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Vol. XIV December, 1966 No. 1



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7



lECElUD



4 Wt^



THE BULLETIN



School of Medicine
University of Nortfi Carolina



THE

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

ESTABLISHED THIS PLAN OF GROUP ACCIDENT AND

HEALTH PROTECTION FOR ITS MEMBERS IN 1940



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each




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Over
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The Bulletin

OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

Published in cooperation with the Whitehead Medical Society
and the Medical Foundation of North Carolina, Inc.



Vol. XIV



December, 1966



No. 1



IN THIS ISSUE

New Plasma Fraction 8

Whitehead Society Day 1

The Clinical Cancer Training Program 13

The Class of 195 6— 10-Year Report 16

First Year Class 17

Departing Faculty 25

Presenting the Faculty 27

Monroe's Marauders 29

Dr. Yamazuki on Parking 30



Editorial Committee



George D. Penick, M.D.

(UNC Med. '44) Chairman

Verne H. Blackwelder, M.D.
(UNC Med. '27)

Charles L. Herring, M.D.

(UNC Med. '5 5)
C. T. Kaylor, Ph.D.

John F. Lynch, Jr., M.D.
(UNC Med. '42)

W. W. McLendon, M.D.
(UNC Med. '56)

C. V. McMillan, M.D.



Isaac V. Manly, M.D.

(UNC Med. '44)
Isaac M. Taylor, M.D.

(A.B. UNC '42)
Shahane R. Taylor, Jr., M.D.

(UNC Med. '59)
B. R. Wilcox, M.D.

(UNC Med. '57)
James W. Woods, M.D.
Emory S. Hunt
Gordon B. LeGrand, M.D.

(UNC Med. '6 5)
Joel E. Rothermel

(UNC Med. '67)



Address all inquiries and communications to Emory S. Hunt, 119 MacNider
Building.

Published four times a year. Entered as third-class matter at the Post
Office at Chapel Hill. N. C.




UNC scientists who developed the new plasma fraction are (left to right) Dr.
Robert H. Wagner, Associate Professor of Pathology and Biochemistry, Dr.
Kenneth M. Brinkhous, Professor of Pathology, Dr. Harold R. Roberts, Associ-
ate Professor of Pathology and Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Dr. William
P. Webster, Assistant Professor of Pathology and Oral Pathology.



New Plasma Fraction

for Treatment of Hemophilia

A new plasma fraction representing a signijficant advance for the treat-
ment of hemophilia has been developed by a group of investigators here at the
School of Medicine.

The new fraction is a concentrate of antihemophilic factor prepared from
human plasma by use of an amino acid, glycine. It is being called Fraction AA
since an amino acid is used as a precipitating agent.

The new fraction offers great advantages over plasma or other readily
available fractions for the treatment of hemophilia. It is simple to prepare, as
only a single precipitating step is required. Also, it is stable and may be stored
for indefinite periods. The antihemophilic activity of a 500 cc. unit of blood
is contained in a volume of about 3 cc, thus permitting injection of large
doses of the antihemophilic factor without increasing plasma volume. This
obviates the hazard of hypervolemia attending the use of large volumes of
plasma.



The fraction was developed by four scientists, Drs. W. P. Webster, R. H.
Wagner, H. R. Roberts, and K. M. Brinkhous in the Pathology Laboratory at
North Carolina. Collaborating in scaling up the procedure to make the material
widely available was Dr. G. M. Thelin of Hyland Research Laboratories of
Los Angeles. Dr. Thelin, a hemophiliac himself, earned a Ph.D. in Biochemistry
from U.N.C. in 1960.

After safety tests had been passed and the Division of Biologic Standards
approved the IND application (Investigational Use of New Drug), the local
Clinical Research Unit Supervisory Committee approved the testing protocol.
Drs. Roberts and Webster by now have administered Fraction AA to a number
of bleeder patients who did not have the antihemophilic factor in their blood.
The average amount of fraction given was equivalent to eight liters of plasma.
Antihemophilic factor levels in the plasma have been elevated to normal and
maintained with repeated injections of the fraction.

Patients also have undergone surgical operations without excessive bleeding
after administration of the fraction. Even with large doses and repeated
injections, no untoward side effects have been noted.

