR READERS



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HE WAS A GLORIOUS FIGURE OF YOUNG MANHOOD.
Baseball Joe in the World Series. Page 234



Baseball Joe in
the World Series

OR

Pitching for the Championship



By LESTER CHAD WICK

AUTHOR OF



"BASEBALL JOE OF THE SILVER STARS,*' "BASEBALL
THE BIG LEAGUE," "Tl
[TCHERS/* "THE EIG;
OARED VICTORS," ETC.



JOE IN THE BIG LEAGUE," "THE RIVAL



ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK
CUPPLES & LEON COMPANY



BOOKS BY LESTER CHADWICK



THE BASEBALL JOE SERIES

i2mo. Cloth. Illustrated
Price per volume, 75 Cents, postpaid

BASEBALL JOE OF THE SILVER STARS
BASEBALL JOE ON THE SCHOOL NINE
BASEBALL JOE AT YALE
BASEBALL JOE IN THE CENTRAL LEAGUE
BASEBALL JOE IN THE BIG LEAGUE
BASEBALL JOE ON THE GIANTS
BASEBALL JOE IN THE WORLD SERIES

(Other Volumes in Preparation)



THE COLLEGE SPORTS SERIES

i2mo. Cloth. Illustrated
Price per volume, $1.00, postpaid

THE RIVAL PITCHERS

A QUARTERBACK'S PLUCK

BATTING TO WIN

THE WINNING TOUCHDOWN

THE EIGHT-OARED VICTORS

(Other Volumes in Preparation)



CUPPLES & LEON COMPANY, New York



Copyright, 1917, by
Cupples & Leon Company



Baseball Joe in the World Series



CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I An Insolent Intruder I

II Glowing Hopes 12

III A Popular Hero 20

IV The Spoils of War 30

V Getting Ready for the Fray 27

VI Joe Gives Fair Warning , 45

VII The Thousand Dollar Bankbill 52

VIII Reckless Driving 61

IX A Brutal Act 69

X The Opening Gun yy

XI Snatched Form the Fire 84

XII The Tables Turned 92

XIII A Gallant Effort 106

XIV More Hard Luck 113

XV Fleming Turns Up Again 121

XVI A Cad's Punishment 128

XVII Planning for Revenge 134

XVIII The Plot 140

XIX Weaving the Web 147

XX A Stirring Battle 155

XXI Evening Up the Score 163

XXII A Hole in the Web 169

XXIII Taking the Lead 176

XXIV Plotting Mischief 187



CONTENTS



CHAPTER PAGE

XXV A Random Clue 1 93

XXVI A Bluff That Worked 200

XXVII Stealing Signals 212

XXVIII A Blow in the Dark 217

XXIX Quick Work 222

XXX A Glorious Victory 229



BASEBALL JOE IN THE
WORLD SERIES



CHAPTER I

AN INSOLENT INTRUDER

"Here he comes !"

"Hurrah for Matson!"

"Great game, old man."

"You stood the Chicagos on their heads that
time, Joe."

"That home run of yours was a dandy."

"What's the matter with Matson?"

"H e's all right!"

A wild uproar greeted the appearance of Joe
Matson, the famous pitcher of the New York
Giants, as he emerged from the clubhouse at the
Polo Grounds after the great game in which he
had pitched the Giants to the head of the National
League and put them in line for the World Series
with the champions of the American League.

It was no wonder that the crowd had gone
crazy with excitement. All New York shared the



2 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

same madness. The race for the pennant had
been one of the closest ever known. In the last
few weeks it had narrowed down to a fight be-
tween the Giants and the Chicagos, and the two
teams had come down the stretch, nose to nose,
fighting for every inch, each straining every nerve
to win. It had been a slap-dash, ding-dong finish,
and the Giants had won "by a hair."

Joe Matson — affectionately known as "Baseball
Joe" — had pitched the deciding game, and to him
above all others had gone the honors of the vic-
tory. Not only had he twirled a superb game,
but it had been his home run in the ninth inning
after two men were out that had brought the pen-
nant to New York.

And just at this moment his name was on more
tongues than that of any other man in the United
States. Telegraph wires had flashed the news of
his triumph to every city and village in the coun-
try, and the cables and wireless had borne it to
every American colony in the world.

Joe's hand had been shaken and his back
pounded by exulting enthusiasts until he was lame
and sore all over. It was with a feeling of relief
that he had gained the shelter of the clubhouse
with its refreshing shower and rubdown. Even
here his mates had pawed and mauled him in their
delight at the glorious victory, until he had laugh-
ingly threatened to thrash a few of them. And



AN INSOLENT INTRUDER 3

now, as, after getting into his street clothes, he
came out into the side street and viewed the crowd
that waited for him, he saw that he was in for a
new ordeal.

