Mary Olmstead Stanton.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO



3 1822027536242








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UN ERSITY OF CAL FORNIA SAN DIEG




3 1822027536242



A SYSTEM



PRACTICAL AND SCIENTIFIC

PHYSIOGNOMY;



OR,



How TO READ FACES.



A MANUAL OF INSTRUCTION IN THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE HUMAN PHYSIOG-
NOMY AND ORGANISM, EMBRACING THE DISCOVERIES OF LOCATED
SIGNS OF CHARACTER IN THE BODY AND FACE, AS
SHOWN BY THE FIVE NATURAL DIVISIONS
OF THE COUNTENANCE.



JVIARY OLMSTKD

AUTHOR OF "A PRACTICAL AND SCIENTIFIC TREATISE ON PHYSIOGNOMY," "A CHART FOR THE DELINEATIONS
OF MENTAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS," ETC.

VOL. I.




PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON:

F. A. DAVIS, PUBLISHER,
1890.



Hy il.->i i and direction of botli Author and Publisher, this work is sold only
by subscription, at the advertised prices, by Agents regularly authorized, \vlio
iii-' itbHoliitely pledged to maintain prices and manner of sale. Its presence,
i IH-I I-IIM-.-. in any book-store which is not an authorized agency, and which
sells otherwise than by subscription, save as a second-hand copy, or its being
ottered for sale at less than the advertised price, is an evidence of fraud,
against which the public, and especially honest and upright book-sellers, are
hereby warned.



Entered according to Act of Congress, In the year 1889, by

MARY OLMSTED STANTON,
la the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C., O. S.



Philadelphia, Pa., U. 8. A,:

The Medical Bulletin Printing Home,

1231 Filbert Street.



TO THE

LOVERS OF SCIENCE,
TO THE

EARNEST AND ENTHUSIASTIC SEARCHERS FOR TRUTH
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD,

THIS WORK
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED.



PREFACE.

To THE READER:

In sending forth this work to the public, I am impelled thereto
by my desire to benefit the masses of mankind in a manner which
I believe they very much need. Man's knowledge of himself
seems not to have kept pace with the knowledge of his surround-
ings. It is time, therefore, that there should be an accordance of
intelligence between the two, in order that, through man's compre-
hension of his powers and possibilities, he may by scientific methods
assist in improving his own life and in perpetuating'a race which
shall be an improvement on the present one. This can come only
through a knowledge of anatomy, physiology, physiognomy, and
hygienic law, practically applied. I have endeavored to put this
science in as plain and simple language as possible, in order that
the non-scientific reader may not be confused by an ambiguous
terminology.

The method of classification used in this system of science is
in accord with that observed by all naturalists in their classifica-
tions of the lower animals, and is based .on the forms of the human
organism, which are produced by the intermingling of the vegeta-
tive, the thoracic, the muscular, the osseous, and brain and nerve
systems. These are treated in the order of evolution, from the
first evolved to the latest acquired, the true and perfected cerebral
system.

Practical and scientific physiognomy gives the most compre-
"hensive theory of mind of any work hitherto presented to the
world. It takes the position that mind inheres in the entire
organism, and that the brain is only one source of the mind or of
mental operations ; that the mind and body are one and indivisible,
and cannot be judged as separate entities ; that the mind is not

(v)



vi PREFACE.

shut up in the skull, as is taught by a certain class of metaphy-
sicians. It teaches that the office of the mind is threefold, viz.,
to produce (1) sensation, (2) consciousness, and (3) ideation. The
chief organ of sensation is the outer skin-covering, and this, as
well as the " five senses," the visceral organs, together with the
hones and muscles, contribute their share of sensation, while the
att'nviit and efferent nerves assist in conveying intelligence to and
from the brain, where all sensation is, as George Henry Lewes
expresses it, " in some profoundly mysterious manner elaborated
into ideas."

This view of the diffusive locale of mind is supported by
Alexander Bain, Henry Maudsley, M.D., Prof. Ernst Haeckel,
J. Lauder Lindsay, Herbert Spencer, Rudolph Virchow, Albert
Ferrier, and all of the most advanced students of mind and body.
In this system of physiognomy this comprehensive theory has been
elaborated and carried to its ultimate by proofs which I believe to
be incontrovertible.

The discoveries in this system of physiognomy include many
important subjects. Among them may be mentioned the very
comprehensive one shown in Fig. 1, which illustrates the three
ruling principles in Nature. Another great discovery is the local-
izing of fifty mental signs of character in the face; another is the
localizing of the facial signs of all the internal organs; still another,
the relating of every mental faculty to a certain physical organ or
system of functions. These ideas are all entirely original, and are
approved by many able anatomists. They are extensively figured,
and the theories expounding them thoroughly elaborated.

