Louisa C. (Louisa Caroline) Tuthill.

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' Hurra ! hurra ! mammoth cabbages for sale ! " p. 2.



I WILL BE A GENTLEMAN:



A BOOK FOR BOYS.



BY MRS. TUTHILL.



" A ruffle, cravat, or a cane,
With him is the pink of perfection ;

A tassel or watch-key he deems
The very tip-top of gentility;

And plain common sense he esteems
Scarce worthy of decent civility,"



SEVENTH EDITION.



BOSTON:
WM. CROSBY AND H. P. NICHOLS,

113 WASHINGTON STREET.
1846.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1S44, by

WILLIAM CROSBY,

in the Clerk's office of the District Court for the District of
Massachusetts.



CAMBRIDGE:

STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY

METCALF AND COMPANY,

PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE

I. JUVENILE GENTLEMEN, ... 1

II. SENT TO SCHOOL, 8

III. SISTERLY AFFECTION, .... 18

IV. A RETURN, ... . 25
V. JOSEPH AT HOME, .... 29

VI. A SUDDEN RESOLUTION, .... 35

VII. THE GENTLEMAN SAILOR, ... 38

VIII. RECOLLECTIONS OF HOME, ... 46

IX. NEW ACQUAINTANCES, .... 54

X. BEAU BRANDON ASHORE, ... 63

XI. THE PARTING, 68

XII. A STORM AT SEA, 72

XIII. A SAIL, 82

XIV. FAYAL, 87

XV. REMEMBERED KINDNESS, ... 99

XVI. A SURPRISE, 102

XVII. THE AZORES, . .110

XVIII. HOMEWARD BOUND, 117

XIX. HOME, 125

XX. ANOTHER MEETING, .... 131

XXI. BETTER HOPES, 137

XXII. AN UNEXPECTED RESOLVE, . . . 143



CHAPTER I.



JUVENILE GENTLEMEN.

I WILL be a gentleman ! Why ? because you
whisk about a little dandy cane, smoke cigars,
and toss your hat on one side of your head ? Is
that the way to be a gentleman ?

One afternoon, last spring, there had been a
sudden gust of wind and a slight shower of rain.
It soon passed over, the sun shone out brightly,
and the rain-drops sparkled like diamonds upon
the trees of Boston Common.

The Boston boys love the Common, and well
they may, for where could they find a more glo-
rious play-ground ? During the shower the boys
had taken shelter under the trees ; as soon as it
had passed they resumed their amusements.

On one of the crossings, or walks, appeared a
small, plainly-dressed old woman, with a cane in
1



y JUVENILE GENTLEMEN.

one hand and a large green umbrella in the other.
She was bent with age and infirmity, and walked
slowly. The green umbrella was open, and
turned up in the most comical manner. The
wind had suddenly reversed it, without the knowl-
edge or consent of the old lady, and she now
held it in one hand, like a huge flower with a
long stalk.

" Hurrah ! hurrah ! " cried one of the boys,
pointing to the umbrella, " mammoth cabbages
for sale ! mammoth cabbages ! "

The whole rabble of boys joined in the cry,
and ran hooting after the poor old woman. She
looked around at them with grave wonder, and
endeavoured to hasten her tottering footsteps.

They still pursued her, and at length began
pelting with pebbles the up-standing umbrella ;
some crying u Mammoth cabbages ! " and others,
" New-fashioned sun-shades ! "

She turned again, and said, with tears in her
eyes, " What have I done, my little lads, that you
should thus trouble me ? "

" It is a shame," said a neatly dressed, fine
looking boy, who rushed through the crowd to
the rescue of the poor old woman.

" Madam," said he, " your umbrella has turn-



JUVENILE GENTLEMEN. 3

ed in the wind ; will you allow me to close it for
you ?"

"Thank you," she replied. "Then that is
what those boys are hooting at. Well, it does
look funny," added she, as she looked at the
cause of their merriment. The kind-hearted boy
endeavoured to turn it down, but it was no easy
task ; the whalebones 'seemed obstinately bent
upon standing upright.

The boys now changed the object of their at-
tack, and the pebbles rattled like hail upon the
manly fellow who was struggling to relieve the
poor woman from her awkward predicament.

"You are a mean fellow, to spoil our fun,"
said they ; " but you can't come it ; you can't
come it ; cabbage leaves will grow upward."

He however at length succeeded, and, closing
the troublesome umbrella, handed it to the old
woman with a polite bow.

" Thank you, thank you, a thousand times, Sir,"
said she, " and I should like to know your name,
that I may repay you whenever I can find an
opportunity."

