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that they have married an Ophelia or a Rosamond.
From a GirVs Point of View.



September TT TOMEN have tenderer hearts
29 y y 'Ci\2ir\. men for a purpose ; and,

if they are hurt oftener than men's, why, that is for
us to bear. We cannot make ourselves over and
turn Amazons at their expense. — Woman s Rights in
Love^from From a Girl's Point of View.



September TJAVE you nevcf noticed the
J. JL change in conversation with the
entrance of a new person ? How, when a lovely
girl enters, the men all straighten their ties and
the women moisten their lips ? — From a Girl 's
Point of View.



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September
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September
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September
30



octobb:r.



October rr^HOSE dense persons inhabiting the
JL thickly populated region bordering
on foolishness, — those self-satisfied, uncomprehend-
ing egoists occupying the half-way house between
wisdom and folly known as stupidity, — against such
my wrath burns fiercely. They are so deceptive,
so un-get-at-able. They wear the semblance of
wisdom, yet it is but a cloak to snare and delude
mankind into testing their intelligence. They are
not labelled by Heaven, like the fools, whom we
may avoid if we will, or to whom we may go in a
spirit of philanthropy. They do not wear straw in
their hair, like maniacs, nor drool, like simpletons.
No : they infest society clad in the most immacu-
late of evening clothes. Often they are college
graduates, and get along very well with other men.
They are frequently found among the rich, some-
times even among the poor. Sometimes they are
stolid, and cannot understand. Sometimes they are
indifferent, and won't understand. Sometimes they
are English. — The Stupid Man^ from From a Girl's
Point of View.



OCTOBER



October
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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



October J SUPPOSE there is not a man in the

X world who would not be surprised if
he knew that we do not consider men good lovers.
We have accepted them and been engaged to them
and married them and pretended to them, and, what
is worse still, pretended to ourselves that they were
satisfactory ; but the truth is, they were not and
they are not, — and this is the first time we have
dared to say so. — Men as Lovers^ from From a
Girl 'j Point of View.



October ry^HERE are men, you know, whose
JL one grand passion in life is for
themselves. — T^he Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



October y^ }^gj. simplicity, she accepted the
^ X spirit of kindliness as the complete

fulfilment of the highest courtesy, and never
dreamed of that pitiful portion of humanity who
demand only the outward form of politeness, and
are ready with their cruel ridicule if this same form
be not of the most finished outside, leaving the
prompting spirit grieved and forgotten. — A Little
Sister to the Wilderness.



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October y QUITE envy a man who is an ac-

■^ ^ X knowledged bore ; he is so free from

responsibility. He does not care that the conversa-
tion dies every time he shows his face : he is used
to it. It is nothing to him that clever men and
women ache audibly in his presence : he has no
reputation to lose. The hostess is not a friend of
his, for whom he feels that he must exert himself.
'^ A bore has no friends. He is a social leech. — Men
Who Bore Us, from From a GirV s Point of View.



cto er /^^F course there is the woman who
V-/ shrieks on political platforms and
neglects her husband, and lets her children grow up
like little ruffians, the woman who wears bloomers
and bends over her handle-bar like a monkey on a
stick, the woman who wants to hold office with
men and smoke and talk like men, — alas that there
is that variety of women ! but she is not new. Pray,
did you never see her before she wore bloomers ?
Bloomers are no worse than the sort of clothes she
used to wear. Her swagger is no more pronounced
now than it used to be in skirts. She has always
had bloomer instincts. — The New Woman, from
From a Girl's Point of View.

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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

October rr^HE whole of Europe would not
X compensate some women for a hurt,
when the hurt had been distinctly worded and the
apology came in the shape of a dumb, voiceless
present. — From a GirTs Point of View.



October r-p^HE touching wickedness of the
X American girl consists in saying
things which would be a shock to her Puritan
mother, but of behaving at all times as if chap-
eroned by the angel Gabriel. — Miss Scarborough's
Point of VieWy from Sir John and the American Girl.



