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way my husband and I fuss ; but somehow, even
when I make up my mind not to get mad, he says
something about my religion just too much — mostly
about babtism — and then I flare up!" — Lizzie
Lee's Separation, from The Instinct of Stepfather hood.



jtiiy '\7'OU say pretty things even to old
X women, and bring them shawls, and put
footstools under their feet with the air of a lover.
And if you only hand a woman an ice, you look un-
utterable things. You have a dozen girls at a time
in that indefinite state when three words to any one
of them would engage you to her. — The Love Af-
fairs of an Old Maid.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



July X TER quick wit resented the inanities of



H



X JL the conventional, but her conscience
kept her from breaking over its set rules. She
shocked her mother by telling her she was too
cowardly to be wicked, and she didn't want to be
good. — Miss Scarborough' s Point of View ^ from Sir
John and the American Girl.



July "^HE ought to have had mo' patience
k3 with him. Cuthbert admits he was
wearin' ; but, laws, sister, most men are ! " — Lizzie
Lee's Separation J from The Instinct of Stepfather hood.



yj July ^TILL natures, with the power of self-



s



sj * kj repression developed beyond all other

faculties, are oftenest misunderstood. — A Little
Sister to the Wilderness.



July ^HE was a girl over whom men went to
V^ pieces so easily and recovered from such
lapses so suddenly that she knew the danger of
believing too much. — A Study in Hearts^ from The
Instinct of Stepfather hood.



rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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J"^'^ "PERHAPS you don^t know that a girl
^ \- who makes a business of wearing scalps
at her belt never stands a bit of a chance with a man
she really loves ; for she is afraid to practise on him
the wiles which she knows from experience have
been successful with scores of others, because she
feels that he will see through them, and scorn her
as she scorns herself in his presence. She loses her
courage, she loses control of herself, and, being used
to depend on " business," as actors say, to carry out
her role successfully, she finds that she is only read-
ing her lines, and reading them very badly, too. —
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid,



j«iy OHE could rock on a squeaking board for
•^ k^ an hour, with no hint from her own sleep-
ing nerves that she was driving the more sensitive
frantic. She never could sit very long without jing-
ling two of her rings together or fingering her bunch
of keys or tapping her thimble on wood. When
she was a child, I suppose she wrote with a slate-
pencil which — but why refer to a sound more
horrible in my ears than the wail of a lost soul ? —
A Woman of No Nerves y from The Instinct of Step-
fatherhood.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



jtiiy A I ^HE judge, although scrupulously care-
*^ X ful about his diet, had dyspepsia. Per-
haps this was because he went through with a good
deal at his meals besides eating, particularly at
breakfast, which was a pity. Breakfast is bad
enough in itself, without any one selecting that un-
fortunate time to be particularly disagreeable. — The
Under Side of Things.



^ \ '^^^ TTEAVEN help the man who is girl-
*' A X spoiled ! — The Untrained Man under
Thirty-Jive^ from From a Girl's Point of View.



J**^*" TTEAVEN defend me from the too accu-
*® JLX rate man ! In non-essentials the man
who decorates his conversation with mild but pleas-
ing patterns of that style of statement made famous
by one Ananias is to be depended upon quite as
surely as the man who takes all the sunshine from
the day, and leads one's thoughts to dwell on high,
by spending ten minutes trying to recall whether he
dropped that stone on his foot before or after din-
ner. — The Too Accurate Man^from From a GirTs
Point of View.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



jttiy XTTOMEN wish to please men aside
29 y Y fj-om their power of winning them.
Whereas, if a man can get a girl without any change
on his part, he considers himself a howling success.
Men as Lovers ^ from From a Girl 's Point of View.



J«iy A PARIS cabman makes it a rule
^^ jr\. never to look around before he turns
his horse. He can determine what is behind him
with more accuracy by running into it. — The
Expatriates.



