Miller & Richard (Firm).

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fenced ; as to the rest, the
few strips of level ground
which lie by the side of a
brook, exhibit a poor crop



22 MILLER & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.



24 POINT, No. 3.



AROUND the house, which stood on an
eminence in the midst of this narrow
Highland valley, there appeared none
of that attention to comfort, far less
to ornament and decoration, which is
usually found surrounding any gentle-
man's residence. An enclosure or two,
divided by dry-stone walls, were the
only part of the domain that was seen
to be fenced ; as to the rest, the level
ground which lay by the side of the
brook exhibited a scanty crop of corn,
liable to continual depredations from
the herds of wild ponies and black
cattle that grazed upon the adjacent
hills. These ever and anon made an
incursion on the arable ground, which
was repelled by the loud, unfamiliar,
and dissonant shouts of half a do/en
Highland swains, all running as if they
had been mad, and every one hallooing
a half-starved dos to the rescue of the



MII.I.KR & RICHARD. 23



MODERN ROMANS.



18 POINT, N .Solid and Leaded.

AROUND the house, which stood on an emi-
nence in the midst of a narrow Highland
valley, there appeared none of that attention
to convenience, far less to ornament and
decoration, which usually surrounds a gentle-
man's mansion. An enclosure or two, divided
by dry-stone walls, were the only part of the
domain that was fenced ; as to the rest, the
narrow slips of level ground which lay by the
side of the brook exhibited a scanty crop of
barley, liable to constant depredations from
the herds of wild ponies and black cattle
that grazed upon the adjacent hills. These
ever and anon made an incursion upon the

arable ground, which was repelled by the
loud, uncouth, and dissonant shouts of half
a dozen Highland swains, all running as if
they had been mad, and every one hallooing
a half-starved dog to the rescue of the forage.
At a little distance up the glen was a small
and stunted wood of birch ; the hills were
high and heathy, but without any variety
of surface ; so that the whole view was wild
and desolate, rather than grand and solitary.
Yet, such as it was, no genuine descendant
of Ian nan Chaistel would have changed the
domain for Stow or Blenheim. There was a



24 MILLER & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.



18 POINT, No. 8. Solid and Leaded.

AROUND the house, which stood on an emi-
nence in the midst of this narrow Highland
valley, there appeared none of that attention
to convenience, far less to ornament and deco-
ration, which miwlly surrounds a gentleman's
habitation. An inclosure or two, divided by
dry-stone walls, were the only part of the
domain that was fenced ; as to the rest, the
narrow slips of level ground which lay by the
side of the brook exhibited a scanty crop of
barley, liable to constant depredations from
the herds of wild ponies and black cattle that
grazed upon the adjacent hills. These ever
and anon made an incursion upon the arable

ground, which was repelled by the loud, un-
couth, and dissonant shouts of half-a-dozen
Highland swains, all running as if they had
been mad, and every one hallooing a half-
starved dog to the rescue of the forage. At
a little distance up the glen was a small and
stunted wood of birch ; the hills were high
and heathy, but without any variety of surface ;
so that the whole view was wild and desolate,
rather than grand and solitary. Yet, such as
it was, no genuine descendant of Ian nan
Chaistel would have changed the domain for



MILLER & RICHARD. 25



MODERN ROMANS.



14 POINT, No. 12. Solid and Leaded.



FROM the minuteness with which I have traced
Waverley's pursuits, and the bias which these
unavoidably communicated to his imagination, the
reader may perhaps anticipate, in the following
tale, an imitation of the romance of Cervantes.
But he will do my prudence injustice in the sup-
position. My intention is not to follow the steps
of that inimitable author, in describing such total
perversion of intellect as misconstrues the objects
actually presented to the senses, but that more
common aberration from sound judgment, which
apprehends occurrences indeed in their reality, but
communicates to them a tincture of its own romantic
tone and colouring. So far was Edward Waverley
from expecting general sympathy with his own
feelings, or concluding that the present state of

things was calculated to exhibit the reality of those
visions in which he loved to indulge, that he dreaded
nothing more than the detection of such sentiments
as were dictated by his musings. He neither had
nor wished to have a confidant, with whom to com-
municate his reveries ; and so sensible was he of
the ridicule attached to them, that, had he been to
choose between any punishment short of ignominy,
and the necessity of giving a cold and composed
account of the ideal world in which he lived the
better part of his days, I think he would not have
hesitated to prefer the former infliction. This secrecy
became doubly precious, as he felt in advancing life
the influence of the awakening passions. Female



26



MII.I.ER & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.



