Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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Latin — Virgil's /Eneid, Book III.; Ccesar^ Ncpos and Sallust

at sight; Latin Composition.
Jfdi/icmaWc*— Solid Geometry; Higher Algebra and Plane

Geometry, in connection with Mathematical Reviews.
Physical Science — Physics and Chemistry, with laboratory

work.
French — Chardenal, Part It., concluded ; Le Conscrit; Colomba ;

Daudet (contes clioisea) ; Prose composition; or
O^ermaa — Grammar; Prose selections; Sight Translations.
Drawing — Geometrical.

Reading — Scott's Marmion; Macaulay's Life of Samuel
Johnson.

For further information concerning the Academy, ad-
dress J. W. Fairbanks, Principal of Smith Academy, or
the Secretary of Washington University.



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Mary Institute.

(a department op WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)



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CALENDAR.



1896-96.



School Organized, Thursday, September 26.
Holiday, TiiANKSciviNa Day, Thursday, November 28.
Christmas Vacation, December 21, 1895, to January 1, 1896,

inclusive.
Second Term begins Monday, Februarys.
University Holiday, Friday, May 8.
First Entrance Examination, Saturday, June 6.
Graduating Exercises, Friday, June 12.
Vacation, June 13 to September 23, inclusive.

1896-97.

Entrance Examination, Tuesday and Wednesday, September

22 and 23.
School Organized, Thursday, September 24.
Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 26.
Christmas Vacation, December 24 to January 1, inclusive.
Second Term begins Monday, February 1.



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OFFICERS

OF

INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT.



RKSIDENCR.

WINFIELD S. CHA.PUN, LL.D.,

Chancellor of the University . . . 3636 Pine st.
EDMUND H. SEARS, A. B., Principal 3529 Bell av.

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT.

MISS LUCY E. SMITH, Assistant to

the Principal 3729 Delmar av.

MISS CARRIE VAN R. ASHCROFT,

English 26 N. Compton av.

MISS MARIA y. BEDINGER, A. B ,

Chemistry and Physics 3420 Washington av.

MISS ANNA L. BRANCH, A; B., En-

glish and Rhetoric 4314 Washington av.

MISS ELLEN C. CLARK, Geography

and Natural Science 2730 Pine st.

MISS SARAH E. COLE, Mathematics,

Astronomy and Mental Science . . . 3853 Washington av.
MRS. SARAH G. HAYES, Mathemat-
ics and History 2813 Stoddard st.

MISS L. BEAUMONT IRWIN, French 3644 Olive st.
MISS LOUISE D. KUEFFNER, A. B.,

German and French 2800 Rasscll av.

MISS JENNIE R. LIPPMAN, A. M ,

Latin 5555 Cabanne pi.

MISS CAROLINE W. MUDGETT,

English Literature 3420 Washington av.

MADAME EMMA RUPPIN, French

and German 1 000 N. Grand av.

MISS SARAH C. SOUTHER, Cooking 4048 Westminster pi.



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232 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITT.

KVSIDKNCB.

MISS VIRGINIA E. STEVENSON,
History 8509 Morgan st.

*MISS ANNIE RUSSELL WALL^ His-
tory 2901 Washington av.

MR. EDWARD P. PERRY, Elocution 2824 Morgan st.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.
MRS. ANNIE L. McCARGO, Principal 6416 Bartmer av.
MISS IDA J. ALVORD, English

Branches West End Hotel.

MISS SERAPH E. BROWN, English

Branches 2744 Lucas av.

MISS BARBARA COUSLAND, English

Branches 4428 Delmar av.

MISS NELLIE M. CURTIS, French

and German 4088 Delmar av.

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.
MISS MARGARET T. WALLACE,

Principal 2980 Laclede av.

MISS NELLIE M. CURTIS, French 4088 Dejmar av.
MISS SOPHIE DESLOGE, English

Branches 6 Benton pi.

IN ALL DEPARTMENTS.

MISS CARRIE VAN R. ASHCROFT,
Calisthenics 26 N. Compton av.

MISS ELIZABETH BUTLER, Draw-
ing 6706 Virginia av.

MISS ELEANOR H. KIRK, Penman-
ship 2744 Lucas av.

MISS SARAH M. MILLS, Drawing . 2926 Eads av.

MISS ESTHER Db B. PETTIBONE,
Singing 3807 Delmar av.

MR. AUGUST H. MUEGGE, Gym-
nastics 2712 Franklin av.

• Resigned December 21, 1890.

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MARY INSTITUTE.