October QO ME of the greatest little frauds I
^<-J know are the purry, kitteny girls with
big, innocent blue eyes. Blazing black eyes, and
the rich, warm colors which dark-skinned women
have to wear, suggest energy and brilliance and no
end of intellect. A mere question of pigment in the
eye has settled many a man's fate in life, and estab-
lished him with a wife who turned out to be very
different from the girl he fondly thought he was
getting. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK
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October J NEVER clamored very much for
X women to be recognized as the equals
of men, either in politics or in love, because, if I
had clamored at all, I should have clamored for in-
finitely more than that, /should have clamored for
men to recognize us as their superiors, and not for
equal rights with themselves, but for more, many
more rights than they ever dreamed of possessing.
'Tis not justice I crave, but mercy; 'tis not equal-
ity, but chivalry. — Woman s Rights in Love^ from
From a GirVs Point of View.



October J APPROVE of men keeping silent
A when they have nothing to say. It
shows that they recognize their limitations, and re-
fuse to rush in where angels fear to tread. — From
a Girl's Point of View.



October TT TOMEN are a beheving set of
V V human geese, and we believe a
great deal of what you men say, which is wrong of
us; and much more of what your pronounced
actions over us imply, which is worse. — From a
GirV s Point of View.



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October y^ELECTABLE as honesty is in a
JL/ bank clerk, or would be in a law-
yer, one yearns for a little less accuracy in the moral
make-up of the too accurate man, for a little of the
celestial leaven of exaggeration in the dusty dryness
of his dead-level garrulousness. — Men Who Bore
Us y from From a GirTs Point of View.



October TT TOMAN'S rights! Why, the
^ V V very first right we expect is to be

treated better than anybody else ! Better than men
treat each other as a body, and better by the indi-
vidual man than he treats all other women. —
JVomans Rights in Love^ from From a GirVs Point
of View.



October rnpHERE is a time when the youth
" X of twenty knows more than any one

on earth could teach him, and more than he ever
will know again, — a time when, no matter how kind
his heart, he is incased in a mental haughtiness be-
fore which plain Wisdom is dumb. — The Untrained
Man under Thirty-five ^ from From a GirVs Point of
View.



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October T_T E nevcr bothers. He never is in
X JL the way. He is as deft at button-
ing a glove as he is amiable at playing cards. You
always think of him first if you are making up a
theatre party. He serves equally well as grooms-
man or pall-bearer, although I do not speak from
experience in either instance. He never is cross or
sulky. He makes the best of everything; and I
think men say that he is " an all-round good fellow."
The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



October XS it that we women are more artistic

X. and cleverer at masquerading the

truth that we make so much better lovers than the



men ? — Men as Lover s, from From a Girl 's Point

of View.



October ripHERE is the cry of the inarticulate,
-L of that large, not-to-be-ignored por-
tion of humanity whose thoughts need an interpre-
ter ; who with womanish, nice perceptions need
equally nice distinction in terms, to enable them to
express the fine shades of meaning which it is their
gift to feel. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness.



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October TT THEN you are not the one who

19 y y should apologize, when you are

less to blame than he, be you the one to apolo-
gize first, and see how quickly his noble nature will
abase itself and rush to meet you, and how sure and
glorious and complete the reconciliation will be ! —
Love-making as a Fine Arty from From a Girl's
Point of View,



October y KNOW a man who is just an ordi-
X nary man in everything else ; but to
see him drive a spirited horse is to know that he
has the making of a good lover in him. — From a
Girl's Point of View.



