Lucius Annaeus Seneca.

The satire of Seneca on the Apotheosis of Claudius commonly called the Apocolocyntosis; online

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given in any of the best mss., and seems an evident interpola-
tion from the reference to Sisyphus in the next chapter.
Haase brackets the clause, and Bucheler omits it.

For the first clause after dicerent Ruhkopf and Schusler give
si uni dii laturam fecissent ; Fickert, si uni di laturam fecis-
sent ; Haase, si unius \diei'\ dilaturam fecissent, with which
cf. Junius, si uni dilatura?n fecissent. Passing over the more
venturesome conjectures of some of the earlier critics (Rhena-
nus, semidii larvafn facesseret ; Fromond, si minus immor-
talem dii naturam fecissent ; Gronovius, si uni dii gratiam
fecissefit; Neubur, siu7ii dii, etc., with statim catalogo damna-
torum inscribi posse inserted before it; Orelli, Titytan iam
diu vultures pavisse ; Curio, better, nisi unius diei iacturam
fecisse7tt), most of the readings are based on the text of the
Val. and inferior group of mss., si uni dii, etc. On the basis
of the St. G. reading is BUcheler's, which makes Sisyphiun
out of sium, inserts satis bodily, and shortens fecissent to
fecisse. The importance, as he considers it, of having at
least three of the veteres enumerated here, because of the ?////
instead of utri or alterutri to follow, does not seem to me

R



242 THE SATIRE OF SENECA [c. 14.

very great. The speaker may very well refer to two and be
thinking of the whole list. Biicheler's Sisyphus here looks
almost as much like an interpolation from below as did the
rejected non unquam Sisyphum onere relevari. Even were
his reading otherwise to be retained, I would substitute
niniium for the satis which he inserts. Its omission after the
preceding word with the same ending would be more easily
accounted for.

To my reading of the passage there is the apparent gram-
matical objection that the two conditional clauses alike modify
Tantalum siti periturum. But this I am inclined to take as
an instance of colloquial tautology which may not have been
unintentional on the part of the writer. It helps to convey the
effect of confused suggestion on the part of the disputants.
See Introd. p. 69, and compare, especially in c. 10, videris
luppiter an in causa . . , si aecus futurus es.

laturam: On plebeian forms in -ura^ see Cooper, Word
Formation in the Latin Sermo Plebeius^ p. 27. The word
is here used in its general sense of enduring; otherwise it is
not specially apt for the suffering of Tantalus. It was in late
Latin that it became a common commercial term for the work
or (jiopcrpov of a porter (taturarius, freq. in St. Augustine).

Ixionis miseri rotam sufflaminandam : For allusions to the
well-known punishment of Ixion, cf. Ovid, Met. iv. 460 ;
Verg. Aen. vi. 601. Su^amino, from sufflamen (cf. Juv.
viii. 148, Ipse rotam astringit sufflamine mulio)^ presumably
was a carter's word. Its use in Sen. Controv. iv. praef. is
evidently intended as a rough and vigorous metaphor.

ex veteribus : So the St. G. and Wolf, mss., and Bucheler
(ed. 1864) and Haase ; the Val. MS., veteris ; edit, prin.^
Ruhkopf, Fickert, and Bucheler {edit, min.), veteranis.

alicuius cupiditatis spem : The reading of the best mss. is
spes. Bucheler and Haase give speciem, which is an emenda-
tion of SchefFer's. Rhenanus gave specimen ; Curio, species,
followed by many of the editors, including Ruhkopf and
Fickert. Schusler gives the MS. reading, which is quite



c. 15.] NOTES 243

explicable ; but for the sake of the accusative singular, with
ciipiditatis^ I venture spe?Ji. Palaeographically considered, this
may easily have disappeared through the form spe sine, etc.