The success of this fraction in stopping and preventing hemorrhage in
hemophiha was reported at the last meeting of the American Society of Hema-
tology in Philadelphia and more recently by Drs. Webster and Brinkhous in
Sydney, Australia and Edmonton, Canada. Investigators in other parts of the
United States have also tested the material developed here and have also reported
good results.



Dr. Harold Roberts prepares a vial of the fraction for administration to one
of the patients with classic hemophilia, tested as a volunteer during the initial
clinical studies. These studies were carried out in the Clinical Research Unit
of the N. C. Memorial Hospital (treatment room shown here). The Clinical
Research Unit played a vital role in the successful application of the fraction
to clinical use.







whitehead Society Officers and Representatives (left to right) : James Wallace,
Treasurer; John Thornburg; Robert Shcarin; Rudy Miiitz; Richard Fleming;
Joel Rothermel, President; David Rendlcman; Robert Whitley, Vice-President;
Roberta Williams, Secretary; Jerry Norton; Jim Goodwin.

Whitehead Society Day . . .
September 14, 1966

The formal phase of Whitehead Society Day was held in the medical school
auditorium and was presided over by Society President, Joel Rothermel. Follow-
ing announcement of scholarship winners by Dean Taylor, Dr. Louis G. Welt,
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine, delivered the White-
head Lecture entitled "The Art of Medicine." In the evening students and
faculty moved to Durham for a lively affair at Josh Turnage's which featured
an address by Dr. Robert A. Ross.

The scholarship winners (shown on the following pages) were as follows:
Gerald W. Blake received the Walter Reece Berryhill (Class '2 5) Scholarship,
established by the Medical Parents Club of U.N.C., awarded annually to a
rising senior on the basis of overall academic excellence since entering medical
school. The H. McLeod Riggins Scholarship, established by Dr. H. McLeod
Riggins (Class '22) of New York City, awarded annually" to a rising junior on
the basis of overall academic excellence during the preceding two years, was
received by Thomas L. Henley. Alumni Loyalty Fund Merit Awards established
by the School of Medicine with funds provided by its alumni are awarded
annually to two members each from the Senior, Junior, and Sophomore classes
on the basis of academic excellence for the preceding year. The senior recipients
were Jerry L. Norton and Barbara J. Parks. The junior recipients were Stephen
W. Young and Michael D. Lutz. The sophomore recipients were Henry M.
Middleton TIT and William T. Rowe.



10




Senior scholarship winners are (left to right ) Gerald W . Blake, Barbara J. Parks,
and Jerry L. Norton.



Sophomore scholar-
ship w i n n e r s are
William T. Kowe
(on the left) and
Henry M. Middle-
ton.




junior scholarship winners are (left to right) Stephen W. Young, Thomas L.
Henley, and Michael D. Lntz.



.^^




€ I '.'IZ




Dr. James H. Scatliff (left), recently appointed Professor and Chairman of the
Department of Radiology, reviews contrast studies of the upper gastrointestinal
tract with Dr. Oscar Sapp, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate
Director of the Clinical Cancer Training Program. Through its wide spectrum
of diagnostic and therapeutic tools, the Department of Radiology plays a vital
role in the Clinical Cancer Training Program.

At the present time the Research Fellows in the Training Program are (left to
right) Dr. Robert D. Croom from the Department of Surgery, Dr. Rudolph F.
Albert from the Department of Pathology, Dr. William A. Nebel from the
Department of Ob-Gyn, and Dr. Michael H. Temko from the Department of
Medicine.







Director of the Clinical Cancer Training Program is Dr. James F. Newsome,
Associate Professor of Surgery.

Inside N. C. Memorial Hospital . . .

The Clinical Cancer

Training Program

A program of patient care, teaching and research in cancer has existed at
the North CaroHna Memorial Hospital since the hospital opened in 1952. Under
the direction of Dr. James F. Newsome, Associate Professor of Surgery, the
program has shown steady growth since its inception. Special tumor clinics
have expanded with the hospital and a Cancer Registry has been maintained
on patients with malignant disease for 13 years. Approximately 8,000 patients
have been listed in the Registry during this time. Virgually all patients have
been followed to date or to death by clinic visit, a follow-up letter by the
referring physician, or by personal follow-up by Registry personnel.