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234



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



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MARY INSTITUTE. 235

SPECIAL REMARKS.
FOUNDATION AND EQUIPMENT.

The Mary Institute was founded under the provisions
of the University Charter in 1859, a commodious building
being erected on Lucas Place, at an expense of $25,000.

In 1878, the school having quite outgrown the existing
accommodations, the present structure was erected on
the corner of Locust and Beaumont streets, at a cost of
$70,000. Its halls are broad, the stairways rise at an
easy grade, the ceilings are high, and the rooms are well
lighted and ventilated. The building contains a gymna-
sium, a calisthenic hall, a large apartment for drawing,
and an ample number of recitation rooms to accommodate
four hundred pupils.

The school is well supplied with apparatus, has a good
reference library, and excellent sanitary appointments.
A proper temperature is carefully maintained in all the
rooms, a trained employe being specially charged with
this task.

During recess a warm luncheon is served in the base-
ment at moderate cost to such pupils as may desire it.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.

Health is always considered more important than intel-
lectual growth, and care is taken that pupils shall not be
put to any undue strain, either mental or physical. Un-
necessary stair-climbing is carefully avoided. Girls in



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236 WASHINGTON CNIVERSITT.

the primary department are obliged to mount the stairs
only for morning devotions and calisthenics ; those in the
preparatory, only for those exercises, and twice a week
for singing and drawing. Academic pupils are kept on
the second and third floors, and are not required to return
to the first floor until dismissal. Parents who find that
their daughters are overworked are earnestly requested
to make it known to the principal.

Calisthenic Exercises occur daily in each class. The
hours for the exercises are arranged near the middle of the
program, thus affording relaxation between the morning
and afternoon recitations. Besides the regular training
in Cahsthenics, special attention is given to the formation
of good habits of movement and posture. Occasional
lectures on physical culture are given in the upper classes.
Two days in every week there is an optional course in
the gymnasium after regular school hours.

GENERAL PLAN AND PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL.

It is the aim of the institute both to fit girls for college
and to give to such as do not wish for a collegiate train-
ing as complete and thorough an education as a school
can provide. To this end instruction is given in all studies
that best contribute to a girl's intellectual development.
As far as is possible, an even balance is kept between such
varying branches as the languages, science, literature,
history, and mathematics ; but some election is allowed,
in order that individual tastes may be encouraged, and
greater interest awakened. Drawing and singing receive
proper attention. There are no extra charges in any
department.



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MART INSTITUTE. 237



ADMISSION.

The dates of entrance examinations in Spring and
Autumn, for the following session, are given in the cal-
endar, on p. 230. For younger pupils the examinations
are oral, conducted privately and only to such extent as
to satisfy the examiner of the applicant's proper place in
the school. For admission to the higher class exam-
inations are in writing. Pupils who are to enter in the
Autumn may be exammed in the preceding Spring on all,
or any, of the necessary subjects, due credit being given
for the work done at this examination.

In order to enter the Academic department a pupil
must pass a fair preliminary examination in the following
subjects: —

English Dictation (as a test of writing and spelling).

ArithmetiCy including decimal and common fractions, de-
nominate numbers, percentage, simple interest, and
bank discount.

Geography, so much as is contained in an ordinary text-
book.

English Orammar, through the parsing and analysis of
simple sentences, and including participial and in-
finitive constractions.

United States History, so much as is contained in Eggle-
ston's work.



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238



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



TERMS.



Primary Department, per term of 18 weeks
Fourth Preparatory Class " •*
Third *•








$35 00
40 00
46 00


Second '* " *• '*
First








50 00

50 00


Filth Academic '' *• *'

Fourth ** *^ - ''

Third

Second ** '*

First ''








55 00

60 00
70 00
80 00
80 OO



Tliese charges are subject to change by vote of the Board of
Directors.

No extras will be charged.

No pupil will be received for less than one term, and no
abatement in tuition ^Yill be made for absence, whether such
absence occur at the beginning, middle or end of the term.

Graduates of Mary Institute are admitted to any studies of
the course upon payment of an entrance fee of fifteen dollars.



BOARD.

Upon application, effort will be made to find board in good
families on reasonable terms. Any persons willing to take
young ladies as boarders are requested to leave their address
with some member of the Faculty.



For more particular in formation in respect to Mary Institute,
reference may be made to the Principal or to any of the
Faculty; or to the Secretary of Washington University.



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The Manual Training School.



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MANAGING BOARD OF THE MANUAL
TRAINING SCHOOL.



