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DOX. 90/

>el Hill, N. C.



3547 Requested



GARL NORRIS PATTERSON. K.D



Sec. 34-65{e) P.L. & R.
U. S. Postage

PAID

CHAPEL HILL. N. C.
Permit No. 24




OF The University of North Carolina School of Medicine




■^mmmmmmm^



To Members of the Medical Society of Ihe Stale of North Carolina




^^ cia^e a^ cfacctfr^OHC . . .



TELEPHONE COLLECT
5-5341 - DURHAM

If you have any prob-
lems in connection with
disability insurance we
invite you to call this *
office collect. We'll do
our best to help you —
and there is no obliga-
tion on your part.

Below is the accident and health
plan established by the state
society for its members in 1940.

PLANS AVAILABLE



Accidental Dismemberment Accident and
Death Benefits, Up to Sickness Benefits



Annual Semi-Annual
Premium Premium



$5,000.00


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($433.00 per month)


172.00


86.50



Members under age 60 may apply for $10.00 per day extra for hospitali-
zation at premium of only $20.00 annually, or $10.00 semi-annually.



For Application or Further Information Write or Call

J. L. Crumpton, State Mgr.

Professional Group Disability Division
BOX 147, DURHAM, N. C.



Representing — Commercial Insurance Company of Newark, N. J.



"When I retire,
I want to go back to Chapel Hill to Live."




HAVE YOU EVER SAID
THAT?

Every month alumni and

friends do come back to

Chapel Hill — buy a

home — and settle

here.

When you get ready to do
that — Let us find for
you just the home you
need.



Service Insurance & Realty Company

Insurance, Property Management, Real Estate



Collier Cobb, Jr., President
106 Henderson Street

chapel hill, n. c.
Telephone No. 8472



— At the same location for 27 years —



LIFE

INSURANCE
TAKES THE



OUT OF




HOME SECURITY

Life Insurance Company



HOME OFFICE

Bascom Baynes, President



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA
George Watts Hill, Chairman of the Board







7-1 «, - ■< -wv




A Pleasant Inn



Of A Great University



In A Good Toivn



A good place to stay, to dine, to entertain or just to visit and enjoy
the congenial homelike atmosphere. For your convenience and
pleasure we offer clean and comfortable guest rooms, appetizing and
wholesome food in our main dining room — The Hill Room — and in
our cafeteria. Private dining rooms are available for parties, ban-
quets, meetings and dances.

You Are Invited To Hospitable

Carolina Inn

Owned and Operated by the University of North Carolina



GLEN LENNOX

Truly a Good Place to Live

And a Good Place to Shop

LENNOX DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Glen Lennox Raleigh Road-U.S. 54

Rental Office Phone 2367



Harris, Upham & Co,

MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
AND OTHER LEADING SECURITY AND COMMODITY EXCHANGES



To Help Vou






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Invest Wisely



TELEPHONE 5103
TRUST BUILDING

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Main Office
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Representatives



CARL M. SMITH
(Chapel Hill)



C. RUSSELL REYNOLDS



THE BULLETIN

of the School of Medicine

in cooperation with the Whitehead Society

and the Medical Foundation

of the University of North Carolina

Vol. IV April, 1957 No. 4

IN THIS ISSUE

A Message from The Dean 7

Ad Infinitum 8

The Class of 1957 H

Epistola Ad Fredericum Wellmanum Magnum 19

The Doctor at the Bedside 22

Presenting the Faculty 26

Alumni Notes 27

Editorial 5 5

FRONT COVER — Clini Wilson and Joel Connor are pictured getting into a
state car as they prepare to call on their Home Care patient — an integral part
of their General Clinic teaching program.

The Home Health Service program is designed to let the senior student care
for one or more chronically ill patients in their homes. For the most part these
patients suffer from severe, long term illnesses and live under adverse socio-
environmental surroundings so that their care challenges the physician con-
siderably.