Furthermore, the relation between physical functions and
mental faculties is conclusively proven, and each mental faculty is
traced to its physiological or anatomical base, either in the nervous,
the muscular, the osseous, the thoracic, or the vegetative systems.

The proofs of the positions which are here offered enable me
to lay claim to having formulated the most advanced system of
mental science hitherto presented to the public, inasmuch as it
traces the several mental faculties to their origin and proves their



PREFACE. Vll

existence in each case, and locates the accompanying mental and
functional signs in the face. Its practicability is such that children
can be taught the sub-basic principles, as well as its methods of
localizing the signs of character in the face r and body. Scientific
and practical physiognomy should be a part of the school educa-
tion of youth, and if life and health are spared me I purpose writ-
ing a primary work for the use of young children in the school and
family.

The study of physiognomy commenced in childhood and its
principles applied in adult life would advance the mental, moral,
and physical conditions of humanity, and carry forward the evolu-
tion of the race on the basis of selected types, instead of by the
slow, unsatisfactory, and animal-like methods at present employed,
in which instinct and not reason governs the reproduction of the
human family. The majority of mankind use their reason in re-
production only when it is desired to obtain a finer breed of fowls
or horses.

I am fully persuaded that a knowledge of scientific and prac-
tical physiognomy, practically applied, will give almost any type of
character that is desired, and this is its highest mission. Consider-
able repetition of the same ideas was unavoidable, owing to the
complex nature of the elements, features, and faculties under con-
sideration.

The nomenclature used in designating the faculties is the same
in ordinary use by the people at large, and is therefore retained,
although no single word can express the scope of a faculty in its
entirety.

This system takes into consideration every feature of the
human body. It includes the investigation not only of facial fea-
tures and signs of character in the face, the body, and limbs, but
declares that the outlines and proportions of the form, the colors
of the skin, eyes, and hair, as well as the voice, the attitude, the
gestures, the movements, the wrinkles, dimples, lines, hands, feet,
and muscles in action, are all faithful indices of character.

One of the advantages which this physiognomy possesses over



viii PREFACE.

all others is that it is a complete system, not scraps, fragments,
and compilations from other works on the subject ; furthermore, it
is not mingled with phrenological, theological, or psychological
theories. It deals entirely with the material mind in a material body.

Speculations in regard to the soul, the hereafter, as well as to
sectarian creeds, are not considered in this connection. Such sub-
jects I think should be left to their own proper teachers, for I deem
it as inappropriate to mingle these subjects with physiognomy as it
would be to associate algebra and theology.

Earnest and religious regard for the welfare of mankind has
impelled the writing of these ideas. I have endeavored to treat the
subject in a reverent spirit, believing that the study of God's
highest manifestation of creative energy is a subject which should
excite our holiest aspiration.

With the hope that these ideas may lead to a correct
knowledge of man, and that this knowledge may conduce to
his welfare, physically, morally, and intellectually,
I am, sincerely, your friend,

THE AUTHOR.



CONTENTS OF VOL. I.



PREFACE, v

INTRODUCTION, 1

PART I.

THEORETICAL PHYSIOGNOMY.

CHAPTER I.
THE BASES OF PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC PHYSIOGNOMY.

Definition ; Lavater's work ; Theoiy of Practical and Scientific Physi-
ognomy ; What it teaches ; How the discoveries were made ;
General laws and principles. The human face the index of all
Nature; Three grand divisions Chemical, Architectural, Mathe-
matical. Mineral forms. The physical basis of Mind, . . 7

CHAPTER II.

THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF FORM.

Rotatory motion the origin of Form ; The movement of the earth has
a direct bearing on the form and destiny of created beings.
Relation between universal existence and mathematical law.
Number the proper index to the volume of Being ; The human
countenance the index to these laws and principles. The law of
Scalenism, or perversion ; Disease a temporary return to abnor
mal or perverted t} r pes ; Straightuess of the bones indicates
straightness'of the mind. The normal factors of Form and
Being in Nature, Art, and Science, 27

CHAPTER III.

THE FIVE ORGAN SYSTEMS WHICH CREATE FORM AND CHARACTER.

All is symbolic in Nature ; Form the decisive factor in the interpreta-
tion of character. The five different organ systems. Form,
character, and earliest appearance of cell life in the organiza-
tion of animal tissue ; The structure of organized bodies, . 59

THE VEGETATIVE SYSTEM, 67

Characterization of the vegetative adult ; The organ 83-stems in
the chemical or vegetative division ; Faculties derived from the
development of these organs.