EDWIN HARRISON, Chairman . . 3747 Westminster pi.

HENRY W. ELIOT 2635 Locust st.

SAMUEL CUPPLES 3673 Pine st.

WILLIAM L. HUSE 9 Westmoreland pi.

HENRY C. HAARSTICK .... Russell & Louisiana avs.
E. C. SIMMONS 21 Westmoreland pi.

C. M. WOODWARD,

Secretary.
Office at the University.



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OFFICERS AND TEACHERS.

W. 8. CHAPLIN, LL.D., Chancellor . 8686 West Pine st.
C. M. WOODWARD, Ph. D., Director 8018 Hawthorne av.
W. F. HANCOCK, First Lieut. 6th U. S.

Artillery, Professor of Military Science

and Tactics The Franklin.

GEORGE W.ERALL,Assistant in Charge

of Third- Year Class, and Teacher of

Physics and Civics 3784B Olive st.

CHARLES HJPOONER, A. B., Assist-
ant in Charge of Second-Year Class,

and Teacher of English and Mathe-
matics 26 Nicholson pi.

WM. R. ViCKROY, Ph. B., Assistant

in Charge of First -Year Class, and

Teacher of Algebra and English . . 3542 Washington av.
CHARLES £. JONES, Instructor in

Forging and Auditor of Shop Accounts 231 4 University st.
OSCAR W. RAEDER, Instructor in

Drawing 2227 Warren st.

GEORGE B. SW AFFORD, Instructor In

Wood-work 6910 Theodosia av

•MARIAN E. COX, Ph. B., Instructor in

Chemistry and History

GEORGE ARROWSMITH, Instructor in

Wood-work and Molding 7024 Stanley av.

JANET C. GLOSS, Ph. M., Instructor

in Modern Languages 3864 Windsor pi.

*CLARA L. WOODWARD, Instructor in

Latin and English



* On leave of absence, at tbe University of Ziirich, Switzerland.

36



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242 WASHIHGTON CNIVKR8ITT.

CHARLES N. McFARLAND (Graduate,
Class 1 892), Instructor of Machlne-Tool
Metal Work 6094 Ridge av.

WILLIAM H. ALLEN, A. B. (Graduate,
Class 1890), Instructor in Matliematics 815 Chouteau av.

HERMANN VON SCHRENK, A. M., In-
structor in Biology and Botany . . .2110 Waverly pi.

LENAK. DIETRICH, Ph. B., Instructor
in Chemistry and History 8613 N. Broadway.

CLARA SESSINGHAUS, Ph.B., Instruc-
tor in Latin and English 2901 Rauschenbach av.

WILLIS HENRY GROCOTT, E. E.
(Graduate, Class of 1891), Assistant in
Drawing 1812 Coleman st.

SUMMARY OP ENROLLMENT, 1895-6.

Third-Year Class 49

SecoDd-Year Class 88

First- Year Class 108

Total 245



ORGANIZATION.

The Manual Training School is a secondary or pre-
paratory school between the District or Grammar School
on the one hand, and the Engineering or Polytechnic
School on the other. It was organized to effect several
ends:

1. To f Ornish a broader and more appropriate founda-
tion for higher technical education.

2. To serve as a developing school where pupils could
discover their inborn capacities and aptitudes, whether in



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MANUAL TRAIKINO SCHOOL. 248

the direction of literature, science, or the practical arts,
while secaring a liberal elementary training. Its useful-
ness is by no means limited to those who have a fondness
for mechanics. Its training is of general educational
value.

3. To furnish those who look forward to industrial
life opportunity to become familiar with tools, materials,
drafting, and the methods of construction, as well as with
ordinary English branches.

The ordinance establishing the Manual Training
School was adopted by the Board of Directors of the
University, June 6, 1879.* The ordinance declared: —

" The students will divide their working hours, as nearly
as possible, equally between mental and manual exer-
cises. They shall be admitted, on examination, at not
less than fourteen years of age, and the course shall con-
tinue three years."

On September 6, 1880, the school opened with a single
class of about 50 pupils. It is accordingly now in its
Sixteenth Year.

During the summer of 1882, the large addition front-
ing on Washington avenue was built and furnished ; this
nearly doubled the capacity of the school. The rooms of
the school are now much crowded.



* Shop-work had already been maintained for seven years
among the classes of the Engineering School in buildings on
the University grounds.



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244 WASHIMttTON UNIVER8ITT.



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION.

Candidates for admission to the First-Year class must
be at least fourteen years old, and each must present a
certificate of good moral character signed by a former
teacher.

