Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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CLARENCE H. WOOLSEY, A. M.,

LL.B., Teacher in charge of Second

Year Class 852 Spring av.

EDMUND A. BURNHAM, A. B.,

Teacher In charge of First Year Class 3844 Delmar boul.
LUTHER E. SMITH, A. B , Teacher

of Higher English and Elocution . . 2910 Pine st.
EDWARD L. BURDICK, S. B., Teacher

of Physics, Algebra, and Drawing . .8831 Morgan st.
HENRY A. BAKER, A. B., Teacher of

German 2910 Pine st.

GEORGE M. TUTTLB, A. B., M. D.,

Teacher of Physiology 2942 Washington av.

JULIUS C. HAINER, B. Sc, LL.B.,

Teacher of Civil Government . . . 7 N. Garrison av.



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212 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

AUGUST H. MUEGGE, Teacher oi
Gymnastics 2712 Franklin av.

WILLIAM F. HANCOCK, First Lieut.
Filth U. S. Artillery, Teacher of Mili-
tary Science and Tactics The Franklin.

WILLIAM H. POMMER, Teacher of
Vocal Music 8709 Evans av.

MME. JUVBT-KAUFMANN, Teacher
of French 3200 Locust st.

MISS MABEL EVANS, Ph. B , Assist-
ant Teacher of Second Year Class. . 4314 Washington boul.

MISS ANNA U. CHANDLER, Assistant
Teacher of Second Year Class . . .5716 Catesav.

MRS. ANNA C. HILLMAN, Teacher in
charge of Second Year Class, Prepar-
atory Department Webster Groves.

MRS. ISABELLE H. LARB, Assistant
Teacher in Preparatory Department . 8109 St. Vincent av.

MRS. OTTILIB A. ALOFS, Teacher In
charge of First Year Class, Prepara-
tory Department 4233 McPherson av.

MISS CLARA Y. VAN NORSTRAND,
Assistant Teacher in Preparatory
Department 3015 Lucas av.



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SMITH ACADEMY.



HISTORICAL STATEMENT.

Smith Academy was founded in 1853, and was opened
in the following year.

The Academy building now occupied was erected in
1878-79, and the name, Smith Academy, was given to the
school in recognition of the munificence of James Smith
and Persis Smith, his wife, from whom the whole amount
($75,000) expended in the building, including the ground
and furniture, was received.



ADMISSION.



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT.

Pupils are admitted to the First Year Class at the age
of eleven years, provided they can pass a satisfactory
examination in reading, spelling, English language and
composition, penmanship, geography, and arithmetic as
far as percentage.

Pupils are admitted to any class, provided they can pass
a satisfactory examination in the studies pursued by the
class below the grade which they wish to enter. The
courses of study as now arranged are sufficient to meet
the requirements for admission to any college or scientific
school.



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214 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITT.

No pupil will be received for less than one term, and
no abatement in tuition will be made for absence, whether
such absence occurs at the beginning, middle, or end of
the term.

COURSES OF STUDY.

The courses of study in this Department are three in
number. The Classical Course and the Course without
Greek extend over six years ; the Preparatory Scientiflc
Course extends over five years. All the courses are iden-
tical during the first two years, but no pupil is required
to take all the regular studies. At the beginning of the
third academic year, those pupils who wish to prepare for
the regular classical course in college and to obtain the
regular college degree of Bachelor of Arts take the Clas-
sical Course ; those who wish to prepare for the college
course in Philosophy take the Course without Greek.
This differs from the Classical Course only in substituting
Science and Modern Languages for the Greek. The Pre-
paratory Scientific Course includes all those studies which
are required for admission to any polytechnic school.

COMMERCIAL CLASS.

Pupils who are able to spend but one or two years in
school, and, for that reason, do not desire to enter upon
one of the regular courses of study, are permitted, under
the direction of the Principal, to select an equal amount
of work from the regular studies with the addition of
Book-keeping and to form a commercial class. The full
Academic Course, although especially designed for those
who intend to pursue the Collegiate Course, is nevertheless



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SMITH ACADEMY. 215

recommended for those who are preparing for commercial
life, unless lack of preparation prevents its adoption.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.

To meet the wishes of a large number of parents, a

Preparatory Department has been organized for boys

eight to eleven years of age. It is placed under the

immediate charge of competent ladies, but is under the

general supervision of the Principal of the Academy.

Pupils are admitted to this Department as soon as they

have sufficient knowledge of reading and writing to

enable them to commence the study of Arithmetic and

Geography.

PHYSICS.