(ix)



x CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

THE THORACIC SYSTEM, . . . 71

Facial sin'iis lor the internal organs; Diseases which assail the
thoracic system.

THE MUSCULAR SYSTEM. . . 75

Arrangement of the muscles ; Voluntary and involuntary ; The
varied expressions of the human face due to the muscles ; The
mechanic:il and artistic principles included in the action of
the muscular system ; Faculties that have signs located in the
muscular division ; Diseases which assail the muscular system ;
The dominant systems of man's organism control his capacities.

THE OSSEOUS OR BONY SYSTEM, 83

Classification of the bones ; Firmness and integrity of character
depend upon the bones ; Composition of the bony structure ;
Kind of food necessary for good bones ; Prominent men who
have excelled in morality, endurance, and heroism ; Bony people
the best ; Faculties derived from the bony system ; Faculties
in the architectural division ; Diseases incident to the bony
svstem ; Remedy for an excessive development of bone. The
points of character which depend upon the several organ sys-
tems of the body.

THE BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM, ....... 94

Size of the brain alone not a proof of great mental power;
Form and congenital quality the most potent factors ; Texture
of the skin significant of mental quality ; Physiology of the
brain and nerves; Diseases which assail this system.



CHAPTER IV.

THE SUB-BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOGNOMY.

FORM AND SIZE; A large head no indication of superior intelligence;
The nose the best indication of power. Quality or mental power ;
Fine hair and skin to be considered first. Form ; Persons of
creative or constructive minds are round in form ; The arch, the
curve, the circle, the ovoid, the square, and straight line; Each
illustrates different phases of character. Color ; The mineral
the original source ; Pure air the best cosmetic ; Color and heat
synonymous, .......... 101

THE LAW OF PROPORTION OR HARMONIOUS DEVELOPMENT, . . . 131
Proportion a potent factor in determining character; One or
more faculties excessively developed dominate and influence
the action of other faculties ; Secretiveness ; Cautiousness ;
Acquisitiveness.

HEALTH, 137

The basis of all really useful character founded on health ;
Organic perfection and morality; Precocious children; Sensi-
tive, nervous children; Drug medication; Pure air the best;
Compensation ; The established laws of compensation.



CONTENTS OF VOL. I. XI



CHAPTER V.

RATIONALE OF PHYSICAL FUNCTIONS AND MENTAL FACULTIES, AND
THEIR SlGNS IN THE FACE.

The brain not the sole seat of the mind. Hope directly related to the
liver. The source of moral power.

THE KIDNEY SYSTEM, 158

Faculties dependent upon it ; Analysis of Conscientiousness ;
Morality dependent on the action of the kidneys ; Color-blind-
ness ; Analysis of Firmness.

FACULTIES DERIVED FROM THE DIFFERENT SYSTEMS.

THE INTESTINAL SYSTEM, 165, 185

Digestion or Alhnentiveness ; Mental power of the nerves of the
digestive apparatus ; Relation of the visceral organs to the brain.
Friendship ; Its selfish and unselfish action ; Its connection with
and dependence on other faculties : Anal}- sis ; The liver as a
clearing-house of the entire organism.

THE GLANDULAR SYSTEM, . 169

Benevolence; Value of the lips as indicators of pathological and
morbid states of the body ; Econoin}^ ; The grade of intellectual
development shows the kind of economy ; Hospitality ; Love
of Home ; Patriotism.

THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM, . . . 177

Amativeness, or love of the sexes; Its moral and physiological
importance should be taught ; Love of Young ; Mirthfulness ;
Sanativeness ; Pneumativeness.

THE LIVER, 182

Hope ; Its dependence upon the liver.

THE NERVES OF THE SKIN, 190

Modesty ; Analysis of the glandular system and olfactory gan-
glia; Cautiousness; The correlation of function with faculty.

THE OSSEOUS SYSTEM, 192

Veneration ; Its connection with the stomach.

THE OSSEOUS AND MUSCULAR SYSTEMS, 194

Executiveness.

THE MUSCULAR SYSTEM, 195,213

Self-will ; Credenciveness ; Uses of this faculty. Calculation :
Music ; All art is founded on a circle or sections of it ;
Analysis of Music; Language; Shown by a high quality of the
muscular system; Musical qualities observed in hmguage.



xii CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

THE OSSEOUS AND NERVOUS SYSTEMS, . ... .199

Observation.