"Gee whiz I" he exclaimed to his friend and
fellow player, Jim Barclay, who accompanied him.
"Will they never let up on me?"

"It's one of the penalties of fame, old man,"
laughed Jim. "Don't make out that you don't
like it, you old hypocrite."

"Of course I like it," admitted Joe with a grin.
"All the same I don't want to have this old wing
of mine torn from its socket. I need it in my bus-



iness."



"You bet you do," agreed Jim. "It's going to
come in mighty handy for the World Series. But
we'll be out of this in a minute."

He held up his hand to signal a passing taxicab,
and the cab edged its way to the curb.

The crowd swept in upon the players and they
had all they could do to elbow their way through.
They succeeded finally and slammed the door shut,
while the chauffeur threw in the clutch and the
taxicab darted off, pursued by the shouts and
plaudits of the crowd.

Joe sank back on the cushions with a sigh of
relief.

"The first free breath I've drawn since the game
ended," he remarked.



4 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

"It's been a wonderful day for you, Joe," said
Jim, looking at his chum with ungrudging admira-
tion. "That game will stand out in baseball his-
tory for years to come."

"I'm mighty glad I won for my own sake," an-
swered Joe; "but I'm gladder still on account of
the team. The boys backed me up in great shape
— except in that fifth inning — and I'd have felt
fearfully sore if I hadn't been able to deliver the
goods. But those Chicagos certainly made us fight
to win."

"They're a great team," admitted Jim; "and
they put up a corking good game. But it was our
day to win.

"Did you see McRae and Robson after the
game?" he went on, referring to the manager and
the coach of the Giant team. "Whatever dignity
they had, they lost it then. They fairly hugged
each other and did the tango in front of the club-
house."

Joe grinned as the burly figures came before his
mental vision.

"They've been under a fearful strain for the
last few weeks," he commented; "and I guess they
had to let themselves go in some fashion or they'd
have burst."

"Do you realize what that home run of yours
meant in money, to say nothing of the glory?"
jubilated Jim.



AN INSOLENT INTRUDER 5

"I haven't had time to do much figuring yet,"
smiled Joe.

"It meant at least fifty thousand dollars for
the team," pursued Jim. v "We'll get that much
even if we lose the World Series, and a good deal
more if we win. And if the Series goes to six or
seven games the management will scoop in a big
pot of money, too — anywhere from fifty to a hun-
dred thousand dollars."

"That's good," replied Joe, a little absent-
mindedly.

"Good?" echoed Jim, sharply. "It's more than
good — it's great, it's glorious ! Wake up, man,
and stop your dreaming."

Joe came to himself with a little start.

"You're — you're right, Jim," he stammered
somewhat confusedly. "To tell the truth, I wasn't
thinking just then of money."

Jim gave him a quick glance, and a sudden look
of amused comprehension came into his eyes. Joe
caught his glance and flushed.

"What are you blushing about?" demanded
Jim with a grin.

"I wasn't blushing," defended Joe, stoutly.
"It's mighty warm in this cab."

Jim laughed outright.

"Tell that to the King of Denmark," he chuck-
led. "I'm on, old man. You told me in the club-
house that you were going to the Marlborough



6 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

Hotel, and I know just who it is that's stopping
there."

"My friend, Reggie Varley, is putting up there,"
countered Joe, feebly.

"My friend Reggie Varley," mimicked Jim, "to
say nothing of his charming sister. Oh, I'm not
blind, old fellow. I've seen for a long time how
the wind was blowing. Well," he continued, drop-
ping his light tone for a more earnest one, "go in
and win, Joe. I hope you have all the luck in the
world."

He reached over and slapped his friend cor-
dially on the shoulder. Then he signaled for the
chauffeur to stop.

"What are you getting out here for?" asked
Joe. "We haven't got to your street yet."

"I know it," answered Jim, preparing to jump
out. "I want to give you a chance to think up what
you're going to say to the lady fair," he added,
mischievously.

He ducked the friendly thrust that Joe made
toward him and went away laughing, while the
cab started on.

Joe knew perfectly well what he intended to
say when he should meet Mabel Varley. He had
wanted to say it for a long time, and had deter-
mined that if his team won the pennant he would
wait no longer.