The physical laboratory, on the second floor of the
building recently erected, is well supplied with apparatus
to which additions are constantly being made. The
laboratory is provided with lecture and working tables
and affords abundant facilities for instruction by lectures
and for practical work in experimental physics.

CHEMISTRY.

Excellent facilities are offered pupils for thorough in-
struction in general chemistry and qualitative analysis.
The chemical laboratory is fitted with tables and appara-
tus for practical work^ and instruction is given partly by
recitation, partly by lectures, and partly by laboratory

work.

DRAWING.

The drawing ' room is well lighted and furnished with
drawing stands, models, and all necessary conveniences.



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216 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Free-hand and geometrical drawing ma}' be taken, in
addition to the regular studies, by the pupils of any class
in which it is not already required. The Course in draw-
ing may thus extend through a period of four years,
beginning with the outlines and proportions of simple
geometric figures, proceeding to the more complex and
ornate forms of decorative art, and including the study of
light and shade, with pencil and brush, both from the flat
and the round, or the solid object. Geometrical drawing
will include the use of instruments, scales, the more im-
portant problems in Plane Geometry, oii.hographic pro-
jections, intersections and development of surfaces, cast
shadows, perspective, together with mechanical and
architectural constructions.

GYMNASIUM.

On the first floor of the building recently erected is a
large gymnasium, handsomely furnished with the most
8er\iceable pieces of apparatus of modern pattern. Four
sets of the larger apparatus are supplied, so that a class of
sixty boys can all get sufficient exercise in a short time.
Each class is sent to the gymnasium near the middle of
the school session everyday under the direction of a care-
ful instructor. Every pupil, unless physically disabled
and regularly excused at the request of parent or physi-
cian, is required to go with his class.

The object is to give a systematic physical training, not
only to those who enjoy athletic sports and would prac-
tice them of their own accord, but also to the large num-
ber who neglect bodily exercise, unless an opportunity is
furnished them. The effect upon the health and bearing



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SMITH AC^DEMT. 217

of the pupils, after a short trial, amply proves the wisdom
of requiring daily gymnastics.

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS.

Instruction in Military Science and Tactics is given to
the older classes in the Academy by First Lieut. William
F. Hancock, of the Fifth United States Artillery.

Students enrolled in these classes constitute companies
B and £ of cadets in the Washington University Battalion,
and the commissioned and non-commissioned officers are
appointed from cadets enrolled in the companies.

Cadets are required Jbo wear the prescribed uniform
when recei\ing practical military instruction, but are not
permitted to wear it at any other time. The cost of the
uniform need not exceed fifteen dollars.

The regular military drill occurs immediately after the
close of the afternoon session of the Academy, on two
days of each week, and the time of the drill does not
usually exceed one hour.

MONTHLY REPORTS.

Monthly reports will be made of the attendance, deport-
ment, standing and general progress of each pupil, to
which the attention of parents and guardians is specially
invited. Pupils are expected to prepare at home a part
of the lessons assigned for each day, and their hours of
study should be regular and free from interruption.

Every absence from the regular exercises of the school
is a serious hindrance to the progress of the individual
pupil and the class to which he belongs, and sickness or
some urgent necessity should be regarded as the only
legitimate excuse.



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218 WASHINGTON UNIVBBSITT.

DIPLOMAS.

Diplomas will be conferred upon those members of the
class who have taken any one of the regular courses of
study, and have passed satisfactorily the required ex-
aminations. Certificates will also be given on the same
conditions, which entitle graduates to enter the corre-
sponding course in the College or School of Engineering
of Washington University without examination.

The courses of stud}' in the Academy have been
extended so as to include all tbe subjects required in
the examinations for admission to the best colleges and
scientific schools. The methods of iustruction are such
as prevail in the oldest and most popular preparatory
schools of New England. The increasing demand for a
school of high grade in St. Louis has been fully met, so
that parents need not send their sons away from home at
the most critical period of their lives, in order to have
them prepared to enter the college of their choice. Al-
though the Academy is especially designed to prepare
students for the Undergraduate Department of Washing-
ton University, and a majority of its graduates enter that
department, the training they receive has proved amply
sufficient to satisfy the requirements of any college.

TUITION.

Preparatory Class, per terra of 20 weeks $50 00

First Year *' ** " 60 00

Second Year '' *' •' 50 00

Third Year «' " *< 66 00

Fourth Year ** ** *• 62 60

Fifth Year ** ** '< 76 00

Sixth Year '* ** '* 76 CO

Commercial •• *« »< 76 00



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SMITH AGADEMT. 219

These rates are for the current year only.

Bills are payable in advance.