THE MUSCULAR AND BRAIN SYSTEMS, . . . 200

Memory of Events ; A faculty of the five systems of functions ;
A great memory only is no indication of intellect or wisdom ;
.Memory depends upon a healthy condition of the body;
Weight ; A high development of the muscular system a power-
ful ally to art; Locality; Large in those whose muscular sys-
tem is supreme.

THE GLANDULAR AND ARTERIAL SYSTEMS, 206

Analysis of color.

THE BRAIN AND NERVE SYSTEM, . . . . . . . 209, 233

Mental order ; Physical order. Intuition; A true and distinct
sense ; Division of the nervous system into two parts ; De-
scription of the powers and action of these two departments of
the brain system ; Organs and functions from which the mental
faculties derive their powers.

THE FIVE SUPERIOR SYSTEMS, . .210

Time; Lacking where the vegetative system predominates;
Time as well as Order one of the leading characteristics of the
bon}' system.

THE BRAIN SYSTEM, 227

Comparison ; Causality ; Reason ; Development of reasoning
faculties among the masses ; Children should be drilled in
logical reasoning.



CHAPTER VI.

THEORIES OF THE MODE OF ACTION OF CERTAIN TRAITS.

Analysis of Amativeuess; Should be judged by the adjoining facial
signs. Analysis of Jealousy ; The result of one of three causes.
Analysis of Revenge. Analysis of Secretiveness ; Intended by
Nature to conceal the lack of some other facuhy. Theory of
Suspicion. Analysis of Anger, Will, and Temper; A dark man
has the strongest temper ; Its effect on the system ; Self-will
the basis of Anger and Temper ; What true religion consists of.
Analysis of Selfishness ; Two distinct and opposite methods of
action; Caused l\y an insufficient development of the glandular
system. Self-conceit; Egotism. Analysis of Scorn and Con-
tempt. Anabysis of Enthusiasm ; Faculty that leads to great
efforts. Analysis of Laziness ; Obstinacy ; Contrariness ; Physi-
ognomy teaclies that all defects can be remedied, to a large
extent, 239



CONTENTS OF VOL. I. Xlll

PART II.

PRACTICAL PHYSIOGNOMY.
CHAPTER I.

THE THREE NATURAL AND PRIMITIVE DIVISIONS OF THE FACE
CREATED BY THE MOUTH, THE NOSE, AND THE EYES.

The month ; The centre of the most primitive system of function.
The nose ; Represents the mental powers. ' The eyes ; Repre-
sent the muscular development of the entire body. Facial
signs of the physiological organs and functions. Digestion, or
Alimentiveness. Location of the signs for the visceral organs.
Physiognomy properly a part of medical science. The glands.
The reproductive system. Lactation. The kidneys ; Conscien-
tiousness dependent on this system. Method of localizing the
higher developments of the body ; The lungs and heart ; The
Liver ; The stomach. The muscular or motive system ; The eye ;
Motion; Vision; Hearing. The osseous system ; Denoted by
the bones of the eyebrow. The brain and nerve system ; Train-
ing the feeble-minded and imbecile ; The sense of touch, . . 273

MENTAL SIGNS OF CHARACTER IN THE FACE, 287

Five practical subdivisions ; The width and length of the face ;
The nose high and broad the entire length a good sign ; The
lower part of the forehead and eyebrows an important part to
consider ; Great size of the forehead no criterion of mentality ;
Local signs for the mental faculties; Summary to the five prac-
tical subdivisions of the face.

CHAPTER II.

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SIGNS OF CHARACTER IN THE FACE.

Fifty separate and distinct faculties described ; The adaptability of
the human mind ; Man does not possess a greater number of
mental faculties than woman ; Gestures significant in disclos-
ing character; The face an exact register of all mental facul-
ties and bodily functions and conditions, ..... 297

THE FACULTY OF CONSCIENTIOUSNESS, 302

Definition ; An excess and deficiency of this faculty ; Facial
and bodily signs ; The color of the face an indication of the
general integrity of a person ; Bodily signs of Conscientious-
ness ; Description of Conscientiousness ; Conscientiousness
large where the bony system predominates.

THE FACULTY OF FIRMNESS, 312

Definition; What an excess or deficiency causes; Facial and
bodily signs ; Description of Firmness ; A receding chin an in-
dication of weakness ; The signs for Firmness observed all over .
the individual.



xiv CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

THE FACULTY OF ECONOMY, 318

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Economy ;
A normal degree of Economy indicates a normal or balanced
condition of mind ; Acquisitiveness not Economy.