They must also, unless presenting diplomas as ex-
plained below, pass a good examination on the following
subjects : —

1. Arithmetic, including the fundamental rules ; com-
mon and decimal fractions ; the tables of weights, meas-
ures, and their use; percentage; interest; and analysis
of miscellaneous problems. Candidates will be examined
orally in mental arithmetic, including fractions, mixed
numbers, and the higher multiplication table.

2. Common School Geography, including map-drawing
from memory.

3. Spelling and Penmanship.

4. The writing of good descriptive and narrative En-
glish, with the correct use of capitals and punctuation.

5. Reading aloud with distinctness and correct ex-
pression.

G. The History of the United States.

Candidates for the Second-Year class must be at least
fifteen years old. All that is specified above will be
required of them, and, in addition, the studies of the
First- Year class.

Similar advanced requirements apply to those desiring
to enter the Third- Year class.



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 215

ALL PDPILS ARE ADVISED TO TAKE THE FULL COURSE.

All pupils are advised to enter the First- Year class
rather than to aim to save a year's expense by waiting
to enter the Second Year. The drawing and shopwork
of the First Year cannot fully be made up, and the boy
who skips the first year is more or less handicapped in all
the subsequent work. A pupil cannot as a rude recite with
one grade and work in the shop with another,

CERTIFICATES.

When candidates can present diplomas showing that
they have completed a thorough course of study pre-
paratory to a high school, or have done satisfactory work
in a high school or school of equal grade, they may be
admitted without examination.

Occasionally boys living at a distance from St. Louis are
examined at their homes, on questions furnished by the
Director.

Vacancies may be filled at any time^ provided the ap-
plicants are prepared to enter existing classes.

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION.

An examination of candidates for admission will be
held at the school on Thursday, June 18, beginning at
nine o'clock. A second examination of applicants will be
held on Friday, September 18.

The scope of the examinations for admission is best
shown by old examination papers, which will be sent by
mail on application.



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246 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITT.



THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION

covers three years, and embraces five parallel lines — as
follows : —

First — A coarse of pare Mathematics, inclading Mental
Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Plane Trigonometry.

Second — A course in Science, inclading Biology,
Botany, Chemistry, and Physics, all with laboratory
practice.

Third — A coarse in Language and Literature, inclad-
ing English Grammar, Spelling, Rhetoric, Composition,
Literature, History, and the elements oi Civics and
Political Economy. Latin, French and German are
introdaced as electives with a part of the English and
Science or History.

Fourth — A course in Vertical Penmanship, Free-hand
and Instraraental Drawing.

Fifth — A course of Tool Instruction, inclading Join-
ery, Wood-Carving, Wood-Tarning, Molding, Pattern-
Making, Soldering, Forging, and Bench and Machine
Work in Metals.

MILITARY DRILL.

During the second and third years of the course, an
average of two hours per week is devoted to systematic
instruction and practice in military drill. The students
of these years are organized as three companies, which
are ander the general direction of Lieut. W. F. Hancock,
5th U. S. Artillery, Commandant of the University
Battalion. The arms and accoutrements are furnished



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MA.NUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 247

by the U. S. Government, but each stadent is required
to provide his uniform — costing about thirteen dollars.
The drill, whether in squad, company, or battalion, is
not allowed to interfere with the usual program of study
and work.

The arrangement of studies, tool-work, etc. , by years
is substantially as follows : —

[An ^' hoar " generally means 50 minutes.]
FIRST YEAR.

Algebra: Three hours a week for the year. Fundamental pro-
cesses, factoring, fractions, equations of one and of two
unknown quantities, and problems involving the same.
Text-book: Wells's Academic Algebra.

Mental Arithmetic : One hour a week for the year. Special
attention to the use of fractions.
Text-books: Stoddard's Intellectual Arithmetic.

Themes: Five hours a week for one term. A one-page Theme
four times a week, and a long theme^ with " brief " for the
same, once a week on subjects chosen principally by the
pupils from observation or from experience.

English History: Five hours a week for one term. From the
Beginnings through the Georges*
Text-book: " Leading Facts of English History."

LiTEEATURB : One hour a week for the year. A study of a few
typical early English ballads, some of Wordsworth's lyrics,
Shakespeare's Macbeth, and George Eliot's Silas Marner
with a view to cultivate an ability to appreciate literature.
(The boys taking Latin, French or German write and revise
one theme a week in connection with this study.)