No extra charge of any kind loUl be made,

N. B. — No pupil will be received for less than one
term, and no abatement will be made for absence, whether
such absence occurs at the beginning, middle, or end of
the term.



GENERAL INFORMATION.

The school year consists of two terms of twenty weeks
each. The Academy does not furnish text-books, but
each pupil must provide for himself the books and neces-
sary articles prescribed for the class to which he belongs.

The Academy has no dormitory system, but rooms and
board for boys whose homes are not in the city may be
obtained in private families at prices ranging from $20 to
$30 a month. The Principal of the Academy will cheer-
fully give recommendations and assistance to parents
who desire to obtain for their sons rooms and board in
the city.

During the past year 310 pupils have been enrolled in
the Academy.

COURSES OF STUDY.

CLASSICAL COURSE.

FIRST YEAR CLASS.

Maihem<Uic» — HoblDson's Complete Arithmetic, beginning at

Percentage ; Stoddard^s Mental Arithmetic.
History — Eggleston^s History of the United States.
English Orammar — Whitney and Lockwood's.
French — Paul Bercy's Livre Des Enfants.



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220 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Physiology —Familiar Talks.

English Composition, Spelling, Penmanship, Drawing,
Vocal Music, and daily exercise in the Gymnasium,
throughout the year.
Reading — Longfellow's Paul Revere's Ride, The Building
of the Ship, The Wreck of the Hesperus, and other short
poems; Dickens' Christmas Carol; Irving's Sketch Book,
Sleepy Hollow, and other selections ; Hawthorne's Twice-
Told.Tales.

SECOND YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin — Allen and Greenough's Grammar; Collar and Daniell's
First Latin Book ; or

♦ Get-man — CoUar's-Eysenbach's Grammar, with Exercises.
MatJiematica — Robinson's Complete Arithmetic.

History — Myer's General History.

English Composition, Spelling, Penmanship, Drawing,

Vocal Music, and daily exercise in the Gymnasium,

throughout the year.
Reading — Gray's Elegy; Goldsmith's Deserted Village

and The Traveler; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Long-

fellow's Evangeline.

SECOND TERM.

Latin — Grammar and Lessons ; Easy Latin Stories ; or

♦ German — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar; Prose Selections.
Mathematics — Elementary Algebra to Simple Equations.
History — Myer's General History completed.

Reading — Longfellow's Courtship of Miles Standish; Haw-
thorne's House of the Seven Gables; Webster's First
Bunker Hill Oration; Dryden's Alexander's Feast.

* German may be Bubstltnted for Latin by papils who do not Intend to
pursue the fall coarse of study in preparation for college or scientific
school.



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SMITH ACADEHT. 221

THIRD YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin — CsEiS&r'B Gallic War, Books II., III.; Collar's Latin

Composition.
G^reeA; — Goodwin's Grammar; White's Beginner's Greek Book.
Mathematics — Elementary Algebra continued.

English Analysis, Rhetoric, Declamations, Compositions^
Drawing, Vocal Music, and daily exercise in the Gym-
nasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Scott's
Marmion; Irving's Alhambra; Tennyson's The Princess.

SECOND TERM.

Latin — Cssar's Gallic War, Books I., IV. ; Collar's Latin Com-
position ; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight.

Greek — Grammar and Beginner's Greek Book continued.

Mathematics — Algebra completed.

Reading — Whittier's Snow Bound; Irving's Sketch Book;
Scott's Lady of the Lake; Scott's Ivanhoe.

FOURTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin — Cicero, Four orations against CatUlne ; Collar's Latin
Composition; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at
sight.
Greek — Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek Prose Composition.
Mathematics — W^vkiYfOTt\i*% Geometry, with original exercises.
German — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar, with Exercises.

Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and dally exer-
cise in the Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Pope's Iliad, Books I., VI., XXII., XXIV.;
Carlyle's Essay on Scott; Byron's Fourth Canto of Childe
Harold; Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans.



* German may be sabsUtated for Latin by pupils who do not intend to
parene the fall coarse of study in preparation for college or scientific
school.



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222 WASHINGTON UNIYBSSITT.

8B0OND TKRM.

Latin — Cicero, Orations lor Manlllan Law, Archias, and Mar-
cellns; Cornelias Nepos; Latin at slgtit; Latin Composi-
tion.

Greek — Xenoption's Anabasis continued; Greek Prose Com-
position.

Mathematics ~ Wentworth's Piane Geometry completed.

German — CoUar^s Eysenbach^s Grammar; Prose selections.

French — Chardenal, Part I. ; Prose Selectipns.