" By no means," replied he, " T am happy to
have rendered you this trifling service ; " and he
walked away.



4 JUVENILE GENTLEMEN.

" Well," said she, " whoever you are, your
father and mother have reason to be proud of
you, for you are a gentleman, a perfect gen-
tleman."

And so he will be ; and I wish I could tell you
his name, that you may see if my prophecy does
not prove true.

" Manners make the irian," you may often have
written in very legible characters in your copy-
book ; they certainly do go very far towards
making the gentleman.

I knew a boy once who thought a " long coat,"
as he called it, would make him a gentleman.
Christopher, (for so I shall take the liberty to
call him, though that was not his real name,)
Christopher lived in the country, and was going
to New York, on his first visit. His father was
very indulgent, and, yielding to his entreaty, al-
lowed the country tailor to make Christopher a
blue broadcloth dress-coat, with bright gilt but-
tons. Silly boy! he was mightily pleased with
his beautiful coat, and tried it on again and again,
and almost wrung his neck to see how it fitted
him in the back and about the shoulders. He
did not wear it, for fear of taking off the gloss,
till he got to New York. No sooner had he step-



JUVENILE GENTLEMEN. 5

ped upon the dock there, than one of the boys
belonging to the gang that always assemble about
the steamboat landings espied the glossy new coat.
" Mister ! Mister ! " said he, " how much will you
take for your long-tailed coat ? "

A country lad, somewhat older than Christo-
pher, who had before visited the city, was to be
his guide through the great metropolis. They
hurried along without taking much notice of the
insult, Christopher merely saying, " I suppose
these are what they call dock-rats."

But it is no easy matter to get rid of the mis-
chievous rogues. A whole troop of young tatter-
demalions followed, crying " Mister ! Mister !
what will you take for the long-tailed blue ? "

Christopher turned an imploring look towards
them, which struck them as peculiarly ludicrous,
for they began imitating it, with their thumbs on
their noses and their fingers in rapid motion,

The country boys, quite dismayed, started
upon a full run, the skirts of Christopher's coat
flying out behind him, like the tail of a kite.
Their persecutors took mud from the gutters
and threw after them, crying^ " Look out for the
brassy buttons ! there goes Tom Thumb, junior."

Christopher and his companion were at last
1*



6 JUVENILE GENTLEMEN.

obliged to take refuge in a shop, and when the
" dock-rats " had dispersed, they sneaked back
to the steamboat. Christopher took off his
mud-bespattered coat, his once beautiful, glossy
coat, and, putting on his old round-about jacket,
ragely concluded that the coat does not make
the gentleman.

" Bill what are you, a Loco-Foco or a Whig ? "
said one of these would-be-gentleman to a boy
about his own age ; they might have been each
twelve years old, or thereabouts.

" I am a Loco-Foco, 'cause mother is a Whig.
She is for ever talking about it ; and it is my opin-
ion that women have nothing to do with politics^
and I should be ashamed to be what my mar
wants to have me. That 's the reason I am such
a raving, tearing Loco-Foco."

" That 's right, Bill," was the reply, "you had
just as lief your anxious mar would know you
are out as not."

" Sure I had ! None of your mammy-calves
for me. I am thankful that I shall be a man
before my mother." So saying, the youngster
spit out the tobacco-juice from his mouth in the
most approved manner. The accomplishment
must have required a great deal of practice.



JUVENILE GENTLEMEN. 7

" Their feet perhaps may want a shoe,

Yet they are patriots through and through,
Their tongues can for their country roar,
As loud as twenty men or more. "

Disrespect for a mother's opinion, certainly,
never will make a boy a gentleman. The wisest
and best men that ever lived have acknowledged,
with gratitude, that they owed their wisdom and
goodness more to their mother's influence than
any other earthly cause. It is a very bad sign
when a boy or a man speaks disrespectfully of
his mother.

Women, it is true, have not much to do with
politics, but they have a right to an opinion, and
they often form correct ones.



CHAPTER II.



SENT TO SCHOOL.

JOSEPH BKANDON was a boy who did not respect
his mother's opinion ; yet she was a good woman,
an excellent woman. Joe wanted to be a gentle-
man, and did not like to be tied to his mother's
apron-string. She was a widow, and Joe was her
only son. She had a house of her own, and a
snug, pretty house it was ; and she had a small
but comfortable income from well-invested funds.
She had made up her mind to send Joe to col-
lege, and for this purpose she instructed her two
daughters at home, that she might save by that
means enough to educate her son in the best pos-
sible manner. The two girls, Susan and Fanny,
were affectionate and kind to their mother, and
as nice, pretty girls as one would wish to see.

