Lilian Bell.

The Lilian Bell birthday book; online

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drop with exhaustion. Love, such as a husband's
love for his wife, is the most precious, the most
supporting thing a woman can have." — The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.



December yj £ ^^s red-headed and freckled ;
A X but, in looking back over one's
acquaintance with pleasant people, the nicest people
one knows are so often red-headed and freckled that
it ought to put a premium on freckles. — The Ex-
patriates.



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T:he LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

December TT E has married Frankie Talia-
A A ferro, and she makes the sweet-
est little kitten of a wife you ever saw. In Louise
he would have been protected by a coat of mail :
in Frankie he finds it turned into a pale blue,
eider-down comforter, which suits his temperament
much better. — The Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



December QOMETIMES girlhood is a mys-

^ \Jj terious chaos of traits, out of

which no one can foretell what sort of cosmos will
follow or whether there will be a cosmos at all or
only intelligent chaos to the end. But this girl
seemed to carry her future in her face. She was
a little mother to us all. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.

December rx^HE eager blood rushed into the
^ JL girl's face, and a soft, dewy look

came into her eyes, — that look which, when a man
sees it in the eyes of the woman he loves, gives him
the feeling that it would be easy to die for her, if
only to see that indescribable look once more. — The
Expatriates.



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December Q«HE IS a mass of Contradiction to
k-7 those who do not understand her,
— now in the clouds, now in the depths. Bad
weather depresses her. So does a sad story, the
death of a kitten, solemn music. She is corre-
spondingly volatile in the other direction, and often
laughs at real calamities with wonderful courage. —
'^he Love Affairs of an Old Maid.



December fT^RUE humiHty disarms the mean-
JL est vanity ; and a sincere eager-
ness to relieve distress will strike through the pride
of the ignorant as a good lance will strike through
tin. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness,



December TT TE women do our best. And we
V V are shrewd enough to know that,
if we should become what men would call honest,
they would simply turn their broadcloth backs upon
our uncalled-for frankness and seek the honeyed so-
ciety of some sweet woman who flattered them ex-
actly as we used to flatter them before we became
so " honest." — From a Girl's Point of View.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK

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December y^ ^\(^^ ^^y of ^^^ Competition in
X every walk of life, it is not those
who can shout the loudest, even in those busy marts
where voice reigns supreme, who are going to be
heard. No one man can continue to shout the
loudest. A momentary audience and a raw throat
are the most he can expect. But it is he who can
exaggerate the most intelligently and overpaint the
most subtly. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



December T^VEN the wayfarer gets an inkhng
1-J from a poster ; but it is a man
of the widest comprehension who gets the whole
truth from the subtlest exaggeration. — From a
Girl *s Point of View.



December yjAVING no marriage of my own



H.
to worry over, it is gratuitous
when I worry over other people's. Old maids, you
know, like to air their views on matrimony and
bringing up children. Their theories on these sub-
jects have this advantage, — that they always hold
good because they never are tried. — The Love Affairs
of an Old Maid.



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December y]sj America particularly, conversa-
X. tion is something which not even
the French, who approach it most nearly, can
thoroughly understand ; for, with all its blinding
nimbleness and kaleidoscopic changes, there is a
substratum of Puritan morality which holds some
things sacred, too sacred even to argue in public,
and one who transgresses turns off the colored
lights, and, lo ! your conversation is all in grays and
browns. — From a Girl 'j Point of View.



December IVJOW of coursc all womcn desire
X^ to be loved. She is a very
queer woman who would deny that proposition if
asked by the right person ; and I hope he would
have sense enough not to believe her if she did. —
From a Girl 's Point of View.



December rT^HE Ffench would commcnt on
^ -L the cost of their resurrection

robes and bite corners off the glittering walls of the
New Jerusalem to see if it were 22-karat gold. —
'The Expatriates.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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December Tt /TARRIED men need all the en-
" i.V A couragement they can get to

keep them making love to their own wives. — From
a Girl 's Point of View.

December TV TEN often wondcr why girls'
i. ▼ JL friendships are so hollow.
They wonder why we are so ungenerous to each
other, — " so hateful " we call it. Hateful is not a
man's word : it is a woman's. And trust a woman
to know exactly what it means ! — From a Girl 's
Point of View.



December ly/TOST girls havc two naturcs, —
i.V J. one she shows to men and the
other to other women. All we know of one is by
the way she droops and is so openly bored in the
society of women. We recognize the other at the
approach of a man, even if we cannot see him, by
the changes in the girl's face. She straightens her-
self, puts a hand on each side of her waist, pushes
her belt down lower, moistens her lips, a sparkle
comes into her eyes, she touches her back hair, and
runs a finger under the edge of her veil. Then she
smiles. — From a Girl 's Point of View.



