Lilley Eaton.

Genealogical history of the town of Reading, Mass. online

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ce five minutes before the procession moves.


visions are formed, and not later than 10 o'clock.


will move through the following streets : Harnden,


i, Woburn, Summer Ave., Mineral, High, Woburn,


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and park with the Reading Department.


t Headquarters on Woburn St. on Tuesday morning


1 be delivered at that time.
>rder,
HARLEY PRENTISS, Chief Marshal.





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1894



Anniversary of the Incorporation



OK



. . REDDING . .



BY TUB TOWNS OK



READING,
WAKEFIKLD,

AND

NORTH READING.




BANQUET,

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AT READING,

. . May 29, at 5.30 P. M



Oon arc tocleomt, genllcmtn ! (Come, musicians, plan.

ROMEO AND JULIET.



Program m



INVOCATION



Be present at our table, Lord ;
Be here and everywhere adored ;
These mercies bless, and grant that we
May feast in Paradise with Thee.

Tune : Old Hundred.

(An old English grace. All are invited to join.)



. Rev. F. S. ADAMS



qoo& digestion to nou all; anb onct more
sootoer a torlromc on you, J'Sltlromr all.

HRNKV VIII.



4)m Itt us bvcatbr.

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW.

SELECTION . . ..... QUARTETTE

ADDRESS . WALTER S. PARKER, President of the evening

SELECTION ........ QUARTETTE

TOASTS AND RESPONSES, in behalf of the President of the
United States and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

His Excellency, the Governor, FREDERICK T. GREENHALGE
Hon. CARROLL I). WRIGHT, U. S. Com. of Labor



SELECTION .....
Massachusetts in the Past "



QUARTETTE
Ex-Gov. A. H. RICE



"The Legislature"

SELECTION .

" Our Educators "



[ Hon. WM. M. BUTLER, Pres. of the Senate
Hon. CHARLES F. BROWN
. SOLON BANCROFT, Esq.



f "The Press"
! "The School"

SELECTION .....
" Grand Army of the Republic " .
" Sons of Veterans " .
SELECTION .....

" Our Friends and Neighbors " j
"Our Industries"



" Ve Ancient Town" .



ORCHESTRA

. STEPHEN O'MEARA
Rev. A. E. WINSHIP

QUARTETTE

Capt. JOHN G. B. ADAMS

J. B. MACCABE

ORCHESTRA

. O. V. WATERMAN
. GEO. A. MARDEN

Hon. H. G. WADLIN
FRED W. HATCH



! ji foas tuber so bctbumpib bith tooibs
first callcb mn brother's fatber bat).

KING JOHN.



SELECTION .



QUARTETTE



dbc car, touch, Mitrll all plcascb from tbe table rise.

3M once, goob nio^t :
Stanb not upon tbt orftcr of nour going,
Uit qo at once. A Itinb goob night
o all.

MACBETH.



MUSIC.



By REEVE'S ORCHESTRA.

By THE BEACON MALE QUARTETTE,

GEORGE J. PARKER. ARTHUR B. HITCHCOCK.

GEORGE W. WANT. DAVID M. BABCOCK




if- fitfpf !%! ! Iff!
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BOSTC



shers.



WEDNESDAY MORN]



INCORPORATION DAY,



Reading's Celebration
Marred by Rain.



Whole Town Was Sad, and
Everybody Kicked,



Postponement of Several
Events Necessitated.



Public Meeting Addressed
by Gov, Greenhalge,






aid), and the very air of the sacred edi-
fice spoke of antiquity to the stranger.

Reeves' band aroused the audience to
a lively pitch, and then Mr. Walter S.
Parker, chairman of the Reading gen-
eral committee, called the assemblage
to order. In a few well chosen words
\M" then introduced Gov. Greenhalge,
who said he was delighted to be there.

"Any one can be a selectman on
sunny days," he said, "and any one can
be chief magistrate of the commonwealth
In sunny weather. The strength and
value of the commonwealth is shown at
a time when difficulties confront the
community, and is measured by the
courage with which it meets the diffi-
culties."

In mentioning his appearance in the
pulpit he spoke of the early religious
training of the Readings and its great
influence on the

CIVII, (iOVK.RNMENT OF TODAY.

At the close of the Governor's ad-
dress, Chairman Parker said that as the
sun was coming out the parade would
start at 3 o'clock. The effect of this




araur in tut- .uiciiiuuii
and Ball in the Evening,



A bitter disappointment.

That was the mornine experience for
old Mother Reading 1 , yesterday, when it
came her turn for hilarity in the joint
celebration of the quarter-millennial
celebration of ancient "Redding."