J«iy ly /TANY people know nothing about a
^* JlVX real apology. A lukewarm apology
is more insulting than the insult. A handsome apol-
ogy is the handsomest thing in the world, and the
manliest and the womanliest. An apology, like
chivalry, is sexless. Perhaps because it is a natural
virtue of women, it sits manlier upon men than

upon women.

. , . *• It becomes

The throned monarch better than his crown."

Love-making as a Fine Art, from From a Girl's
Point of View.



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AUGUST



X Florence, but Flossy. I suppose she
was one of those fluffy, curly, silky babies. She
grew to be that kind of a girl, — a Flossy girl. It
speaks for itself. I dare say with that name she
never had any incentive to outgrow her nature. —
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



August rx^HE wisest thought is that which is
A ripening in the minds of philosophers
who are yet dumb. The cleverest books are those
which have not yet been written. The heavenliest
music is that which is yet surging and beating in the
hearts of men, which cannot find a voice. — A Little
Sister to the fVilderness.

if

August y NEVER said you could not get mar-
A ried. There is nothing intricate about
that. Anybody can marry. — From a Girl's Point
of View.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



Ati^ost T3RONSON had his ideals before he
^ \^ was married, as most men have, con-

cerning the kind of a home he hoped for. He
always said that it was not so much what your home
was as how it was. He believed that a home con-
sisted more in the feeling and aims of its inmates
than in rugs and jardinieres. He used to say that
" the oneness of two people could make a home in
Sahara." — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



August "ripHERE is nothing, absolutely
■^ JL nothing, you cannot do with a

man who loves you, if you don't care a speck for
him. And the luxury of perfect indifference !
Emotions are awfully wearing." — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



August ly /TAKING love to women requires
i. T -L the same sort of skill required to
play a scientific game of whist. I have seen men
win very superior girls, but they have done it in a
manner which would disgust good whist-players. —
Love-making as a Fine Art^ from From a GirV s
Point of View.



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August y^ LL that girls have to do is to lean
-iTjL back, and let men wait on them until
they see one that suits them. It is like ordering
from a menu card for them to select husbands.
Marrying is so easy for a girl. It comes natural to
her. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



August TTTITH success should come the de-
V V termination, be you man or woman,
to fall upon your knees every day, and pray Heaven
for strength to keep from believing the flattery of
enemies, so that you still may be bearable to your
friends and livable to your family. — The Untrained
Man under Thirty-five^ from From a GirTs Point of
View.

Aogttst ^ILENCE is a weapon. It is a power-
k3 ful corrective, when used against a si-
lent person, who then sees himself as others see
him. It is a defence, used against the indiscreet ;
and in the hands of wise men it is a suit of armor.
Silence is never dangerous, unless, like a gun, in
the hands of a fool. — Men who Bore Us ^ from From
a Girl 'j Point of View.



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August ^HE wears red on a cold, raw day ; and
k-^ the eyes of the men light up when they
look at her. She wears gray when she wants to look
demure. Let a man beware of a woman in silvery
gray. — The Philosophy of Clothes, from From a Girl's
Point of View.



August « ly/fEN who stand by their guns,—
i. ▼ JL those are my heroes. Sometimes
one never knows their names : only rhat a fireman
belonging to such and such a company rescued
women and children from a burning building. No
name, often not even a medal or the recognition
of having his name spelled correctly in the morning
papers, but in my mind every inch a hero, and
the bravest of heroes at that." — The Expatriates.



August TT /"HY are old maids always supposed
V V to wear black silks ? And why are
they always supposed to be thin ? — the old maids,
1 mean, not the silks. Why are literary women
always supposed to be frayed at the edges? — Phi-
losophy of Clothes, from From a Girl's Point of
View.



Tke LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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August Y F a girl receives three proposals, that, I
X am told, is a fair average. If she re-
ceives ten, she is either an heiress or a belle. If
she receives more than ten, she must visit in the
South. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



August rr^HERE is only one thing meaner
■* A than a person who never apologizes,

and that is a person who will not accept one. —
Love-making as a Fine Arty from From a GirVs
Point of View.