He had met her for the first time two years be-



AN INSOLENT INTRUDER 7

fore under unusual circumstances. At that time he
was playing in the Central League, and his team
was training at Montville, North Carolina. He
had saved Mabel from being carried over a cliff by
a runaway horse, and the acquaintance thus
formed had soon deepened into friendship. With
Joe it had now become a much stronger feeling,
and he had dared to hope that this was shared by
Mabel.

Reggie Varley, Mabel's brother, was a rather
affected young man, who ran chiefly to clothes
and automobiles and had an accent that he fondly
supposed was English. Joe had met him at an
earlier date than that at which he had formed
Mabel's acquaintance and under unpleasant con-
ditions. Reggie had lost sight of his valise in a
railway station, and had rashly accused Joe of tak-
ing it. He apologized later, however, and the
young men had become the best of friends, for
Reggie, despite some foolish little affectations,
was at heart a thoroughly good fellow.

The brother and sister had come to New York
to see the deciding games and were quartered at
the Marlborough Hotel. Mabel had waved to
Joe from a box at the Polo Grounds that after-
noon, and her presence had nerved him to almost
superhuman exertions. And he had won and won
gloriously.

Would his good luck continue? He was asking



8 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

himself this question when the taxicab drew up at
the curb, and he saw that he was at the door of
the Marlborough.

He jumped out and thrust his hand in his pocket
to get the money for his fare, but the chauffeur
waved him back with a grin.

"Nuthin' doin'," he said. "This ride is on me."

"What do you mean?" inquired Joe in surprise.

"Jest what I said," returned the chauffeur.
"The fellow that won the championship for the
New Yorks can't pay me any money. It's enough
for me to have Baseball Joe ride in my cab. I
can crow over the other fellows that wasn't so
lucky."

"Nonsense," laughed Joe, as he took out a
bankbill and tried to thrust it on him.

"No use, boss," the man persisted. "Your
money's counterfeit with me."

He started his car with a rush and a backward
wave of his hand, and Joe, warned by a cheer or
two that came from people near by who had recog-
nized him, was forced to retreat into the hotel.

He did not send up a card, as he was a frequent
caller and felt sure of his welcome. Besides, he
was too impatient for any formalities. He wanted
to be in the presence of Mabel, and even the ele-
vator seemed slow, though it shot him with amaz-
ing speed to the fifth floor on which the Varley
suite was located.



AN INSOLENT INTRUDER 9

His heart was beating fast as he knocked at the
parlor door, and it beat still faster when a familiar
voice bade him enter.

He burst in with a rush that suddenly stopped
short when he saw that he was not the only visi-
tor. A young man had stepped back quickly from
Mabel's side and it was evident that he had just
withdrawn his hand from hers.

For a moment Joe's blood drummed in his ears
and the demon of jealousy took possession of him.
He glared at the visitor, who stared back at him
with an air of insolence that to Joe at that moment
was maddening.

The stranger was dressed in a degree of fash-
ion that bordered on foppishness. He wore more
jewelry than was dictated by good taste, even go-
ing so far as to carry a tiny wrist watch. His eyes
were pale, his chin slightly retreating, and his face
showed unmistakable marks of dissipation. His
air was arrogant and supercilious as he took Joe
slowly in from head to foot.

Mabel rushed forward eagerly as Joe entered.

"Oh, Joe !" she cried, "I'm so glad you've come !
I never was so glad in all my life."

Before the joyous warmth of that greeting,
Joe's jealousy receded. He could not question her
sincerity. All her soul was in her eyes.

He took her hand tenderly in his and felt that
it was trembling. Had she been frightened? He



io BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

turned her about so that he stood between her and
the visitor.

"Tell me," he commanded in a low voice. "Has
this man offended you?"

"Yes, no, yes!" she whispered. "Oh, Joe,
please don't say anything now! Please, for my
sake, Joe ! It's all right now. I'll tell you about
it afterward. He's Reggie's friend. Don't make
a scene, please, Joe!"

Joe's muscles stiffened, and had it not been for
Mabel's earnest pleading, he would have thrown
the other fellow out of the room. But Mabel's
name must not be mixed up in any brawl, and by a
mighty effort he restrained himself.

The visitor during this brief colloquy had been
moving about uneasily. He evidently wished him-
self anywhere else than where he was. Then, as
the two turned toward him, he put on a mask of
carelessness and drawled lazily:

"Won't you introduce me to — ah — your friend,
Miss Varley?"

Mabel, recalled to her duty as hostess, had no
option but to comply.

"This is Mr. Beckworth Fleming, Joe," she
said. "Mr. Fleming, this is Mr. Matson."