Editorial Committee

ERNEST CRAIGE, A.B. ('39) M.D., JOHN CHAMBLISS, M.D. ('43)

Chairman HUGH HEMMINGS, M.D. ('54)

FRED W. ELLIS, M.D. ('48) EMORY S. HUNT

WILLIAM H. SPRUNT, M.D. ROBERT BROWN ('59)

WARNER L. WELLS, M.D. REBECCA BUCKLEY ('58)

W. REECE BERRYHILL, M.D. ('25) JAMES FRESH ('57)

GEO. L. CARRINGTON, M.D. ('18) ELIZABETH VANCE ('60)

GILMER MEBANE, M.D. ('39) BENSON R. WILCOX ('57)



Address all inquiries and communications to Emory S. Hunt, 117 Medical
Science Building— or Box 957, Chapel Hill, N. C.

Published jour times a year — October, December, February and April —
Entered as third-class matter at the Post Ojjice at Chapel Hill, N. C.



I




it has been our pleasure

to serve the University

and all of its divisions

since 1899



THE BANK OF CHAPEL HILL



GLEN LENNOX



CHAPEL HILL



CARRBORO



Member F.DJ.C.



3^55^5:555;q;S:3^5:5^5G55;555555S55^^^



A Message from the Dean

The sincere congratulations of the Medical Faculty to the class of 19 57!
In the number of sixty your freshman year began with the senior year of the
class of 1954, the first class to graduate in the expanded Medical School of the
University of North Carolina. Thus the four-year cycle of the first medical
school generation here is completed.

As you have developed in the first portion of your medical education the
School has concurrently grown in stature. Through your conscientious efforts
and your fine attitude displayed in the laboratories, on the wards, and in the
clinic you have made important contributions to the reputation and the
tradition of the University Medical School. For this we will always be grateful.

As you become alumni in various communities in various branches of
medicine I hope you will remember that the faculty have a continuing interest
in your professional development and in your careers. I hope you will remember
too that as expensive as your undergraduate medical education has been for
you and your families, the State through the University has paid by far the
larger portion of the actual cost. You have an opportunity and an obUgation
to repay this debt in both financial and spiritual ways over the years ahead by
helping to maintain ever higher standards — ever better facilities for those who
come after you.

The needs for physical and functional expansion of the Medical School are
so great and so acute that continuing efforts on the part of alumni and friends
are necessary unless we are to fall behind in the maintenance of present stand-
ards of excellence in teaching, research, and patient care. The recently
announced substantial addition to the endowment funds of privately supported
medical schools by the Ford Foundation points up the fact that unless alumni
and friends of the State Universities come to their support in terms of demand-
ing larger appropriations from the State, the plight of the publicly supported
medical schools will worsen. We will count on your support in educating the
public in this respect, as well as in the more technical aspects of your pro-
fession. This, as in every other profession, is a continuing process and eternal
vigilance must be exercised.

Gratefully and Sincerely,

W. R. BerryhiU, M.D.
Dean



Ad Infinitum

DEDICATION

The ensuing paragraphs are respectfully dedicated to the memhers of
the class of 1957, who, not unlike their predecessors will, in time, seek to
relive the four years now nearing their end.

Verily, there is much left unsaid. It is our fond hope that perhaps a
decade from now these pages may yet he in your possession, and as they
are re-read, afford you the infinite pleasure found in memories.

One wonders who would care to relive the 4th of September,
1953 when a ghastly green group of some 60 entered their "brave
new world." And, as fate would have it, the period of indoctri-
nation reminded one of learning to swim by being thrown in— ^
anatomy. One entered the laboratory expecting to be confronted
by an array of cadavers, only to face a bulletin board. One by
one they filed in, timidly peeking around this bulletin board,
daintily admiring each specimen with wan face — occasional brave
utterances — too dreadfully frightened to become ill.

Upon the scene came Van Cleave, devouring each with a
glance. His "cervical" antics at first brought titters, later gales
of laughter, and became the model of many a mimic.

Then there was histology. Endless hours of gazing into the
wee world of the yet inanimate — immersion oil consumed by the
gallon. The mitochondria and Golgi network yet unseen. Coffee
breaks every five minutes, interspersed liberally with witty
words of wisdom by one Dr. Hooker. His staccato speech still
rings in our ears, his adrenocorticoids still in the realm of the El
Dorado.

And what of embryology and the venerable Dr. George.
That peaceful gentleman who forever preached the importance
of the origin of the unknown and the blessings of the "good old
intrauterine days."