sine fine et effectu : This is the reading common to most of
the editions. Biicheler and Schusler, following the St. G.
MS., have si?te effectu. The Val. MS. has sine fine effectus ;
Wolf., sine fine et effectus. Sine fine, as Fromond pointed
out, would be an easy dittography, but it is impossible to say
which blunder the copyist was more inclined to produce, that
or the contrary one of omitting fine after sine. (See Ross-
bach, p. 31.) Recalling, e.g. Verg. Aen. ii. 771, sine fine
furenti, and the tendency here both to literary parody and to
burlesque of legal repetitiousness (cf. eg),! have preferred
the traditional reading.

alea ludere: Cf. c. 12, fin., and references on Claudius's
fondness for gambling.

pertuso fritillo : Cf. the proverbial pertusum dolium of the
Danaids ; Plant. Ps, 369 : In pertussum ingerimus dicta
dolium ; so also tov Ttrprjixivov ttlOov, Luc. Dial. Mort. xi. 4.
Cf. Apollod. ii. I, 5 ; Find. N. 10. Similarly Lucret. iii. 936
(ed. Brieger) :

Si non omnia pertusum congesia quasi in vas
Co7nmoda perfluxere, etc.

fugientes semper tesseras quaerere : Although this perform-
ance is compared below to that of Sisyphus, it has more
resemblance, not only to that of the Danaids, but in some
of the lines to the Tantalus myth, as expressed, e.g., in Hor.
S. i. 1,68-69:

Tantalus a labris sitiens fugientia capiat
Flumina.

15. subducto . . . fundo : Rousseau includes in his trans-
lation a reference to the Danaids :

Du cornet dSfonce, panier des Danaides,
II sent couler les dSs ;



244 '^^^ SATIRE OF SENECA , [c. 15.

and at the end he ingenuously replaces the comparison to
Sisyphus with another, at some length, of an athlete who
throws his arm out of joint by striking at his rival and missing
him : fat pris la liberie de stibsiituer cette comparaison a celle
de Sisyphe employ te par Senlque^ et trap rabattue depuis cet
auteur.

auderet : Claudius is by this time intimidated, as well as dis-
couraged. Arderet^ however, has been proposed (Palmer i
inventuui^ t. Gertz) .

mittere talos: Cf. Mart. xiv. 16:

Quae scit compositos manus improba mittere talos ^ etc.

In Hor. S, ii. 7, 17, the act is reversed : mitteret in phimum
talos.

lusuro : So the mss. and the editions generally, including
Bucheler's edition of 1864. In his editio tninor it is changed
tofusuro. Wehle, in 1862, cast doubt upon the line, objecting
to lusuro similis because he says Claudius is actually lusurus^
and to petenti because it requires an object. The objections
do not seem on the whole sufficient. If actually about to
" play " the dice {lusuro), Claudius would have been succeed-
ing better than he did, and the object of petenti is clearly
enough understood.

apparuit subito C. Caesar : On Caligula's treatment of Clau-
dius, cf. Suet. Cal. 23 : nam Claudiu7n patruum non nisi in
ludibrium reservavit ; also id. CI. 8 and 9 for particular in-
stances, and 38 on Claudius's pretence of stupidity ; id. JVero,
6; Dio, Ix. 3; id. lix. 23.

ilium viderant ab ipso . . . vapulantem : The Ms. reading
gives ab illo ; the repetition of ilium, illo, is plainly objection-
able, and Bucheler, who keeps it, brackets the first. But this
seems needed as the object of viderant with vap7ilantem^ and,
especially after petere, illu?n is better than ab illo referring to
Gains, the principal subject. Mahly suggests, testes qui olim
viderant ab ipso . . . vapulantem. ipso can be adopted
without olim, to which there is no need of changing. There



c. 15.] NOTES 245

may be some allusion to the familiar use among slaves of ipse
for the master of the house.

flagris, ferulis, colaphis vapulantem : evidence that Gaius
had habitually treated Claudius as his slave. The colaphi^s
(K6XjCL(t>os)y about as colloquial a word as our verb, to " cuff,"
describes a kind of treatment especially shameful to bear. As
to vapu/anUm, cf. vaptdare in c. 9.

