Lilian Bell.

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*^^y T_TE generally sat silent before her, only
JL X looking at her in the comprehending,
appreciative way which develops unexpected powers
of monologue in a woman who makes thought a
habit. — H^ith Feet of Clay^ from Sir John and the
American Girl.

May ^HE always knew where the hem of her
\Zj gown was, and how her train was hanging,
and that people were looking at her. It was a sub-
consciousness entirely beyond her control, and in
no way interfering with the deep experiences of her
life ; yet because she talked about it people called
her frivolous. — The Under Side of Things.



May T HAVE always said that a man could
A marry any woman he wanted to, — given
equal conditions, — and now I shall forever after-
wards add that a woman can marry any man she
sets out to. — The Under Side of Things.



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^^^^ T TE thinks his money will compensate
^ i J. for the lack of family and the lack of
breeding, and that it will even get him into heaven.
Well, it will almost do that. I suppose heaven is
the only place where money will not buy an en-
trance into best circles. — A Pigeon Blood Ruby, from
Sir John and the American Girl.



*•*'' ^T^HERE are traditions of women to
A whom their engagement was the period
of bliss for which books are the authority. But
books are so misleading. There are other women
who would not live through it again for anything, —
even to acquire the husbands whom its trials pur-
chased. — The Under Side of Things.



*•*'' A 11 7'^ women have a right to question the
V V wisdom of Olympus, when we, who
must of necessity cope with the petty, narrow, hate-
ful woman-worries of life, are only given the shield
of Patience and are denied the buckler of Humor,
when we might just as well have had both and been
invulnerable, all but the heel. — From a Girl's Point
of View.



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^. May i"p jg gQ g^gy ^^ fggi sympathy for a man
A you admire, especially if he is strong and
loyal, and does not ask or desire it of you. — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



^^^^ TTE was always turning over a new leaf.
\. \. But he lived in the land of to-morrow.
His intentions, however, were good, only Kate said
he spent the most of his time paving hell. And
that saying almost shocked several members of first
families into untimely graves. — The Under Side of
Things.

May Y HAVE no worries which I do not borrow
X from my married friends. I keep up with
the fashions ; my clothes fit me ; my fingers still
come to the ends of my gloves ; I feel no leaning
towards all-over cloth shoes ; I have not gone per-
manently into bonnets. I have tried to be a pleasant
Old Maid, and my reward is that my friends make
me feel as if they liked to have me about. I am
not made to feel that I am passee. One's clothes and
one's feelings are all that ever make one passee. —
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



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"^^y "IW TARY mules in West Tennessee kicks
^^ i\l like or Nick and Gineral Grant.

They air ugly as sin an' mean as dirt. Paw, he
named 'em that a-way 'case he says all the trouble
the South ever had come from one or t'other of
them two." — A Little Sister to the Wilderness,



May A I AHE names of the two towns may differ
** X in v^arious Eastern States ; but their tol-

erance rarely gets beyond two, and, when it does, it
skips over to London and Paris. It never, for in-
stance, comes to include three, — their own. New
York, and Boston, or their own, Philadelphia, and
New York. For most Eastern people the trinity
does not exist. They have fallen into a certain
geographical unitarianism. — The Under Side of
Things.



May T T 7 H EN you say of a woman, " She is one
12 VV of those honest, outspoken persons,"
it means that she will probably hurt your feelings
or insult you in your first interview with her. This
is why honesty is so disreputable. — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.



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May /^PPOSITE to her, on the other side of
^** V^ the table, her younger brother squirmed.
GifFord's years are of no importance. He was at
the age when boys wriggle. — The Under Side of
Things.



May T7VXCELLENT people they were, with
^^ I J sterling principles and large bank ac-
counts, and clothes four seasons behind the times.
That was the Scotch of it, — to buy good firm ma-
terial which wore like iron, and then to wear it out.
The Under Side of 'Things.



May y p other women would let men alone,
X constancy would be less of a hollow mock-
ery. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



May QOMETIMES in fashionable life we
*^ k3 catch a glimpse of the simple-minded,
homely kindHness which we are taught to believe
exists only among horny-handed farmers, rough
miners, and hardy mountaineers. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



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May y OFTEN wonder if men who have loved

X. superior women and married average ones
do not have occasional wonderings and yearnings
over lost " might have beens." — The Love Affairs

of an Old Maid.

if

May A I 'SHE years cannot go on without destroy-
® X ing the old landmarks, and I am so
old-fashioned that change of any kind saddens me.
People move away, strangers take their houses, the
girls marry, children grow up, and everything is so
mutable that sometimes my cheerfulness has a haze
to it. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



May A I AHE favorite gibe of the self-made man
A is directed against the college graduate.
Let there be a young fellow present who is fresh
from college, and let him mention any subject con-
nected with college life, from honors to athletics,
and then, if you are hostess, sit still and let the icy
waves of misery creep over your sensitive soul ; for
this is the opportunity of his life to the self-made
man. — Men who Bore Us^ from From a Girl's
Point of View.