October y THINK women are often mis-
** X judged. Men seem to think that all

we want is to be loved. Now that isn't all that I
want ! If 1 had to choose between being loved by
a man — the man, let us say — and not loving him
at all, or loving him very dearly and not being
loved by him, I would choose the latter; for I
think that more happiness comes from loving than
from being loved. — The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



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October /I WOMAN who suffers heartache
JL\. because her husband never apolo-
gizes to her, or who endures mortification unspeak-
able because she has not a penny of her own, has
no right to rebel, even in her own heart, unless she
is training her son to make the sort of husband for
some httle girl, now in pinafores, which she would
have wished for herself — From a GirVs Point of
View.



October xp ^ j^^j^ ]^^^ j^q specific intentions
^ A towards a girl, and has not deter-

mined in his own mind that he wants to marry her ;
if he is only liking her a great deal, with but an
occasional wonder in the depths of his own heart
whether this girl is the wife for him, — to call upon
her casually and see the family scatter and other
callers hastily leave is enough to scare him to
death. — From a GirV s Point of View.



October yi TRITE saying has my sympathy.

^ Jl\. It generally is stupid and shop-

worn, and consequently is banished to polite society
and hated by the clever. — From a GirVs Point of

View.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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October J £Y ^-i^g j^gj^ gj^g yg ^Ij ^}^g so-called
^ -L> rights they wish to. I never shall

get over wanting to get behind some man if I see
a cow. — Woman s Rights in Love^ from From a Girl 's
Point of View.



October J ABOMINATE those people who
X are always right. You can't amuse
yourself by picking flaws in them. They are so
irritatingly conclusive. — From a Girl's Point of
View.



October /'^F course, every woman knows that
V^ a sick man is sicker than a thousand
sick women, each of whom is twice as sick as he is.
We all know that he can groan louder and roll his
eyes higher and keep more people flying about —
and all this with just a plain pain — than his wife
would do with seven fatal ailments. — From a GirVs
Point of View.



October T~^OR myself, I consider absolute hon-
-L esty most unpleasant. I never knew
any really nice, lovable women who were unflinch-
ingly honest. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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October T^V VERY woman has had, at some time
*^ I J in her Hfe, an experience with m.an

in the raw. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



October Ty /T OTHERS rear their daughters and
®® X V J. send them to fulfil their mission

in life, of being wives and mothers, versed in every-
thing except the two things they are destined to be.
It is as if a ph3^sician were taught architecture,
music, and painting, and then sent out to practise
his unskill in medicine upon a helpless humanity. —
From a GirFs Point of View.



October ^ MAN thinks, if a woman begins
•** ir\. to smile at him again after a hurt,

for which he has not yet apologized, has commenced
to grow dull, that the worst is over ; and that, if he
keeps away from the dangerous subject, he has done
his duty. Besides, hasn't he given her a piano to
pay for it? But that same man would call another
man a brute who insisted upon healing up a finger
with the splinter still in it, so that an accidental
pressure would always cause pain. — Love-making as
a Fine Art ^ from From a Girl's Point of View.



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHD



AY BOOK



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NOVEMBER



November y ]sj^ ipomt of fact, whcn a man is in
X love and a girl does not yet know
her own mind ; when she is weighing out their
adaptability and balancing his love for football
against her passion for Browning ; during the deli-
cate, tentative period, when the most affectionate
solicitude from friends is an irritation, there ought
to be a law banishing the interested couple to an
island peopled with strangers, who would not dis-
cover the delicacy of the situation until it was too
late to spoil it. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



November rT^RERE are times in the lives of
X all of us when it bores us to be
talked to of home or friends or wife or husband or
mother or religion. There are times when nothing
but a large, comfortable silence can soothe the
worry and fret of a trying day. At such times let
the tactless woman and the thoughtless man be-
ware, because everything they say will be a bore. —
From a Girl 's Point of View.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



November 1^ /TANY bravc men, who would
-L ▼ -L stop a runaway horse or who
would dare to look for burglars under the bed,
quail utterly before the prospect of talking to a
young girl who frankly says, " I don't think." —
From a Girl 's Point of View.



