Lilian Bell.

The Lilian Bell birthday book; online

. (page 2 of 6)
Online LibraryLilian BellThe Lilian Bell birthday book; → online text (page 2 of 6)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


20 IVA body. Not that I am select-

ing a husband for his murderous capabilities, but it
would be a satisfaction to know that if a foot-pad
attacked him he could defend himself I believe if
I said, * Burglars ! ' to Mr. Finch, he would crawl
under the table." — y/ Pigeon Blood Ruby y from Sir
John and the American Girl.



42



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



Febrtiary

24



February
25



February
20



nC.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

February y DEPEND a great deal upon other
X men's opinion of a man. I never
thoroughly trust a man who is not a favorite with
his own sex. I wish men were as generous to us
in that respect, for a woman whom other women do
not like is just as dangerous. And I never knew
simple jealousy, the reason men urge against ac-
cepting our verdict, to be universal enough to
condemn a woman. There always is a sufficient
number of fair-minded women in every community
— just enough to be in the minority — to break
continuous jealousy. — I'he Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



February "IV iTEN must nccds study women.
i.V J. Often the terror with which
some men regard these, to us, perfectly transparent
complexities, could be avoided if they would ana-
lyze the cause with but half the patience they
display in the case of an ailing trotter. But no.
Either they edge carefully away from such dangers
as they previously have experienced or, if they
blunder into new ones, they give the woman a
sealskin, and trust to time to heal the breach.
"The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



44



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



February

27



February
28



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



February '^JO one could deny that the room
*^ X^ was beautiful, for the military

lends itself readily to decorations. From crossed
sabres and stacked arms up to small cannon, every-
where were the signs of the peaceful side of war ; and
over and under and above, in all kinds of soft dra-
peries and flowing festoons, the flag, — the dear, dear
flag, — that flag which taste and love and patriotism all
combine to make us think the most beautiful in the
world ; the flag which pulls at your heartstrings like
a human thing when you see it floating anywhere ;
which makes you want to put your hand on it and
love it, if you see pictures of it with hosts of others ;
which, when you accidentally run across it in
Europe, makes you want to kiss and hug and cry
over it, if you are a woman ; and stand up and take
your hat oflf to it, if you are a man. — The Under
Side of Things.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



February
29



MARCH



MarcH yp scems sometimes as if children know
* A just when their heavenly healing is

needed by helpless grown people ; for what else can
explain their sudden bursts of affection, or the love
expressed in their clinging kisses when one least
looks for such outpourings? — A Little Sister to
the Wilderness.

MarcH TV^TO woman's friendship could stand
^ X^ the test of a man's coming between

them. — With Feet of Clay^ from Sir John and the
American Girl.

MarcH ^HE possesscd the American girl's
•* w3 native quickness of wit, and she had
that sharp little manner of putting things which
made you look up from your soup, if you sat next
her at dinner, but it seemed more than all to be
her electrical vitality which made you like her.
There was a sparkle to all she did, as if the sunlight
were flashing over a little lake. — 'The Expatriates.



MARCH



Marcb

1



MarcH
2



MarcH
3



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH " T'M afraid that some day, after I am
^ JL safely married to you, and you are

nagging my life out, that I shall meet the man, for I
know he exists somewhere, who will think the very
sins for which you lecture me, virtues; who will
accept me wholly, imperfections and all ; who will
allow me to be myself, and find that self wholly
good ; who will foster the very side of me which you
are trying to crush ; who will think that when I do
the thing it becomes fine and good, because he
knows and believes in the real me, and who will
never consider my most generous actions * bad
form.' " — The Expatriates.



MarcH yp jg Q^g Qf ^\^q unanswered conun-
•^ X drums of life why the anger of a lover

rises to a white heat at a similar display of his own
mild insanity in any one else. — The Under Side of
Things.



MarcH A | AHERE is something pathetic about
^ X the wrinkled socks of an old man,

especially if they are white. — A Little Sister to the
IVilderness.



50



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH

4



Marcb

5



MarcH
6



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



Marck XT IS the cffcct Only that men take in;
X and when a man goes into ecstasies over
a gown of pale green on a hot day just because you
look so cool and fresh in it, when you know that
you paid but forty cents a yard for it, and only
nods when you show him your velvet and ermine
wrap, which cost you two hundred dollars, I would
just like to ask you if it pays to dress for him.
From a Girl 's Point of View.



