Miller & Richard (Firm).

Printing type specimens, comprising a large variety of book and jobbing faces, borders and ornaments online

. (page 1 of 20)
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SPECIMENS OF



PRINTING!

.^ 5r









TYPE






MILLER & RICHARD

EDINBURGH AND LONDON



EX L1BRIS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA





JOHN HENRY NASH LIBRARY

<> SAN FRANCISCO <8>

PRESENTED TO THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

ROBERT GORDON SPROUL, PRESIDENT.

BY~ *

MR.ANDMRS.MILTON S.RAY
CECILY, VIRGINIA AND ROSALYN RAY

AND THE

RAY OIL BURNER COMPANY




riii lii



PRINTING TYPE



SPECIMENS



COMPRISING A LARGE VARIETY OF

BOOK AND JOBBING FACES, BORDERS

AND ORNAMENTS.




MILLER & RICHARD



EDINBURGH:
Rcikie's Court, Nicolson Street.

Telegraphic Address : "Richard."
Telephone No. 656.



LONDON :
Water Lane, Ludgate Hill.

Telegraphic Address: "Pica" (Cent.)
Telephone Not. ion and ioi> City.



^



14th OCTOBER, 1918. Subject to alteration without notice. All previous Lists Withdrawn.

Miller & Richard's Revised Price List.

(PRICES PER LK.)



CLASS A (Book and News Founts).

Complete Founts, Roman or Italic, including Spaces and Quads.




CLASS B.




CLASS C.


POINT BODIES


Small
Founts
& Sorts.


601


120 Ib.


240 lb.


500 lb.
and
above.


POINT BODIES


Small
Founts.


60 lb. | 120 lb.
Including Spa


2*0 lb.
:es and Q


500 lb.
lads.


POINT BODIES


Small
Founts.


60 lb.


96 to 72 Point


s. d.

3 3


s. rf.

2 8


S. rf.

2 8


. d.

2 8


s. d.

2 8


96 to 72 Point


V d


s- ll


> ii


s. d.


?. il


96 to 72 Point


s. ,/.

4 2


s. d.