November ^^ THOSE wearisome, breathless

^ V^ people, who insist upon giving

you the tiresome details of insipid trivialities !
There is no escape from them. They are every-
where. They are found on farms, in mining-camps,
in women's clubs, in churches, jails, and lunatic
asylums ; and the nearest approach to a release
from them is to be fashionable, for in society no-
body is allowed to finish a sentence. — From a GirFs
Point of View.



November r-pHOUGH uncultured and un~
^ JL taught, there are some who pos-

sess the grander harmony of soul and poetry of
heart which many masters and many tongues cannot
teach to aught save the elect. — A Little Sister to
the Wilderness.



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November TT7HILE in her desire for enjoy-
V V ment she was wilHng to pay for
it by helping a mild flirtation along, still, when she
looked out over the ocean or wakened in the
middle of the night, she abhorred the whole situa-
tion, and hated herself quite genuinely for counte-
nancing it. She got over this, however, when she
put on a ball-gown. Miss Scarborough was fin de
siecle without and early Christian within. — Miss
Scarborough's Point of View y from Sir John and the
American Girl.

November y4 ^ISS NANCY is a poct with-
-Z\. out genius, — one who has a
talent for discovering the fineness of life, but who
lacks the wit to keep his views from ridicule. —
From a Girl ' s Point of View.



November ^ DAPTABILITY is a heaven-
jL JL sent gift. It is like the straw
used in packing china : it not only saves jarring,
but it prevents worse disasters ; and without it a
man is only safe when he is alone. — Frotn a GirVs
Point of View.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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November TT TOMEN are not looking for
V V flaws in men : they are only
too anxious to make the best of sorry specimens
and shut their eyes to faults, and to coax virtues
into prominence. Men have nothing to complain
of in the way women in society treat them. They
get better than they deserve, and much better than
they give. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



November
lO



IN love a woman's first right is to
be protected from her friends while
she considers the man whom she contemplates lov-
ing. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



November J HAVE an idea that names show
X character. I believe names handi-
cap people. I believe that children are sometimes
tortured by hideous and unmeaning names. We
cannot be too thankful to our mothers who named
us Mary and Dorothy and Constance. What an
inspiration to be " faithful over a few things " such
a name as Constance must be ! — The Love Affairs of
an Old Maid.



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November T^RQM the Standpoint of observa-
** J_ tion and inexperience, I should

say that the supremest lack of men as lovers is the
inability to say, " I am sorry, dear : forgive me." —
From a Girl 's Point of View.



November J COULD weep over the early death

*^ A of an epigram with a hearty spirit,

which is second only to the grief I feel at a good
story spoiled for relation's sake. — From a Girl's
Point of View.



November rT~^0 be actually interested is as
*^ JL likely to make one grateful as

anything in this world, unless it be a realization of
the kindness of fate in sparing us the perpetual
society of fools. — From a Girl ' s Point of View.



November TTTHAT is it that makes the
15 y y American girl so dangerous for

all the other women in the world to compete with ?
It is because she studies her man. — From a Girl's
Point of View.



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November XT-QU think I havc never loved?
X All nonsense, my dear. The fact
is, I am constantly in love. I manage it in this
way. I am an idealist. I admit it. I worship an
ideal ; but that ideal is hollow, — built like a suit of
armor. I meet a man who attracts me. Presto ! I
slip him into my hollow ideal ; and he marches
around in it, doubtless wondering what weighs him
down so. I love my ideal personally then, until I
discover that he eats with his knife or beats his
mother, when I take off his armor and stand it in
the closet with my mackintosh and umbrella, until
I need it again. Meantime I love it empty, — with
an impersonal love which keeps my hand in. —
Unpublished Notes.