LOVE OF HOME, 324

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Love of
Home ; This trait should be cultivated in children.

PATRIOTISM, . - 329

Facial and bodily signs ; Definition of Patriotism.

BENEVOLENCE, 335

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Benevo-
lence; Faculties in combination modify and influence this trait;
Difference between benevolence and friendship.

BlBATlVENESS, , . 339

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty indi-
cates ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Bibativeness ;
Situation of this sign most suggestive; Indicates the func-
tional purity of the entire organism.

ALIMENTIVENESS, OR DIGESTION, 348

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Alimentive-
ness ; The mouth by its shape and color gives the general tone
or grade of the individual.

AMATIVENESS, 355

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Amative-
ness ; Training in sexual morality ; Works that all young
people should read ; Signs for emotional traits found in the
glands and muscles, not the bones.

LOVE OF YOUNG, 367

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty may
lead to ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Love of
Young ; Should be balanced by reason and justice ; Does- not
necessarily impart a tone of kindness to the individual.

MlRTHFULNESS, 373

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description ; Mental uses
of Mirthfulness.

APPROBATIVENESS, . . . 378

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency indicates ; Facial
and bodily signs ; Description of Approbativeness ; Essential
to the success of some people.

FRIENDSHIP, . 385

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Friendship;
Selfish and unselfish friendship ; Friendship with fine inherited
quality shows a strong, magnetic nature ; Diverse manifesta-
tions of Friendship.



CONTENTS OF VOL. I. XV

HOSPITALITY, 392

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Hospitality.

PNEUMATIVENESS, . 397

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty may
lead to; Facial and bodily signs; Description of Pneumative-
ness ; The most essential factor is pure air ; Manifestations of
Pneumativeness ; Acuteness of scent; Great energy of mind
and body.

GLANDULAR AND ARTERIAL SYSTEM.
COLOR, 408

Definition ; Facial and bodiby signs ; Description of Color ; A
high cultivation of the color-sense a religious duty ; Aids
toward cultivating this sense ; What the color of the face reveals ;
Color-blindness.

SANATIVENESS, . . . . 427

Definition ; What a deficiency of this faculty leads to ; Facial
and bodily signs ; Description of Sanativeness ; One of the
normal and primitive functions ; Magnetic healers ; The faculty
of Sanativeness should be large in physicians ; Longevity of
life ; Facial signs that a good surgeon or physician should
possess.

SELF-ESTEEM, 436

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Self-esteem ;
Its relation to other faculties ; Self-assertion and Positiveness ;
The combination of Self-esteem with other faculties; What a short
upper lip. denotes.

MODESTY, 445

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Modesty ;
Blushing ; Downcast looks not an indication of Modest} 1 " ; Shy-
ness sometimes spelt " slyness."

FORCE, 454

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty leads
to ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Force ; Possessors
of round muscles are the most vigorous ; Children should be
thoroughly trained in gymnastics ; Force gives to the voice
clearness and resonance ; Color of great service in determining
what degree of force will be exhibited.

RESISTANCE, 463

Definition ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Resistance;
Sometimes takes the form of combativeness or contrariness ;
Mental resistance.

SECRETIVENESS, 469

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty leads
to ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Secret! veness ;
Physiological peculiarities of secretive men ; What deficiency
of faculties Secretiveness indicates ; This faculty large in priests
and physicians ; Characteristics of Secretiveness.



X vi CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

('A! Tlol SNKSS, . . 479

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty leads
to ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Cautiousness ; The
nose the principal sign ; Its connection with other faculties.

HOPE, . 486

Definition ; What an excess or deficiency of this faculty leads
to ; Facial and bodily signs ; Description of Hope ; Hygienic
remarks ; Its connection with and indication of the general con-
dition of the internal organs ; Temporary disorders of the liver ;
A clear, fresh-colored complexion.

ANALYSIS, ... . 493

Definition ; What a deficiency of this faculty indicates ; Fac-ial
and bodily signs; Description of Analysis; The capacity for
analyzing ; Large in all talented persons; Of great help in the
investigation of human character; Must be judged in combina-
tion with other faculties.

MENTAL IMITATION, . . 499

Definition ; What a deficiency of this facult}' indicates ; Facial
and bodily signs; Description of Mental Imitation; What is
the basis of supply of Mental Imitation ; All features subject
to the modifying action of the law of Quality ; Signs for literary
and artistic faculties grouped about the tip of the nose ;
Nosology ; Normal uses of Imitation.



Online LibraryMary Olmstead StantonA system of practical and scientific physiognomy; or, How to read faces .. (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 69)