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Printing type specimens, comprising a large variety of book and jobbing faces, borders and ornaments online

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Allan Ramsay was
born at Leadhills, in
Lanarkshire, on the
15th October 1686, of
respectable parents.

DALHOUSIE



MILLER & RICHARD. QQ



O.S. ANTIQUE, No. 7.



36 POINT. 7 A-23 a about 20 Ib.

At the age of twenty-six,
marrying one Christian
Ross, the daughter of an

FOUNDATIONS



8 A-23 a about I5lb.



Ramsay showed no propensity
for poetry until he had passed
the initiatory difficulties of life.

GENTLE SHEPHERD

24 POINT. 14 A-49 a about 15 ll>.

As Ramsay was always ambitious of
associating with his superiors, his com-
plaisance and inoffensive humour ably
seconded his wishes, and enrolled him

PASTORAL DIALOGUE

18 POINT. 21 A-49 a alwut 12 II).

He delivered to Edward a sword and steel pistol,
and pointing up the tract, laid his hand on the hilt
of his own claymore, as if to make him sensible
they might have occasion to use force to make

A NOCTURNAL ADVENTURE



1OO MILLER & RICHARD.



O.S. ANTIQ.UE, No. 7.




THE MEDIEVAL VIEW OF NATURE

|HE testimony of mediaeval art, sculpture,
[and literature, taken in its breadth, is very
| curiously conclusive. It marks the medi-
aeval mind as agreeing entirely with the ancients,
in holding that flat land, brooks, and groves of
aspens, compose the pleasant places of the earth,
and that rocks and mountains are, for inhabitation,
altogether to be reprobated and detested ; but as
disagreeing with the classical mind totally in this
other most important respect, that the pleasant
flat land is never a ploughed field, nor a rich lotus
meadow suitable for pasture, but garden ground
covered with flowers, and separated by fragrant
hedges, with an ancient castle in the middle of it.
(J The aspens are delighted in, not because they
are suitable for coach-making- men to make cart-
wheels of, but because they are shady and graceful ;
and the fruit-trees, covered with delicious fruits,
especially apples and oranges, occupy still more
important positions in the scenery. Singing-birds,
not sea-crows, but nightingales, perch on every
bough ; and the ideal occupation of mankind is not
to cultivate either the garden or the meadow, but
to gather roses and oranges in the one, and ride
out hawking over the other. (J Finally, mountain
scenery, though considered as disagreeable for our
general inhabitation, is always introduced as being
proper to meditate in, or to encourage communion
with higher beings ; and in the ideal landscape of
our daily life, mountains are considered agreeable
things enough, so that they be far enough away.



14 POINT iA Point Leaded.



MILLER & RICHARD. 1O1



O.S. ANTIGHUE, No. 7.



A VOLUNTEER SIXTY YEARS SINCE.

hearing the unwelcome sound of the drum,
I%B' Major Melville hastily opened the sashed-door,




r and stepped out on a sort of terrace which then
^divided his residence from the high-road from
which the martial music proceeded. Waverley and his
new friend followed him, though probably he would have
dispensed with their attendance. They soon recognised
in solemn march, first, the performer on the drum ; sec-
ondly, a large flag of four compartments, on which were
inscribed the words Covenant, Kirk, King, Kingdoms.
<I The person who was honoured with this charge was
followed by the commander of the party, a thin, dark,
rigid-looking man, about sixty years old. The spiritual
pride, which in mine host of the Candlestick mantled in
a sort of supercilious hypocrisy, was in this man's face
elevated and yet darkened by genuine and undoubting
fanaticism. <J It was impossible to behold him without
imagination placing him in some strange crisis, where
religious zeal was the ruling principle. A martyr at the
stake, a soldier in the field, a lonely and banished wan-
derer consoled by the intensity and supposed purity of
his faith under every earthly privation ; perhaps a per-
secuting inquisitor, as terrific in power as unyielding in
adversity ; any of these seemed congenial characters to
this personage. With these high traits of energy, there
was something in the affected precision and solemnity
of his deportment and discourse that bordered upon the
ludicrous ; so that, according to the mood of the spec-
tator's mind, and the light under which Mr Gilfillan
presented himself, one might have feared, admired, or
laughed at him. His dress was that of a west-country
peasant, of better materials indeed than that of the lower
rank, but in no respect affecting either the mode of the
age, or the Scottish gentry at any period. His arms were
a broadsword and pistols, which, from the antiquity of
their appearance, might have seen the rout of Pentland,



12 POINT. ii Point Leaded.



1O2



MILLER & RICHARD.



O.S. ANTIQ.UE, No. 7.