Reading — Macanlay's Essay on Lord Clive ; Scott's Old
Mortality; Longfellow's Evangeline; Dryden's Palamon
and Arcite.

FIFTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TKKM.

LaCin — Virgil's ^ueid, Books L, II.; Latin Composition;

Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight.
Greek — Selections from Hellenica or Cyropedia, and other

Attic Prose; Greek Prose Composition.
Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic, including ' metric system,
and higher Algebra, in connection with Mathematical
Reviews.
German — Grammar; Prose Selections; Sight Translations.
French — Chardenal, Part I., concluded; Prose Selections;
Van Daell's Introduction to French Authors ; Sight Trans-
lations.
Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily

exercise in Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II. ; Pope's
Iliad, Books I., XII.; Addison's The Roger de Coverley
Papers in the Spectator; Goldsmith's The Vicar of
Wakefield.

SECOND TERM.

La«n — Virgil's .^neld; Cicero reviewed; Caesar, Nepos, and
Sallust at sight; Latin Composition.



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SMITH ACADEMY. 223

Oreek — Selections from Herodotus; Reading at sight; Greek

Prose Composition; Reviews.
Mathematics — Higher Algebra and Plane Geometry, with origi-
nal exercises, in connection with Mathematical Reviews.
Oennan — Grammar; Prose Selections; Sight Translations.
French — Chardenal, Part II. ; Van Daeil's Introduction to
French Authors and other Prose Selections; Le Conscrit;
Colomba; Daudet (Contes Choisis); Sight Translations.
Reading — Coleridge^s The Ancient Mariner; Southey^s
Life of Nelson ; Carlyle's Essay on Burns ; Lowell's The
Vision of Sir Launfal; Hawthorne's The House of the
Seven Gables.

SIXTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin - Virgil's iEneid; Ovid at sight; Daniell's Latin Com-
position.

Oreek — Selections from Herodotus; Homer's Iliad; Reading
at sight; Greek Prose Composition.

Phytical Science ~ Physics, with laboratory work.

HUtory — Pennell's Ancient Greece.

Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily exer-
cise in Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Burke's
speech on Conciliation with America.

SECOND TERM.

Lal<» — Virgil's Eclogues; Cicero and Virgil at sight; Exer-
cises in writing Latin at sight.

Greek — Herodotus and Homer at sight; Greek Prose Composi-
tion; Reviews.

Physical Science — Physics, with laboratory work.

History — Allen's Short History of the Roman People.

Reading — Scott's Marmion ; Macaulay's Life of Samuel
Johnson.



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224 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



COURSE WITHOUT GREEK.



THIRD YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

LaUn — Csds&T^s Gallic War, Books, II., III.; Collar's Latin
Composition; or

♦ Oerman — CoUar's-Eysenbach's Grammar ; Prose selections.
Matliemaiics — Elementary Algebra.

History — Montgomery's English History.

English Analysis, Rhetoric, Declamations, Compositions,
Drawing, Vocal Music, and daily exercise in the Gymna-
sium, throughout the year.

Reading — Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; Scott's Mar-
mium; Irving's Alhambra ; Tennyson's The Princess.

SECOND TERM.

Latin — Caesar's Gallic War, Books I., IV. ; Collar's Latin Com-
position; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight;
or,

* Oerman — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar; Prose selections.
Mathematics — ElementAT J Algebra completed.

English Literature — Painter's.

Reading — Whittler's Snow Bound; Irving's Sketch Book;
Scott's Lady of the Lake ; Scott's Ivanhoe.

FOURTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin — Cicero, Four Orations against Catiline ; Collar's Latin
Composition; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at
sight.

Mathematics — Wentworth's Geometry, with original exercises.

Physiology — Brand's.

* German may be sabstltuted for Latin by pupils who do not Intend to
porsue the full course In preparation for college or sclentiflo school.



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SUITH ACADEMT. 225

Oerman — Collar's-Eysenbacb's Qrammar with Exercises.

DeclamatioDS; Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily exer-
cise in the Gymnasium, througlioat the year.
Reading — Pope's Iliad, Books I., VI., XXII., XXIV.;
Carlyle's Essay on Scott; Byron's Fourth Canto of
Childe Harold ; Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans.

SECOND TERM.

Latin — Cicero, Orations for Manilian Law, Archias, and
Marcellus; Cornelius Nepos; Latin at sight; Latin Com-
position.
Mathematics — Wentworth's Plane Geometry completed.
Civil Oooemment — John Fiske's Civil Government in United

States.
€hrman — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar; Prose selections.
French — Chardenal, Part I.; Prose Selections.