3 6


3 5


2 10


2 9


2 9


2 9


60 to 48 Point


3 5


2 10


2 9


2 8


2 8




60 to 48 Point


3 9


3 2


3 1


2 11


2 10




60 to 48 Point


5 1


4


42 to 24 Point


3 9


3 2


3 1


2 10


2 9




42 to 24 Point


4 2


3 7


3 6


3 2


3




42 to 24 Point


5 10


4 8


18 to 14 Point


4 2


3 7


3 6


3 3


3




18 to 14 Point


4 6


3 11


3 10


3 6


3 3




18 to 14 Point


6 5


5


12 Point


4 4


3 9


3 8


3 5


3 2




12 Point


4 8


4 1


4


3 8


3 5




12 Point


6 9


5 4


11 Point


4 6


3 11


3 10


3 7


3 4




11 Point


5 1


4 5


4 4


4


3 9




11 Point ....


7 2


5 8


10 Point


4 8


4 1


4


3 9


3 6




10 Point


5 3


4 7


4 6


4 2


3 11




10 Point


7 6


6


9 Point


5


4 5


4 4


4 1


3 10




9 Point


5 8


4 11


4 10


4 6


4 3




9 Point


8


6 6


8 Point


5 3


4 7


4 6


4 3


4




8 Point


5 10


5 1


5


4 8


4 5




8 Point


8 5


6 10


7 Point


5 10


5 1


5


4 8


4 5




7 Point


6 5


5 7


5 6


5 1


4 9




7 Point


9 2


7 6


6J Pt. (EmYldrt
6 Point }


6 9


5 11


5 10


5 5


5 1




64 Pt. (EmYld)\
6 Point /


7 6


6 6


6 5


6


5 8




64 Pt. (EmYIdA
6 Point /


11


9


Ruby-Nonp.
5.\ Point (Ruby)
5 Point


7 8
8 3
9 9


6 9
7 3
8 7


6 8
7 2
8 6


6 2
6 8
7 11


5 9
6 3
7 5




Ruby-Nonp.
54 Point (Ruby)
5 Point


8 8
9 2
11


7 6
7 11
9 6


7 5
7 10
9 5


6 11
7 4

8 10


6 6
6 11

8 4




Ruby-Nonp.
54 Point (Ruby)
5 Point


12 7
13 6
16


10 6
11 4
13 6


44 & 4 Point


12 9


11 3


11 2


10 5


9 9




4i & 4 Point


14 3


12 5


12 4


11 7


10 11




44 & 4 Point


21


18



CLASS D.




CLASS E.




QUADS (2 to 4 ems).


POINT BODIES


Small
Founts.


60 lb.




POINT BODIES


Small
Founts.


30 lb.




POINT BODIES


Less than
1 cwt.


1 cwt. and
above.


96 to 72 Point


s. d.

4 2


s. d.

3 8




96 to 72 Point


s. d.

7 8


s. d.
1 2




96 to 72 Point*


i. d.
1 4


s. d.

1 2


60 to 48 Point


5 8


5 2




60 to 48 Point


8 8


8 2




60 to 48 Point*


1 4


1 2


42 to 24 Point


6 8


6 2




42 to 24 Point


9 8


9 2




42 to 24 Point*


1 4


1 2


18 to 14 Point


7 2


6 6




18 to 14 Point


10 4


9 8




18 to 14 Point


1 7


1 4


12 Point


7 8


7




12 Point


11 2


10 6




12 Point ....


1 8


1 5


11 Point


8 2


7 6




11 Point


12


11 4




11 Point ....


1 9


1 6


10 Point


8 8


8




10 Point


12 8


12




10 Point


1 11


1 7


9 Point


9 2


8 6




9 Point


17 8


17




9 Point


2


1 8


8 Point


9 8


9




8 Point


18 8


18




8 Point


2 1


1 9


7 Point


10 8


10




7 Point


20 8


20




7 Point


2 3


1 11


64 Pt. (EmYldfl
6 Point /


12 8


12




6J Pt. (EmYld)l
6 Point /


24 8


24




64 Pt. (Em'r'ld)\
6 Point )


2 8


2 4


Ruby-Nonp.


14 8


14




Ruby-Nonp.










Ruby-Nonp.


3


2 8


54 Point (Ruby)


15 8


15




54 Point (Ruby)










54 Point (Ruby)


3 2


2 10


5 Point


18 8


18




5 Point










5 Point


3 9


3 5


44 & 4 Point


24 8


24




4J & 4 Point










4J & 4 Point


4 11


4 6



SPACES (Em to Hair).


POINT BODIES


Less than
1 cwt.


I cwt.
and above.


96 to 72 Point


s. d.

1 6


s. d.
1 4


60 to 48 Point


2 6


2 4


42 to 24 Point


2 8


2 6


18 to 14 Point


2 10


2 8


12 Point


3


2 10


11 Point


3 2


3


10 Point


3 5


3 2


9 Point


3 7


3 4


8 Point


3 9


3 6


7 Point


4 2


3 9


64 Pt. (Em'r'ld))
6 Point ]


5


4 6


Ruby-Nonp.


5 8


5 3


54 Point (Ruby)


6


5 7


5 Point


7 2


6 9


4J & 4 Point


9 5


9



* Quotations.



LEADS, CLUMPS,


METAL FURNITURE AND


QUOTATIONS.


LEADS
(full lengths)
3 Point
2 Point
14 Point ....
1 Point


Small
Weights.


Icwt.


s. d.

1
1 4
1 9
2 3


s. d.

10
1 2
1 5
2 1


CLUMPS


1


10


METAL FURNITURE ....


1 2


1 1


QUOTATIONS


1 2


1 1


Leads and Clumps cut to sizes, Jd. per lb. extra.
Clumps under 7 ems as quadrats.
Nicking charged according to time.