CHAPTER V. CHOICE OF A PROFESSION.




the minuteness with which I have traced Waverley's
pursuits, and the bias which these unavoidably commun-
( cated to his imagination, the reader may anticipate, in the
following tale, an imitation of the romance of Cervantes.
he will assuredly do my prudence the greatest injustice in the
supposition. <J My intention is not to follow in any way the steps
of that inimitable author, in describing such total perversion of in-
tellect as misconstrues the objects actually presented to the senses,
but that more common aberration from sound judgment, which ap-
prehends occurrences indeed in their reality, but communicates to
them a tincture of its own romantic tone and colouring. So far
was Edward Waverley from expecting general sympathy with his
own feelings, or concluding that the present state of things was
calculated to exhibit the reality of those visions in which he loved
to indulge, that he dreaded nothing more than the detection of such
sentiments as were dictated by his musings. <J He neither had nor
wished to have a confidant, with whom to communicate his reveries ;
and so sensible was he of the ridicule attached to them, that, had
he been to choose between any punishment short of ignominy, and
necessity of giving a cold and composed account of the ideal world
in which he lived the better part of his days, I think he would not
have hesitated to prefer the former infliction. This secrecy became
doubly precious, as he felt in advancing life the influence of the
awakening passions. Female forms of exquisite grace and beauty
began to mingle in his mental adventures ; nor was he long with-
out looking abroad to compare the creatures of his own imagination
with the females of actual life.

<I The list of the beauties who displayed their hebdomadal finery
at the parish church of Waverley was neither numerous nor select.
By far the most passable was Miss Sissly, or, as she rather chose
to be called, Miss Cecilia Stubbs, daughter of Squire Stubbs at the
Grange. I know not whether it was by the ' merest accident in the
world,' a phrase which, from female lips, does not always exclude
malice prepense, or whether it was from a conformity of taste, that
Miss Cecilia more than once crossed Edward in his favourite walks
through Waverley-Chase. He had not as yet assumed courage to
accost her on these occasions ; but the meeting was not without its
effect. A romantic lover is a strange idolater, who sometimes cares
not out of what log he frames the object of his adoration ; at least, if
nature has given that object any passable proportion of personal
charms, he can easily play the Jeweller and Dervise in the Oriental
tale, and supply her richly, out of the stores of his own imagination,



10 POINT. i Point Leaded.



MILLER & RICHARD, 1O3



O.S. ANTIQlUE, No 7,



WAVERLEY : SIR WALTER SCOTT

THE hint which the Chieftain had thrown
out respecting Flora was not unpre-
meditated. He had observed with great
satisfaction the growing attachment of Wav-
erley to his sister, nor did he see any bar to
their union, excepting the situation which
Waverley's father held in the ministry, and
Edward's own commission in the army of
George II. These obstacles were now re-
moved, and in a manner which apparently
paved the way for the son's becoming recon-
ciled to another allegiance. In every other
respect the match would be most eligible.
The safety, happiness, and honourable pro-
vision of his sister, whom he dearly loved,
appeared to be ensured by the proposed union,
and his heart swelled when he considered
how his own interest would be exalted in
the eyes of the ex-monarch to whom he had
dedicated his service, by an alliance with one

8 POINT. Soli. I.



CHAPTER XXV.



NEWS FROM ENGLAND.



THE letters which Waverley had hitherto received from
his relations in England and Wales were not such as
required any special notice in this narrative. His father
usually wrote to him with the pompous affection of one who
was too much oppressed by public affairs to find leisure
to attend to those of his own family. Now and then he
mentioned persons of rank in Scotland to whom he wished
his son should pay some attention ; but Wavcrley, hitherto
occupied by the amusements which he had found at Tully-
Veolan and Glennaquoich, dispensed with paying any at-
tention to hints so coldly thrown out, especially as distance,
shortness of leave of absence, and so forth, furnished a
ready apology. But latterly the burden of Mr Richard
Waverley's paternal epistles consisted in certain mysterious
hints of greatness ana influence which he was speedily to
attain, and which would ensure his son's obtaining the most
rapid promotion, should he remain in the military service.
Sir Everard's letters were of a different tenor. They were
short ; for the good Baronet was none of your illimitable
correspondents, whose manuscript overflows the folds of
their large post paper, and leaves no room for the seal ;
but they were kind and affectionate, and seldom concluded
without some allusion to our hero's stud, some question
about the state of his purse, and a special inquiry after
such of his recruits as preceded him from Waverley-rfonour.
Aunt Rachel charged him to remember his principles of
religion, to take care of his health, to beware of Scotch
mists, which, she had heard, would wet an Englishman
through and through ; never to go out at night without his

5 POINT. Solid



THE INTRIGUES OF SOCIETY AND LOVE.