MarcH «^^AN you fall in love to order?" I
® V^ asked in dismay. " Not exactly.

* To order ! ' Why, no. Anybody would think
you were having boots made. But it's being with
a man, and having him awfully good to you, and
admiring everything you say, and having lots of
smart clothes, and not being in love with any other
fellow, that makes you love a man." — 'The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.

MarcK y IVING with a song in one's life may
^ Lj be the sweetest while it lasts, and

before one thinks ; but to live by a psalm is to find
life infinitely more beautiful and worthier. — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



52



T:he LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK
March

7



MarcH

8



MarcH



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

March rr^HE world is full of chatterboxes,
X whose emptiness makes more noise
than the fulness of the philosophers. — A Little
Sister to the Wilderness.

March ^T^HERE are fashions in thought as
X well as in dress ; and the best of us
follow both, as sheep follow their leader. We will
sometimes follow our neighbor's line of insular
prejudice, when worlds could not bribe us to copy
her English or her gowns. — 'The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid,

March TJ" ER respcct, which she withheld from

X \. him until his sensitiveness forced him
to make the most radical move of his life in order
to compel it, she now, with the royal generosity of
her nature, lavished upon him without stint or
reason. He revelled in this fine distinction with
the reacting joy of his previous discomfort, and
lapped himself in the tropical warmth of her appre-
ciation with all the satisfaction of the mentally thin-
skinned who dread the cold judgment of the world.
With Feet of Clay ^ from Sir John and the American
Girl.



54



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

MarcH
lO



Marcln
11



MarcH
12



T:he LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH A | AHE untold story of his silent love
*** JL for his friend's wife was so recent, so

hopeless, and so perfectly understood by her that
he was safer for a companion than a freshly made
widower; for the sacredness of his grief was tem-
pered by a certain earthly piquancy which removed
it from the danger of the solely spiritual and gave it
a temporal flavor which acted as mental ballast.
With Feet of Clay, from Sir John and the American
Girl.

MarcH yp secms as if some men never would
^ X see the justice of the way a woman, who
has been affronted by somebody else, takes it out
on her husband or whoever happens to be handy !
The Under Side of Things.



MarcH TT THEN a man speaks of a "simple
15 y Y white muslin " in the softly admir-

ing tone which he generally adopts to go with it, he
means anything on earth in the line of a thin, light
stuffs which produces the effect of youth and inno-
cence. A ball-dress or a cotton morning gown is
to him a " simple white muslin." — T'he Philosophy
of Clothes, from From a Girl's Point of View.

-



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

MarcH
13



MarcH

14



MarcH

15



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH y]vf ^^ brutc it is instinct; in women, in-
X tuition, Man is the only creature sent
■> helpless into the world to blunder along on reason.
A Study in Hearts^ from The Instinct of Stepfather-
hood.

Marcb TTIS was a typical man's mind, out of
X X which was driven all thought of love
at the idea of a woman's having got on the wrong
train. — A Study in Hearts^ from 1'he Instinct of
Stepfather hood.



MarcH y^ ^tdX life you cannot lose your love
X and heal your worse than widowed heart
and love anew, as you would in private theatricals.
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



Marcb TT E was moody, and confided in her.
X X She was foolish, and confided in him.
They both decided that their hearts were ashes, —
love burned out, and life a howling wilderness, —
and then proceeded to exchange these empty hearts
of theirs and to go through this howling wilderness
together. — 'The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



S8



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcK
16



MarcH

17



MarcH
18



MarcH
19



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH « "PJUT on youf prettiest frock, the one

X which fits the best in the back. All
your gowns should fit best in the back, for your
back is at the mercy of the observer. You can de-
fend the front in fifty ways ; but how do you know
what is going on behind you ? A woman of genius
has the backs of her gowns faultless. Mine are !
The fronts of mine are plain. You never notice
them, because I myself am the front of a gown."
The Under Side of Things.