The two men bowed coldly but neither extended
a hand.

"Mr. Fleming is a friend of Reggie's," Mabel
explained to Joe.



AN INSOLENT INTRUDER n

"And of yours also, I hope, Miss Varley," said
Fleming with an ingratiating smile.

"I said a friend of Reggie's," returned Mabel,
coldly.

It was a direct cut, and Fleming felt it as he
would have felt the lash of a whip. He turned a
dull red and was about to reply, when he caught
the menacing look in Joe's eyes and stopped. He
muttered something about a pressing engagement,
took up his hat and cane, and with a pretence of
haughtiness that failed dismally of its effect, swag-
gered from the room.



CHAPTER II

GLOWING HOPES

"And now!" exclaimed Joe, as soon as the door
had closed on the unwelcome visitor, "tell me,
Mabel, what that feilow said or did, and I'll hunt
him up and thrash him within an inch of his life.
I'll make him wish he'd never been born."

"Don't do anything like that, Joe," urged the
girl. "He's probably had his lesson, and it isn't
likely I'll ever be troubled by him again. He's
just an acquaintance that Reggie picked up some-
where, and I've only seen him once before to-day.
He called at the hotel to see Reggie, and when he
found he wasn't in, he stayed to talk with me. He
started in by paying me a lot of compliments and
then became familiar and impudent. He seized
my hand, and when I sought to pull it away from
him he wouldn't let me. I was getting thoroughly
frightened and was going to call out when your
knock came at the door. Oh, Joe, I was so glad
when I saw who it was !"

She was perilously near to tears, and her beau-
tiful eyes were dewy as they looked into his. Joe's

12



GLOWING HOPES 13

heart beat madly. The words he had been long-
ing to say leaped to his lips, but he choked them
back. He did not want to catch her off her guard,
to take advantage of her emotions and of her
shaken condition. Her acceptance of him at that
moment might be due in part to gratitude and re-
lief. He wanted more than that — the uncondi-
tional, unreserved surrender of her heart and life
into his keeping, based only on affection.

So he held himself under control and recom-
pensed himself for his selfdenial by an inward
promise to make things interesting for Mr. Beck-
worth Fleming, if ever that cad's path and his
should cross.

"But come," said Mabel more brightly, as she
sank into a chair and motioned Joe to another,
"let's talk about something pleasant."

"About you then," smiled Joe, his eyes dwelling
on her eloquently.

"Not poor little me," she pouted in mock hu-
mility. "Who am I compared with the great
Joseph Matson about whom all the world is talk-
ing — the man who won the championship for the
Giants, the hero whose picture to-morrow will
hold the place of honor in every newspaper in the
country?"

"You're chaffing me now," laughed Joe.

"Not a bit," she said demurely, her dimples
coming and going in a way that drove him nearly



i 4 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

distracted. "I really feel as though I ought to
salaam or kow-tow or whatever it is the Orientals
do when they come before the Emperor. But, oh,
Joe," and here she dropped her bantering manner
and leaned forward earnestly, "you were simply
magnificent this afternoon. The way you kept
your nerve and won that game was just wonder-
ful. I was so excited at times that I thought my
heart would leap out of my body. I was proud,
oh, so proud that you were a friend of mine I"

Joe had heard many words of praise that day
but none half so sweet as these.

"Will you let me tell you a secret?" he ex-
claimed, half rising from his chair. "Do you
want to know who really won that game?"

"Why, you did," she returned in some surprise.
"Of course the rest of the team did, too, but if it
hadn't been for your pitching and batting "

"No," he interrupted, "it was you who won the
game."

He had risen now and had come swiftly to Her
side.

"Listen, Mabel," he said, and before the note in
his voice she felt her pulses leap. "You were in
my mind from the start to the finish of that game.
I looked up at you every time I went into the box.
This little glove of yours" — he took it from his
pocket with a hand that trembled — "lay close to
my heart all through the game. Mabel "



GLOWING HOPES 15

"Why, hello, Joe, old top!" came a voice
from the door that had opened without their
hearing it. "What good wind blew you here?
I'm no end glad to see you, don't you know. Con-
gratulations, old man, on winning that game.
You were simply rippin', don't you know."

And Reggie Varley ambled in and shook Joe's
hand warmly, blandly unconscious of the lack of
welcome from the two inmates of the room.

"How are you, Reggie?" Joe managed to blurt
out, wishing viciously that at that moment his
friend were at the very farthest corner of the
world.

It is possible that Mabel's feelings were most
unsisterly, but she concealed them and rallied more
readily than Joe from the shock caused by her
brother's inopportune coming.