14 POINT, No. 10. Solid and Leaded.




FROM the minuteness with which I have traced






Waverley's pursuits, and the bias which these






unavoidably communicated to his imagination,






the reader may perhaps anticipate, in the follow-






ing tale, an imitation of the romance of Cervantes.






But he will do my prudence injustice in the sup-






position. My intention is not to follow the steps






of that inimitable author, in describing such total






perversion of intellect as misconstrues the objects






actually presented to the senses, but that more






common aberration from sound judgment, which






apprehends occurrences indeed in their reality,






but communicate* to them a tincture of its own






romantic tone and colouring. So far was Edward






Waverley from expecting general sympathy with






his own feelings, or concluding that the present






state of things was calculated to exhibit the reality






of those visions in which he loved to indulge,






that he dreaded nothing more than the detection






of such sentiments as were dictated by his musings.






He neither had nor wished to have a confidant,






with whom to communicate his reveries ; and so






sensible was he of the ridicule attached to them,






that, had he been to choose between any punish-






ment short of ignominy, and the necessity of






giving a cold and composed account of the ideal






world in which he lived the better part of his






days, I think he would not have hesitated to






prefer the former infliction. This secrecy became






doubly precious, as he felt in advancing life the







MILLER >t RICHARD.



27



MODERN ROMANS.



30 POINT, No. i.



AROUND the house, which
stood on an eminence in
the midst of a Highland
valley, there appeared to
be none of that attention
to convenience, far less to
ornament and decoration,
which usually surrounds a



24 POINT, No. 5.



Around the house, which stood on
an eminence in the midst of this
beautiful Highland valley, there
appeared none of that attention
to comfort, far less to ornament
and decoration, which is usually
found surrounding a gentleman's
habitation. An inclosure or two,
divided by dry-stone walls, were
the only part of the domain that



28 MILLER & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.



18 POINT, No. 10. Solid and Leaded.

AROUND the house, which stood on an
eminence in the midst of a narrow High-
land valley, there appeared to be none of
that attention to convenience, far less to
ornament and decoration, which usually
surrounds a gentleman's habitation. An
inclosure or two, divided by dry-stone
walls, were the only part of the domain
that was fenced ; as to the rest, the long
strips of level ground which lay by the
side of the brook exhibited a poor crop
of barley, liable to constant depredations
from the herds of wild ponies and black
cattle that grazed upon the surrounding

hills. These ever and anon made an in-
cursion upon the arable ground, which
was repelled by the loud, uncouth, and
dissonant shouts of several Highland
swains, all running as if they had been
almost mad, and every one hallooing an
under-fed dog to the rescue of the forage.
At a little distance up the glen was a
small and stunted wood of birch ; the
hills were high and heathy, but with-
out any variety of surface ; so that the
whole view was wide and very desolate,



MILLER it RICHARD. 29



MODERN ROMANS.




EARLY in the morning they were again mounted, and on the road to Edin-
burgh, though the pallid visages of some of the troop betrayed that they
had spent a night of sleepless debauchery. They halted at
Linlithgow, distinguished by its ancient palace, which, Sixty
Years since, was entire and habitable, and whose venerable
ruins, not quite Sixty Years since, very narrowly escaped the unworthy fate
of being converted into a barracks for French prisoners. May repose and
blessings attend the ashes of the patriotic statesman, who, amongst his last
services to Scotland, interposed to prevent this profanation ! As they ap-
proached the metropolis of Scotland, through a champaign and cultivated
country, the sounds of war began to be heard. The distent, yet distinct
report of heavy cannon, fired at intervals, told Waverley that the work of
destruction was going forward. Even Balmawhapple was moved to take
some precautions, by sending an advanced party in front of his troop, keeping
the main body in tolerable order, and moving steadily forward. Marching in