Attg«8* TT JOMEN who are capable of being
^ V V really ^ored never even see men

who ogle, any more than, if you were being roasted
alive, you would care if a hairpin pulled. — Men who
Bore Us^ from Froin a Girl 'j Point of View.



August TT THY have men always possessed an



lO



w



exclusive right to the sense of
humor ? I believe it is because they live out of
doors more. Humor is an out-of-door virtue. It
requires ozone and the light of the sun. — From a
Girl 's Point of View.



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August rx^HE great soft gift of silence shall al-
' A ways remain the precious possession

of those who cherish it as they should. They shall
still, as friend and mate, draw to themselves the
articulate. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness.



August ly /TEN have become famous as con-
-LV-L versationalists who have only sat
and looked admiringly at vivacious women. — From
a Girl 's Point of View.



August rx^HERE is a difference between pity
X and sympathy. One is thrown at
you : the other walks with you. — "The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.

August rr^HE " tell-all-about-everything " bore
^ X can only be explained on the mi-

crobe theory. None other can account for its uni-
versality. You can carry contagion of it in your
clothes and inoculate a person of weak mental con-
stitution, who is of a build to take anything, until,
in a fortnight, he or she will be a hopeless slave to
the tell-all-about-everything habit. — Men who Bore
Us y from From a Girl's Point of View.



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August ^HE thought what her mission was, —
wZl to make a home ; to be a good wife ;
to understand and teach little children. And where
do you find the new woman now? In the kinder-
garten colleges ; in university settlements ; attend-
ing mothers' meetings ; teaching ignorant mothers
how to understand the tender souls and delicate
bodies of the dear httle creatures committed to their
loving but unwise care. You find them well pre-
pared by a course of study to accept the responsi-
bilities of life when their time comes. Is that
trivial ? Is that a subject to sneer at or to jest about .?
Rather it is the hope of the nation. — The New
tVomariy from From a Girl 's Point of View.



Atx^ttst y^OME now. Own up, you men.
** V_>^ How well do we girls know you
when you have called on us three hundred and sixty-
five times in succession ? Not at all. We knov/
only what we can see and hear. How well do we
know you when we have been engaged to you six
months? Not at all. We know only what you
have been unable to conceal of your faults, and the
virtues you have displayed in your show-windows.
From a GirVs Point of View.



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August TT7HEN success — business or social
V V or athletic or literary or artistic —
comes to the untrained man under thirty-five, it
comes pitifully near being his ruin. — The Untrained
Man under Thirty-five^ from From a Girl's Point of
View.

August 'XTQU can jail a man who steals your
■* X watch ; but the girl who steals a man's

heart away from his sweetheart walks free and un-
condemned even, to their shame be it spoken, by
those who know what she has done. Love is not
a matter of infatuation. It is not the temptation
which is wrong : it is the deliberate following it up
simply because the temptation is agreeable. Of
course it is agreeable ! You are not often irresist-
ibly tempted to go and have your teeth filled ! —
From a Girl 's Point of View.



August /- I AHE girl is actively miserable, and
^ X her husband is indifferently uncom-

fortable, — which is the habit this married couple
have of experiencing the same emotion. — The Love
Jffairs of an Old Maid.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



August TT is a sad thing to get so used to a
*^ X beautiful exception like love that you

never think of it as marvellous.— The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



August y^ GIRL who deliberately intends to
*' xjL get another girl's lover begins by

gaining her confidence. Very likely she manages to
stay all night with her. (That is the time you tell
everything you know, just because it is dark, and
then spend the rest of your life wishing you hadn't.)
From a Girl ' s Point of View.



August y WOULD even address a private
*® JL query, at just this point, to the women,

begging that the men will skip it, asking women
where in the world we would find ourselves if we
were unflinchingly honest with the men who love
us ? — Love-making as a Fine Arty from From a
Girl 's Point of View.