It was the second and last, or "Incor-
poration" day of the observance, and
not one in a thousand had any idea
that nature would be so fickle after giv-
ing WakHU-ld SD glorious a day on
Monday.

It's too bad." cried the ladles. The
men echoed the sentiments, but added a





MR. HARLF.Y PRF.NTISS.

Chief Marshal.



announcement tended to a breaking up
of the meeting to a greater or less de-
gree.

I,ieut.-Gov. Wolcott said he did not
know what words he could add to those
of the Governor, but he joined him in
the general congratulations. The early
days were days of hardship and penury,
although days of heroic struggle and
days which laid the foundation of the
nation.

He spoke of the articles in the his-
torical collections in the high school
building, and compared them, in gen-
eral, to the luxuries of today. He told
of the motives which had induced those
early hardy settlers to push their way
into the then unbroken forests of pres-
ent Reading, and then he took up the
services the Headings had extended in
the several wars in which the country
had engaged.

Hon. Carroll D. Wright, a resident
of Readirier. also indulged in remarks
concerning the weather. He slated that
it had been suirtrested that he and Hun.
Horace <;. Wadlin should indulge in a
eeneral talk on statistics, and tliere-
fore u-ive the citi/.'iis something dry.
Thev had declined, however, as the
aericultunil d. looked on

tile \veitther. Hlwavs f'H- the bell,

r, and had full
men!



Ing: to the programme, .M

Francis to;ich"d ;i match to the huge
bonfire 01- 'ill an.! a (lam.- soon

shot into the heavens, rctitcting its
light for miles around.

'Ph.- rir- was kept up till da
Tin-re \vas a struggle for mastery be-
tweeii Die flames iiin.1 the rain, but the.
fire got a clean knock-down at e
deluge.

About 8 o'clock yesterday morning the

downpour began, and wh-n the anxious

pened their eyea then-

seemed little hope for a pleasant day.
THE WHOLE TOWT ! KI.T SU>,

ami everybody kicked.

At S::;i) o'clock the sun tried to strug-
gle through the clouds, but made a. dis-
mal failure of it. Rain fell in torrents
till noon, then tapered off for clearing
weather till > o'clock, when Old Sol was
himself again.

Reading- was a pretty dreary town all
the morning. The bands pre-empted all
the halls, played whist and smoked till
they got tired, and then practised
marches and ball music for the edifica-
tion of the onlookers.

The military men enjoyed themselves
as best they could, and did not seem
to fret any more than did the bands,
whose pay was assured, rain or shine.

far the largest measure of anx-
iety fell on the shoulders of the va-
rious committees Reading- had appro-
priate.! J4(iOO for the fun and as much
more wan sub >mj \Vak-lieM

and North Heading were fully as Had.
Chief Marshal Prentiss rode around in
the wet until he was soaked, trying to
see some Indication of the sun appear-
ing, and the telephone station was over-
burdened with anxious queries on the
prospect In general.

Th" 1M Massachusetts school regi-
ni'Tit was to have its annual field day
in the town. The tents were all
pitched, and baked beans, rolls and
fruit by the barrel were on hand for
the boy soldiers. The field day was
the first feature of the day that was
postponed till Saturday.

Then one after another feature was
postponed all the morning long all
but the hell ringing and salutes by He-



concluding

the crowd tot outside II
and staff
Inii' aroiino i.. u.-i rhe lin.- of ;.

Consid-rint:' ihe conditions to be over-
come. 1 1: \y it s really an e
l-iit one. First came Baldwin's ('ad.-t
band, then the sltrnal coips of the I'd
brigade under the leadership of l.ieut.
llenrv Snratue: the chief marshal and
staff, the indenendent corps of Cadets
of I'.oston. l.-)0 strong, under command
of Mai. Georsre R. Rogers, and then the
invited tiuests In barouches.
In the .a rrlaues were:
(li.v. (irpfahalijt 1 , I.ieut.-Gov. Wolcott,
On. J)alton, ineinbern of the Governor's giatT,
Senator lirovvn of Heading, representative
crol't nint Miller. lion, rarroll li. \\-riglil, Coin
niander-in Chief .1. :. U. Adams of the <;. A. It. and
many others of note.

Following these came the I,awi-
ry (two guns) under comman
l.ieut. Sanborn. This company '
the salute at the appointed time.

A few more barouch.-s. containing
ex -Mayor Hart of Boston, and s.
men and leading citizens from
three Readings, follo.wed.

The second division was under themar-
shalshlp of D. \\". \\Vston. It was "led"
by the lOverett drum corps and fol-
lowed by ,1. F. Ruggle.s camp L'.'!. S. of
V., veteran post 194, (3. A. It., veterans
in carriages and in barges, and
temperance brigade.