is Menandro liberto suo tradidit : Menander was a not very
uncommon freedman's name. But it is not unlikely that, as
Blicheler thinks, the writer here means the great Athenian
comic poet. His life on earth having been spent in exposing
the foibles of men, he now figures as the assistant of the judge
of the dead.

ut a cognitionibus esset : an office here first mentioned.
Cf. Hirschfeld, Verwaltiingsgesch. I. p. 208, note 4; see also
Mommsen, Staatsr. II. p. 965, note 2 (3d ed.). The later offi-
cials, a cognztiofiibiis, were of higher rank, but under the early
emperors the functions here represented as performed by a
slave were exercised by imperial freedmen. The office had to
do with the investigation of cases outside the ius ordmarmm.

Claudius is thus not only very appropriately consigned to
his destiny as forever subject to the orders of a freedman, but
he is also condemned to a kind of legal drudgery quite accord
ing to his habit, laborem irritum^ etc. The rapid and sum-
mary fashion in which at the end (cf. Introd. p. 54) Claudius
is '^ shaken down " from one situation to another, only empha-
sizes the contemptuousness of his treatment.



INDEX



[To the pages of the Introduction and Notes]



Acilius Aviola, 155.

adquiescunt . . . poetae, 162.

advocationem, 239.

Aeacus, 54, 237.

Aeduans, Qaudius's speech on,

14, 15, 167.
Aelius Saturninus, satire of, 48.
aenatorum, 221.
Agatho, 222.
agmine facto, 237.
Agrippina, her marriage to
Claudius, 12, 40, 41, 194,
211, 215.

and his death, 17.

her appreciation of the Apoco-
locyfttosisj 19, 39, 40.
atKe TrddoL rd t' epe^e Kri., 240.
Albertus Pius, 92, 93.
Alexandriae, 192.
alogia, 68, 69, 184.
Amandi, Codex, 88.
dfia Trpdaata Kal dwio'a'Uj 198.
amici, 235.
Amphaeus, 235.
animam agere, 163.
animam ebulliit, 70, 172.
annis vixi, 72, 180.
anno novo, 155.
Apocolocyntosis :

a caricature, 16.



Apocolocyntosis [continued] —
its motive, 19.
as a reHgious tract, 20-22.
its authorship, 23 seq.
Hterary estimates of, 24-25.
unworthy of Seneca, 27 seq,
and the Consol. ad Polyb.^ 24,

26, 31-37-
an affront to the Caesars, 37-40.
and Seneca's opinions, 41-45.
its style, 45, 64 seq.
unmentioned by Latin authors,

46.

mentioned by Dio Cassius, 48.
applicability of the name, 49

seq., 96, 99.
lacuna in text, 53, 188.
its end, 54 seq.
an epithet ? 56.
as Menippean satire, 58 seq,
hastily composed, 66.
syntax of, 71.
verse in, 73.
manuscripts of, 86 seq.
editions, 86, 92 seq.
its place among Seneca*s

works, 104.
Apollo, 17, 156.
Apotheosis . . . per satiuram,

58, 87» 92.



247



248



INDEX



Appiae viae curator, 158.

Arar dubitans, 185.

Aristophanes, 16, 21, 78.

dpovpa, 200.

Asinius Celer, 236.

Asinius Marcellus, 155.

Assarionem, 215.

Atellanae, 21.

Athenis, 192.

Atropos, 169.

auctoratos, 201.

auctorem, 174.

Augeae, cloacas, 188.

Augurinus, 66, 168.

Augusta, diva, 203.

Augustine, St., quotes Seneca,

20, 44, 232.
Augusto (mense), 187.
Augustus, his early opinion of
Claudius, 7, 8, 9, 205, 206.

his speech, 10, 65, 66, 67, 73,
76, 205 seg.

his funeral, 158.