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May \ STRONG-MINDED woman is easier

X \. to persuade than a weak one. The
grander the nature, the greater its pliability towards
truth. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



"^^^ \ MAN whom girls have trained is really
L\. modest. Even at twenty he does not
think that he knows it all. — Untrained Man under
Thirty-jive^ from From a Girl 's Point of View.



May TT'OU never will hear a man praise even the
X good dressing of a woman he dislikes ;
while girls who positively hate another girl often will
add, " But she certainly does know how to dress."
Philosophy of Clothes^ from From a Girl ' s Point of
View.

^^^ I^T EARLY everybody who was full-
X^ grown, and there were also quite a
goodly number of non-dangerous infantile disorders,
had his own private malady, which wis as distinctive
and peculiarly his own, and as unavailable to others,
as his silver door-plate. — The Under Side of Things.



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'^^^ A VERY good thing about Percival is that
^ xV. he does not think he knows everything.
It encourages me to believe in his genius. — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



May 0(HE and her conscience were on intimate
•^ \Sy and free-spoken but not particularly
agreeable terms. One sometimes has friends of
that description. — A Study in Hearts.

May TT WOULD rather argue with a woman
X who is desperately in love, to prevent her
marrying the man of her choice, than to try to dis-
suade a woman from marrying a man she has set her
head upon. You feel sympathy with the former ;
and you have human nature and the whole glorious
love-making Past at your back, to give you confi-
dence and eloquence. But with the latter you are
cowed and beaten beforehand, and tongue-tied dur-
ing the contest. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



^^^^ T T^ED against a high soul, there is no
\_J surer method of humiliation than an
apology. — From a GirTs Point of View.



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^^'^ 1V.T^ unwarned man is a suitable antagonist
JL^ for a predetermined woman. Besides
that, it is said that even Jove nods upon occasions ;
but, if Venus ever did, the record has been lost. —
The Under Side of Things.

May A I ^O be absolutely genuine and humble is
JL half the battle. One may win even the
most obstinate and prejudiced. If one will only
bend low enough, one may go through the lowest
portal. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness.

May "w-p ^i^g mother has neglected her obvious
A duty in training her son to be a livable
portion of humanity, who but the girls must take
up her lost opportunities ? — From a GirTs Point of
View.



May y NEVER could understand why a man
A who plays a good game of whist should
not know how to make love. There are so many
points in common. You can play a game of whist
with only enough skill to keep your partner's hands
from your throat, or you can play it for all there is in
it. — Men as Lovers^ from From a GirV s Point of View.



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June X NEVER can blame people who refuse to
accept an apology in the shape of flowers
when the wound has been given in words. — From
a Girl's Point of View.



line "W"

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J**"*® T_T E is so clever that you would be afraid
A JL of him if it wasn't for his lovely man-
ners, which make you feel as though what you are
saying is just what he has been wanting to know,
and he is so glad he has met some one who is able
to tell him. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



June TT7HO knows the private demon who
V V dwells, side by side with one's good
angel, in the heart of a woman like me ? Does any
one dream of the tumult within, when I carry such
a proud front ? Who can tell what is going on in
the heart of any woman who is making up her mind
to marry ? — A Pigeon Blood Ruby ^ from Sir John and
the American Girl.



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June A I AHERE is SO much in life which we
^ A cannot see at the beginning, but which

grows with our growth, and bears us company in
the richness of evening-tide. — The Love Affairs of
an Old Maid.

J'***® \ MAN who talks constantly has a
"^ -/ jL thousand ways always at hand in which
to make a fool of himself. A silent man has but
one. — Men who Bore Us^ from From a Girl's
Point of View.



June yY never does women any harm to weep
X and sob and cry their hearts out over
tender, old-fashioned music. And, if they were not
just that gentle an;! sentimental and soft-hearted,
the men would never love them as they do. — The
Under Side of Things.



June ^ I AHE dyspeptic generally wants to tell
JL you " all about it." That is a bore, to
begin with ; for nobody in the world wants to hear
anybody in the world tell all about anything in the
world. — Men who Bore Usy from From a GirV s
Point of View.



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jtine A BROKEN engagement ought to be
JLjL considered a blessed thing as a preven-
tive of further and worse ills. — From a Girl's Point
of View.



June ^HE was one of those who are fully ap-
k_y predated only when they are dead, and
who then call forth the bitterest remorse that we
have not made them know in life how dear they
were and how painfully necessary to our happiness.
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



June / I \Q have the bridge of your nose ache is
X the only stopping-place this side of
tears for the pathos in the under side of things. —
The Under Side of Things.



