Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

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nature. Experience has shown that where there is
natural aptitude for public speaking, students by this
means alone can become ready and effective speakers
during the two years of the course. But for the purpose
of more thorough instruction in this branch of the profes-
sional work, and in the proper care, management and
preservation of the voice, upon which so much of the
value of the lawyer's work depends, exercises in elocu-
tion will hereafter form a part of the regular course,
nnder the care of Mr. Edward P. Perry, Instructor in
Elocution in Washington University, who will give each
class an exercise of this kind weekly.

The expense of this instruction is defrayed by the
School. Students who desire private lessons in addition
to these will have an opportunity of obtaining them from
the same teacher.

LIBRARY AND TEXT-BOOKS.

The Law Library, for the use of which no charge is
made, consists of about 7,000 volumes, selected with
great care, and including more than two hundred extra
copies of the text-books in use.



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12 i WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY,

The expense of text-books for the entire course, if
purchased new and of the latest editions, is about $75.
This sum may be materially reduced by the purchase of
second-hand books which may be usually had in consid-
erable variety. All the books used in recitation may be
found in the Library and can be studied there free of
charge, but not taken from the room.

GRADUATION,

Applicants for the degree of LL.B. must have been
members of the Senior Class for the required time, and
must have attended with the prescribed regularity. They
will deliver to the Dean on or before the fifteenth day of
May an original thesis upon some legal subject approved
by the Faculty. The subject of the thesis for the year
1896 was: *' Rights and Remedies of a Beneficiary of a
Trust, as against the Trustee and third Persons, in case
of misappropriation of the Propert}^ held in Trust."

They must pass the examination prescribed by the
Advisory and Examining Board, and conducted by a
committee of that Board. This examination will be in
writing, upon questions prescribed by the Committee,
and answered under the supervision of the Faculty, with-
out the use of books or any other assistance. It usually
occupies an entire week, and is held early in June. As
the degree of LL.B. conferred by this University entitles
the holder to admission to the bar, it will not be granted
except upon the most satisfactory evidence of actual pro-
ficiency, or to any person who will not have attained the
age of twenty-one years on or before the first of October
following, at the latest.



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LAW SCHOOL. 125

By the Revised Statutes of Missouri of 1889, § 62-1
(Vol. 1, p. 237), all who have completed this course and
taken this degree are entitled to practice law in this State
without further examination, upon taking the oath pre-
scribed in the constitution and laws (§ 608, and Const.,
Art. XIV., § 6).

The above examination is upon all the subjects of the
two years* course, and is in addition to the Faculty ex-
aminations held upon the individual subjects during the
two years.

FEES AND EXPENSES.

The annual fee for attendance in either class is $80,
payable in advance. There are no extra charges of any
kind, and the members of either class are free to attend
all lectures and exercises of both ; but no student can at
the same time be a regular member of more tban one
class. No reduction will be made from the term fee, nor
any part of it returned for absence from any cause.

Good board and lodging can readily be obtained in the
city at from $4 to $5 per week. The expense may be
lessened to students rooming together. The average
price paid for board with rooms during the last two or
three years by students in good houses near the Law
School is believed to have been not over $20 per month,
while some have obtained it as low as $15.

Those who find it necessary to earn a part of their liv-
ing in other pursuits while takiug the course can do so by
lengthening that course from two to three years, taking a
propotionate part of the class-work (to be designated by
the Faculty according to circumstances of each case) in



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126 WASHINGTON CNIVERSITT.

each year. Every facility will be extended to them for
such an arrangement ; and the charge for tuition in such
cases will only be for two years ; but no other diminution
of the daily requirements of attendance and study will
be sanctioned, except in the ease of special students not
candidates for a degree.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDY IN OTHER DE-
PARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

Students paying full tuition in the Law Department
may take special studies in the Undergraduate Depart-
ment without additional charge for tuition, provided they
are able to do so without interference or neglect of any
part of the Law course. To avail themselves of this
privilege, they must present for each course a written
introduction from the Dean of the Law Faculty and must
engage to attend such course punctually, and to conform
to the same regulations with other students of that
course.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES.