This year the cancer program at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital
has begun an important phase of expansion. With a grant from the U. S.
Public Health Service, a formal Clinical Cancer Training Program has been

(Continued on page 21 }

13





Are you a young doctor cottsidering
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Deposited


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357.75


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411.00


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The Class of 1956-A 10-Year Report

A medical student cautioned the parents of medical students here on
Parents' Day that it may be unrealistic to think that a medical education is
completed in four years of medical school and a year of internship.

Joel E. Rothermel, now a senior at the University of North Carolina
School of Medicine, reported to the UNC Medical Parents Club at their annual
meeting on "Ten Years Later — A Report on the Class of 1956."

"By rough calculation," the parents were told, "the members of the
Class of 1956 have spent an average of seven and a half years in training
beyond the undergraduate level — that is, four years of medical school, one
year of internship and an average of two and a half years in residency.

"Three are still in training."

Rothermel reminded the parents that financing such a prolonged educa- •
tional program has always been a problem.

"A crude estimate of the average cost of medical school, internship and
residency, including subsistence, for the Class of 19 56 was about $18,800."

He said that questionnaires returned by the 1956 medical graduates here
did not show the exact sources of financing. But he said, three out of five of
the graduates had "significant educational indebtedness" when they completed
their training — ranging from $2,000 to $10,000.

"Six still owe the University for funds borrowed while they were stu-
dents here," he said.

Rothermel said that the Class of 1956 (selected because it was the first
class to receive the benefits of the UNC Medical Parents Club) upheld one
of the stated goals of the UNC medical school.

The goal he referred to is to provide physicians for North Carolina and
to increase both the quality and quantity of medical care in the state.

"Of the members of the Class of 1956," he reported, "only 10 — including
those in the military — do not live in North Carolina, and one of the non-
residents wants to return."

Other interesting facts gleaned from the medical students of 10 years ago:

""Sixty-five per cent of them planned to become general practitioners
(family physicians) , but only 24 per cent now are in general practice.

'■'Ninety-seven per cent of the class served in the armed forces or the
U. S. Public Health Service, most after receiving their medical degrees.

"At the time they graduated in 1956, about half of them were mar-
ried (compared, interestingly, to 65 per cent of married students in this
year's graduating class).

Rothermel concluded his report with the comment, "The years have been
kind to the members of the Class of 1956.

"Many of us feel that your support added in no small measure to the
success of this and subsequent classes."

16



University of North Carolina
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE



First-Year Class
1966-1967



Name


Undergraduate College


Residence


Allsbrook, William Calvin, Jr.


Duke


Clayton, N. C.


Almond, Charles Malcolm


U.N.C.


Red Springs, N. C.


Baggett, Henry Clifford


U.N.C.


Reidsville, N. C.


Bernstein, Jerry Charles


Duke


Wilson, N. C.


Blair, Robert Gillespie, Jr.


Davidson


Winston-Salem, N. C.


Boyles, Larry Wayne


U.N.C.


Hickory, N. C.


Browder, James Patterson, 111


U.N.C.


Chattanooga, Tenn.


Busby, Julian Goode


U.N.C.


Kannapolis, N. C.


Busby, William Jarvis


U.N.C.


Salisbury, N. C.


Byrd, William Eugene


U.N.C.


Mount Olive, N. C.


Cameron, Harold Harrington


U.N.C.


Broadway, N. C.


Chafetz, Neil


Cornell


Mt. Vernon, New York


Chang, Bruce Shoo-tang


Princeton


Raleigh, N. C.


Cohan, Robert Henry


U.N.C.


St. Petersburg, Fla.


Crocker, Daniel Lind


Davidson


Selma, N. C.


Crumley, Charles Edwin


U.N.C.


Chapel Hill, N. C.


Dance, Mary Dewey


U.N.C.


Fayetteville, N. C.


Davis, John Shuster


Amherst


Philadelphia, Pa.


Durana, Joan Christine


Duke


Winston-Salem, N. C.


Harp, Henry Shelton, IIT


Johns Hopkins


Baltimore, Maryland


Farmer, Pamela Ann


Mt. Holyoke


Chapel Hill, N. C


Freeman, Richard McConnell


N. C. State


Charlotte, N. C.


Goodman, Joseph Henry


U.N.C.


Leland, N. C.


Goodwin, James Oscar


U.N.C.


Apex, N. C.