TIIK KIIU- DKI-AI: i HI

came next, led by the Salem Cadet
band, and lined up in following order:
Reading fire department, K. C. Xich
chief: engine 1. hose 1. Sunnier hi
and ladder trucks (built in 17r>9).
^. hose :,'. and barouches with veteran
and invited firemen; WakehYld depart-
ment. Chief Kriglneer Flanders
charge; American Watch
bnnd. engine !. Wakefield volume
company, and Greenwood ho*.
pany. The North Reading depaiime
followed, and a tally-ho contain!:
bers of Reading Athletic club
up th.- i.

Charles K. ITusscy was marshal of ''
fourth division, which was



Lawrence battery.

The firemen started In for a parade,
but this was

NOT A KLORIOI S

The town was vory handsomely dec-
orated, and business blo.-ks, private
dwellings, town house and the old
house opposite the Common, where < 'ol.
Bancroft, father of the historian, and
e stopped, and Odd Fel-
lows' Hall, whore thr reception com-
mittee held forth, and the Reading
Athletic Club, where the press head-
quarters, under charge of Chairman
>. . Loring. were located, being the
more noticeable. By afternoon many
decorations were a conglomeration of
colors.

The Governor and invited guests ar-
il train at 10 o'clock, and
the customary salute was fired. The
party was driven to the reception com-
mittee's rooms, where the party re-
1, the visitors being introduced by
Senator Brown of Reading.

In the party were Gov. Greenhalge,
Lleut.-Gov. Wolcott, Congressman
Stevens, ex-Gov. Tuttle of New Hamp-
shire, Adjt.-Gen. Dalton, Gen. David-
son and Cols. Benton, Carr, Paige and
Moses.

The party was entertained at luncheon
by Hon. Horace G. Wadlin, and time
was killed In various ways, till it was
led to hold a general public meet-
ing in the Old South Church at 2
o'clock. Meanwhile, everybody who
visit. 'd the open houses, at which
committeemen. railroad men and others

i in the old-time fashion.
It was -2 o'clock, with just a shade of
light in the heavens somewhere, when
the church was packed with moist
humanity. This church society Is one
Of the oldest in the state Cits history
has been published In The Boston Her-




ronoweu



(some 20 In all) containing th
iing Temperance Union and
school children. In this division
was a float representing the Pllgft
fathers. The Woman's Relief Corp
also had a float representing a happ>
home scene.

This ended (h.. parade feature. Th"<
march was through many of the princi-
pal streets, and was in progress upward
of two hours. After this the invited
guests were driven to the reception
enmmii toe's headquarters, and shortly
afterward carriages were again taken,
thi; time to Black's block, the big
wooden structure opposite the railroad
station, for the grand banquet.

At 6 o'clock the bell ringing and sa-
lute firing were on again, and during the
evening there was a band concert on
the Common. The green was lighted
throughout with red and green flre.
and presented a pretty scene.

The firemen held a banquet in Lyceum
Hall at 1 o'clock. Chief Engineer Ed-
ward C. Nichols was toastmaster, and
addresses were made by ex-Chief Ben-
jamin Boyce of Reading, Chief Flan-
ders of Wakefield, Chief Simonds of
North Reading, ex-Chief Marchant of
Gloucester, Engineer Crowe of the same
city, ex-Chief Osborne of Salem and
Chief A. F. Richardson of Danvers,
In the evening the department had a
ball in the same hall, which was largely
attended. With this feature ended the
celebration of 1894.



BANQUET AND SPEECHMAKING.

Closing Feature of the Reading Quarter-
Millennial Celebration.
The vast hall in P'-ck's block, Read-
ing. wa filled to overflowing last even-



l CONTINUED ON NINTH PAGE.)






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X



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O



GHNHALOGICAL HISTORY



OF THE



TOWN OF READING, MASS.



INCLUDING THE PRESENT TOWNS OF



WITH

CHRONOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SKETCHES,

1



*

FROM 1639 TO 1874.





-






By HON. LILLEY EATON.








;

; The hills are dearest, which our childish feet
M.IVL- climbed the earliest; and the streams most sweet
Are ever those at which our young lips drank,
Stooped to their waters o'er the grassy bank."

WIUTTIBR.


9s *&*jf



V #

4",



.

BOSTON:

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, PRINTERS, 34 SCHOOL STREET.

1874.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1874,

BY JOHN S. EATON,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



EXPLANATORY PREFACE.



IN order that the readers of this Historical Record may fully understand
its origin, and the method of its completion, these explanatory pages are
presented.