NO SURCHARGE.



BORDERS, INITIALS, Etc.



BORDERS 10 Point and smaller
are priced under Class C ; Larger
Bodies, 7/6 per lb. Combination
Borders and Ground Borders, 7/6
per lb.

CHEQUES, 7/6 per lb.



For Complete Price List of Borders,
Initials, &c., see next page.



FOR CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE FACES
SEE OPPOSITE PAGE.



7 6



MUSIC (Sol-fa).

10 Point

9 Point ................ 8

8 Point ................ 8 5

6 Point _ ... 11



MUSIC (Old Notation).

Ruby, 12/- Quads, 3/-

Pearl Diamond, 14/2 ,, 4/-

Gem, 18/8 ,, 5/-



r than Romans} cast on Old Sadies are charged 25% extra.



FOUNTS CLASSED FOR PRICE LIST.



, . \-^.

Albion B
Antiques, Nos. i, 7, 8, la,

15, 1 6 and 17 _. B

Antique, Nos. 6 and 14.... C
Antique Condensed, No. 1 3 C

Antique Italic _ B

Black, No. a ._. ._ C

Bohemian ._ C

Bold Edina C

Bold Italic ._. . B

Bold Tudor Black _ .... C

Caledonian Italic C

Canterbury Text . C

Commercial Script E

Edina . . C

Edina Condensed D

Egyptian ._ B

Egyptian Expanded B

Grange ._ D

Grange Expanded C

Greek ._. C

Grotesque, Nos. i, 2, 4,

6, 8 and 10 B

Grotesque, Nos. 3, 5 and 7 C

Grotesque, No. 4 Italic.... B

Grotesque, No. 10 Italic B

Half Fractions E

Ionic, Nos. i, 2 and 3 .... B

Ionic Expanded C

Jacobite B

Lothian ._ C

Montrose B

Music Sol-fa C

Oceanic . C

Old Style Grotesque .... B



, I \x-.

Old Style Grotesque Cond. B

Olivian _ B

Ornamented _ C

Ornamented Titling .... C

Poynder B

Poynder Bold B

Poynder Expanded B

Poynder Italic C

Pretorian C

Reading C

Sans-serif, Nos. i, 3, 4,

6, 7 and 8 C

Sans-serif, No. 5 B

Sans-Serif I talic C

Script, No. 3 E

Signs C

Superiors C

Titling, 2-Line C

Trajan B

Trajan Condensed C

Trajan Bold B

Trajan Bold Condensed.... B

Tudor Black C

Tudor Bold C

Tudor Black Italic C

Type-Writer B

Worcester B

Zephyr D

BORDERS

Combination, Nos. 20,

*2i and 22 7/6

Fontaine ._ 7/6

*Herrick 7/6

Raphael 7/6

Bohemian, Set A, B, C

and E 7/6

Bohemian, Set D .... 7/6



BORDERS continued

Verona . 7/6

Poynder ._ 7/6

Card Border, 12 Point 7/6

it ii ** it o/O

6 ll/-

4 .. 21/-

3 .. 211-

No. 60, 36 Point .... 7/6

,, 63, 36 7/6

,, 73. 36 ,, 7/6

,, 62, 30 ,, 7/6

ii ?' 24 M - 7/6

,, 72, 24 .. 7/6

., 39. >8 - 7/6

,, 59. > 8 .. 7/6

,. 61, 18 7/6

,, 64, 1 8 ,, 7/6

74. ' .. 7/6

76, 18 7/6

36, 12 . 7/6

,, 40, 12 ,, . 7/6

37. 8 8/5

4'. 8 8/5

38, 6 , ll/-

,. 42. 6 ,, . ll/-
CLUNV BORDERS
No. 78, 18 Point 7/6

Nos. 81 and 85 18 7/6

No. 79 12 7/6

Nos. 82 and 86 12 7/6
Nos. 83, 87, 89,

91 and 93 6

No. 80 6

Nos. 84 and 88 4



Nos. 90, 92 and 94 6



III-
III-
211-



COM* for IhcM Burden, ia/-.