COLONEL TALBOT became more kindly in his
demeanour towards Waverley after the confid-
ence which he had reposed in him ; and as they
were necessarily much together, the character of the
colonel rose in Waverley's estimation. There seem-
ed at first something: harsh in his strong expressions
of dislike and censure, although no one was in the
general case more open to conviction. The habit
of authority had also given his manners some per-
emptory hardness, notwithstanding the polish which
they had received from his intimate acquaintance
with the higher circles. As a specimen of the mili-
tary character, he differed from all whom Waverley
had as yet seen. The soldiership of the Baron of
Bradwardine was marked by pedantry ; that of Major
Melville by a sort of martinet attention to the min-
utiae and technicalities of discipline, rather suitable
to one who was to manoeuvre a battalion, than to him
who was to command an army ; the military spirit
of Fergus was so much warped and blended with
his plans and political views, that it was less that
of a soldier than of a petty sovereign. But Colonel
Talbot was in every point the English soldier. His
whole soul was devoted to the service of his king
and country, without feeling any pride in knowing



6 POINT. Solid.



THE CHIEFTAIN MATCH-MAKING.

NOR could Fergus perceive any obstacle
to the scheme. Waverley's attachment
was very evident ; and as his person was
decidedly handsome, and his taste apparently
coincided with her own, he anticipated no
opposition on the part of Flora. Indeed,
between his idea of patriarchal power and
those which he had acquired in France re-
specting the disposal of females in marriage,
any opposition from his sister, dear as she
was to him, would have been the last ob-
stacle on which he would have calculated,
even had the union been less eligible.
q Influenced by these feelings, the Chief now
led Waverley in quest of Miss Mac-Ivor,
not without the hope that the present state
of his guest's spirits might give him courage

8 POINT. Leaflet!.



WAVERLEY MAKES FOR EDINBURGH CASTLE.

EARLY in the morning they were again mounted and
on the road to Edinburgh, though the pallid visages
or some of the troops showed signs that they had spent a
night of sleepless debauchery. They hatted at Linlithgow,
distinguished by its ancient palace, which, sixty years since,
was entire and habitable, and whose venerable ruins, not
quite sixty years since, very narrowly escaped the unworthy
fate of being converted into barracks for French prisoners.
May repose and blessings attend the ashes of the patriotic
statesman, who, amongst his last services to Scotland, in
terposed to prevent this profanation? As they approached
near the metropolis of Scotland, through a champaign and
cultivated country, the sounds of war began to be heard.
The distant, yet distinct report of heavy cannon, fired at
intervals, told Waverley that the work of destruction was
going forward. Even Balmawhapple was moved to take
some precautions, by sending an advance party in front of
his troop, keeping the main body in tolerable order, and
moving steadily forward. Marching in this manner they
very quickly reached an eminence, from which they could
view Edinburgh stretching along the ridgy hill which slopes
eastward from the Castle. The Utter, being in a state of
siege, or rather of blockade, by the northern insurgents,
who had already occupied the town for two or three days,

5 POINT. Leaded.



WAVERLEY MAPPING OUT HIS CAREER.

FROM the minuteness with which I have traced
Waverley's pursuits, and the bias which these
unavoidably communicated to his own imagination,
the reader may perhaps anticipate in the following
tale an imitation of the romance of Cervantes. But
he will do me injustice in the supposition. My inten-
tion is not to follow in the steps of that inimitable
author, in describing such total perversion of intel-
lect as misconstrues the objects actually presented
to the senses, but that more common aberration from
sound judgment, which apprehends occurrences in-
deed in their reality, but communicates to them a
tincture of its own romantic tone and colouring. So
far was Edward Waverley from expecting general
sympathy with his own feelings, or concluding that
the present state of things was calculated to exhibit
the reality of those visions in which he loved to in-
dulge, that he feared nothing more than the detection
of such sentiments as were dictated by his musings.
He neither had nor wished to have a confidant, with

6 POINT. Leaded.



1O4



MILLER &; RICHARD.



O. S. ANTIQUE, No. 7.



Mentone Lyceum Theatre

Lessee and Manager, :: :: :: :: :: :: Mr PERCIVAL LAWRENCE.



For Six Nights and Matinee, commencing 25th March
Mr Percival Lawrence will present the

GILBERT DRAMATIC COMPANY

Direct from a Successful Continental Tour, in

Henry VIII

Famous Shakespearean Drama



The following Talented Artistes will appear

Mr NORMAN MANCLARK Miss MAISIE CHURCHILL

Mr CHARLES BRADFORD Miss WINIFRED EDWINS

Mr FREDERICK VERNEY Miss VIOLET CHAMBERS



Seats may now be booked at the Theatre or local Musicsellers.