Claudius's relationship, 203,
205, 210.

his jRes Gestae, 206.
aurea . . . saecula, 169.
auriculam, 70, 72, 202.
Ausonius, on Claudius, 1 1.

imitation of the Apoc, Z^, 161.
axes, primos, 171.

Baba, 66, 166.
Baccho, viso senescere, 161.
Baillard on the word Apoc.f 51.
balineo, 230.
belua centiceps, 230.
bene canum, 174,
Benejiciis, De, 43, 89.
Birt on authorship of the Apoc»,
25, 52, 54.



Boissier on Z' apotheose imperiale,
22.
estimate of the Apoc.y 24.
on Seneca's opportunism, 30.
on Spanish influence in Rome,
42.
boleti, 17,49, 173.
Boxhorn, 54.
Brigantas, 226.
Britannia, 195.
Britannicus, 19, 39.
Britannos, 167, 225.
bucca, 69, 157.

Biicheler, de Ti. Claudio Caesare
grammaticOy 14.
collations of Mss. of the Apoc,

87 seq., 99.
editions of the Apoc, 98, 99,
ei passim.
Byron, Vision of Judgmenty 84,

85.

caeli scrutatur plagas, 195.

Caligula, 3, 18, 38, 156, 157, 213.

canem subalbam . . . nigrum, 231,

canis adsidit, 207.

capite obvoluto, 228.

capsulam, 168.

carcere, 171.

carpebat, 67, 161.

Catonius, Justus, 235.

Catullus, quoted, 220.

causidici, 15, 188, 222, 227.

celerius, 72, 230.

censeo, 200, 204,

Cerberus, 230.

cert a clara affero, 159.

Cicero, 60, 69, 79, 81.

Cincia lex, 222, 232.

civilia bella compescui, 206.

civitate donaret, 15, 167.



INDEX



249



civitatulas, 70, 202,

clarius, 217.

Qaudius, his funeral, I, 221.

authorities for his life, 3.

his character, 3-6.

his physical appearance, 6,

174, I75» 176, 183, 225.

his defective speech, 6, 7, 173,

175, 185, 216, 239.

his absent-mindedness, 7-9,
174, 212, 237.

as a judge, 9, 66, 187, 211, 218,
226, 227, 240.

his literary interests, 10, 13,
14, 29, 177, 203, 227.

his gambling, li, 227, 243-245.

his lack of independence, 11,
12, 55, 78, 168, 184.

unfairly treated, 13, 16.

de Vita Sua^ 13, 177.

his authorization of lawyers*
fees, 15, 222.

and the extension of citizen-
ship, 15, 41, 167.

Seneca's allusions to, else-
where, 43.

worshipped in Britain, 77,

195.
his death, 17, 155, 161, 162,

163, 165, 166, 173.
his secular games, 155, 165,

228.
descendant of Aeneas, 178;

Augustus, 203, 205, 210.
Divus, 203, 211, 217.
his voracity, 204.
on revenge, 240.
dementia^ De, 44, 90.
Clotho, 66, 164, 166, 167, 168,

169.
cluo, 69, 185.



cognitionibus, a, 245.
colaphus, 69, 245.
collo obtorto, 219.
colloquialisms, 68 seq,

grouping of, 72.
comoedos audit, 17, 173.
compendiaria, 229.
concacavi, 69, 173.
conceptis, verbis, 159.
Consolatio ad Polybium^ 8, 24,

26, 3i-37» 56.
contulerim, 187.
cor nee caput habet, 190.
cordatus homo, 224.
Cornelia, lex, 237, 241.
corpus eius dis iratis natum, 216.
Cotta, 233.
Crassus Frugi, 40, 213, 214, 215,

218, 236.
Cretaea tenens oppida, 227.
Crispus Passienus, 43.
cruciatus cesset, 165.
Cruttwell on the Apoc,^ 24*
cubiculo suo, 194.
cucurbitae, 51, 52.
Cunaeus, 79, 81 seq.
Curio, C. S., 91, 96.
curva corriget, 194.
Cyllenius, 219.
Cynthia, 160.

