Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

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the material involved. Three recitations a week,

Mr. Van Ornum.
10. Engineering Materials. A review of the principles of me-
chanics relating especially to the strength of materials,
both inside and beyond their elastic limits, together with
the description of methods of testing the strength of ma-
terials and a discussion of the essential properties of the
more common materials of engineering construction, such
as iron, steel, wood, cement, stone, brick, etc. Three
recitations a week. Professor Johnson,



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46 WASBIHGTOll CHITKB8ITT.

11. Testing Laboratory Practice. Experimental tests in the

testing laboratory made by the student on the strength of
the Tarions kinds of engineering materials named in 10.
Tktte hours a week for one year. Mr. Van Omum,

12. Hydraalics. A study of the theoretical and empirical laws of

the flow of water as related to orifices, weirs, pipes, canals,
natural channels, etc. Two recitations a week.

Professor Johnson.

13. Irrigation and Drainage. The principles and practice of

modem irrigation methods, including a study of all the
elements of a complete irrigation scheme, and also a study
of the methods of drainage of land.
City Water Supply. The principles and practice governing
the collection, storage, pumping, settling, filtering, and
distribution of potable waters, as modified by the various
conditions governing the supply, and the various demands
of the city service. Two recitations a week.

Professor Johnson.

14. Sewerage and Drainage of Cities. The practical designing

of systems of sewerage and drainage of cities, together
with a study of the various methods of sewage disposal,
the principles of house drainage, sanitary plumbing, etc.
Three recitations a week. Professor Johnson.

15. Specifications and Contracts. The study of the principles

of the law of contracts as applied to engineering work,
together with typical forms of specifications governing
both the commercial and the technical features of engi-
neering construction, and of all the related documents
pertaining to engineering contracts. One recitation a
week. Professor Johnson.

10. Higher Course in the Strength of Engineering Materials.
The elements of the theory of elasticity as applied to the
strength of materials within the elastic limit, together
with a study of the more elaborate special investigations
in the strength and the fatigue of engineering materials,
which have been made abroad, and of the various types



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 47

of testing machines in common use in this and in other
countries. Three recitatioriB a week. Professor Johnson.

17. River and Harbor ImproYements. A stndy of the principles

and of the current practice at home and abroad, in the
matter of the improvement of low water navigation of
inland rivers, together with the methods employed for
the protection of unstable banks, and the prevention of
destructive floods. Also, a study of the methods pursued
in improvement works at the months of rivers, and in the
construction of artificial harbors. Three hours a week.

Professor Johnson,

18. Advanced Course in Engineering Design. The preparation

of original designs for various kinds of civil engineering
structures, with all the computations, plans and specifica-
tions for the same. Six hours a week.

Professor Johnson,

19. The Economic Design of Metallic Bridges. A study of the

principles of economy involved in the designing of such
structures, with the application of these principles to all
the more common styles of metallic truss bridges. Two
Jiours a week. Professor Johnson.

20. Seminary Work. The preparation of abstracts and reports

on assigned subjects, the information^ to be found either
from the direct study of the works themselves, or of
descriptions of them as found in the technical library.
These subjects are assigned to individaal members of the
class two or three weeks in advance of the date assigned
for making the report, at which time the student occupies
the hour in presenting the subject to the class and the
instructor. One object of this course is to enable the
students to become acquainted with the best eugineering
literature, whether in formal monographs, or in society
proceedings, or in the leading technical journals. Three
Jiours a week. Professor Johnson.

21. Professional Thesis. An extended study or design, involving

original investigation or experiment, intended to show



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48 WASHINGTON UNIYBRSITT.

the ability of ttie student to conduct an important study
of tills ]£ind to a successful issue.

Under the direction of TroftBsor Johnson,

22. Structural Drawing. To accompany course 6. Six hours a

week. Mr, Van Omum,

23. Engineering Design. Supplementary to courses 7, 9, 13, U.

Eight hours a week. Professor Johnson,

MECHANICAL EN6INEEBINQ.