Body and Jobbing Founts supplied at prices reduced on account of weight (except 60 Ib. Founts of Classes C and D faces, and
30 Ib. Class E faces) are charged 6d. per Ib. extra if proportion of Spaces and Quads not included in Founts.

Spaces and Quads are sent with all Founts unless otherwise ordered. Founts cast on larger than own Bodies, charged according
to Face.

Sorts and additions to 120 Ib. Founts and upwards, all Classes, supplied at current Fount price if ordered within Three Months
from delivery of Fount.

Words only, double price. Accented sorts supplied to many of our Jobbing Series at a small extra charge.

Railway Carriage paid on Orders to the value of 5 and upwards. Full price allowed for returned Type Boxes, and half price
for returned Crates, if received in good condition.

OLD TYPE, Etc. Government Prices and Terms.

OLD BODIES. All founts (other than Romans) ca*it on old bodies are charged 25 per cent, extra.

When ordering additions and sorts, a pattern type of each fount required should be forwarded with order. A capital H and

lowercase m. as little used as possible, are the best to send.
TERMS. 5 per cent Discount for Cash ; or on approved Current Accounts of Three Months, if paid in January, April, July.

and October. ALL OTHER SETTLEMENTS NET.



MILLER & RICHARD, KDINIII RI.H AND LONDON.



INDEX TO TYPES AND BORDERS.



Accents, Signs, &c.
Albion



ANTIQUES

Antique, No. 1

Antique, Old Style, No. 6

Antique, Old Style, No. 7

Antique, No. 8

Antique, No. 12 ....

Antique, No. 14 ....

Antique, No. IS ....

Antique, No. 16

Antique, No. 17 ....

Antique, Old Style Italic

Antique Condensed, No. 13

Antique Fractions
BLACKS

Black, No. 2

Canterbury Text

Tudor Black

Tudor Black Italic
Bohemian

Bold Italic

BORDERS

Bohemian, and Ornaments

Card Nos. 1 to 35

Cluny Borders

Fontaine

Herrick

Poynder, and Ornaments

Raphael

Verona

No. 20

No. 21

No. 22

Nos. 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42

Nos. 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 and 64

Nos. 71, 72, 73, 74 and 76
Caledonian Italic
Chess and Draughtsmen ....
Edina

Edina Bold ....
Edina Condensed ....

Egyptian ...;

Egyptian Expanded

Electros

Figures

Fractions, &c.

Grange

Grange Expanded ....

Greek

GROTESQUES

Grotesque, No. 1

Grotesque, No. 2

Grotesque, No. 3

Grotesque, No. 4

Grotesque, No. 5

Grotesque, No. 6

Grotesque, No. 7



PAGE

391-394
212

125

44-45
98-105
110-113
108-109
292-293
126-127
128-130

131

106-107
114-115

379

358-359
360-361
362-363
364-365
313-316
369

414
415

421-422

407-408

402-404

419

409-411

405-406

413

401

412

416-417
420
418
368

374-375

278-279

282-285

280-281

116-118

118a-119

463-512

380-390

379

286-287

288-289

372

226-227
212

196-197
223-225
194-195
218-219
192-193



GROTESQUES continued

Grotesque, No. 8

Grotesque, No. 10

Grotesque, No. 4 Italic

Grotesque, No. 10 Italic

Old Style Grotesque

Old Style Grotesque Condensed

Initials

IONICS

Ionic, No. 2

Ionic, No. 3

Ionic Expanded

Jacobite ....