Danaids, 243.
decoUare, 70, 184.
dede neci, etc., 166.
Develay, V., 100.
dicto citius, 230.
Diderot, on Claudius, 4.

on Seneca, 29.

on the Consol. adPolyb., 35, 36.
diem obiit, 156.
Diespiter, 11, 15, 65, 76, 201,



250



INDEX



diminutives, 70, 72, 167, 168.
Dio Cassius, on Qaudius, 3, 5, etc.

allusion to the Apoc, 23, 25,
48 seq.

on Seneca, 27.

on the Consol, ad Poly b.^ 36, 56.
Ditis, ad ianuam, 230.
Druids, 215.
Drusilla, 18, 157.

iyyiov y6w KV^firjSf 98, 209.
editio princeps of the Apoc, 86,

91, 92 seg.y 102, et passim,
efFerunt, 165.
Ennius, 21, 58, 59, 60.

quoted in heaven, 195, 203.
*E7riKOi^petos ^e6s, lo, 189.
Erasmus, 82, 95.

his edition of Seneca, 96, 99.

his Adagia, 99, 100, 157, 218.
eip'fiKajxev (ru7xa^/>w/xev, 44, 23 1.
Euripides' Cresphontes quoted,

63, 172.
ex quo, 156, 165.

fabam mimum, 199.
Faber, Nic, 96.
Fabius, 233.

facile descenditur, (63), 230.
facile, tam, quam, 207.
factus dictus pictusve, 200.
facundia (Augusti), 205.
fallit laborem, 170.
famam mimum fecisti, 199,
Farrar on the Apoc, 24.
fatuari, 70, 184.
fatuum, 8, 40, 156, 215.
fecit illud, 171.
Felix, 205.

ferrum suum in igne, 67, 204.
fessas habenas, 73, 163.



Febris, 5, 7, 50, 67, 68, 72, 179,

180, 182, 183.
Fickert, edition of Seneca, 98.
fingite luctus, 224.
forum . . . resonet, 224.
freedmen of Claudius, 1 1, 12, 36,

56, 67, 78, 229, 234, 235, etc.
Friedlander on the Apoc, 24, etc,
fritillo, 227, 243.
Fromond, scholia, 97.
Fulgentius Planciades, 79.
fusos, 168.

Gains Caesar, 54, 213, 244. Vid.

Caligula.
Gallio, L. Junius, 48, 50.
Gallos, 167.
Galium, 181, 186.
Garat on Seneca's philosophy,

30-
Gellius on Seneca's style, 68.
generi, 213, 218, 236.
Graecos, 167.
Graeculo, 176.

Guasco, edition of the Apoc, 97,
Guelferbytanus, Codex, 88.

Haase, on the style of the Apoe^^

45.
edition of Seneca, 98.
Harpocras, 234.
Havet, on the Apoc.y 24, 34.

on the literary conscience, 41.
Heinsius, D., 46, 51, 96, loi, etc,
Helvius, 233.

Hercules, 6, 9, 10, 21, 54, 63, 64,
65, 67, 68, 72, 73, 95, 179,
185, 188.
and St. Peter, 85,
dXe^//ca/fOS, 175.
his labors, 176.



INDEX



2SI



Herodianus on apotheoses, 221,

224.
Hesperus, 171.
Hispanos, 167.
historico, 157.
historiis (Claudii), 177.
Homer, verses from, 10, 63, 80,

176, 178, 198, 200,212,239.
Homericus, aeque, loi, 178.
honores autumni, 160.
Horace, 63, 66, 230.
horam eius, 1 66.
(horam) inter sextain et septi-

mam, 162.
horologia, 162.

Ilienses, 178.

*IXi6^6i' /AC (pipiaVj 178.

imposuerat, 70, 179.