1. Kinematics of Machinery. The principles of mechanism,

rolling curves, cams, teeth of wheels, link work and
escapements. Three recitations a week, Mr, Boehm,

2. Kinematics of Machinery. Trains of mechanism, epicyclic

trains, and the efficiency of mechanisms. Two recita-
tions a week. Mr, Boehm,

3. Machinery. The details of pipe-fitting, pulleys, shafting,

belting, erecting machinery, dynamometers, lubrication
and lubricants, and calorimeter tests of fuels. Two leC'
tures a week. Professor Kinealy,

4. 'Elementary Steam Euginceriug. An elementary study of
thermodynamics, the theory of the steam engine, types of
engines, valves and valve diagrams, indicators and indi-
cator cards, combustion of fuel, and boilers and chim-
neys. Three recitations a week. Professor Kinealy,

5. Machinery Drawing. The drawing of straight line motions,
pipe-fittings, and the teeth of wheels. Six hours a week.

Mr, Boehm,

G. Machinery Drawing. Tlie drawing of details of the steam
engine, link motions, and valve diagrams. Six hours a
week. Mr, Boehm.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. The standardization of instru-

ments, lining up and adjusting the steam engine, the use
of the indicator, valve-setting, and tests of the steam
engine. Three hours a week, Mr. Boehm,

8. Advanced Steam Engineering. The study of the details of



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00U1WIE8 OF UnrfRUCTIOK. 49

different engines; also^ the thermodynamics ot heat

engines. T%ree recitations a week. Pro feasor Kinealy .

9. Steam Engine Designing. The theory and practice ot engine

designing. JTiree lectures a week. Professor Klnealy.

10. Bteam Bngine Designing. Work in drawing room to

accompany course 9. Six hours a week.

Professor Kinealy.

11. Steam Engine Designing. Work in drawing room to

accompany course 9 for students in Electrical Engineer-
ing. Two hours a week. Professor Ktnealy,

12. Bteam Boiler and Chimney Designing. The theory and

practice of boiler and chimney designing. Two lectures a
week. Professor Kinealy,

18. Steam Boiler and Chimney Designing. Work In the draw-
ing room to accompany course 12. Six hours a week.

Professor Klnealy,
U. Ilachine Designing. Study of the principles involved in the
designing of machines. Two recitations a week.

Professor Kinealy,
10. Machine Designing. The transmission of power by shaft-
ing, gearing, belts and ropes. Two recitations a week.

Professor Kinealy,

16. Hydraulic Machinery. The theory of pumpiug machinery,

water wheels and turbines. One hour a week.

Professor Kinealy,

17. (a) Mill and factory construction ; slow burning construc-

tion. Three lectures a week for a part of a term,
(fi) The elements of the theory and practice of heating and
ventilating buildings. Three lectures a week for a part of
a term. Professor Kinealy.

18. Mechanical Laboratory. Tests of steam and gas engines,

and tests of lubricants. Three hours a week,

Mr. Boehm,

19. Mechanical Laboratory. Calorimeter tests of fuels, chim-

ney gas analysis, boiler tests; vlsitiug manufacturing
establishments. Siz hours a week, Mr. Boehm,



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50 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

20. MechaDical Laboratory. A sliort coarse of work with the

steam engine for students in Civil Engineering. Two
howB a week' Mr. Boehm,

21. Heating and Ventilating, Refrigeration. Study in detail of

the various systems of heating and ventilating buildings ;
an elementary discussion of refrigeration and refrigera-
tion machinery. Three hours a week. Professor Kinealy,

22. Gas and Petroleum Engines. A study of gas and petroleum

engines. Two hours a week. Professor Kinealy,

23. Designing. Work in the drawing room; making designs of

shops and factories, power, plants, and heating and ven-
tilating systems. Six hours a week. Professor Kinealy.

24. Mechanical Laboratory. Special investigations. Six hours

a week. Mr. Boehm.

25. Power Transmission. The transmission of power by air

and water. Two hours a week. Professor Kinealy.

26. Railway and Marine Engineering. Study of locomotives,

and marine engines. Three hours a week.

Professor Kinealy.

27. Thesis. A critical review of some mechanical construction,

or a complete design of some machine or power plant.



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THE COLLEGE.



Admission.

Candidates for admission to the College will present
themselves for examination on Monday, June 14, 1897, in
room No. 8, east wing of the University Bailding, at 9
o'clock A. M. A second examination will be held on
Tuesday and Wednesday, September 21 and 22, for such
candidates as cannot be present in June.

Division op the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, pass the
entire examination at one time; or he may divide it (1)
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year; provided he is prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other colleges are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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52 washington uhiversitt.

Requirements for Admission to the Freshman Class.*

I. Elements of English. Neat and readable hand-
writing; correct spelling, punctuation and use
of capitals; proper construction of sentences;
clearness and conciseness of expression.
II. Algebra^ including radicals and equations of the
second degree.