Commencing each Evening at 7.15. Carriages forward at 10.30.

Saturday Matinee commences at 2. Matinee terminates at 5.30



Prices of Admission

Boxes, 2, 2s. ; Stalls, 10s. ; Dress Circle, 7s. 6d. ; Upper Circle, 4s.



M1I.I.KR & RICHARD. 1O5



O. S. ANTIQ.UE ITALIC.



48 POINT. , \ ' -. ' iilnnit 20 ll>.

National Finances
CHANCELLOR



42 POINT. 5 A '8 a alum! 20 Ib.

To posterity it will be
a matter for wonder

PARLIAMENT

36 POINT. 7 A~2o a about 18 Ib.

We consider the immense
outlay of capital involved

PRIME MINISTER

30 POINT. 10 A~32 a about 16 Ib.

The person who is to be honoured
with the leadership of this party

POLITICAL ECONOMY

1O8 MILLER & RICHARD. O*



O.S. ANTIGlUE ITALIC.



24 POINT.



16 A-44 a about 15 Ib.



The person ivho is
to receive this post
must be associated

CIVIL SERVICE



18 A-54 a- -about 12 It).

The person who 'was to
be honoured uoith this
charge was followed by

SIXTY YEARS AGO



19 A-tB a about n IK



The person 'who received the

honour of our command "was

followed by the Lieutenant of

MILITARY TRANSPORT



BRASS RULE



OUR Brass Rule Department
is equipped with all the
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IT Only the Best Hard Brass Rule
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Miller & Richard



EDINBURGH AND LONDON



WOOD LETTER



CUT ON ROCK MAPLE
BY PA TENT MA CHINES



By this means the Letters
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36 A-go a about 10 Ib.



The person who u>as to receive the
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RISE OF THE PEASANTRY



10 POINT.



30 A-n6 a about 8 Ib.



The person who was to be honoured with
this charge was followed by the captain
of the party, a thin, dark, rigid-looking
man, of about middle age. The spiritual

IRISH LIFE AND CHARACTER



8 POINT. 38A-i5oa about 6 Ib.

The person who was honoured with this command
was followed by the captain of the party, a thin,
dark, rigid-looking man, of about middle age. The
spiritual pride, which in mine host of the Candle-

HISTORY OF SCOTTISH ARISTOCRACY



MII.I.KK & RICHARD.



1O7



ANTIQUE, No. 12.



96 POINT. 3 A-9 a aiioiii 60 Ik

Election
TERM

72 POINT. 4 A r ; :i -alnrtit 40 Ib.

Rose Bush
GRAND



60 POINT. 4 A-i3 :i~aloul 30 ll,

Silver Medal
HONOUR

48 POINT. 4 A-i3 a al*out 25 ll.

Garden Culture
NURSERY



1O8 MII.I.K.k X KK MAKIi.



ANTIQ.UE, No. 12.



42 POINT.



4 A 14 a alxmt 20 Ib.



Harbour Dipectop
PRACTICAL



30 POINT.



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Colonial Maritime Defence
RESERVE FORCES



27 A-8s a about to Ik.

Navigate Steamers
ORIENTAL

10 POINT. 33A-104U alout 8 II).

Investment Prospectus
SHARE CAPITAL

8 POINT. 35 A-no a about 6 Ib.

Colonial Daily Newspapers
SPECIAL EDITION



6 POINT. 47 A-I44 a about 5 Ib.

Drawing Examination Certificate

ACADEMY PROFICIENCY



THE



Art of Typography

By THEO. L. DE VINNE. :: :: :: :: A Master of the Art.



CORRECT

COMPOSITION.

Treatise on spelling', ab-
breviations, punctuation,
compound words, the use
of Italic, proof-reading.



TITLE PAGES.

Appeals to all Interested
In the making of Books.
Divided Into three parts:
historical, practical and
critical.



PLAIN MODERN METHODS

PRINTING TYPES. OF COMPOSITION.

A concise work for prin- Treatise on type-setting,

ters and those connected and the proper arrangre-

wlth the Industry. ment of pages.

CLOTH, 1O/6 each Volume.



9 A-38 a alwut 15 Ib.



Modern Recitals Mechanical Engineer
COMEDIES GREAT FEATS



36 P. .INT.



7 A-2i a about 20 Ib.



Australian Commerce
GOVERNMENT



MII.I.KK ,*t KICHAKD.



ioe



ANTIQUE, No. 8.