Those first 3 months of our medical lives — never to be for-
gotten, yet who would care to relive them. With each day, with
each origin and insertion, with each intricate mnemonic of mem-
ory we fancied ourselves as undergoing a magnificent meta-
morphosis — men from boys — culminating in December with
examinations, cramming, diarrhea, et al.

We entered physiology and "neuro" with somewhat more
confidence than the previous quarter — just as ignorant but infin-
itely more cocky. It was in that winter session we surveyed the
world of the Betz cell under the keen eye of Lionel Truscott,
part-time anatomist, full-time sportsman. It was then too that



we entered the renal cult of "Daddy Hiatt" that bearded veteri-
narian, and his "hirsute" friend, Dr. Miller; and "bloody" Dr.
Ferguson. Who can forget that magnificent moment, the grandi-
ose medical milestone, when some of the students discovered that
one kymographically inclined dog was gravid, performed the most
unsterile Caeserean yet conceived, and received their first lesson
in unsuccessful resusitation, and the shy recipient of Dr. Hiatt's
annual furlined prize for the finest graph.

Then there was biochemistry, which smacked strangely of
undergrad chemistry — we had not yet escaped it. The boiling
Kjeldahls, the wholesale urine collections, the weeklong diets, the
horse hemoglobin of Dr. Irvin. The quiz almost everyone flunked
twice. All this interspersed with more anatomy-relations, courses;
if you can't find it, look in the waste can, if it's not there make
one — the midnight oil of the horrible orals. We had made our
bed, we now lay writhing in it.

But, this too passed — on into the spring — warm, inviting —
ever in agonizing competition with physiology and biochemistry.
That dark, slanting lecture hall filled with a lethargic bunch —
only the seats preventing total hypnosis, only visions of the sum-
mer preventing total psychosis.

Most returned in September, 1954, having spent the summer
in anything but medicine, avowing to be more dedicated this year,
to ease up on the wine, women, and song. Some had taken this
avowal to extremes and returned deeply enmeshed in matrimony.

We had heard of Brinkhous, Graham and Loring, but rumors
forever run rampant in places as this. Alas, our worst fears were
quickly confirmed, for the pathologists, in their fiendish manner,
had concocted a unique antisedative — asking questions — a most
disrupting 8 A.M. influence. But for 6 months we endured this
"micromania" of anaplasia, unknowns, and inflammatory
responses. We Hterally blundered through biostatistics, in a per-
petual fog of chi square. No sooner out of the frying pan than
into the fire of bacteriology. Each day we emerged from the lab,
hands replete with gram stain and agar, reams of notes, and
corynebacteria. We swabbed painstakingly each orifice and are
yet amazed at the creatures contained within.

Thence to pharmacology, the kingdom of salvarsan, opium
and penicillin — lorded over by Doctors Czasky and Butler. All
hail to barbiturate, the panacea of mankind — damned the
dosages, full speed ahead. And ahead we went, through the spring,
headlong into the comprehensives, the now infamous and defunct
system of examinations, designed by masters of sadism to test



quality of one's most primitive reflexes — abdominal and cremas-
teric.

For two years we had gazed with envy and anticipation at
those in white, who inhabited the tiled halls of the tower of ivory.
We had known of this locale only by the proximity of the coffee
shop. 'Twas in the fall of '5 5 that we donned the spotless suits
of white, equipped with tubes and tourniquets, hammers and
flashlights and set out to save lives. At last — medicine. But
where? — CBC's and urines, chemistries and LE Preps — bleed them
blind! Change dressings, longer writeups, give fluids — this is
medicine? Those bright faces, this burning ambition, those suits
of white are no more — iii their stead are a pitifully paranoid pack.
If perchance you should observe cowering in the darkest corners,
of the hospital a gaunt creature in an off-white, too short outfit,
mumbling fitfully to himself of "hierarchy," "damned intern,"
or "bloody bunch," this, by gad, is a 3rd year student. Deft with
an idiot stick, amazing with the needle, and totally off and out
of balance. Fearful of naught but the "steely thumb of blue." A
psychiatrist not by choice, yet endowed with the omnipotent
realization that he is the biggest "crock" of them all. And some-
where amid the hostility there was room for learning. And how
we learned. By the end of year three, we became ever more keenly
aware of just how ignorant we were.