III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry, Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IV. Latin. Grammar, four books of Caesar, seven

orations of Cicero, and six books of the ^neid
of Virgil. Prose Composition.
V. Modern Language. Either French or German at
the option of the candidate ; facility in reading
ordinary prose at sight and knowledge of ele-
mentary grammar shown by the ability to trans-
late easy sentences from English into French or
German.

VI. History. Of the United States and of England,
such as is found in any text-book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools ; of
Greece and Rome, such as is found in Pennell's
or Smith's Small Histories.

VII. Elementary Physics. Either o or 6.

a. As much as is contained in such books
as Gage's ^* Introduction to Physical Science,"
or Appleton's *^ School Physics."

* Note. Greeit is not required for admiaslon; bat candidates who In-
tend to continue the atady of Greek after admiaslon to the OoUose nust
falfillthe following reqalrements:—

Goodwin's Grammar and Keader; or Grammar, foar booka of the
Anabasis, and three books of the Iliad ; prose composition.



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THS COLLKOB. 58

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
*' Text-Book of Physics."

Spscial Stcbents.

Special students may be admitted to one or more
courses in the College upon the following conditions: —

1. That evidence of proper preparation, satisfactory to
the committee and to the instructors concerned, be sub.
mitted before admission to any course or courses.

2. That candidates for degrees who fail in the work of
the regular courses shall not have the privilege of becom-
ing Special Students, unless such failure shall come from
physical inability to do the required work.

3. That Special Students shall not be regarded as can-
didates for a degree.

All matters concerning Special Students are referred
to a standing committee of the Faculty, which is composed
of Professors Snow, Waterhouse and Sanger. Applica-
tions should be made to Professor Snow, Chairman.

ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE COLLEGE.



Fbxshman Ykar.

♦ Prescribed Studies,

English, courses 1 and 2, three times a week.

German, courses 1 and 2, or French, courses 1 and 2, for
those who do not present both of these languages for admission.
Three times a week.



* The Ugares uidicate the nnmberB of the Coarees of Instraotion.
&%9 pp. 81-^.



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54 WABUINOTON mnVESSITY.

Elective Studies.

lu addition to the prescribed studies, every Freshman Is re-
quired to take each term elective studies amount'ng to three full
courses. No Freshman may elect more than one course in the
same subject without the consent of the Dean.
The following courses are open to Freshmen:—

Greek, 1, 2.

Latin, 1,2.

English, 1, 2.

German, 1, 2.

French, 1, 2.

History, 1, 2.

Mathematics, 1, 2.

Drawing, I, 2.

Physics, 1,2.

Chemistry, 1, 2.

Botany, 1, 2.
A Freshman who is qualified to take a higher course in any
study named above may do so, with the permission of the
instructor of the course and the Dean of the College.

Sophomore and Junior Ykars.

The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Junior years
consists of :—

English, courses 3, 4, and 5, 6.

Besides the prescribed courses every Sophomore and every
Junior is required to take each term four elective courses, or an
equivalent amount of courses and half courses.

Senior Year.
Eight courses, all elective, are required for the Senior year.

ADVISERS.

A Standing Committee of five members of the Faculty
is appointed annually to advise students of the College



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THB COLLKOB. 65

in the choice of studies and to assist them in making a
wise arrangement of their work. The Committee for
the year 1896-97 consists of Professors Snow, Water-
house, Pritchett, Trelease, Heller.

CHOICE OF 8TUDIB8.

Every student is required to give notice in writing to
the Dean of the College on the first day of each term of
his choice of studies for that term.

Changes may be made only by permission of the Ad-
visers, to whom application must be made in writing,
with a full statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any course for
which his previous training has not fully prepared him.

REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
ARTS. .

The satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses of
one term each, with three recitations a week (or their
equivalent), is necessary to fulfill the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Arte.



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THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.



Admisuon.



Candidates for admission to the School of Engineering
will present themselves for examination on Monday, June
14, 1897, in room No. 8, east wing of the UniverBity
Building, at 9 o'clock a. m. A second examination will
be held on Tuesday and Wednesday, September 21 and
22, for such candidates as cannot be present in June.

Division of the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, pass the
entire examination at one time ; or he may divide it (1)
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year ; provided he is prepared at the flrst
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other institutions are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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thb aohool of bnoinbbrimg. 57

Rbquirbmsnts fob Admission to thb Frbsqman Class.