In pursuance of the terms of a donation of $6,000 here-
tofore made to the University for the benefit of the Law
School, six free scholarships are established in this de-
partment ; also an annual prize of $50 in money for tbe
best thesis upon some legal topic, to be publicly awarded
at Commencement. Competition for this prize is confined
to the regular members of the graduating class in each
year under regulations duly announced.

Applicants for free sc?iolarsht2)s should apply in person
or by letter to the Dean, on or before the fifteenth



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LAW SCHOOt. 127

(lay of September, furnisbiDg written testimonials of
at least two responsible persons, that the pecuniary cir-
cumstances of the applicant are such as to make him
deserving of this assistance, that he is of good character
and standing, and that he has received a good English
education at least. Other things being equal, preference
will be shown to candidates who have received a collegiate
education, and especially to those who have done this
wholly or partially by their own efforts. Applicants not
personally known to any of the Faculty will do well to
state fully and precisely their age, place of birth and
residence, present occupation, education (both general
and legal), and any other circumstances that may be of
weight in making a selection. Such communications will
be held strictly confidential.

As the applicants for /ree scholarships are usually far
in excess of the number that can be given, no student will
hereafter have the benefit of such scholarship for more
than one year. As far as practicable, the scholarships
will be equally divided between the two classes — depend-
ing upon the number and success of the candidates for
scholarship in either class.

Two members of each class have an opportunity to
earn their tuition and a small salary in addition, by ser-
vice as librarians, and in other capacities connected with
the work of the School. Application for such positions
must be made in person, on or before the fifteenth day
of September.

For further information, inquiries may be addressed
to Wm. S. Curtis, Law School Building, 1417 Lucas
Place, St. Louis, Mo., or the Secretary of Washington
University.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE.

(mBDICAL department op WASHIHGTON DNIVEB8ITT.)



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CALENDAR.



1896-97.



Session Opens Thursday, September 24.

Christmas Vacation, December 24 to January 4, inclusive.

Commencement (Graduating Exercises), Thursday, April 29,
1897.

HouDAYS : Thursday of Fair Week, Thanksgiving Day, Wash-
ington's Birthday.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE.



BOARD OF OVERSEERS.

ELISHA H. GREGORY, M. D., Chairman.
GEORGE E. LEIGHTON. CARLOS S. GREELEY.
HENRY HITCHCOCK. HENRY H. MUDD, M. D., Treaa.

JOHN GREEN, M. D. JOHN P. BRYSON, M. D.

JAMES E. YEATMAN. G. BAUMGARTEN, M. D., Sec'y.



BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

A. F. 8HAPLEIGH, President. GEORGE E. LEIGHTON.
CARLOS S. GREELEY, V.-Pres. EDWARD C. ELIOT.
JAMES E. YEATMAN, Sec'y. JOHN J. O'FALLON.
HENRY HITCHCOCK. GEORGE W. ALLEN.

E. C. SIMMONS. R. M. SCRUGGS.

F. L. HAYDEL, M. D. J. PITMAN, M. D.

JAMES C. MOORE.



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132 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITT.

•ELSWORTH F. SMITH, M. D., LL.D.,

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Pathological Anatomy^

Emeritus.



FACULTY.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, LL.D.,
Chancellor of the University.

J. B. JOHNSON, M. D.,
Professor of the Principles of Medicine.

ELISHA H. GREGORY, M. D., LL.D.,

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery, and Clinical

Surgery.

G. BAUM6ARTEN, M. D.,

Professor of the Practice of Medicine.

HENRY H. MUDD, M. D., Dean,
Professor of Clinical Surgery, and Special Fractures and Dis-
locations.

WASHINGTON E. FISCHEL, M. D.,
Professor of Clinical Medicine.

ROBERT LUEDEKING, M. D.,

Professor of Diseases of Children.