J^"** 1W TO love was ever wasted. It enriches
X^ the giver involuntarily. You are a
sweeter, better woman than before you loved, unless
you made the mistake of small natures, and let it
embitter you. You have no right to feel that it has
been wasted. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



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FOR the dramatis persona a. marriage en-
gagement is an uncomfortable contriv-
ance in many ways. Like the misunderstood
honeymoon, it is easier for an outsider to weave
romances about its perfect bliss than it is for the
courageous participants, who are simply trying to
live it down. — From a Girl 'j Point of View.



June TT THAT girl at a summer resort has not
V V felt the misery of coming out on the
verandah with the wrong man, only to see the right
man with another girl ? And if the other girl was
having her glove buttoned at just that particular
moment, and your own soul's property was bending
over her hand, — actually holding it, as everybody
knows a man has to do when he buttons a glove, —
and if the other girl was so absorbed in the inter-
esting process that she did not look up to bow or
give him a chance to bow, and you had to go on
down the steps, chattering to your own man, who
suddenly has become so hateful to you that you
almost wish he would trip on the steps and land on
his head, — then you can truthfully say that you
know what real misery is. — The Under Side of
Things.



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June y J3Q j^Qj. mentally love white, and he does
^ jL not mentally love black, as so many hus-
bands and wives do. We both love gray, — different
tones of gray, but still gray. — The Love Affairs of
an Old Maid.

if



June /'~\H, these girls, these girls, who believe
^ V-^ every time a man at a ball says he loves
them that he means it ! — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



June IT j^-p xvi^xi beware how they criticise us
J_-/ unfavorably ; for the truth of the matter
is that, be we frivolous or serious, vain or sensible,
clever or stupid, rich or poor, we are what the
American man has made us. — From a Girl ' s Point
of View.

if

June |7VVERYBODY seems to think they are
1 -^ making an experiment of marriage, be-
cause they are so much alike. But, then, doesn't
every one who marries at all, Jew or Gentile, black
or white, bond or free, make an experiment ? — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



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June TTE was more than convinced that she
JL A was a lady. In fact, she admitted it



H

herself. — The Under Side of Things.



June "TT is true that these unselfish women in-

X culcate a system of unselfishness in their

families which often works their ruin. They rob

the children of their rightful virtue of self-sacrifice.

The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



*''*"* 1\ /T^ friends always have confided in me.
1. ▼ X I suppose it is because I am receptive.
Men tell me their old love affairs. Girls tell me
the whole story of their engagements, — how they
came to take this man, and why they did not take
that one. And even the most ordinary are vitally
interesting. Before I know it, I am rent with the
same despair which agitates the lover confiding in
me, or I am wreathed in the smiles of the engaged
girl, who is getting her absorbing secret comfortably
oflF her mind. It seems to relieve them to air
their emotion, and sometimes I am convinced that
they leave the most of it with me. — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.



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June /^^H me, these mothers ! It brings tears
V - / to my eyes to think of their unending
love, which wraps around and shelters and broods
over every one whose helplessness clings to their
help, whose need depends upon their exhaustless
supply. Theirs it is to bear the invisible but
princely crest, " Ich dien'' — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.

June X AM in mortal terror of a very little baby.
X It feels so much like a sponge, yet lacks
the sponge's recuperative qualities. I am always
afraid, if I dent it, the dents will stay in. You know
they don't in a sponge. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



June /CONVERSATION with the untrained
V_>^ man under thirty-five is impossible, be-
cause he never converses : he only talks. — From
a Girl 's Point of View.



June rr^HERE'S no use in talking. After a
■* X girl falls in love with a man, she often
ceases to be the girl he courted. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



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jtxne "\/rEN seldom make perfect lovers. I
^* i. ▼ J. deeply regret being obliged to say
this, as they are about all girls have to depend upon
in that line. — Men as Lovers^ from From a Girl's
Point of View.



June ^HE is so perfect that there is absolutely
\Zj no flaw in her for me to recognize and
feel friendly with. — The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.

June y^ Qj^g skilled at reading human nature
jL an apology becomes a weapon. — From a
Girl 's Point of View.



