Lucius Annaeus Seneca.

The satire of Seneca on the Apotheosis of Claudius commonly called the Apocolocyntosis; online

. (page 18 of 18)
Online LibraryLucius Annaeus SenecaThe satire of Seneca on the Apotheosis of Claudius commonly called the Apocolocyntosis; → online text (page 18 of 18)
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218.
vae me, 71, 173.
vafer, 197; vafro, 179.
Valenciennensis, Codex, 87, 91,

92, 102, et passim,
valentem, virum, i86,
Valerius Antias, 21.
vapulare, 69, 201, 245.
Varro, scepticism of, 20, 21.

titles of his satires, 53, 61, 79.

definition of satura, 58 note.

imitation of Menippus, 59,
60.

imitated by Seneca, 60-62, 74,

75-
by Martianus Capella, 79.
quoted in heaven, 63, 75, 189.



256



INDEX



Vatican Mss. of the Apoc,^ 90.
Vavasseur, De Ludicra Dictione,

78.
velit, nolit, 158.
Venerem, 192.
Verdaro, on the Apoc.^ 21.

his translation, loi.
Vergil, quoted, 158, 166.
Vespasian, last words of, 38.
veteribus, 242.
Vettius Valens, 233.
Vica Pota, 201,
Vienna, 181.



vindemitor, 1 61.
Vision of Judgment, 84, 85.
Vitellius, 40, 41, 165, 211.
vivere videri, desiit, 17, 69,

173-
Vulcan, 212.

Walae, Vita, 85, 1 59.
Weissenburgensis, Codex, 91,

96.
Wolfenbuttel MS., 88.

Xanthum, 183.



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Online LibraryLucius Annaeus SenecaThe satire of Seneca on the Apotheosis of Claudius commonly called the Apocolocyntosis; → online text (page 18 of 18)