November yp j^g ]^^^ ^^^ married, I doubt
X whether she would have had the
courage to engage herself to any other man. She
loved him too truly to take the first step towards an
eternal separation. Women seldom dare make that
first move except as a decoy. They are naturally
superstitious ; and, even when curiously free from this
trait in everything else, they cling to a little super-
stition in love, and dare not tempt Fate too inso-
lently. — '^he Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



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the LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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November l^T EARLY all nicc men make good

i.^ lovers in deeds. Many fail in

the handling of words. >■ Few, indeed, combine the

^ two and make perfect lovers. — From a Girl 'j Point

of View.



^



November
19



IT is not wilful cruelty which makes
us say that (to a woman) the word
" bore " is in the masculine gender and objective
case, object of our deepest detestation. — From a
GirTs Point of View.



November y DARE say that more women
JL would have the courage to remain
unmarried, were there so euphonious a title awaiting
them as " bachelor," which, when shorn of its ac-
companying adjective " old," simply means unmar-
ried. The word *' bachelor," too, has somewhat of
a jaunty sound, implying to the sensitive ear that its
owner could have been married — oh, several times
over! — if he had wished. But both "spinster"
and " old maid " have narrow, restricted attributes
which, to say the least, imply doubt as to past op-
portunity. — Preface to The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

November QOMETIMES ill the street-car or
\<D on the elevated train I have seen
women who, I felt convinced, had little babies at
home. It is because of the peculiar look they wear,
the rapturous mother-look, which has its home in
the eyes during the most helpless period of baby-
hood, — an indescribable look, in which dreams and
prophecy and heaven are mingled. It is the sweet-
est look which can come to a woman's face, saying
plainly : " Oh, I have such a secret in my heart !
Would that every one knew its rapture with me ! "
'I'he Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



November XT is all your own fault that you are
A managed (as you men all know you
are), and your fault that you get pale gray truth in-
stead of the pure white. It starts out pure white,
but it is doctored before it reaches you. — From a
Girl 'j Point of View.



November yT really is asking too much of a
X woman to expect her to bring up
a husband and her children, too. — From a Girl ' s
Point of View.



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November A | ^HE ncw woman whom I mean is
^ X silk-lined. She is nearly always

pretty. She is always clever. She is always a lady,
and she is always good. Perhaps to the cynical
that combination sounds as if she might not be in-
teresting ; but she is. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



November XT THAT cau you say to a man

25 y Y vvhose confidence in his power

to please you is such that at parting he says : " I
cannot spare you another afternoon this week, but
I'll come next Thursday if I can. Don't expect me,
however, until I let you know ; and don't be disap-
pointed if you find that I can't come, after all " ? —
From a Girl's Point of View.



November T £Y « another woman " sympathize
JL J with an estranged lover, and place
a little delicate blame upon his sweetheart and flatter
him a great deal, and, presto ! you have one of these
criss-cross engagements which turns life to a dull
gray for the aching heart which is left out. — 'The
Love Affairs of an Old Maid,



The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

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November A CCURACY Is almost fatal to a
XjL flow of spirits. If one is obliged
to weigh one's words, one may live to be called a
worthy old soul, but one will not be in demand at
dinner parties. — From a Girl's Point of View.



November /4 WOM AN always Icnows whcn a
XjL man is so perilously near being
in love with her that she can say anything imperti-
nent to him with the knowledge that he will take it
meekly. — From a Girl 'j Point of View.



November TT THAT kind of women will these

29 y y girls make, to whom a wrinkle

in their waist is of more moment than their soul's



29 V V girls make, to whom a wrinkle

nore moment than t
salvation ? — From a Girl *j Point of View.



November y QQ not Want somebody to go
X ahead and baste my life for me.
I would rather blindstitch it for myself as I go
along. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



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D ECEMBER



December ^TT^HE mere fact that you are all
X in all, the only woman to the
man you so dearly love, the one person who can
make his world ; when you think that your being
away from one meal or out of the house when he
comes in will make him miss you till his heart
aches, — this will keep down a moan of pain when it
is almost beyond bearing, for fear it might cause
him to suffer with you. It will nerve you to stand
up and smile into his eyes, when you are ready to


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