Green, Stephen Lloyd


Pennsylvania


Brooklyn, New York


Gygi, Andrew Charles, Jr.


U.N.C.


Norfolk, Virginia


Hartness, John Frederick, Jr.


Davidson


St. Petersburg, Fla.


Henderson, Frederick Wayland


U.N.C.


Greensboro, N. C.


Herring, Mary Dawn


U.N.C.


Wilmington, N. C.


Hinkle, Robert Linville


U.N.C.


Charlotte, N. C.


Hooks, William Borden, Jr.


U.N.C.


Tarboro, N. C.


Howe, Donald Douglas


U.N.C.


La Grange, N. C.


Janis, Mark Gerson


Colgate


Brooklyn, N. Y.


Jenkins, James Jay


Duke


Greenville, N. C.


Kehayes, Alexander Ryland


Clemson

(Continued on page 20)
17


Edenton, N. C.



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Name

Koon, Crawford Bryan, Jr.
Kroncke, Frederick, George, Jr.
Lefler, Charles Deems
Leonard, John Richard, III
Lokey, Julian Lee, Jr.
McQueen, James Aubrey
Melton, James Durant
Moore, Michael Allan
Nelson, William Kolmer
Nicholson, Thomas Westray
Norfleet, Edwin Alvin
Oliver, George Motley, Jr.
Parker, Martha Elizabeth
Plenge, Richard Edward
Rendleman, David Atwell, III
Robert, Thomas Adams, Jr.
Roy, Subir

Rubin, Adrian Stevens, Jr.
Sherman, Morton Eugene
Sloan, James Boykin
Smithson, Kenneth William
Smithwick, James David
Suberman, Christine Oliver (Mrs.)
Suberman, Rick Ian
Sussman, Edward Bart
Thomas, Charles Carroll, II
Thompson, Charles Eugene
Underbill, Thurlow Reed
Vaughan, Ross Leroy, Jr.
Walker, Edwin Lance
Walton, Everette Joseph, Jr.
Weatherly, William Jesse
White, Gilbert Case, II
Winfield, Heber Gray, III
Winslow, James Elbert, Jr.
Zirkle, John William



(Continued from page 17)
Undergraduate College
Duke
Duke
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
Davidson
Davidson
U.N.C.
Wake Forest
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
Brown
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
St. John's
M.I.T.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
Rutgers
Wofford
A & T
Virginia
U.N.C.
Davidson
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
U.N.C.
Davidson
U.N.C.
Carson-Newman

20



Residence
Hickory, N. C.
Roanoke Rapids, N. C.
Chapel Hill, N. C.
Lexington, N. C.
Raleigh, N. C.
Laurinburg, N. C.
Glen Alpine, N. C.
Mt. Airy, N. C.
Clinton, N. C.
Rocky Mount, N. C.
Goldsboro, N. C.
Gary, N. C.
Asheville, N. C.
Lenoir, N. C.
Salisbury, N. C.
Lexington, Kentucky
Chapel Hill, N. C.
Greensboro, N. C.
Memphis, Tenn.
Wilmington, N. C.
Southern Pines, N. C.
Morehead City, N. C.
Raleigh, N. C.
Raleigh, N. C.
Park Ridge, New Jersey
Hickory, N. C.
Rocky Mount, N. C.
Matthews, N. C.
Nashville, N. C.
Raleigh, N. C.
Forest Park, Georgia
Washington, N. C.
Durham, N. C.
Washington, N. C.
Hurdle Mills, N. C.
Jefferson City, Tenn.




A lighter moment in the Ob-Gyn Tumor Clinic is enjoyed by the patient, Dr.
Edgar Douglas, resident in Ob-Gyn (seated on the left) and Artan Davidian,
senior student.

(Continued from page 13)
initiated. Under the direction of Dr. Newsome, the program will utilize a
multidisciplinary approach to early diagnosis, up-to-date therapy, and periodic
follow-up of patients with cancer. This program will offer to afflicted per-
sons the best possible chance for curative therapy and will offer to practicing
physicians and trainees both diversified and specific training in the manage-
ment of malignant disease. Although the etiology of cancer is not yet known,


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Online LibraryMedical Foundation of North CarolinaThe bulletin of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina [serial] (Volume 14 (1966-1967)) → online text (page 1 of 11)