And now the 4th year is nigh over. This, the year of out-
patients and obstetrics, of urology and Lumberton, of internships
and free nights. There were moments when we truly "played
doctor." Recall the normal spontaneous delivery, the abated
ulcer, the diagnosed murmur, the deftly referred neurotic.

It would seem apropos at this point to emote with some
worldly remark stolen from the sages. None seems forthcoming,
for such phrases always carry with them an air of finality. Unlike
the past, there is no finality to the future. It proceeds ... ad
infinitum.



Monogram Club Dining Room

Reasonable Prices
Regular Meal a la cart-e

Serving Hours
Lunch: 12:00-2:00 — Dinner: 5:30-7:30

— Air -Condi Honed —



10



The Class of 1957



JOSEPH JETHRO ALLEN: "Joe"— Joe
is 2 5 years of age and lives
in Greensboro, N.C. Receiv-
ed his B.S. in Medicine at
UNC in 19 54. AKK. After a
one year rotating internship
at Roper General Hospital,
Charleston, S.C., and military
service, Joe plans to do gen-
eral practice.




ERNEST HYDE BROWN, JR.: "Itchy"

is 2 5 years of age, from Ivan-

^^^ hoe, N.C. Received his B.S.

■^^^^\ in biology and chemistry at

H_ ^ Davidson College. Phi Chi.

Wife, Sue. No children. After

^JH^^ ' Jj^ a rotating internship at Roper

^■^lll*'^^^ in Charleston, S.C. and mili-

^■/AmH tary service, Ernest plans to

do general practice in Eastern N.C.



LYNDON U. ANTHONY: 23 years of
age, from Greensboro, N.C.
Lyndon completed his under-
graduate training at UNC
and the first two years of
Medical School at the Uni-
versity of Tennessee before
returning to UNC for the
completion of his medical
traming. Phi Chi. Wife, Aggie. No chil-
dren. Lyndon is planning a career in sur-
gery and will do a surgical internship at
Barnes Hospital in Saint Louis, Mo.




JAMES HENRY BURRUS: Jim is 24
years of age, from Moores-
ville, N.C. He attended Mars
Hill Junior College and re-
ceived his B.S. in medicine at
UNC in 19 54. Phi Chi. Wife,
Sikes. One son, Jimmy. After
a rotating internship at Rex
Hospital, Raleigh, N.C, Jim
plans an Ob-Gyn residency and eventually
hopes to practice in Western N. C.




FRANCIS




practice
Medicine.



NORMAN BOWLES, JR.:
"Norm" is 26 years of age,
from Durham, N.C. Received
his A.B. degree in chemistry
at UNC in 19 5 3. Phi Chi.
Single. Plans general rotating
internship at Grady in At-
lanta, Ga. In the future
Norm plans to do private
North Carolina in Internal



JAMES ROBERT CLAPP: Jim is 2 5 years
of age, from Siler City, N.C.
Received his undergraduate
training at Duke University
before coming to UNC. Phi
Chi. Wife, Janet. No chil-
dren. Jim will be going to
Dallas, Texas, this summer
where he will have a straight

medicine internship at Southwestern.




HAROLD JOHN BRADLEY: 2 3 years
of age, from Greensboro,
N.C. Received his B.S. in
medicine at UNC in 1954.
I ^ J Wife, Mary. No children.
►• J| AKK, Alpha Omega Alpha.
y^-^m John plans to go into urology
^H and will have a straight urol-
a^H ogy internship at Johns Hop-
kins in Baltimore, Md.




ROBERT SEITZ CLINE: Bob is 24 years
of age, from Hickory, N.C.
Received his B.S. in Medicine
at UNC in 19 54. AKK. Wife,
Martha. No children. Bob will
have a rotating intc;"nship at
Roper in Charleston, S.C. He
plans to do general practice
in North Carolina.




11



LUTHER HALL CLONTZ: Luke is 24
years of age, from Morgan-
ton, N. C. Received his B.S.
Degree in medicine from
UNC in 1954. Phi Beta
Kappa. Wife, Ruth. Son,
Geoffry. He will have a
rotating internship with the
Navy and will be stationed in

Charleston, S. C. He eventually plans to

do general practice.