August TTTHAT the Gaul calls pride the
29 y Y Anglo-Saxon calls vanity. — 'The

Expatriates.

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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

August rr^HE adulation of the world is more
** A intoxicating and more deadly than

to drink absinthe out of a stein, — more insidi-
ous than opium, more fatal than death. It unset-
tles the steadiest brain and feeds the too ravenous
ego with a food which at first he deems nectar
and ambrosia, but which he soon comes to feel is
the staff of life, and no more than he deserves. —
The Untrained Man under Thirty-five^ from From a
Girl 'j Point of View.



August yN the whole history of the world, from
JL nineteenth - century Public Opinion
clear back to the age of chivalry, men never have
been inclined to deal out justice to women. It
is their watchword with each other, but with
women it always is either injustice or mercy. And,
in spite of all wrongs and all abuses, I say. Heaven
bless the men that this is so ! Who among us is
brave enough to demand justice at the expense of
chivalry ? — From a Girl 's Point of View.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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Au^txst
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SEPTEMBER



September XT is not pride, it is a stupid van-
X ity and an abnormal self-love which
prevent a man or woman from apologizing. — From
a Girl's Point of View.



September ]\ >TEN never will have done with
-LV X their strictures on girls until
girls achieve two things. One is to observe more
honor in their relations with each other, and the
other is to learn to think. — From a Girl's Point of
View.

September x^QU men are so terribly practical
X and common-sense and every-day.
We girls like flowers, and mental indigestibles, and
occasional Sundays. We do not know why we do,
but we do, and we cannot help it ; and, if you are
going to make love according to Hoyle, you must
recognize this fact, and pamper us in our folly.
Don't we pamper you ? — Men as Lovers, from
From a GirV s Point of View.



164



S EPTEM BER



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



September T^QES a fragment of genius cor-
^ J_V rupt the aesthetic sense ? Is writ-

ing a hardening process? Must you wear shabby
boots and carry a baggy umbrella just because you
can write ? Not a bit of it. Little as some of you
men may think it, literary women have souls ; and
a woman with a soul must, of necessity, love laces
and ruffled petticoats and high-heels and rosettes.
Otherwise, I question her possession of a soul. —
From a GirV s Point of View.



September ^ 3 ^\xk\ most men, love was mak-
•^ JL\. ing him more alive. He felt

more keen, more sensitive to impressions, more
psychological. The woman's point of view was con-
tinually coming into his mental vision, rendering
him uncertain of himself, less assured. His un-
conscious masculine finality of judgment was being
shaken. — The Expatriates.



September Try requires a finer type of generosity
^ X to receive generously than to give

generously. — Love-making as a Fine Art, from
From a Girl's Point of View.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



September TT E spcnds hours Studying that
jL JL horse's traits. He is always
saying that she won't back, or that she hates this and
is afraid of that. His horse never has to do any-
thing that she doesn't want to ; but his wife does. —
Love-making as a Fine Art^ from From a Girl's
Point of View.



September y jvj ^}^g £^g|. place, dyspepsia is such
X a refined and ladyHke trouble. It
has no disgusting details. You can refer to it at all
times without fear of nauseating your hearers. In
the second place, you can count on nearly half of
your hearers' having it, too. — Men who Bore Usy
from From a Girl's Point of View.



September y4 NEW Man has been created
'* by the development of the New



A

Woman, and he is the highest type we have.



" Courtesy wins woman as well
As valor may, but he that closes both
Is perfect."

— The New Woman^ from From a Girl ' s Point of
View.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

September rT^QO much analysis is death to
A unmitigated rapture. — From a
Girl 'j Point of View.



September J GLORY in the new woman in that
X so often she is rich and beautiful.
It is easy enough to be good if you are plain. In
fact, there is nothing else left for a plain woman to
do. — 'The New Woman^from From a GirV s Point of
View.