KAKI.Y next morning they won 1 again mounted,
anil on the road to Kdinburgh. though the
pale visages of some of the
troop lietrnyed that they
Inul spent the night in de-
bauchery. They halted tit
Linlithgow, distinguished by its ancient pnlnee,
which. Sixty Years since, was entire and hahit-
ahle, and whose venerahle ruins, not quite
Sixty Years sinee, very narrowly escaped the
unworthy fate of Inking converted into a bar-
racks for French prisoners. Alay repose and
Messing attend the ashes of the patriotic states-
man, who, amongst his last services to Scot-
land, inter[>osed to prevent this profanation !
As they approached the capital of Scotland,
through a champaign and cultivated country,
sounds of war began to lie heard. The distant,
yet distinct report of heavy cannon, tired at
intervals, told Waverley that the work of




destruction was going forward. Kven lialma-
whapple wan moved to take some precautions,
by Bending an advanced
|irty in front of his troop,
keeping the main Ixidy in
giMxl order, and moving
steadily forward. Marching in this manner
they very quickly reached an eminence, from
which they could view Kdinlmrgh stretching
along the ridgy hill which slopes eastwards
from the Castle. The latter, Iwing in a stage
of siege, or rather of blockade, by northern
insurgents, who had already occupied the town
for two or three days, fired at intervals upon
such parties of Highlanders as expOMQ them-
selves, cither on the main street, or elsewhere
in the vicinity of the fortress. The morning




this manner they very quickly reached an eminence, from which they could
view Edinburgh stretching along the ridgy hill which slopes eastward
from the Castle. The latter, being in a stage of siege, or
rather of blockade, by the northern insurgents, who had
already occupied the town for two or three days, fired at
intervals upon such parties of Highlanders as exposed themselves, either
on the main street, or elsewhere in the vicinity of the fortress. The
morning being calm and fair, the effect of this dropping fire was to invest
the Castle in wreaths of smoke, the edges of which dissipated slowly in
the air, while the central veil was darkened ever and anon by fresh clouds
poured forth from the battlements ; the whole giving, by the partial con-
cealment, an appearance of grandeur and gloom, rendered more terrific
when Waverley reflected on the cause by which it was produced, and that
each explosion might ring some brave man's knell. Ere they approached



30



MILI.KR & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.




EARLY in the morning they were again mounted, and on the road to Edinburgh, though
the pallid visages of some of the troop betrayed that they had spent a night of sleepless
debauchery. They halted at Linlithgow, distinguished by its ancient
palace, which, Sixty Years since, was entire and habitable, and whose
venerable ruins, not quite Sixty Years since, very narrowly escaped
the unworthy fate of being converted into a barracks for French prisoners. May
repose and blessings attends the ashes of the patriotic statesman, who, amongst his last
services to Scotland, interposed to prevent this profanation ! As they approaced the
metropolis of Scotland, through a champaign and cultivated country, the sounds of war
began to be heard. The distant, yet distinct report of heavy cannon, fired at intervals,
told Waverley that the work of destruction was going forward. Even Balmawhapple
was moved to take some precautions, by sending an advanced party in front of his
troop, keeping the main body in tolerable order, and moving steadily forward. Marching
in this manner they very quickly reached an eminence, from which they could view
Edinburgh stretching along the ridgy hill which slopes eastward from the Castle. The
latter, being in a stage of siege, or rather of blockade, by the northern insurgents,




KARLY next morning they were again mounted,
and on the rood to Edinburgh, though the pale
visages of some of the troop
betrayed that they had spent
a night of delwuchery. They
halted at Linlithgow, distin-
guished by its ancient palace,
which, Sixty Years since, was entire and habit-
able, and whose venerable ruins, not quite Sixty
Years since, very narrowly escaped the unworthy
fate of l>eing con verted into a t>arracks for French
prisoners. May repose and blessings attend the
ashes of the patriotic statesman, who, amongst his
last services to Scotland, interposed to prevent
this profanation ! As they approached the capital
of Scotland, through a champaign and cultivated
country, sounds of war l>egan to l>e heard. The
distant, yet distinct report of heavy cannon, fired
at intervals, told Waverley that the work of de-
struction was going forward. Kven lialmawhapple
was moved to take some precautions, by sending
an advanced party in front of his troop, keeping
the main Ixxly in tolerable order, and moving




steadily forward. Marching in this manner they
very quickly reached an eminence, from which
they could view Edinburgh
stretching along the ridgy
hill which slopes eastwards
from the Castle. The latter,
lieing in a stage of siege, or rather of blockade,
by northern insurgents, who had already occu-
pied the town for two or three days, fired at
intervals upon such parties of Highlanders as
exposed themselves, either on the main street,
or elsewhere in the vicinity of the fortress. The
morning lading calm and fair, the effect of this
dropping tire was to invest the Castle in wreaths
of smoke, the edges of which dissipated slowly
in the air, while the central veil was darkened
ever and anon by fresh clouds jxmred forth from
the battlements ; the whole giving, by the. partial
concealment, and appearance of grandeur and