I. Elements of English. Neat and readable hand-
writing ; oorreot spelling, ponoiuatioii and use of
capitals ; proper construction of sentenoes ; clean-
ness and conciseness of expression.
II. Algebra y including radical^ and equations of the
second degree.

III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry. Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IV. Modern Language. Either French or German at

the option of the candidate ; facility in reading
ordinary prose at sight, and a knowledge of ele-
mentary grammar shown by the ability to trans,
late easy sentences from English into Freaoh or
German.
V. History. Of the United States and of England,
such as is found in any text-book on history in-
tended for the use of preparatory schools.
VI. Elementary Physics. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books as
Gage's *' Introduction to Physical Science,"
or Appleton's '* School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
"Text-Book of Physics,"

VIII. Drawing, a. Free-hand drawing in outline from
groups of simple objects, b. Simple free-hand
lettering.

Candidates for the Freshman Class must be at least
sixteen years old.



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58 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITT.

ARKANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF EN-
GmEEBING.

The courses of study in the School of Engineering are
five in number : —

I. Civil Engineering.

II. Mechanical Engineering.

III. Electrical Engineering.

IV. Chemistry.

V. Science and Literature.

* Frbshman Ybar.
The same for all Courses,

FIRST TBRM.

Mathematics, 1. f Chemistry, 1.

Physics, 1. English, 1.

French o
German



French or i Drawing, 1.

^ 1 or 8.



SECOND TERM.

Mathematics, 2. Chemistry, 2.

Physics, 2. English, 2.

French o
German



French or ^ Drawing, 2.

V2or4. ^*



L CIVIL ENGINEERING.
Freshman Year.
(See above.)

Sophomore Year,
first term.
Mathematics, 8. Descriptive Geometry, I.

Physics, 8. Civil Engineering, 1.



* In the School of Kn^ineerlng all the stadles for each oonne are
prescribed ; there Is no choice except as indicated .

t The flgares Indicate the numbers of the Ooarses of Instmotlon.
See pp. 81-«>.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF KMGINEKRINQ. 59

French or 'k Drawing, 8.

German ]^^^^' Shop-work, 1 .

SECOND TERM.

Mathematics, 4. Civil Engineering, 2, 8.

Physics, 4. Drawing, 4.

Mechanics, 1. Shop-work, 2.
Descriptive Geometry, 2.

Junior Year,
first term.
Mathematics, 5. Mechanics, 2.

Civil Engineering, 4, 5. Physics, 6.

Chemistry, 12. Shop- work, 8.

second TERM.

Civil Engineering, 6, 10, 22. Mechanics, 8.

Mechanical Engineering, 4. Physics, 6.

Geology, 1.

Senior Tear.
first term.
Civil Engineering, 7, II, 12, 18. Mechanics 4, 6
Mechanical Engineering, 20. Astronomy, 1 .

SECOND TERM.

Civil Engineering, Mechanics, 6.

9, 11, 14, 15, 16, 23. Astronomy, 2.
Mechanical Engineering, 16.

Fifth Tear.

first term.
Civil Engineering, 16, 17, 18, 20. Mathematics, 7.
Physics, 7. Political Economy, 1 .

SECOND TERM.

Civil Engineering, 20, 21, 22. Mathematics, 6.

Mechanical Engineering, 18, 19. Chemistry, 17.



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60 WAaBIKGTON UKIVBRSITT.

II. Ml^CHANICAL ENGINEERING.
Fkmhman Ysar.

(See p. 58.)

80FHOMORB Tear.

FIRST TERM.

Mathematics, S. Descriptive Geometry, 1.

Physics, B. Civil Engineering, 1.

French or \ 3 ©r 6 Drawing, 8.

German, / ' Shop-work, 1.

SECOND TERM.

Mathematics, 4. Civil Engineering, 2, 3.

Physics, 4. Drawing, i.

Mechanics^ 1. Shop- work, 9.
Descriptive Geometry, 2.

Junior Year.

riRST TERM.

Mechanical EngineerUig^ 1» a, 5. . Mechanics, 9.
Physics, 6. Shop-work, 3.

Mathematics, 5.

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Mechanics, S.

2, 4, 6, 7. Physics, 6.
Civil Engineering, 8, 10.

Senior Year,
first term.
Mechanical Engineering, Mechanics, 4.

8, 9, 10, 14, 18. Physics, 7, 8.
ClvU Engineering, 11, 12.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF EKOtNEERING. 61

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, 11, 18.

12, 18, 15, 16, 17, 19. Mechanics, 5.