Marcb irjERHAPS you think that girls do not
Jl know enough about other girls' hus-
bands to discuss them with profit. But, if there has
been a dinner or theatre party within our memory
where the married girls did not take the bachelors
and leave their husbands for us, we would just like
to know when it was, that's all. — From a Girl's
Point of View.

MarcH THviD you cver notice that men in-
** X - / stinctively put confidence in a girl
with blue eyes, and have their suspicions of a girl
with brilliant black ones ? and will you kindly tell
me why ? — From a Girl ' j Point of View.



60



riie LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

Marcb
20



MarcK
21



MarcH
22



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



*•'**'*=** TVyTEN are always saying, " Well, why
23 1.VJ_ don't you tell us the kind of men
you would like us to be ? " And their attitude
when they say it is with their thumbs in the arm-
holes of their waistcoats. When a man is thor-
oughly satisfied with himself, he always expands
his chest. — l^he Untrained Man under Thirty-five^
from From a Giris Point of View.



MarcH A | ^HE owncr of a stern moral sense,
*^ A who has the wit not to preach at

people, has no idea how permeating a Puritan in-
fluence is. It percolates through all looser -jointed
natures with which it comes in contact, and acts
like a spiritual tonic, stiffening up involuntarily the
moral backbone of the weak. — Miss Scarborough's
Point of View y from Sir John and the American Girl.



March y WONDER why Sunday nights always
*^ JL brings to a woman thoughts of the man
she loves and can't marry, — won't marry, I mean.
A Pigeon Blood Ruby^ from Sir John and the Ameri-
can Girl.



62



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH
23



March

24



March
25



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



MarcH T TER gravcst fault is a witty tongue.
•*^ JLl That which many people would give
years of their lives to possess is what she has shed
the most tears over, and which she most liberally
detests in herself She calls it her private demon,
and says she knows that one of the devils, in the
woman who was possessed of seven, was the devil
of wit. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



MarcH ^HE is clcver, too, at introspection
*^ k3 and analysis — of herself chiefly. She
studies her own sensations and dissects her moods.
She is not, perhaps, more selfish than many another
woman ; but her selfishness is different. She is
mentally cross-eyed from turning her eyes inward
so constantly. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



**=^'«=** /^^H, I hope, if I should live to be over
*® V>/ fifty, that I may be a pleasant old
person. I hope my teeth will fit me, and the part-
ing to my wave be always in the middle. I hope
my fingers will always come fully to the ends of my
gloves, and that I never shall wear my spectacles on
top of my head. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



March
20



March
27



March
28



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



Max-cH y j)Q j^q^ ggg }^q^ ^ woman with any
X self-respect can marry until she meets
her master. The man I marry must have a stronger
will and a greater brain than I have, or I should rule
him. I shall never marry until I find a man who
knows more than I do. Yet, as to these other men
who have loved me, you know what a tender place
a woman has in her heart for the men who have
wanted to marry her. My intellect repudiated, but
my heart cherishes them still. Odd things, hearts.
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



MarcH ^ BORE is a man or woman who
jL\. never knows How or When. — Men
who Bore us, from From a Girl 's Point of ^iew.



MarcH l^TOBODY wants undiluted honesty, —
X^ least of all, men. But the mistake
women make is in coloring the truth. They make
it gray, and gray is dull and unbecoming. Now
when / color the truth, I make it red. Most men
love red. It warms and cheers. — The Under Side
of Things.



66



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

Marcb
29



MarcH
30



Marcb
31



APRIL



April fT^HE first spring wind brings a sugges-
A tion of late patches of snow, of the last
thaw, of the rich black earth melting beneath, of
the thin green stalks of jonquils and crocuses to-day
and the promise that we shall have violets to-
morrow. There is little of tenderness in a spring
wind. It is too young for that. Tenderness comes
with experience. But there is a rush and a whirr in
it as of myriads of unseen wings, and there is a
buoyancy in its sting which sends a sparkle into
wintry blood and a thrill to cool pulses ; for its elec-
tricity is contagious. — The Expatriates.



April Tft yf'ANY people, of wide experience in
XV JL other matters, absolutely deny the
existence of love at first sight. They lay great
stress upon the impossibility of such an occurrence,
and point with pride to the fact that they are bank
presidents or treasurers of orphan asylums or alder-
men, to give weight to their opinions. — The Under
Side of Things.