Biology: Five hours a week for sixteen weeks. The study of
Typical Animal forms, their structure and habits. Refer-
ence Book: Burnet's "School Zoology." All instruction
is given in the biological laboratary, and the pupils study



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248 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

actaal specimens of insects, fishes or animals, witli the aid
of glass and instrnments. Drawings and written descrip-
tions are required of all pnpils.
Kinds and. (Jsbs of Wood : Fifteen ezercUes,

Botany: Five hours a vseek for fifteen weeks. A study of the
growth and structure of plants.
Text-book: Bergen's ^* Elements of Botany."

Free -Hand Drawing: Five hours a week for fourteen weeks.
Projection of points, lines, and solids in space ; lettering in
many different alphabets; and elements of surface decora*
tion.

instrumental Drawing: Five hours a week for twenty -four
weeks. One sheet of straight lines and circular arcs in an
interlaced design; one of line shading; and two sheets of
machinery details from free-hand sketches. The prepara-
tion of drawings for the exercises in woodwork.

Joinery: Ten hours a week for fourteen weeks. The use of the
different hand tools, and the making of simple joints.

Wood Carving: Ten hours a week for five weeks. The use of
carving tools in ornamental line work and the shaping of
simple designs in low relief.

Wood-Turning : Ten hours a week for nineteen weeks. Face-
plate and center turning. Polishing and simple designing.

ELECTIVE 8.

Those who show a satisfactory proficiency in the use of the
English language will be allowed to choose Latin or German
or French in the place of Themes and History, provided
there be a sufficient number to form a division in any one
of those studies.

Latin : Five hours a week for the year. Grammar and Reader.
Latin Composition.

French : Five times per week. Grammar — Whitney's Practical
French, La Langue Francaise (Bercy).

German: Five times per week. Grammar: Joynes-Meissuer ;
Conversation — Fischer's Practical Lessons; Beading —
Der Zerbrochens Krug (Zschokke).



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 249



SECOND YEAR.



Algebra : Five hours per week for twenty weeks. The use of frac-
tional exponents, reduction and combination of radicals, the
solution of quadratic equations and equations containing
radicals. The graphical interpretation of equations of first
and second degrees is considered, and simultaneous values
are illustrated. Text-book, Wells*s Academic Algebra.

Qbometry: Five hours per week for twenty weeks. Five books
of Wells's Geometry are thoroughly mastered. The ability
to reason correctly is cultivated not only by standard dem-
onstrations^ but by numerous Independent theorems and
problems.

English: Five hours per ti^eek for twenty weeks. Standard
books in prose and poetry (Dickens, Goldsmith, Scott or
Holmes) are carefully read and used as the basis of frequent
themes.

History: Four hours per week for twenty weeks. English His-
tory for those who did not have it during the First Year;
otherwise, Ancient History, especially Persian and Grecian.

Composition: One hour a week for twenty weeks. Themes
written from field notes and observations among the indus-
tries of St. Louis.

Chsmistry : Four hours per week for twenty or forty weeks (as
per electives). First term, sixty experiments are made
and recorded by each student. Additional and more difficult
experiments are made by the teacher and recorded by pupils.
Second term, Remsen^s Manual is completed by the class.

Drawing. Five hours per week for forty loeeks. Orthographic
projections of intersecting solids and the development of
their surfaces; Tinting with brush; Free-hand Detail
Sketches, and Instrumental drawings from the sketches;
Isometric Drawings and Graining; Geometrical Drawing;
Ornamental Lettering and Border Design.

Pattern-Making and Moulding: Ten hours per week for ten
weeks. Patterns made, molded, and cast in plaster; cores



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260 WASHINGTON UNIVBB8ITT.

made aud baked. . The principles of soldering are acquired
and sheet metal forms are produced.

FORQING: Ten hours per toeek for thirty weeks. All elementary
processes of the forge are learned including welding iron,
and forging and tempering a set of steel tools for each
pupil. Projects of ornamental wrought iron or steel work.

Military Drill: Two hours a week for Uiirty weeks. The
school of the soldier and the company.

BLBCTIVES.

Latin may be continued through three Books of Cssar; or
German or French may be continued or taken np in the
place of one term of History and one term of Chemistry by
those who desire it and whose standing in English work
will admit.

Latin: Five hours per week through the year. Grammar and
Composition continued and three Books of Ceesar.

French: Five times per week. Whitney's Practical French con-
tinued. Selected Readings, Sight-reading and Written
Exercises,

German: Five times per week, Grammar continued ; Conversa-



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 12 of 70)