96 POINT. 3 A-9 a aljout 50 II).

Rose Show
GARDEN

72 POINT. 4 A- 17 a alxnit 40 Ib.

Record Travel
HONOURS

60 POINT. 5 A-2O a about 30 Ib.

Grecian Novelist
of great renown

CENTENARY



HO MILLER (t RICHARD.



ANTIQ.UE, No. 8.



5 A-i8 .1 about 25 Ib.



Italian Opera Season
GREAT TENOR

42 POINT. 6 A-ig a about 21 Ib.

Norwegian and Swedish
COASTING CRUISE

36 POINT. 8 A- 3 o a about 20 11).

Decline of the Roman Empire
GIBBONS' FINE WORK

30 POINT. 10 A-3I a about 16 Ib.

Recent Achievements in Aeronautics
include many most daring exploits

FLIGHT ACROSS ATLANTIC

24 POINT. 18 A-53 a about 15 Ib.

The recent Exhibition of Printing Machinery
was a revelation to many provincial visitors

SUPERB DISPLAY OF SPECIMENS



MIU.KR & RICHARD. HI

CONTINUXtlUN OF THIS StKlES OVERLEAF



ANTIdUE, No. 8.



22 A- 76 a ulx.nit 12 lb.



Advanced Chemistry Lecture
will be delivered as soon as
the necessary arrangements

THIRD EXAMINATION



35 A-120 a alxjut lu III

Handsome Specimens of Typography
were submitted for the consideration
of the visitors to the Exhibition, who
were greatly impressed by the work
executed by the junior competitors

ELABORATE REPRODUCTION



41 A-I-.-J a .iluut 8 ll>.

The mist has now given place to a most
persistent rain, that soaks us and all our
belonging's to saturation, but we are not
dismayed, we are enjoying- the novelty of
the situation. There is a dreamy melan-
choly and fascinating 1 beauty in the grey

JOURNEYING IN THE HIGHLANDS.







FASHION FAIR.






THE..


-o-




Ideal


Home


Exhibition


1


"THIS Exhibition has been
organised with the view
of demonstrating the true
value of every requisite in
the building up of the Ideal
Home. It will embrace all
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in Home conception, con-
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-O-






EXHIBITS






In EMBROIDERIES,




250


TAPESTRY-MAKING,
TORCHON LACES.




IN PRIZES.


-o-
Cookery Competitions.





ooo

8



MARINE GARDENS.



This Day's Programme.



BESSES

0' THE

BARN
BAND



Selections from Guilmant
and Mendelssohn



RESERVED SEATS, 2s. and Is.

Seats may be booked by Telephone. o



S POINT. 48 A-I4J a about 6 Ik.

The mist has now given place to a most persistent
rain, that soaks us and our belongings to satura-
tion, but we are not dismayed, we are enjoying
the novelty of the situation. There is a dreamy
melancholy and fascinating beauty in the grey
enshrouding mist, the sombre shoulders of rock,
and gigantic precipices looming here and there
through the veil. There is the beauty of Fairy-

CYCLING IN THE WESTERN HIGHLANDS.



6 POEM. 48 A-I46 a about 4 II).

The mist has now Riven place to a most persistent rain,
that soaks us and our belongings to saturation, but we are
not dismayed, we are enjoying the novelty of the situation.
There Is a dreamy melancholy and fascinating beauty in
the grey enshrouding mist, the sombre shoulders of rock,
and overhanging precipices looming here and there through
the veil. There is the beauty of Fairyland in the mountain
bracken, the purple heather, and stunted gorse, decorated to
extravagance with misty pearl drops. There is the sadness
of a Highland lament in the music of the Invisible stream-
lets that sing all alone in this deserted Highland glen, where

WITH CYCLE AND CAMERA IN THE HIGHLANDS.



5 POINT ON 6 POINT BODY.



56 A-io6 a about 4 lb.



The mist has now given place to a most persistent rain, that soaks us
and oup belongings to saturation, but we are not dismayed, we are
enjoying the novelty or the situation. There Is a dreamy melancholy
and fascinating beauty In the enshrouding mist, the sombre shoulders
of rock, and overhanging precipices looming here and there through
the veil. There Is the beauty or Fairyland In the mountain bracken,
the heather, and stunted gorse. decorated to extravagance with misty
pearl drops. There Is the sadness or a Highland lament In the music
or the Invisible streamlets that sing all alone In this deserted glen

WITH CYCLE AND CAMERA IN THE WESTERN HIGHLANDS
Also supplied on 5 Point body.



112



M1LI.KR ,t RICHARD.



ANTIQ.UE, No. 8.



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