GEORGE SADLER EDWARDS: 29 years
, of age from Rocky Mount,
N. C. He has a B.S. degree
in business from Davidson
College. Phi Chi. Junior
Class President. Wife, Kathy.
Three children, George Jr.,
Nancy, EUzabeth. George is
going into surgery and will

intern at UNC.




JOEL DEWITT CONNER: Joel is 23
years old, from Lincolnton,
N. C. He received his B.S.
degree in medicine at UNC
in 19 54. Phi Chi. Wife,
Nancy. No children. After
a rotating internship at Roper
in Charleston, S. C. and
service, he plans to either go

into Ob-Gyn or do general practice.




THOMAS ALBERT FARMER, JR.: Al

is 2 5 years old from Smith-
field, N. C. Attended David-
son College and received a
B.S. in Medicine at UNC in'
1954. Phi Chi. Phi BetaJ
Kappa. Wife, Nancy. N9;
children. Al will go to the;
University of Alabama where!

he will do a straight medicine internship.

He plans a career in Internal Medicine.




WILLIAM POWELL CORNELL: Bill is

2 5 years of age, from Char-
lotte, N. C. He has an A.B.
in chemistry from UNC.
Phi Chi. Wife, Dorothy. Son,
Parker. Bill will be going to
Baltimore, Md., where he will
do a straight surgical intern-
ship and continue on into a
surgical residency.




JOHN KIRBY FARRINGTON: John is
2 5 from Thomasville, N. C.
Undergraduate training at
Duke University. Phi Chi.
Wife, Frances. No children.
He will intern at Fort Ben-
ning Army Hospital. His
future plans are at present
undetermined.




GORDON CAMERON CROWELL: Gus

is 24 years of age, from Lin-
colnton, N. C. Received his
B.S. in medicine from UNC
in 19 54. Phi Chi. Wife,
Frances. Son, Tommy. He
will go to Grady Memorial
Hospital in Atlanta where he
will do a straight medicine
internship. After service and residency in
medicine he hopes to practice in Lincoln-
ton.




ERIC LINDSAY FEARINGTON: Lind-
say is 2 5 years of age fronr
Winston-Salem, N. C. B.S!
in Medicine at UNC in 1954i
Phi Beta Kappa. Wif
Delores (Dee). No children
Plans his internship at Park
land Memorial Hospital
Southwestern School of Medi
cine, U. of Texas, Dallas, Texas. Afte:
service and a year of residency he plan
general practice in North Carolina.




12





JAMES WILLIAM FRESH: Jim is 31 and
comes from Hickory, N. C.
He has an A.B. from Lenoir
Rhyne College and an M.S.
from UNC. Single. Sigma
Xi, Elisha Mitchell Society,
AKK. Plans a pathology
internship at UNC to be
followed by a residency in

pathology. He is interested primarily in

Hematology and Ob-Gyn.

JAMES BUN Y AN GLOVER: Jim is 2 5
years of age from Nashville,
N. C. Received his B.S. in
Medicine at UNC in 1954.
Phi Chi. Wife, Harriet. No
children. He v^ill do a medi-
cal internship at Vanderbilt
University. He is undecided
about his future plans.

JULIUS ALPHEUS GREEN, JR.: Julius
is 2 5 and comes from
Thomasville, N. C. Received
his B.S. in Medicine at UNC
in 19 54. Phi Chi, Phi Beta
Kappa. Wife, Pearl. Daugh-
ter, Jane. Will have a
straight medicine internship
at UNC and plans to go into

Internal Medicine.

STEPHEN THOMAS GUPTON, JR.:
Gup is 26 and comes from
Rocky Mount, N. C. At-
tended State College and
received A.B. degree from
UNC in 195 3. Phi Chi,
AOA. Wife, Helen. No
children. Will intern at Iowa
State University. After serv-
ice, he plans to do a residency in Medicine.

JAMES GRAYSON HALL: Gray is 27.
From Danbury, N. C.
Received A.B. in Chemistry
from UNC, Phi Chi. Wife,
Julia. No children. Will do
a rotating internship at City
Hospital in Winston-Salem,
N. C. Plans to do general
practice after service.