Inachia urbs, 185.

incest i, 191.

incipit . . . velle respondere,

240.
inferos, ad, 220.

ingenti /xc7(£Xy xo/>tfV> 69, 223.
initio, 155.
intellegi, magis, 161.
intermundia, 82.
irascitur, Qaudius, 183.
iratus fuit uxori, 212.
Ixionis, 242.

ianitor, 6, 65, 174.

Janus, 65, 75, 76, 197, 198.

Jerome, St., 27.

Julian, his Caesares, li, 38, 74,

78, 82, 176, 190, 200, 229,

240.
luHas, duas, 210, 236.
lulio mense, 187.
luncus, praetorius, 233.



lunia Calvina, 192.

Junius, H., 49, 51, 96.

Juno, 192.

iunonia monstra, 103, 105.

Jupiter, 21, 22, 65, 76, 179, 196.

nedum ab love, 191.

luppiter ... in causa . . .
tua, 211.

iratus . . . uxori, 212,
iuratores, 157.
iurisconsulti, 223.
ius dicebam, 187.
Juvenal, satires of, 60.

Ka^(rapes. Vid. Julian.
Klebs, on the Apoc, 25,
Ko\oK(fVT7jy 51, 54.

Lachesis, 169.

Laruis, 200.

laturam, 241, 242.

laudatio funebris, I.

legibus urbem fundavi, 63, 206.

liberum factum, 156.

Licinus, 182.

Lindemann, on the authorship of

the Apoc.f 25, 45.
Lipsius, his Somniumf 79 seq.,
loi, 177, 196.

commentator on ApoCy 91, 96.

editions of Seneca, 97.
Li via, 7, 203, 205, 206.
Livius Geminius, 18, 158.
Livy, on the origin of satire, 58.
Lodge, Thomas, loi,
Lucan, Pharsalia^ 83.
Lucian, satires, 38, 74 seq.

Dialogues of the Dead, 74.

Dialogues of the Gods, 75.

Q^Qiv *EKK\r)(rlaj 75 seq,

Nero, 77, 170.



252



INDEX



Lucifer, 171.

Lucilius, scepticism of, 21.

Satires, 59, 60.
Lucretius on the popular mythol-
ogy, 21.
luctatur, cum anima, 165.
Ludus de Morte Claudii, 2, 92,
98, 155, etc.
objections to this title, 57,

70.
Vid. Apocolocyntosis.
Lugudunenses scire debes, etc.,

183.

Luguduni natus est, loi, 180.
Lugudunum, site of, 185.
Lupus, 236.

Mabillon, Acta Sanctorum, etc.,

85, 86, 159.
Mackail on the Apoc, 24.
Magnus, Pompeius, 213, 214,

218, 236.
manus, gestu solutae, 183.
manus manum lavat, 67, 204.
mapalia, 70, 196.
Marci municipem vides, 180.
Mariangelus Accursius, 94.
Martial, 69, 89.
Martianus Capella, 79.
mathematicos, 165.
Medi, picta . . . terga, 225.
mehercules, 166, 190.
Menander, 54, 245.
Menippean satire, 58 seq,
revived, 79 seq.
Tres Satyrae Menippgae, 82.
Menippus, 59, 60, 74, 82.
mentis suae non est, 185.
mera mendacia, 180.
Mercury, 17, 164, 168, 227.
Messala Corvinus, 63, 207.



Messalina, her death, 9, 12, 13,
212.

flattered by Seneca, 36.

her crimes, 39, 195, 210, 217,
232, 233.

related to Augustus, 212.

in Hades, 234.
Metamorphoses of Ovid, 203, 204.
minari, 174.
Minos, 226, 237.
Mnester, 195, 233.
monstra timuerit, 176.
Morgan, Forrest, translator, loi.
mulio (perpetuarius), 69, 183.
mures ferrum rodunt, 184.
mures molas lingunt, 193.
muscam excitare, 207.
mutatur . . . metallo, 169.
Myron, 234.
Mythologicon of Fulgentius Plan-

ciades, 79.
fXiopoO eiiXdrov rvx^Tv, 1 95.
ficjpov TrXriy/if 9, 185.
Mwpwv iirayda-raa-LSf 8, 48.