June y^ID you ever notice, when he talks, how
*® J_^ Rachel turns her head away ? But you
can see the color creep up into her face. She is too
proud and shy to let people see how much she cares
for him. But, when she speaks, Percival looks at
her with all his eyes, and positively leans forward so
that he shall not miss a word. I love to watch
those two. Sometimes when I have been with them,
I feel as if I had been to church. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



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June A I AHERE are those rare souls whose sor-
X. row is never of their own making,
whose lives might bask in sunshine except for the
shadows which others cast. — A Little Sister to the
Wilderness.

j««e I^ENTUCKY girls are all pretty, I
^^ X^ suppose, — everybody says so, and
you have to make believe you think so, whether
you do or not ; but this one, — you know her ?
Isn't she the prettiest thing you ever saw? — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



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JULY



jtiiy y HONESTLY believe that the simple
JL phrase, " I am sorry, dear : forgive me,"
has done more to hold brothers in the home, to
endear sisters to each other, to comfort mothers and
fathers, to tie friends together, to placate lovers ;
that more marriages have taken place because of
them, and more have held together on account of
them ; that more love of all kinds has been engen-
dered by them than by any other words in the
English language. — From a Girl ' s Point of View,



jtiiy TT is only by knowing the under side of
X things that we are able to judge brilliancy
gently. — The Under Side of Things.



J^*'' \ GIRL who wilfully catches a man's
xlL heart on the rebound does the thing
which involves more risk than anything else malevo-
lent fate could devise. — The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



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^^^^ TTOW dare men and women trifle with
■^ JL JL the Shekinah of their lives? And,
when it has been dulled by abuse, what a pitiful
Shekinah it appears to the one who approaches it
reverently, confidently expecting it to be the uncon-
taminated holy of holies! It is this sort of thing
which makes infidels about love. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



jtiiy OHE disbelieved in people against her
* vD will. She envied those who could skim
lightly over the surface of society, being amused by
its cleverness, yet escaping the heartache which she
always carried home with her at the remembrance
of its falseness. — Miss Scarborough' s Point of VieWy
from Sir John and the American Girl.



3^'^y A LL my life I have been dodging bores
xjL and landing clever men and floating in
to shore on the high tide of success, without letting
anybody catch me at my harmless little tricks except
women. I wouldn't let them if I could have helped
myself. But other women are sometimes too much
for me. — The Under Side of Things.



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J"*'' IV /TEN might be a little bit surprised if
' i-T-L they could read the minds of these
very wives whom they have won, whose life-work
often may be only to improve them so that they
will make some other woman the kind of a husband
they should have made at first, and then to lie down
and die. — The Untrained Man Under Thirty-five,
from From a Girl's Point of View.



jttiy T KNOW so many women who carry an
X ache in their hearts, which their husbands
never suspect ; sometimes for a love they have lost ;
sometimes for one that never came ; sometimes for
one they dared not take. — A Pigeon Blood Ruby,
from Sir John and the American Girl.



July TT is a fortunate thing for some people's
X chances for a future life that there are a
reasonable number of consciences distributed through
the world, although it would be an Old Maid's sug-
gestion that sometimes they be allowed to drive in-
stead of being used as a liveried tiger, — for orna-
ment, and always behind. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



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jtiiy yj" is so easy for one's Ego to grow accus-
*^ A tomed to spelling itself with a capital, and
to forget that one's old friends had hitherto always
spelled it with a small letter. — The Self-made Mariy
frohi From a GirVs Point of View.



jtiiy -yp (^Qgg j^Q^ surprise me so much when
A girls from another city marry men under
thirty-five. Most men do not Hke to write letters,
and visits are only for over Sunday. — From a Girl's
Point of View.



jtxiy TT'OU have set your feet on the slippery
jL downward path of Perfection, and I only
wish you could see how stupidly conceited you
appear to a pagan outsider because you believe so
absolutely that you are right and that I am wrong. —
The Under Side of Things.



jtiiy 'T 'X THY is it that men expect an old sweet-
13 y y heart to take an active interest in their
bride-elect, and are so deadly sure that they will
like each other ? — The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



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J***'' \ LICE has embraced Theosophy and
*** xjL spells her name " Alys." She always is
interested in something new and advanced ; and,
whenever I meet her, I am prepared to go into ec-
stasies over a plan to save men's souls by electricity,
or something equally speedy in the moral line. She
is daft on spiritual rapid transit. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid,

jtaiy Tyl 7IT is a weapon of defence, and was
15 V V no more intended to be an attribute

of woman than is a knowledge of fire-arms or a
fondness for mice. A witty woman is an anomaly,
fit only for literary circles, and to be admired at a
distance. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



jtiiy TT'OU can always tell when a man is in
jL love, especially if he is not the lovering
sort, and has never been troubled in that way before.
The best kind of love has to be so intuitive that it
often is grandly, heroically awkward. Depend upon
it, a man who is dainty and pretty and unspeakably
smooth when he makes love to you has had alto-
gether too much practice. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



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jtaiy y HAVE seen women so uplifted by the
JL sound of glorious music, and men so
stirred by the sight of some heroic deed, that I have
thought, " Oh, what the world loses because you do
not speak now, and tell what you dream and strive
and agonize to do!" — A Little Sister to the Wil-
derness.

jt»iy (t T T THEN I see how easily some married
V V people get along with each other,
and how patient wives are, I do get ashamed of the


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