68



APRIL



April
1



April
2



the LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

April A I AHE more I know of horses, the more
jL natural I think men and women are
in the unequalness of their marriages. I never yet
saw a pair of horses so well matched that they
pulled evenly all the time. The more skilful the
driver, the less he lets the discrepancy become
apparent. Going up hill, one horse generally does
the greater share of work; and, if they pull equally
up hill, sometimes they see-saw and pull in jerks on
a level road. And I never saw a marriage in which
both persons pulled evenly all the time ; and the
worst of it is, I suppose this unevenness is only
what is always expected. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.

-^""^ IV /fOST men are provincial when they
^ i. V -L make love, but it is the provincialism
of those who give the matter no thought, and not
of bigotry. — Love - making as a Fine Art, from
From a Girl's Point of View.



April

5



IT is queer what a curious effect daylight
has on love, and odd how many of the
kinks the moon puts in that the sun takes out.
The Under Side of Things.



70



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK
A.pril

3



April

4



April

5



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April yx is the curse of triflers that even when
X in earnest they cannot take all the com-
fort from the blissful pastime of falling in love with
which that rapturous occupation is usually fraught.
A Study in Hearts^ from 'The Instinct of Stepfather-
hood.

April A I ^HEIR manners in public would have
A put Beau Brummel to the blush ; but
in private Frances was a little demon, and Peggy
would fight as quietly but as long as a bull-dog.
Frances flew into a passion a dozen times a day,
but was ready to kiss and apologize in two minutes.
Peggy would stand almost anything, but, when once
her anger against her sister began to burn with a
slow white heat, she had to be peeled off of Frances
like a plaster. — The Under Side of Things.



^'*''" XJOBODY could take any comfort with
X ^ as sharp a child as Frances, and people
made no secret of their preference for the soothing
companionship of her fat little sister. Most people
prefer a pin-cushion to an emery — for daily use. —
The Under Side of Things.



72



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April
6



April

7



April
8



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April •^IRLS really believe, I suppose, that
vJ they dress for other girls ; but they do
not. They dress for men. And only experience
will teach them the highest wisdom in the matter.
But that they cannot acquire until they believe
that only another woman will know just how well
they are dressed, and, above all, whether Doucet
turned them out or a dressmaker in the house at
two dollars a day. — The Philosophy of Clothes ^ from
From a Girl 's Point of View.



April y SUPPOSE that women who never have
' encouraged a love which they did not



I

intend to return never dream that an honest love
may not be reciprocated. — The Love Affairs of an



Old Maid.

if



April y WONDER how many marriages there
A. really are where both are perfectly free to
marry. I mean, no secret entanglements on either
side, — no other man wanting the bride, no girl
bitterly jealous of her. I never heard of one, — not
among the people / know, at least. — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.



74



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April

9



April

lO



April
11



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April "p^EAUTY such as hers successfully
** J3 masks unusual intelligence ; for who
looks for philosophy in Venus ? — A Little Sister
to the PFilderness.

April "|~J\LDERLY admirers with unctuous
*** m2j manners and an oily skin can make
themselves very revolting to sensitive young ladies
with romantic tendencies. — The Under Side of
Things.

April T_TE felt that a girl who could look up
*^ JLjl at a fellow like that was enough to
turn West Point back to the starting-place for all
the world, — the Garden of Eden, so called, per-
haps, because two lovers were there alone, with no-
body to bother them or ask them to make up a
set. — The Under Side of Things.



April rr^HERE is something particularly ru-
*^ X minative about the occupation of

watching for the postman. A girl is apt to feel
gently sentimental at such a time. — A Study in
HeartSy from The Instinct of Stepfather hood.

^6 "



riie LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April
12



April
13



April

14



April

15



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April Xp a woman's heart is filled with love for
X a man, it makes it so tender that he has
doubly the power to wound by a word or neglect. —
From a GirVs Point of View.



April T TER sensitiveness through every avail-
^^ JTX able channel makes her of no use to
general society. Blundering people tread on her,
malicious ones tear her to pieces. She is so clever
that she is perfectly helpless. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



April TT is of no use to kick against the pricks.
*® A Bores are in this world for a purpose, —
to chasten the proud spirit of women, who otherwise
might become too indolent and ease-loving to be of
any use, — and they are here to stay. — Men who
Bore Us, from From a Girl's Point of View.