Joe was the most tormenting tease to his



SENT TO SCHOOL. 9

sisters. He pulled the ears of Susan's favorite
kitten every time he could get a chance. He
trampled upon the flower-beds in Fanny's little
garden. Because Susan had a small nose, he gave
her the sobriquet of Pug ; and Fanny, who had
light brown hair, he called Tow. In short, he in-
vented every possible way to make them uncom-
fortable, until Mrs. Brandon concluded that she
must send Joe away to school. He had got en-
tirely beyond her management, and had not the
least respect for her opinions.

The morning came for Joe's departure for
school. His kind mother had prepared every
thing for his comfort in the neatest order. His
sisters had each secretly put a little packet of
" goodies " into Joe's carpet bag, that he was to
have the pleasure of coming upon unexpectedly,
when far from home.

The stagecoach was at the door. Joe drew
on his new kid gloves with a very important air,
and called out to the driver, " Here, fellow, come
and take my luggage." It was carried out.

" Good by, mother," said he, in a swaggering
kind of indifferent manner.

" Stop, Joseph, my son," said Mrs. Brandon,
" are you not going to give us one kiss before



10 SENT TO SCHOOL.

you leave ? We shall not see you again in a very
long time."

" Do n't make such a baby of me, mother," he
replied, pushing her aside, and rushing out.

" God bless you my son ; be a good boy," said
she. *

" Pug and Tow, good by," said Joe, springing
upon the top of the stagecoach. The driver
snapped his whip and the horses went off at full
speed.

Mrs. Brandon and the girls went ifeck into their
little parlour and sat down and wept together right
heartily. Ah, how little do men know of the
tenderness of woman's affection ! Although Jo-
seph Brandon had tyrannized over his mother
and sisters, and been a continual trouble to them,
no sooner had he left them than they forgot all
his faults, and loved him dearly, as a son and
brother.

Joe's first letter home will give an account of
his journey. It was as follows :

DEAR MOTHER :

You told me to write to you as soon I could. I
only arrived yesterday.

I met with a little bit of an accident on the






SENT TO SCHOOL. 11



road. There was a big fellow on the top of the
coach who took it into his head to be very saucy
to me. He was a travelling pedler, or some such
sort of thing, with his box of jewelry, spectacles,
<Scc., who had got tired of trudging, and had
coaxed the driver to give him a lift for a mile or
two.

I would not bear the vulgar fellow's imperti-
nence, so I threw his box of gimcracks into the
road. He made a mighty fuss about it, and the
driver stopped for him to pick it up. When he
opened it, the glasses of some of the spectacles
were broken, and several of the crystals to his
pewter watches. Would you believe it, he threat-
ened to sue my parents ? But I took out five dol-
lars and gave him, telling him another time to
mind who he was saucy to. You know, mother,
after what had happened, I wanted him to know
that he had insulted a gentleman. I do n't be-
lieve his whole pedler-concern was worth five dol-
lars, for he looked at the money with surprise,
and all the people in the coach seemed to feel
that I was somebody.

You know, mother, that was all the money I
had with me, and therefore I expect by return of
mail that you will send me some more.






12 SENT TO SCHOOL.

I do n't know yet how I shall like the school.
Tell Pug that there is a boy in our school whose
nose has just such a turn up as hers, and there
are Tow-heads in abundance.

From your affectionate son,

JOSEPH BRANDON.

The widow had given her son the five dollars
for spending money, for the whole term. She
had not a dollar left in her own purse. What
could be done ? The girls read the letter.

" I would not send him a fourpence," said Su-
san. " Extravagant fellow ! and so foolish, too, to
give five dollars to a pedler to show him he was a
gentleman! Mother, let him go without money
a while, till he knows better how to use it."

" But," said Fanny, whose affectionate disposi-
tion ever led her to self-sacrificing kindness,
"but, mother, he may want something that we
have not thought of; I will send him the gold
piece that Aunt Mary gave me last Christmas."

" No, my dear child," quickly replied Mrs.
Brandon, " you ought not do to that. Poor fel-
low, I do not know what will happen if he should
need any thing among strangers."

" He shall have it. he shall have it," exclaimed
Fanny.



-



SENT TO SCHOOL. 13



" A part of it, my child," said Mrs. Brandon.
" I am sorry, indeed, to have your dear aunt's gift
changed ; but if you will lend it to Joseph, Mr.
Fuller, the grocer, will change it for you."

Fanny's sun-bonnet was on in a moment, and
she flitted, like a bird, across the street with the
gold piece, and soon returned with a two-dollar
bill and a three.

" Send him the three," said Fanny.

" The two, mother, the two, " said Susan ; " Joe
is a mean fellow, and I do not doubt that he in-
sulted the man first."