September ^TT^HE too accurate man is ubiqui-
X tous. If you hear of him, and
refuse to meet him, it is only to find that he has
married your best friend, whom worlds could not
bribe you to give up. If you weed him out of
your acquaintance, it is only to realize that he was
born into your relationship u. generation ago, before
you could prevent it. Sometimes he is your father,
sometimes your brother. Both of these, however,
can be lived down. But occasionally you discover
that, in a moment of frenzy, you have married him !
Heaven help you then, for " marriage stays with
one like a murder." — The Too Accurate Man^from
From a GirVs Point of View.



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September T T IS a qucstion whether a woman
*** X ever knows all the joys of love-

making who has one of those dumb, silent hus-
bands who doubtless adores her, but is able to
express it only in deeds. — Love-making as a Fine
Art, from From a GirVs Point of View.



September TJVAR be it from me to say that the
*^ J7 untrained man under thirty-five,

at his worst, is of no use in this world. He is excel-
lent for a two-step. — The Untrained Man under
Thirty-five, from From a Girl ' j Point of View.



September A | ^HE most perfect lover is the
^■^ JL one who best understands how

and when to apologize. — Love-making as a Fine
Art, from From a GirVs Point of View.



September TT 70MEN have more conscience
V V about deceiving themselves into
staying in love than men have. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



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September yjk MAN nevcr scems to be able to
-ZJL understand that, in order to ob-
tain the supremest pleasure from an act of thought-
fulness to his wife, he must be wholly unselfish and
give it to her in her line and the way she wants it,
and the way he knows she wants it, if he would
only stop to think. — Love-making as a Fine Art^
from From a Girl's Point of View.



September J HAVE learned to love my life
A and to cultivate it. Who knows
what is in her life, until she has tended it and made
it know that she expects something from it in re-
turn for all her aspirations and endeavors ? — The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



September JNFIRMARIES should be estab-
X lished for the purpose of making
the stupid interesting, or classes organized on
"How to Be Brief" or on "The Art of Relating
Salient Points " or on " The Best Method of Skip-
ping the Unessentials in Conversation." / would
go, for one. — Men who Bore Us^ from From a
Girl 'j Point of View.



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September ripHERE IS a hollowness about
-L having a man praise your gowns
when you know he doesn't know what he is talk-
ing about. When a man praises your clothes, he
always is praising you in them. — The Philosophy
of Clothes y from From a Girl's Point of View.



September yt DYSPEPTIC disagrees with
jr\. me as religiously as if 1 had eaten
him. — Men who Bore Us, from From a Girl's Point
of View.



September jk MAN will always take more
xjL good advice from a woman
whom he has no right to love than he will from his
own sweetheart or wife. — From a GirVs Point of
View.

if

September XTOU men do not recognize the
X romantic streak which, of more
or less breadth and thickness, runs through every
woman, making her love good love-making. — Love-
making as a Fine Art, from From a Girl ' s Point of
View.



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September



84 H



OW I pity the people who love



"never apologize'' ! — Love-making as a Fine Art,
from From a Girl ' s Point of View.



September -I^VERY man honestly believes that
^ I J he has made, is making, or could

make a good lover. — Women as Lovers, from From
a GirVs Point of View.

if

September J NEVER worry mysclf when a man
A is on his knees in front of me,
tying the ribbons of my slipper, as to whether he
considers me his equal politically or not. It is
sufficient satisfaction for me to see him there. —
Woman s Rights in Love, from From a GirVs Point
of View.



September A ■ \Q those of US who are romantic
' JL it is fearful to think of deliber-

ately turning our backs on the terrapin and lobster
and ice-cream of life, and meditating upon plain
bread and cold potatoes. — Men as Lovers, from
From a Girl ' j Point of View.



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September
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IMAGINE the calamity of Hamlet
married to Ophelia ! That would
have been a tragedy. Think of a man clever
enough to discover that his idol was made of putty,
— that his sweetheart was a Rosamond Vincy !
Hamlet was a wise man. He withdrew in time.
Most men have to be married ten years to discover


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