April A I AHERE is a delicacy, a fineness, about
*^ X an answering silence which quickens

the mind beyond that of the most responsive
speech. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness.



78



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK
A,pril

16



April

17



April
18



April

19



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April /^^UTSIDE gossip was scarce, of course,
*^ V^ in a town like Stockbridge, where
nothing ever happened. Still, Mrs. Copeland
thought there was no sense in Mrs. Overshine's
acting as if she were the ark of the covenant, just
because she was in the inner circle of a celebrated
New York divorce case. — The Under Side of
Things.



■^J*"* TTIS anger never disturbed her. She
** jn could cope with that. It was only
his conceit which sickened her, and made her long
for unlimited open air, — some vast wilderness in
which to pray out loud her thankfulness that she
wasn't married to him and forced to liste i to it
always. — Miss Scarborough' s Point of VieWy from
Sir John and the American Girl.



April " y BELIEVE in callin' a spade a spade,
^* X and not * a sweet little shovel,' just be-

cause it happens to belong to us ; especially when
it is a. spade, and not entirely free from garden mould,
either ! " — Lizzie Lee's Separation^from The Instinct
of Stepfatherhood.

— _ -



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April
20



April
21



April
22



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April *< y OOK up there," she cried, pointing.
i J " See the red in the river, and the
black shadows, and the silver haze on the opposite
shore, and the purplish light on the trees. Isn't
that a lovely picture ? "

" What a beautiful, misty look it has," said Gor-
don. " It is like a Corot."

" Only in a Corot we call that haze atmosphere;
but in Pennsylvania we call it malaria," said Kate. —
The Under Side of Things.



April TTE looked so manly and determined
^ X A that Miss Scarborough viewed his
possibilities in a feminine flash, and allowed herself
to drift for a moment into the current of his will.
It was one of those rare, potential moments when a
woman lets herself think for the first time of this
particular man as her husband. — Miss Scarborough' s
Point of View^ from Sir John and the American Girl.



April "W"p takes moral courage in a man to be
25 j[_ |.j.^g ^Q Qj^g woman, if another woman has
pitted her charms against him. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.





rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April

23



April
24



April
25



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

April ^HE had everything in the world she
*^ k3 wanted, yet she was always referred to as
"poor little Elsie Copeland." Alas, to waste the
heavenly gift of pity upon the carefully suffering
rich ! — The Under Side of Things.



Y April rr^HERE is no hatred so bitter as that
*^ A engendered by outraged love. — The

Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



A»>"* TT THEN a woman, born to be ruled by
28 VV love only, passes by her master spirit,
she becomes an anomaly in woman, — she makes
complications over which the psychologist wastes
midnight oil, and, if he never discovers the solution,
it is because of its very simplicity. — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.

April y Y really would be a delightful as well as a
*^ X most instructive thing if a man occasion-
ally could exchange places with the woman he loves,
and view his actions through her eyes. — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.





rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April
26



April

27



April
28



April
29



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April ^^NE'S first enchanted, enchanting view
V^ of Piccadilly is like being in love for
the first time. You like it, and yet you don't like
it, — this tremendous rush of feeling. You wish it
would go away, yet you fear it will go all too soon.
It gets into your head and makes you dizzy, and
you want to shut your eyes ; but you are afraid, if
you do, that you will miss something. You cannot
eat, and you cannot sleep. You feel that you have
two consciousnesses, — one which belongs to the life
you have lived hitherto, and which is still going on
somewhere in the world, unmindful of you, and you
unmindful of it ; and the other is this new bliss
which is beating in your veins, and sounding in
your ears, and shining before your eyes, which no
one knows and no one dreams of, but which keeps
a smile upon your lips, — a smile which has in it
nothing of humor, nothing from the great without,
but which comes from the secret recesses of your
own inner consciousness, where the heart of the
matter lies. — As Seen by Me.



86



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



April

30



\



MAY



2 4 5 6

Online LibraryLilian BellThe Lilian Bell birthday book; → online text (page 2 of 6)