" I will send him the two," said the widow, and
she inclosed it in the following



MY DEAR JOSEPH :

It is with deep regret that I am compelled to
blame you, yet much to blame you certainly
are.

Let me tell you, hi the first place, that I had no
money to send you; the inclosed is the gift of
dear little Fanny, who changed her aunt's pres-
ent, the favorite gold-piece, that she might be
able to aid you.

And you wish to be a gentleman, Joseph.
2



14 SENT TO SCHOOL.

Was it like one to get into a quarrel with the
pedler ? No ; it was much more like a swagger-
ing bully. A true gentleman is quiet, unobtrusive,
and, as the very name implies, gentle. I know
that boys of your age very generally suppose
that noisy, dashing manners mark the gentleman ;
and consider a mild, peaceable deportment as girl-
ish in the extreme.

I have no doubt that the famous Bayard, the
chevalier sans peur et sans reproche, had very
amiable and delicately gentle manners, although
he was the bravest of the brave.

Sir Philip Sidney, who lived in the reign of
Elizabeth of England, was a man of remarkable
bravery, as well as a perfect gentleman ; it was
said that his life was poetry in action. Do you
suppose that he had the bold, swaggering manners
that you admire? I imagine them resembling
sweet music, perfect harmony, soothing and
exalting to the feelings.

Our own Washington, too, with his noble hero-
ism, his indomitable spirit, how calm and quiet
were his manners! What simple, natural digni-
ty, with the refinement and chivalrous politeness
of a gentleman! A model for every American
boy.



SENT TO SCHOOL. 15

Lavish expenditure of money is no mark of a
gentleman. Give to every one what is justly due,
and be capable of true generosity. You must, in
fact, be just, before you can be generous. How
seldom is generosity perfect and pure ! How
often do men give, because it throws a certain
inferiority on those who receive, and a superi-
ority on themselves.

Your fellow-travellers, Joseph, were not im-
posed upon by your false generosity to the ped-
ler. They probably thought you a very foolish
boy, throwing away your parents' money. You
were far from coming off triumphantly, as you
imagined, by dashing off your five dollars. You
cannot "buy golden opinions of all sorts of
men," with money. The worldly may seek the
rich and the prodigal for their own interest, and
to answer their own selfish ends ; respect for the
man himself is a very different thing from the
tribute paid to his wealth. Besides, you are not
wealthy, and pretending to be so was not only
folly, but sin.

Do you not suppose, my dear Joseph, that the
son who stayed at home and labored faithfully
with his father was more of a gentleman than
the Prodigal Son? Was the Prodigal a gentle-



16 SENT TO SCHOOL.






man, when spending his substance in " riotous liv-
ing," any more than when he sat down among
the swine, and would have eaten with them of the
husks ? A miserable way, indeed, did he take to
be a gentleman, and yet it is not a very uncom-
mon one. Many hard-working fathers and moth-
ers have gentleman sons, idle and extravagant,
very like the Prodigal. No doubt he thought he
was much more generous and noble-spirited than
his brother. I can even conceive of his thinking
himself, in rags and dirt, a reduced gentleman.

Remember, then, my son, prodigality is no
mark of a gentleman.

I have already written so long a letter that I
can only add my fervent wishes for your success
at school. Be obedient and studious.

How much of my comfort during the remain-
der of my pilgrimage depends upon you, Joseph.

" When I am feeble, old and gray,
Your healthy arm must be my stay,
And you must wipe my tears away."

How sweetly you once lisped out those simple
lines, so familiar to every child, and I fondly
believed that your heart would ever be true to
your MOTHER.

Susan and Fanny send 1



i love.

.



SENT TO SCHOOL. 17

And how did Joe feel on the reception of his
mother's letter ? He glanced his eye hastily over
it, took out the money, and exclaimed, " Only
two dollars how mean!" then threw the letter
into his trunk, and tried to stifle the reproaches of
conscience. Alas ! too well did he succeed.



2*






CHAPTER III.



SISTERLY AFFECTION.

SEVERAL weeks passed, and no answer was re-
turned to his mother. Fanny went every day to
the post-office, and returned home disappointed.
Susan said it was just like him not to write, but
she would bring a letter ; so she immediately wrote
the following epistle :

A pretty fellow are you, Joe, not to answer
dear mother's kind letter ! Here we haunt the
post-office, week after week, till I am absolutely
ashamed. Poor Fanny says nothing, but tries to
comfort us. You know it was her money that
you received, and you have not even thanked her.