In the month of February, 1865, the Hon. Lilley Eaton delivered a lecture,
containing a portion of the historical reminiscences herein recorded, and
subsequently received the following letter :



HON. LILLEY EATON



[COPY.]

"SOUTH READING, Feb. 25, 1865.



Dear Sir, The undersigned, your fellow-townsmen, would respectfully tender you
their congratulations for your very interesting lecture, delivered at the Town Hall, on
Wednesday evening last. They feel that it is to you, more than any one else, that the
town is indebted for the high position it occupies in intelligence and progress ; to you,
who have so long been identified with its schools, and all that goes to educate us in
the paths of knowledge and prosperity ; to you, who deem no labor too great that will
enrich the present from the gleanings of the past ; to you, who, in the halls of legisla-
tion, have represented us so long and so well.

Happy is the town which claims a citizen of equal worth with the one we are now
addressing.

As everything relating to the history of our town is worthy of permanent record, we
respectfully request you to prepare a copy of your lecture, or a history of the town,
for publication.

We are, Dear Sir,

Very respectfully yours,

THOS. EMERSON.
S. O. RICHARDSON.
EDWARD MANSFIELD.
(Signed,) JONAS EVANS.

K B. WILEY.
C. WAKEFIELD.
P. H. SWEETSER."

In compliance with the above request, the preparation ot these records
was speedily commenced, and from year to year their collection and arrange-



j v EXPLANATORY PREFACE.

ment were carried forward with a patience alike remarkable and unwearied,
in the confident expectation of their completion and publication under his
personal supervision.

The unexpected death of Mr. Eaton, which occurred on the i6th of Jan-
uary, 1872, at the age of seventy years, prevented the accomplishment of this
design, and the manuscript he had prepared was found to be in some portions
incomplete.

In accordance with the wishes of many of the inhabitants of Wakefield,
and others, who desired copies of the records which had been thus laboriously
obtained, and by authority of the town of Wakefield, the work has been com-
pleted through the agency of a committee appointed for the purpose.

Although its completion has been effected by hands less skilful than those
employed at its commencement, an attempt has been made to carry out the
original design (as far as such design was apparent), in the arrangement and
embellishment of the work, and to present it to the public, as nearly as has
been possible, in the form he had expected it to assume.

In the more ancient records, there may be detected occasional omissions
of dates, which (it is presumed) were not found in the original search for them,
and no later attempt has been made to supply them.

In the records of recent years, such omissions have been mainly supplied.

We therefore present these so nearly completed records of the vanished
years and early settlers of this venerable town, fully confident that their im-
perfections will .find ample compensations in the value, variety, and interest of
recorded historical incidents, in the entertaining anecdotes and personal de-
scriptions, and in the patriotic, poetic, and eloquent sentences which mark
the composition of the original historian.

JOHN S; EATON, I

LUCIUS BEEBE,
RICHARD BRITTON, <



CHESTER W. EATON



Publication.




tctttftt.



PREFACE



*T is good sometimes to travel back

To days of " auld lang syne,"
Retrace the ancient fathers' track,

Along the mossy line ;
Visit the old ancestral homes,

Our parents' virtues learn,
And round their monumental stones

Let veneration burn.
Review the trials that they bore,

In old primeval years,
To gain this fair and goodly shore,

Mid toil and want and fears ;
Observe their efforts here to raise

The standard of the Cross,
Where they might preach and pray and praise,

No prelates to oppress.
And how, in after-times, they grew

The tree of liberty,
And, from its topmost branches threw

The flag of victory ;
That same bright flag, whose starry fold

Their loyal sons admire,
And spite of traitors, will uphold,

With sword and blood and fire.

ANIMATED life-long with perhaps rather more than an average share of
sentiments as above expressed, loving with ardor my native home, revering
whatever was time-honored and worthy, it has always been my delight " to
inquire for the old paths, and to walk therein" ; to use my leisure hours in
exploring the ways of the fathers ; and collect, as I had opportunity, what-
ever was antique, curious, and interesting, storing it for occasiona
reference.

It was known to my fellow-citizens that I had sucli collections in store ;
that I had for many years of my life been conversant, often officially, with the
municipal, literary, financial, and social progress of the town of South Read-



vi PREFACE.

ing ; and was more or less familiar with the course of events in the three
Readings, for the last half-century. They therefore very kindly invited me to
prepare for the press these historical collections and reminiscences, gener-
ously agreeing to assume the pecuniary responsibility of the publication.



Online LibraryLilley EatonGenealogical history of the town of Reading, Mass. → online text (page 1 of 80)