Narcissus, 2, 12, 18, 217, 229.
narrat, 180; narro, 18 1.
natum putavit, 166.
nenia, 65, 74, 223.
Nero, and the funeral oration, i,
37» 203.

and Claudius, 3, 19, 39, 48, 49,
50.

poem on, 17, 18, 59, 65, 168 seq.

Neronian hypothesis for the
Apoc.f 19 note.

Seneca's pupil, 28.

in Lucian's dialogue, 77, 170.

his Quinquennium, 155, (171).

Apollo- like, 169, 170.
nescio, inquis, 212.



INDEX



253



Nest oris annos, 169.
Neubur, edition of the Apoc, 97.
nimis rustice ! etc., 162,
notae Tironianae, 198.
notarius, 198.
not or, 69, 186.
novi generis fades, 176.
novo more, 9, 16, 176.
Numa, 22.

nummulariolus, 70, 202.
nuntiatur, 174.

Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii,
De, 79.

oblitus nugarum, 1 86.
Oceanum, 226.
Octavia, 40, 210, 218.
Octobris, idus, 155, 161.
Olympus, 77, 188, 219.
Orelli, collation of St. Gall MS.,

87, 98.
oro per quod, 191.
ortum, 160.

5(ra \l/dfjLa66i re k6vi$ re, 239.
Osiris, 44, (77), 231, 232.
Ovid, 81, 203, 204.
ovo ovum (simile), 218.

Pallas, 235.

irdtn-a <pl\(jjv TrXiJpi;, 237.

parataxis, 71.

Parcae, 164, 170.

Paris Mss. of the Apoc, 89,

90.
Parthos, rebelles, 225.
passibus acquis, non, 63, 158.
pedem dextrum, 175.
pedibus in hanc sententiam itum

est, 219.
peregrinos in semen, 168.
Fersida, 225.



Petronius (Arbiter), Satiricon,
46, 58, 59» 62, 64, 88,
99.
phraseology from, 51, 69, 71,
etc.

P. Petronius, 239.

Pheronactus, 235.

philologos, 177.

philosophos, 161.

Phoebus, 160, 163, 170.

Pieria . . . lauro, 169.

planctus, 224.

Plancus, L. Munatius, 180.

plena manu, 172.

Pliny the Elder, citation of Clau-
dius's histories, 14, 177.

Pliny the Younger, allusions to
Claudius, 10, 14, 19.

Plutus, 201.

podagricus, 230.

poetae, vosque, 227,

Polybius, 234.
Vid. Consolatio.

Pompeius Magnus, 214, 218,
236.

Pompeius, Pedo, 236.

portentum (hominis), 215, 216.

postmeridianus consul, 197.

praeputium, 69, 189.

privatis intra curia morantibus,

195-
proverbium, verum, 156.
proverbs, 67.
Publilius Syrus, 23.
pudet imperii, 207.
Pumpkinification, 50, 56.

quaerito, 157.
quare, inquis, 192.
Quintilian on Seneca, 30.
quo non alius, 224.



254



INDEX



Radbertus, auth. ViU Walae,

85.

rapa vorare, 11, 203.

recipio, tibi, 181.

regem aut fatuum nasci, etc., 8,

156, 215.
rei publicae (respondit), 92, 165.
Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 206.
Rhadamanthus, 237, 240.
Rhenanus, B., editions of the

Apoc, 95, 96.
scholia, 95 seq.; and the Greek

quotations, 95, 177; quoted,

104.
pLxj/e irodbs rcrayCiv, etc., 212.
Rhodanum, 183, (185).
Riese on the authorship of the

Apoc, 25, 49.
Romae inquis, 192.
Romae reliquerat ceteros deos,

179.
Roman comique, 84.
Romulus in heaven, 1 1, 203.
Rossbach on the Valenciennes

MS., 92.
Rousseau, 99, 100, 155, 243.
Rufrius Pollio, 235.
Ruhkopf, on the ConsoU ad

Polyb., 32.
Mss. collated for, 88 seq,
his edition of Seneca, 97, et
passim,

Sacram viam, 220.

saeculi felicissimi, 155, (171).

salvum et felicem habeam, 159.

sanctificatio, i.