"I was just telling Joe how proud we were of
him," she smiled. "But he's so modest that he re-
fuses to take any credit for what he has done. In-
sists that somebody else won the game."

"Of course that's all bally nonsense, don't you
know," declared Reggie, looking puzzled. "The
other fellows helped, of course, but Joe was the
king pin. Those Chicagos were out for blood and
Joe was the only one who could tame them."

Joe listened moodily, and while he is recover-
ing his composure it may be well, for the sake of
those who have not followed the career of the fam-



16 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

ous young pitcher, to mention the previous books
of this series in which his exploits are recorded.

His diamond history opened in the first volume
of the series, entitled: "Baseball Joe of the Silver
Stars; Or, The Rivals of Riverside." Here he
had his first experience in pitching. In that re-
stricted circle he soon became widely known as one
of the best of the amateur boxmen, but he had to
earn that position by overcoming many difficulties.

In "Baseball Joe on the School Nine," we find
the same qualities of grit and determination shown
in a different field. The situation here was com-
plicated by the efforts of the bully of the school,
who did everything in his power to frustrate Joe
and bring him to disaster.

A little later on, Joe went to Yale, and his
triumphs in the great university are told in the
third volume of the series, entitled: "Baseball Joe
at Yale; Or, Pitching for the College Champion-
ship."

As may be imagined, with such redoubtable ri-
vals as Harvard and Princeton, a very different
class of baseball is required from that which will
"get by" in academies and preparatory schools.

Joe got his chance to pitch against Princeton
in an exciting game where the Yale "Bulldog" "put
one over" on the Princeton "Tiger."

But in spite of his athletic prowess and general
popularity, Joe was not entirely happy at Yale.



GLOWING HOPES 17

His mother had set her heart on Joe's studying for
the ministry. But Joe himself did not feel any
special call in that direction. While always a
faithful student he was not a natural scholar, and
outdoor life had a strong appeal for him. His
success in athletics confirmed this natural bent,
until at last he came to the conclusion that he
ought to adopt professional baseball as his voca-
tion.

His mother was, naturally, much disappointed,
as she had had great hopes of seeing her only son
in the pulpit. Moreover, she had the vague feel-
ing that there was something almost disreputable
in making baseball a profession. But Joe at last
convinced her that whatever might have been true
in the early days of the game did not apply now f
when so many high-class men were turning toward
it, and she yielded, though reluctantly.

Joe's chance to break into the professional
ranks was not long in coming. That last great
game with Princeton had been noted by Jimmie
Mack, manager of the Pittston team in the Central
League. He made Joe an offer which the latter
accepted, and the story of his first experience on
the professional diamond is told in the fourth vol-
ume of the series entitled: ''Baseball Joe in the
Central League; Or, Making Good as a Profes-
sional Pitcher."

But this was only the first step in his career. He



18 BASEBALL JOE IN WORLD SERIES

was too ambitious to be content with the Central
League except as a stepping stone to something
higher. His delight can be imagined, therefore,
when he learned that he had been drafted into the
St. Louis Club of the National League. He was
no longer a "busher" but the "real thing." He
had to work hard and had many stirring ad-
ventures. How he succeeded in helping his
team into the first division is told in the fifth
volume of the series, entitled: "Baseball Joe in
the Big League; Or, A Young Pitcher's Hardest
Struggles."

But these hard struggles were at the same time
victorious ones and attracted the attention of the
baseball public, who are always on the lookout
for a new star. Among others, McRae, the fam-
ous manager of the New York Giants, thought he
saw in Joe a great chance to bolster up his pitch-
ing staff. Joe could hardly believe his eyes when
he learned that he had been bought by New York.
It brought a bigger reputation, a larger salary and
a capital chance to get into the World Series.
He worked like a Trojan all through the season,
and, as we have already seen, came through with
flying colors, winning from the Chicagos the final
game that made the Giants the champions of the
National League and put them in line for the
championship of the world. The details of the
stirring fight are told in the sixth volume of the



GLOWING HOPES 19

series, entitled: "Baseball Joe on the Giants; Or,
Making Good as a Ball Twirler in the Metrop-
olis."

"I say, old top," remarked Reggie, breaking
in on Joe's rather resentful musings, "you're go-
ing to stay and have dinner with us to-night, you
know."

Joe looked at Mabel for confirmation.

"You certainly must, Joe," she said enthusias-
tically. "We won't take no for an answer."

As there was nothing else on earth that Joe
wanted so much as to be with Mabel, he did not


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