Lothian
Montrose



PAGE

... 210-211

... 214-217

... 220-222

213

... 198-199

200

... 513-515

... 123-124

... 120-122
290

132-133

... 134-135

... 334-335
Newspaper and Magazine Column Headings 50-53

Oceanic 291

Olivian 294-295

Poynder 296-297

Poynder Bold 298-300

Poynder Expanded 302-303

Poynder Italic 301

Pretorian 310-311

Reading 304-305

ROMANS (MODERN)

Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, 19,

20, 23, 24, 28, 30, 31, 33 and 34 20-43

ROMANS (OLD STYLE)

Old Style 1-8

Old Style, No. 4 9-11

Old Style, No. 5 12

Old Style Italic 14-15

Old Style No. 4 Italic .... 13

Old Roman, No. 3 .... 16-19
SANS-SERIFS

Sans-serif, No. 1 204

Sans-serif, No. 3 .... 201-203

Sans-serif, No. 4 190-191

Sans-serif, No. 5 .... 205-207

Sans-serif, No. 6 .... 188-189

Sans-serif, No. 7 208-209

Sans-serif, No. 8 187

Sans-Serif Italic 186
SCRIPTS

Script, No. 3 366-367

Commercial Script . .... . 367

Script Dashes 376

Time-Table Figures .... 54-55

Titlings 46-49

Tonic Sol-Fa Music 371

Trade Marks, &c. 373

Trajan 317-322

Trajan Condensed . .... .... 322 A-C

Trajan Bold 323-328

Trajan Bold Condensed 329-332

Type Writer 370

Worcester 306-309

Zephyr 312



OLD STYLE.



48 POINT.



IN ANCIENT times
the usual methods
of making a copy
from written liter-

PRINTERS



36 POINT.



IN ANCIENT times the usual
method of making a copy of
a written literary production
consisted, simply, in writing
it over again. It was a slow

CALIGRAPHY



MII.I.KR ,^ RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



30 POINT.



IN ANCIENT times the ordinary
method of making a copy of a
written literary production con-
sisted, simply, in writing it over
again. It was a slow and costly
process, and the copies were not
always perfect reproductions or

MODERN DESIGN



24 POINT.



IN ANCIENT times the usual method of
making a copy of written literary pro-
ductions consisted, simply, in writing
them over again. It was a tedious and
costly process, and the copies were not
always perfect reproductions or correct
transcriptions of the originals. Those
manuscripts which have come down to

PRACTICAL PRINTING



MII.LKR & RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



18 POINT.



WAVERLEY riding post, as was the usual cus-
tom of the period, without any adventure save
one or two queries, which the talisman of his
passport sufficiently answered, reached the bor-
ders of Scotland. Here he heard the tidings of
the decisive battle of Culloden. It was no more
than he had long expected, though the success
at Falkirk had thrown a faint and setting gleam
over the arms of the Chevalier. Yet it came
upon him like a shock, by which he was for a
time altogether unmanned. The generous, the
courteous, the noble-minded Adventurer, was
then a fugitive, with a price upon his head ; his
adherents, so brave, so enthusiastic, so faithful,
were dead, imprisoned, or exiled. Where, now,
was the exalted and high-souled Fergus, if, in-
deed, he had survived the night at Clifton ?-
where the pure-hearted and primitive Baron of
Bradwardine, whose foibles seemed foils to set
off the disinterestedness of his disposition, the
genuine goodness of his heart, and his unshaken
courage? Those who clung for support to these
fallen columns, Rose and Flora, where were
they to be sought, and in what distress must not
the loss of their natural protectors have involved
them ? Of Flora he thought with the regard of
a brother for a sister of Rose, with a sensation