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rhe LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK
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December TTVVEN the densc man is quite cap-
J— y able of comprehending the a b c
of human nature and of keeping his family in flan-
nels. — From a Girl ' j Point of View.



December y WONDER what will happen
JL when, in heaven, one of these self-
less women is led in triumph to a solid gold throne,
all filled with eider-down cushions, where she can
take the rest she never had on earth. Won't she
stagger back against the glittering walls of the New
Jerusalem, and say: "Not for me, not for me!
Surely it must be for my husband ! " — 'The Love
Affairs of an Old Maid.

December TT THEN stupid men are men of

20 y Y family, and one expects to find

their wives sitting with clenched hands and set teeth,
simply enduring life and praying for death, one is
often surprised to see that they are generally stout
women who wear many diamonds and a bovine ex-
pression in their eyes, — women, in short, who are
too stupid to be bored by stupidity. — Fro7n a GirPs
Point of View.

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oecetnber TT THAT would be the feelings of a
^* VV man of brilliant intellect — for

the accomplished villain is always clever — who was
detected in his crime, and who stood breathless be-
fore his accusers, waiting for and expecting a life sen-
tence at hard labor, to hear the judge's voice pro-
nounce sentence, " Condemned for life to the
perpetual society of fools." I believe that man
would be taken from the court-room a raving ma-
niac. — From a Girl ' j Point of View.



December ripHERE is a Certain long, wonder-
A ing, incredulous look which a
woman gives her lover when she has tried to make
him understand her for his own good and he has
obtusely ignored her generosity. ' No man who has
seen it ever understood it. It is so far beyond
speech. — A Little Sister to the Wilderness.



December y p vc\t,x\. chosc their wives oftener
jL with regard to the mother's appear-
ance and character, there might be more marriages
which retain their flavor. — "The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



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December A | ARE real ncw woman is one
■* JL whom you would wish to know.

She is one whom you would invite to your most
select dinners. You would be better men if you
had more friends like her, and broader-minded
women if you dropped a few of those who hand you
doughnut recipes over the back fence and who en-
tertain you with the history of the baby's measles.
From a Girl 's Point of View.



December /^NCE womcn taught their daugh-

■^ V^ ters housekeeping and sewing

from stern principle, and made it neither beautiful
nor attractive. Then housekeeping went out of
fashion. — From a Girl's Point of View,



December A ■ AH E more fiery and impetuous a
X woman is, the more easily, if she
is in love, will she mould herself to circumstances.
The more untamed and unbending she seems, the
more helpless will she be under the strong excite-
ment of love or grief. — The Love Affairs of an Old
Maid.



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December "rT^HERE are SO many more Amer-
' JL icans on board than English, I

am afraid it will not be polite of us to ask them to
sing their national hymn alone."

" Not a bit of it," declared Lida, stoutly. "You
don't know the English, my dear. If there were
only one fat dowager or one beef-fed man, she or
he would stand up all alone and sing it to the glory
of God and the honor of Great Britain, and sit
down in the proud consciousness of a duty well
done." — The Expatriates.



December T T is as if the new woman were striv-
X ing, by making the best of her pres-
ent environments and simply developing her woman
nature instead of struggling to usurp man's, to
enunciate a philosophy of life which shall so dignify
homely duties and beautify the commonplace that
her creed might well be : —

" We shall pass through this world but once. If
there be any kindness we can show or any good
thing we can do to any fellow-being, let us do it
now. Let us not defer nor neglect it ; for we shall
not pass this way again." — From a Girl's Point of
View.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



December y KNOW One of thesc men whose
X descriptions of a woman's dress are
one of the experiences of a lifetime. He loves the
word " bombazine." His mother must have worn
a gown of black bombazine during his impression-
able age ; and he never will be successful in de-
scribing a modern costume until bombazines again
become the rage. — From a Girl ' s Point of View.



December y HAVE no paticncc with those
**^ X people who fall in love with forbid-

den property and give as their excuse, " I couldn't
help it." Such culpable weakness is more danger-
ous to society than real wickedness. — From a Girl 's
Point of View.



December ry^HERE is no loneliness in the
** X world for a woman like the lone-

Hness of being unloved. — The Love Affairs of an
Old Maid.



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The LILIAN BELL BIRTHDAY BOOK



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QCP



1 7 1902



Oi-.l



1902



S£P. W 1902

sf:p 20 190?





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Online LibraryLilian BellThe Lilian Bell birthday book; → online text (page 6 of 6)