FiPTH Year.

FIRST TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics, 7.

21, 22,28, 24. Physics, 16.
Political Economy, 1 . Astronomy, 1.

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics, 6.

26, 26, 27. Chemistry, 17.

III. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
Freshman Tsar.
(See p. 68.)

Sophomore Year,
first term.
Mathematics, 8. Descriptive Geometry, 1.

Physics, 8. Civil Engineering, 1.

French or ^ Drawing, 8.

German ;• ^^ *• Shop-work, 1.

SECOND TERM.

Mathematics, 4. CivU Engineering, 2, 3.

Physics, 4. Drawing, 4.

Mechanics, 1. Shop-work, 2.

Descriptive Geometry, 2.

Junior Tear,
first term.
Physics, 6. Mathematics, 5.

Mechanical Engineering, 1, 8, 5. Mechanics, 2.
Chemistry, 12. Shop-work, 8.



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62 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITT.

SECOND TERM.

Physics, 6. Mechanics, 8.

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, 8, 10.

2,4,6, 7. Geology, 1.

Senior Tear.

FIRST TERM.

Physics, 7, 8, 9. Mechanics, 4.

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, 11, 12

8, 9, 10, 14.

SECOND TERM.

Physics, 10, 11, 18. Mechanics, 5.

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, II.

12, 16, 16.

Fifth Year.

FIRST TERM.

Physics, 12, 14. Mathematics, 7.

Astronomy, 1. Political Economy, 1.

SECOND TERM.

Physics, 10, 12, 14. Mathematics, 6.

Mechanical Engineering, 16. Mechanics, 6.

Thesis. Civil Engineering, 15.

IV. CHEMISTRY.

Freshman Year.

(See p. 58.)

Sophomore Year.

first TERM.

Chemistry, 8, 5, 12. Mathematics, 8.

Physics, 8. French or \

German /»^^^-



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STUDIBS IH THB SCHOOL OP BNOIMEERING.



63



Chemistry y 4, 6^ 13.
Mechanics, I.
Physics, 4.



S1BCOND TBRM.



Mathematics, 4.
French or i



German



► 4 or 6.



Chemistry, 7, 9, 14.
Physics, 6.
Mathematics, 5.



Chemistry, 8, 10, 16.
Physics, 6.
Scientific German.



Junior Ykar.
first trrm.



\ 1 or 3
) 6 or 7.



French ^ 1 or 3

or
German



SECOND TERM.



French \ 2 or 4

or S
German j 6 or 8.



Senior Year,
first term.

Chemistry, 16, 18, and 20 or 22.

Electives — These elective courses will be selected, after con-
sultation with the Instractors, according to the direction of
the student's worlc. Among such courses may be men-
tioned : Electricity, Botany, Geology, and Bacteriology.

second term.

Chemistry, 11, 19, and 21 or 23.

Electives — As specified under the worlc of the first term, with

the addition of Course 17.
Preparation of Thesis.



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64 WASHIKaTOM UMIVBRBITT.

V. SCIENCE AND LITERATURE.

Freshman and Sophomore Years.

(Bee p. 68.)

Junior Year.
The work of the Junior year consists of nine courses, all
elective. The choice of studies must be approved by the
Dean of the School of Engineering at the beginning of each
term.

Senior Year.
The woric of the Senior year consists of nine courses, all
elective. The choice of studies must be approved by the
Dean of the School of Engineering at the beginning of each
term.

THE OBSERVATORY.

The work of the Observatory comes under three heads : —

1. Practical instruction is given in the determination
of time, latitude and longitude, and the ordinary observ-
ations of spherical astronomy. Students desiring a
special professional course in astronomy will be given
full facilities in both reading and practice.

2. A regular scheme of scientific work is carried on.
This work embraces equatorial observations of the planets
and double stars, together with a large amount of meri-
dian work.

3. As far as possible it is the intention to give in the
Observatory opportunities for popular instruction and for
viewing the more interesting objects.

The instrumental equipment is well adapted for in-



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THE OBSERVATORY. 65

struction in Sidereal Astrouomy. The following arc the
principal instruments : —

The EquaJtOTio.l — Objective G 1-2 inches, reground by
Clark; mounted in most excellent style by Warner &
Swazy, Cleveland, Ohio. The mounting includes driving
clock, micrometers, circles and a complete battery of
eye-pieces.

The George Partridge Transit Instrument — Objective
3 inches. The instrument was made by Fauth & Co., and



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 16 of 70)