MILLER & RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



14 POINT.

WAVERLEY riding" post, as was the usual fashion of the
period, without any adventure save one or two queries,
which the talisman of his passport sufficiently answered,
reached the borders of Scotland. Here he heard the tid-
ings of the decisive battle of Culloden. It was no more
than he had long expected, though the success at Falkirk
had thrown a faint and setting gleam over the arms of
the Chevalier. Yet it came upon him like a shock, by
which he was for a time altogether unmanned. The gen-
erous, the courteous, the noble-minded Adventurer, was
then a fugitive, with a price upon his head ; his adherents,
so brave, so enthusiastic, so faithful, were dead, im-
prisoned, or exiled. Where, now, was the exalted and
high-souled Fergus, if, indeed, he had survived the night
at Clifton ? where the pure-hearted and primitive Baron
of Bradwardine, whose foibles seemed foils to set off the
disinterestedness of his disposition, the genuine goodness
of his heart, and his unshaken courage ? Those who
clung for support to these fallen columns, Rose and Flora,
where were they to be sought, and in what distress
must not the loss of their natural protectors have involved
them ? Of Flora he thought with the regard of a brother
for a sister of Rose, with a sensation yet more deep and
tender. It might be still his fate to supply the want of
those guardians they had lost. Agitated by these thoughts
he precipitated his journey. When he arrived in Edin-
burgh, where his inquiries must necessarily commence,
he felt the full difficulty of his situation. Many inhabi-
tants of that city had seen and known him as Edward
Waverley ; how, then, could he avail himself of a pass-
port as Francis Stanley ? He resolved, therefore, to avoid
all company, and to move northward as soon as possible.
He was, however, obliged to wait a day or two in expec-
tation of a letter from Colonel Talbot, and he was also to
leave his own address, under his feigned character, at a



MILLER & RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



WAVERLEV riding post, as was the usual fashion of the period,
without any adventure save one or two queries which the talisman
of his passport sufficiently answered, reached the borders of Scot-
land. Here he heard the tidings of the decisive battle of Cul-
loden. It was no more than he had long expected, though the
success at Falkirk had thrown a faint and setting gleam over the
arms of the Chevalier. Yet it came upon him like a shock, by
which he was for a time altogether unmanned. The generous, the
courteous, the noble-minded Adventurer, was then a fugitive, with
a price upon his head ; his adherents, so brave, so enthusiastic, so
faithful, were dead, imprisoned, or exiled. Where, now, was the
exalted and high-souled Fergus, if, indeed, he had survived the
night at Clifton ? where the pure-hearted and primitive Baron of
Bradwardine, whose foibles seemed foils to set off the disinterest-
edness of his disposition, the genuine goodness of his heart, and
his unshaken courage ? Those who clung for support to these
fallen columns, Rose and Flora, where were they to be sought,
and in what distress must not the loss of their natural protectors
have involved them ? Of Flora he thought with the regard of a
brother for a sister of Rose, with a sensation yet more deep and
tender. It might be still his fate to supply the want of those

Kuitai. guardians they had lost. Agitated by these thoughts, he pre-
cipitated his journey. When he arrived in Edinburgh, where his
inquiries must necessarily commence, he felt the full difficulty of
his situation. Many inhabitants of that city had seen and known
him as Edward Waverley ; how, then, could he avail himself of a
passport as Francis Stanley ? He resolved, therefore, to avoid all
company, and to move northward as soon as possible. He was,
however, obliged to wait a day or two in expectation of a letter
from Colonel Talbot, and he was also to leave his own address,
under his feigned character, at a place agreed upon. With this
latter purpose he sallied out in the dusk through the well-known
streets, carefully shunning observation, but in vain : one of the
first persons whom he met at once recognised him. It was Mrs
Flockhart, Fergus Mac-Ivor's good-humoured landlady. ' Gude
guide us, Mr Waverley, is this you? na, ye needna be feared for
me I wad betray nae gentleman in your circumstances. Eh,
lack-a-day ! lack-a-day ! here's a change o' markets ! how merry
Colonel Mac- Ivor and you used to be in our house?' And the



Mll.LKR & RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



ii POINT.