who had already occupied the town for two or three days, tired at intervals upon
such parties of Highlanders as exposed themselves, either on the main street, or
elsewhere in the vicinity of the fortress. The morning being calm
and fair, the effect of this dropping tire was to invest the Castle
in wreaths of smoke, the edges of which dissipated slowly in the
air, while the central veil was darkened ever and anon by fresh clouds poured
forth from the battlements ; the whole giving, by the partial concealment, an appear-
ance of grandeur and gloom, rendered more terrific when Waverley reflected on the
cause by which it was produced, and that each explosion might ring some brave
man's knell. Ere they approached the city, the partial cannonade had wholly ceased.
Balmawhapple, however, having in his recollection the unfriendly greeting which his
troop had received from the battery at Stirling, had apparently no wisli to tempt
the forbearance of the artillery of the Castle. He therefore left the direct road, and
sweeping considerably to the southward, so as to keep out of the range of the cannon,
approached the ancient palace of Holyrood, without having entered the walls of the



MILLKK & RICHARD.



31



MODERN ROMANS.



EAIU.Y in the morning they were again
mounted, HIM! on the road to Edinburgh,
though the pallid visages
of some of the troop
betrayed that they luul
spent a night of sleepless
debauchery. They halted at Linlithgow,
distinguished by its ancient palace, which,
Sixty Years since, was entire and habitable,
and whose venerable ruins, not quite Sixty
Years since, very narrowly escaped the




EAKLY in the morning? they were a^ain mounted, and on the road to
K'linliin -h. though the pallid visages of some of the troops Itetrayed
that they had spent a ni^ht of sleepless de-
liauehery. They halted at Linlithjfow, dis-
i iii-ui-li. tl by its ancient |talace, which. si\I\
Years since, was entire and habitable, and
whose venerable ruins, not quite Sixty Years
since, very narrowly esrajH-d the unworthy

fate of tain}? converted into a larracks for Pencil prisoners. May
repose ami blessings attend the ashes of the patriotic statesman, who,
amongst his last services to Scotland, interposed to prevent this
profanation ! As they approached the capital of Scotland, through




a champaign and cultivated country, the sounds of war tH'iran to lie
heard. The distant, vet distinct raport of heavy cannon, fired at
intervals, told Wavertey that the work of destruction was -uin-
forward. Even Italmawhapple was moved t take some precaution*,
by sending an advanced {tarty in front of his troop, keeping the main
liody in tolerable order, and moving steadily forwanl. Marching in
this manner they very quickly reached an eminence, from which they
could view Edinburgh stretching alom/ the ridjry hill which slopes
eastward from the Castle. The latter, lieimf in a stajre of siejfe, or
rather of blockade, by the northern insniyentJ*. who hod already
occupied the town for two or three days, fired at frequent intervals.



unworthy fate of )>eing converted into a
barracks for French prisoners. May re[H>se
and blessing attend the ashes of the patriotic
statesman, who, amongst his last services to
Scotland, interposed to prevent this profana-
tion ! As they approached the metropolis
of Scotland, through a champaign and culti-
vated country, the sounds of war l>egan to
be heard. The distant, yet distinct report
of heavy cannon, fired at intervals, told
Waverley that the work of destruction was
going forward. Even Balmawhapple
was moved to take some precautions,
by sending an advanced party in front
of his troop, keeping the main body in
tolerable order, and moving steadily
forward. Marching in this manner
they very quickly reached an emi-
nence, from which they could view
Edinburgh stretching along the ridgy
hill which slopes eastward from the
Castle. The latter, being in a stage
of siege, or rather of blockade, by the
northern insurgents, who luul already
occupied the town for two or three
days, fired at intervals upon such par-
ties of Highlanders as were exposed.