Sangallensis(St. Gall), Codex, 55,

87, 91, 102, et passim,
Sardi Venales^ 79, 81 seq*
satire, origin of, 58.



Saturnalia, 190, 223.
Saturnalicius, 70, 190,
Saturninus Lusius, 236.
Saturnus, 191.

Sauromatas et si qui, etc., 167.
Scarron, Paul, 84.
Scheffer, 57, 97, loi, etc.
Schmitz on the Apoc.^ 24.
Schusler, edition of the ApoCy

98, etc.
scis, 158.
scitis, 173.
Scribonia, 214.
securis, Romanae, 226.
sellas, 237.

senatores, occisos, 238.
Seneca, and his pupil, 1,18, 28, 37.
grudge against Claudius, 2, 28,

156, (210).
and Roman citizenship, 26, 41,

42.
inconsistencies, 27, 33, 34, 35,

41.
canonized, 27, 86.
his philosophy, 29 seq,
the humorist, 42, 64.
sententiam dicere nee disputare,

195.
sententiam, interrogatur, 197.
sententiam vincere, 204,
servum me ducat, 216.
Shakespeare, Richard III, 85,

164, 232.
sicariis, 237.
Silanus, Appius, 210, 213, 217,

236.
Silanus, L. Junius, 40,41, 191, 192,

193, 194,210, 213,218, 236.
Silanus, M. Junius, 210, 213.
Silius, C, 232, 233.
simile, tarn, quam, 218.



INDEX



255



sine fine et effectu, 243.

Sisyphus, 241, 244.

2/cta/Aax^a, 53.

slang, 70.

socer, 213, 217, 236.

socrus, 236.

Sol, 171.

Somnium of Lipsius, 79 seq,j

177, 196.
Sonntag, edition of the Apoc, 97.
sorer mea [Graece] nescit, 208,

209.
sororem, festivissimam, 192.
Southey, Vision of Judgment, 84.
spem, alicuius cupiditatis, 242.
Stahr, Agrippina, 100.

on the authorship of the Apoc,^

25» Z1^ 47» 49.
stercoris exhausi, plus, 188.
Stoic god, 189.
stulte, stude, 70, 192.
subscriptionem, 238.
sufflaminandam, rotam, 242.
Suillius, 28, 210.
summam, ad, 216.
Super stitionesy Seneca, contra, 20,

44, 232.
surrexit, 205.
Sylvanus, C, editor of editio

prin., 92, 94, 95.

tabella, recitavit ex, 217.
Tacitus, on Claudius' funeral, I.

on Seneca, 30.
Talthybius deorum, 227.
Tantalum, 241.
Tectam, viam, 228.
tempora somni, 160.
tenebris, in, 231.
Terentum, 228.
tergemini regis, 185.



TertuUian, 20.

Tiberim, 228.

Tiberius, funeral of, 158.

epigram on, 169.

gift to Claudius, 190.
Tiburi for tibi, 102, 186.
t£s irbdev, etc., 96, 1 76.
Tithoni, 169.
togatos, 168.
tragic us fit, 184.

translations of the Apoc,^ 99 seq*
Traulus, 233.
tria verba cito dicat, 2l6.
TpiKdpavos, 61.
Tpio5lTr}s TpiTTi/Xios, 53.
Tristionias, 215.
Trogus, 233.
turpius est, 9, 13.
Tyrrell, on Roman use of Greek,
8,63.

ut qui . . . timuerit, 175.

vacationem, rerum iudicandarum,


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Online LibraryLucius Annaeus SenecaThe satire of Seneca on the Apotheosis of Claudius commonly called the Apocolocyntosis; → online text (page 17 of 18)