Solid. WAVKRLEY riding post, as was the usual fashion of the period,

without any adventure save one or two queries, which the talisman of
his passport sufficiently answered, reached the borders of Scotland.
Here he heard the tidings of the decisive battle of Culloden. It was
no more than he had long expected, though the success at Falkirk
had thrown a faint and setting gleam over the arms of the Chevalier.
Yet it came upon him like a shock, by which he was for a time alto-
gether unmanned. The generous, the courteous, the noble-minded
Adventurer, was then a fugitive, with a price upon his head ; his
adherents, so brave, so enthusiastic, so faithful, were dead, imprisoned,
or exiled. Where, now, was the exalted and high-souled Fergus, if,
indeed, he had survived the night at Clifton ? where the pure-hearted
and primitive Baron of Bradwardine, whose foibles seemed foils to set
off the disinterestedness of his disposition, the genuine goodness of
his heart, and his unshaken courage ? Those who clung for support
to these fallen columns, Rose and Flora, where were they to be
sought, and in what distress must not the loss of their natural pro-
tectors have involved them ? Of Flora he thought with the regard
of a brother for a sister of Rose, with a sensation yet more deep and
tender. It might be still his fate to supply the want of those guard-
ians they had lost. Agitated by these thoughts, he precipitated his
journey. When he arrived in Edinburgh, where his inquiries must

Leaded, necessarily commence, he felt the full difficulty of his situation.
Many inhabitants of that city had seen and known him as Fdward
Waverley ; how, then, could he avail himself of a passport as Francis
Stanley ? He resolved, therefore, to avoid all company, and to move
northward as soon as possible. He was, however, obliged to wait a
day or two in expectation of a letter from Colonel Talbot, and he
was also to leave his own address, under his feigned character, at a
place agreed upon. With this latter purpose he sallied out in the
dusk through the well-known streets, carefully shunning observation,
but in vain : one of the first persons whom he met at once re-
cognised him. It was Mrs Flockhart, Fergus Mac-Ivor's good-hum-
oured landlady. ' Gude guide us, Mr Waverley, is this you ? na,
ye needna be feared for me I wad betray nae gentleman in your
circumstances. Eh, lack-a-day ! lack-a-day ! here's a change o' mar-
kets ! how merry Colonel Mac-Ivor and you used to be in our house?'
And the good-natured widow shed a few natural tears. As there
was no resisting her claim of acquaintance, Waverley acknowledged
it with a good grace, as well as the danger of his own situation.
' As it's near the darkening, sir, wad ye just step in by to our house



MIU.KR & RICHARD.



OLD STYLE.



10 POINT.

Solid. WAVERLKY, riding post, as was the usual fashion of the period, without

any adventure save one or two queries, which the talisman of his passport
sufficiently answered, reached the borders of Scotland. Here he heard the
tidings of the decisive battle of Culloden. It was no more than he had long
expected, though the success at Falkirk had thrown a faint and setting gleam
over the arms of the Chevalier. Yet it came upon him like a shock, by
which he was for a time altogether unmanned. The generous, the courteous,
the noble-minded Adventurer, was then a fugitive, with a price upon his
head ; his adherents, so brave, so enthusiastic, so faithful, were dead, im-
prisoned, or exiled. Where, now, was the exalted and high-souled Fergus,
if, indeed, he had survived the night at Clifton ? where the pure-hearted
and primitive Baron of Bradwardine, whose foibles seemed foils to set off the
disinterestedness of his disposition, the genuine goodness of his heart, and
his unshaken courage ? Those who clung for support to these fallen columns,
Rose and Flora, where were they to be sought, and in what distress must
not the loss of their natural protectors have involved them ? Of Flora he
thought with the regard of a brother for a sister of Rose, with a sensation
yet more deep and tender. It might be still his fate to supply the want of
those guardians they had lost. Agitated by these thoughts, he precipitated
his journey. When he arrived in Edinburgh, where his inquiries must
necessarily commence, he felt the full difficulty of his situation. Many in-
habitants of that city had seen and known him as Edward Waverley ; how,
then, could he avail himself of a passport as Francis Stanley ? He resolved,
therefore, to avoid all company, and to move northward as soon as possible.

i .eaJed. He was, however, obliged to wait a day or two in expectation of a letter from
Colonel Talbot, and he was also to leave his own address, under his feigned


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