The morning bein^ calm ami fair, the effect of this dropping fire,
was to invest the Castle in wreaths of smoke, the edjres of which
dissi)>ated slowly in the air, while the cen-
tral veil was darkened ever and anon by
fresh clouds poured forth from the battle-
nients ; the whole >rivintf, by the partial
concealment, an appearance of grandeur
and ^l<>m, rendered more terrific when Waverley refleeU-d on the
cause by which it was produced, and that each explosion mi- lit
ringf some brave man's knell. Hre they approached the city, the
p:\rtiul cannonade had wholly ceased. Halmawhapple, however,
having in his recollection the unfriendly ^reetin^ which his troop
had received from the lottery at Stirling, had apjiarently no wish
to tempt the forbearance of the artillery of the Castle. He there-
fore left the direct road, and sweeping considerably to the south-
ward, HO as to keep out of the raujre of the cannon, approached
the ancient palace of llolyrood, without having entered the walls of
the city. He then drew up his men in front of that venerable pile,
and delivered Waverley to the custody of a tfuard of Highlanders,



Waverley reflected on the cause by
which it was pnxluced, and that each
explosion might ring some brave
man's knell. Ere they approached
the city, the partital cannonade had
wholly ceased. Balmawhapple, how-
ever, having in his recollection the
unfriendly greeting which his troop
luul received from the Iwittery at
Stirling, had apparently no wish to
tempt the forl>earance of the artillery
of the Castle. He therefore left the
direct road, and sweeping considerably
to the southward, so as to keep out




The morning l>eing calm and fair, the
effect of this dropping fire was to invest
the Castle in wreaths
of smoke, the edges of
which dissipated slowly
in the air, while the
central veil was darkened ever and anon In-
fresh clouds poured forth from the battle-
ments ; the whole giving, by the partial
concealment, an appearance of grandeur
and gloom, rendered more terrific when



of the range of the cannon, approached the
ancient palace of Holyrood, without hav-
ing entered the walls of the city. He
then drew up his men in front of that
venerable pile, and delivered Waverley to
the custody of a guard of Highlanders,
whose officer conducted him into the in-
terior of the palace. A long, low, and
ill-proportioned gallery, hung with pictures,
said to be the portraits of kings, who, if
they ever nourished at all, lived several



32



MILLER & RICHARD.



MODERN ROMANS.




EARLY in the morning they were again
mounted, and on the road to Edinburgh,
though the pallid visages
of some of the troop be-
trayed that they had .spent
a night of .sleepless de-
bauchery. They halted at Linlithgow, dis-
tinguished by its ancient palace, which, .Sixty
Years since, was entire and habitable, and
whose venerable ruins, not quite Sixty Years
since, very narrowly escaped the unworthy fate
of being converted into a barracks for French
prisoners. May repose and blessings
attend the ashes of the patriotic states-
man, who, amongst his last services to
Scotland, interposed to prevent this
profanation ! As they approached the
metropolis of Scotland, through a cham-
paign and cultivated country, the sounds
of war began to be heard. The distant,
yet distinct report of heavy cannon,
fired at intervals, told Waverley that the
work of destruction was going forward.
Even Balmawhapple was moved to
take some precautions, by sending an
advanced party in front of his troop,
keeping the main body in good order,
and moving steadily forward. Marching
in this manner they very quickly reached
an eminence, from which they could view



Edinburgh stretching along the ridgy hill
which slopes eastward from the Castle. The
latter, being in a stage of siege, or rather of
blockade, by the northern insurgents, who had
already occupied the town for two or three
days, fired at intervals upon such parties of
Highlanders as were exposed. The morning
being calm and fair, the effect of this dropping
fire was to invest the Castle in wreaths of
smoke, the edges of which dissipated slowly in
the air, while the central veil was darkened
ever and anon by fresh clouds pouring forth.




EAIU.V in the morning they were again mounted, and un the- road to Edin-
burgh, though the pallid visages of some of the, troop betrayed that they had
l*nt it night of sleepless debauchery. They halted
at Linlithgow. distinguldwd by its ancient palace,
which, Sixty Yearn since, was entire and habitable,
and whose venerable ruins, not quite Sixty Years
since, narrowly ewe-aped the unworthy fate of being
transformed into a barracks for French prisoners.
May rcjioKe and blessings attend the ashen of the

patriotic statesman. M-JIO, amongst his last services tf> Scotland, interjxwd to
prevent this profanation ! As they approached the rnetrojMilis of Scotland,
through a champaign and cultivated country, the sounds of war l>egan to be


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Online LibraryMiller & Richard (Firm)Printing type specimens, comprising a large variety of book and jobbing faces, borders and ornaments → online text (page 4 of 20)