My pet, Snowball, is growing so cat-like that
I have discarded her, and taken to petting your
poor old Hero, who really grieves at your ab-



SISTERLY AFFECTION. 19

sence. His faithfulness to his master is really
touching.

I do not think that ycu behave well, but yet
you are my brother, and in spite of all your
naughtiness I love you. I have not much news
to tell you. We have almost finished Old Rol-
lin, only twenty pages more to read. Mother
has already begun to knit your winter stockings,
and seems to think of you every minute.

It is a great effort for me to write, for you know
I am not very literary, and you will, I am sure,
acknowledge this from your sister,

SUE.

Like many other mothers, Mrs. Brandon was
willing to make every personal sacrifice for her
son, hoping that he might become a good and
useful man. Fearing that her means would not
be sufficient to carry him through college, she
dismissed her only domestic, and with the aid of
her daughters performed all the household labor.
She did not, in consequence, neglect their in-
tellectual culture. Neither did she lose her
lady-like appearance, or allow her daughters to
be neglectful of theirs. Every person, capable
of judging, would have said that Mrs. Brandon



20 SISTERLY AFFECTION.

was a lady, and that her daughters were becom-
ing more and more like their mother.

Joseph, soon after the reception of Susan's let-
ter, wrote a short but dutiful one to his mother,
and at the same time the following to his sister
Fanny,

DEAR LITTLE Tow :

It was very kind in you to change your beloved
gold for me. If you will send me the remaining
three dollars I will send you the first gold-piece
that I get, and you shall again admire the effect
through the meshes of your little purse.

Do n't say a word to mother about this letter.
It is a matter between ourselves. I want a new
cap desperately. Mine is a shabby countrified
thing, of a different fashion from what the boys
wear here, and you know I must appear like a
gentleman^ for one of these days I shall be one,
and then I will see that mother, and Susan, and
you, live in elegant style, and have every thing
you wish. Susan is not as generous as you,
Fanny, and therefore you must not tell her about
the money. Just inclose the bank-note carefully
in a letter, and put it into the post-office directed
to me. I know you will oblige your brother,

JOSEPH.



SISTERLY AFFECTION. 21

Fanny was an amiable, affectionate little girl,
only eleven years old. She had never written
a letter to send through the post-office. She had
never done any thing without her mother's con-
sent, and it was a fearful task that her brother
had imposed upon her. She feared it was wrong
to do as he requested, but her brother's letter
seemed to her youthful fancy so kind, so affec-
tionate, and so great was her desire to oblige
him, that after a violent struggle in her own mind
she determined to send him the money.

She took her little writing-desk into her own
room, and sat down, trembling, to write.

She made several attempts before she suc-
ceeded to her own satisfaction, and, indeed, she
was not very well satisfied at last.

DEAR JOSEPH :

I am very sorry that you do not wish me to tell
mother about this money that I now send to you.
She would not tell me not to send it, I am sure,
because you really want it. I hope it is not
wrong to write without her knowing it. O, do
try to make a good man. Our dear mother prays
for you every morning and night, and talks about
you a great deal.



22 SISTERLY AFFECTION.

I am so afraid Susan will come up stairs, and
find me writing, that I must stop. O, dear! I
have got to put this in the post-office, and I shall
tremble so. I shall feel like a little thief.

From your loving sister,

FANNY.

P. S. You won't call us Pug and Tow any
more, will you ? Susan's nose is really quite
pretty, and my hair grows darker every day.

Fanny did feel as she said she should, " like a
little thief," when she stealthily stole to the office
and deposited her letter.

Joe must have felt as meanly as if he had been
robbing a hen-roost when he took out the three
dollars. He did. But then he thought immedi-
ately how necessary it was that he should look
like a gentleman, and he went and bought a
new black cloth cap with a very large tassel, and
strutted about in a very consequential manner.

The next Saturday evening, Mrs. Brandon and
her daughters sat in their neat little piazza, ad-
miring the rich glow of a golden sunset-sky.

" It is a beautiful prelude to the Lord's day,"
said Mrs. Brandon. " Sunday was originally
named after that glorious luminary, but it should



SISTERLY AFFECTION. 23

remind us now of the Sun of Righteousness, who
has risen with healing in his beams."

The labors of the week were past. In the
soothing calmness of the quiet evening, the wid-
ow's heart expanded with gratitude to her Heav-
enly Father. She remembered that there was to
be a contribution at church the next day, for a
benevolent object in which she was deeply inter-
ested.

" Fanny, dear," she said, "I must borrow your
three-dollar note for the contribution-box to-mor-
row. I have no smaller sum by me than ten,
and I cannot afford to give so much. In the
course of the week I will .pay you my debt, for
I have not forgotten that I am to restore your


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