Reading —- Macaulay's Essay on Lord Clive ; Scott's Old
Mortality; Longfellow's Evangeline; Dryden's Pala-
mon and Arcite .

FIFTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Z^otiii — Virgil's ^neid, Books I., II.; Latin Composition;

Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight.
Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic, including metric system, and
higher Algebra, in connection with Mathematical Reviews.
Physical Science — Shepard's Chemistry.
Oerman — Qrammar; Prose selections; Sight Translations.
French — Chardenal, Part I., concluded; Prose Selections; Van
Daell's Introduction to French authors; Sight Translations.
Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily exer-
cise in the Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II. ; Pope's
Iliad, Books I. and XII. ; The Sir Roger de Coverley
Papers in the Spectator; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield.

Note — Advanced German may be aabstltnted for Latin by papils
who do not intend to take the fall coarse of study In preparation for
college.



u



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226 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SECOND TERM.

L<Uin — Virgirs ^neid; Cicero reviewed; Caesar, Nepos, and

Sallust at sight; Latin Composition.
Matfiematics — Higher Algebra and Plane Geometry, in connec-
tion with Mathematical Reviews.
Physical Science — Shepard's Chemistry.
French — Chardenal, Part II.; Le Consent; Colomba; Daudet

(Contes Choisis) .
German — Grammar; Prose selections; Sight Translations.

Reading — Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner: Southey's
Life of Nelson; Carlyle's £8say on Burns; Lowell's
vision of Sir Laanfal; Hawthorne's The House of the
Seven Gables.

SIXTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERAI.

Laitn — Virgil's ^neid; Ovid at sight; Daniell's Latin Com-
position.

Physical Science — Physics, with laboratory work, and Astron-
omy.

History — Pennell's Ancient Greece.

French — La Fontaine's Fables; Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme
Pauvre; Daily translation of English into French.

German — Prose Selections; Daily translation of English into
German.

Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily exer-
cise in Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Burke's
Speech on Conciliation with America.

SECOND TERM.

Latin — Virgil's Eclogues; Cicero and Virgil at sight; Exer-
cises in writing Latin at sight.

Physical Science — Thjaica, with laboratory work, and Astron-
omy.

History — Allen's Short History of the Roman People.



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SMITH ACADEMY. 227

French — Le Bourgeois GeDtilhomme ; Confessions d^nu
Ouvrier; Dally translation of English into French.

German — Grammar ; Prose Selections ; Daily translation of
English into German.

Reading — Scott's Marmlon; Macaulay's Life of Samuel
Johnson.



PREPARATORY SCIENTIFIC COURSE.
FOURTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

LaiiJi — Cffisar's Gallic War, Books IL, III.; Collar's Latin

Composition.
Mathematics — Wentworth's Geometry, with original Exercises.
Physiology — Brand's.

French — Cbardenal, Part I. ; Prose selections.
German — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar, with Exercises.
Drawing — Free-hand and Geometrical.

Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music, and daily exer-
cise in the Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Pope's Iliad, Books I., VI., XXII., XXIV.; Car-
lyle's Essay on Scott; Byron's Fourth Canto of Childe
Harold; Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans.

SECOND TERM.

Laiin — C«esar's Gallic War, Books I., IV.; Collar's Latin Com-
position ; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight.

Mathematics — Wentworth's Plane Geometry completed.

CivU Government — John Fiske's Civil Government in the
United States.

French — Chardenal, Part I., concluded; Prose selections; or

(?eniian — Collar's-Eysenbach's Grammar; Prose selections.
Reading — Macaulay's Essay on Lord Clive; Scott's Old
Mortality; Longfellow's Evangeline; Dryden's Palamon
and Arcitc.



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228 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

FIFTH YEAR CLASS.

FIRST TERM.

Latin — VirgiVs Mue\d, Books I., XL; Collar*s Latin Composi-
tion ; Exercises in reading and writing Latin at sight.

Mathematics — Trigonometry ; Higlier Arithmetic^ including
metric system^ and higher Algebra, in connection with
Mathematical Reviews.

Physical A'cicncc — Physics and Chemistry, with laboratory
work.

French — Chardenal, Part IL; Prose selections; Van DaelPs
Introduction to French Authors ; or

German — Grammar; Prose selections; Sight Translations.

Drawing — Geometrical.

Declamations, Compositions, Vocal Music and daily exer-
cise in the Gymnasium, throughout the year.
Reading — Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; Burke*s
Speech on Conciliation with America.

SECOND TERM.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 11 of 70)