LOIS THELMA HARRIS: Lois is from
Valdese, N. C. She has an
A.B. and M.A. in Zoology.
Single. After a rotating
internship at Brooklyn Hos-
pital, Brooklyn, N. Y., she
plans a residency in Pathol-
ogy-

BENNETT ALLEN HAYES, JR.: Ben-
nett is 26 years old and comes
from Durham, N. C.
Received his A.B. at UNC in
1952. Phi Chi. Wife, Mary
Evelyn. No children. He
will do an internship at the
University of Arkansas. His
future plans are undecided
but he is considering a residency in Ob-
Gyn.

JACK BROWN HOBSON: "Hicky" is
2 5 years of age from Char-
lotte, N. C. Received his
B.S. degree from Davidson
College. Phi Chi. Jack plans
to marry Eutha Sharpe of
Harrelsville, N. C, early
in June. He will do a rotating
internship at the University

of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He plans

to go into Internal Medicine.

JAMES PAUL HURST, JR.: Paul is 2 5
years old from Charlotte,
N. C. Received his A.B.
degree from UNC, 195 3. Phi
Chi. Single. He will do a
rotating internship at Jeffer-
son Medical College in Phil-
adelphia, Pa. His future plans
are undecided.

HELEN BLANCHE HUTCHINS: Helen
is 24 and comes from Yad-
kinville, N. C. She received
her A.B. degree from
WCUNC in 195 3. Single.
After a rotating internship at
University Hospital in
Augusta, Georgia, she plans
general practice in N. C.






13





GEORGE LEE IRVIN III: "Bucky" is 26
years of age from Winston-
Salem, N. C. Received a B.S.
degree from Davidson Col-
lege in 195 3. Phi Chi. Single.
Will intern at UNC in sur-
gery. After service and sur-
gical residency he will prac-
tice in N. C.



HARRY LESTER JOHNSON, JR.:

Harry is 27 and comes from
Elkin, N. C. Received his
undergraduate training at
Guilford College in Greens-
boro, N. C. Vice President
and Corresponding Secretary
of AKK. Wife, Jeane. Son,
Harry IIL Will do a rotating
internship at Rex Hospital in Raleigh,
N. C. He plans to do general practice in
Greensboro, N. C.



THOMAS MILTON JOHNSON: Tom is
24 years old from Clayton,
N. C. Received B.S. degree
from UNC in Medicine in
19 54. Phi Beta Kappa.
Single. After a rotating
internship at the Medical Col-
lege of Virginia in Richmond,
Va., he plans general practice

in Eastern N. C.



WILLIAM OSBORNE JONES: Bill is 24
and comes from Henderson,
N. C. Received his under-
graduate training at Duke
University. Honor Council.
Wife, Frances. No children.
He will do a Pediatric intern-
ship at Johns Hopkins in
Baltimore, Md., followed by

a pediatric residency and military service.







BILL GAM FAT JUNG: Bill is 26 years
of age from Charlotte, N. C.
He received his undergrad-
uate training at UNC. Phi
Chi, Phi Beta Kappa. Bill will
wed Ruby McElheny of S. C.
shortly after graduation. He
will do a straight surgery
internship at Bellevue Hos-
pital, N 1 C, and plans to do a surgery
residency.

RICHARD V. LILES, JR.: Dick is 2 5
from Wadesboro, N. C. He
received his B.S. degree from
Davidson College in 195 3.
President of Phi Chi. Single.
After a rotating internship
at the University of Alabama
and service he plans to do
general practice in Piedmont

N. C.

GERALD THOMAS McMAHON: Jerry
is 2 5 years of age from Ashe-
ville, N. C. He received his
B.S. degree in Medicine from
UNC in 1954. Phi Chi, Phi
Beta Kappa. Wife, Patricia.
Son, Robert. Will do rotating
internship at Rex Hospital in
Raleigh, N. C, followed by

a residency in Ob-Gyn and military service.

DONALD EDWARD MITCHELL: Don
is 2 5 from Ahoskie, N. C.
Received B.S. in Medicine at
UNC in 1954. Phi Chi.
Single. After rotating intern-
ship at D. C. General Hos-


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Online LibraryMedical Foundation of North CarolinaThe bulletin of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina [serial] (Volume 5 (1957-1958)) → online text (page 1 of 15)