JOHN GREEN, M. D.,

Professor of Ophthalmology,

JAMES M. SCOTT, M. D.,
Professor of Obstetrics.

* Deceased.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL C0LLE6B. 133

JOHN P. BRYSON, M. D.,
Professor of Oenito-Urinary Surgery.

FRANK R. FRY, M. D.,
Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System.

HENRY SOHWARZ, M. D.,

Professor of Gyncecology,

FRANK A. GLASGOW, M. D.,
Professor of Clinical Oyncccology,

HARVEY G. MUDD, M. D..
Professor of Osteology and Regional Anatomy.

PAUL Y. TUPPER, M. D.,
Professor of Descriptive Anatomy.

EDGAR M. SENSENEY, M. D., Secrbtary,
Professor of Therapeutics and Materia Medica.

CHARLES R. SANGER, A. M., Ph. D.,
Professor of Chemistry,

NORMAN BRUCE CARSON, M. D.,
Professor of Clinical Surgery.

JOSEPH GRINDON, M. D.,
Professor of Dermatology.

•HENRY HODGEN, M. D.,
Professor of Orthopcedic Surgery.

JOHN B. SHAPLEIGH, M. D.,

Professor of Otology.

SIDNEY P. BUDQETT, M. D.,

Professor of Physiology and Histology.



• Dec«a8ed.



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134 WASHIHGTOll UHITERSITT.



OTHER INSTRUCTORS.

*£LISHA H. GREGORY, Jr., M. D.,
Instructor in Practieal Anatomy,

ELSWORTH S. SMITH, M. D.,
Instructor in Physical Diagnosis.

AMAND N. RAVOLD, M. D.,
Lecturer on Hygiene, and Instructor in Bacteriology.

LEWIS L. McCABE, M. D.
Instructor in Clinical Medicine.

JULES F. VALLfi, M. D.,
Instructor in Obstetrics.

♦GREENFIELD SLUDER, M. D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Diseases of the Nose, Throat and Chest.

EDWIN C. BURNETT, M. D.,
Lecturer on Syphilis.

VILRAY P. BLAIR, M. D.,
Instructor in Practical Anatomy.

CHARLES CLAFLIN ALLEN, LL.B.,
Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence.

ARTHUR E. EWING, M. D.,
Lecturer on Diseases of the Eye.

ALBERT E. TAUSSIG, M. D.,
Instructor in Clinical Medicine and Urinology.

THEODOR KODIS, M. D.,

Lecturer and Demonstrator in Pathology, and Curator of the

Museum.



* On leave of absence In Europe.



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ST. IX>UIS MEDICAL COLLE6R. 135

HENRY C. HARTMANN, M. D.,

Lecturer on Orthopmdic Surgery.

JOSEPH MASERANG, Jr., Ph. O.,
Instructor in Materia Medica and Pharmacy,

LEWIS O. ATHERTON, B. S.,
Assistant in Chemistry.



STAFF OF THE O'FALLON DISPENSARY.

PROFESSOR H. H. MUDD,
Director.

CLINICAL LECTURERS.

.PROFESSOR H. H. MUDD,
Surgery.

PROFESSOR W. E. FISCHEL,
Medicine.

PROFESSOR ROBERT LUEDEKING,
Diseases of Children.

PROFESSOR JOHN GREEN
Diseases of tJie Eye.

PROFESSOR J. P. BRYSON,
Diseases of Qenito- Urinary Organs,

PROFESSOR FRANK R. FRY,
Diseases of the Nervous System.

PROFESSOR HENRY SCHWARZ,
Diseases of Women.

PROFESSOR N. B. CARSON,
Surgery.



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136 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

PROFESSOK JOSEPH GRINDON,
DisedMes of the Skin.

PROFESSOR J. B. SHAPLEIGH,
Diseases of the Ear,

DR. E. S. SMITH,
Physical Diagnosis.

DR. EDWIN C. BURNETT,
Syphilis.

DR. ARTHUR E. EWING,
Diseases of the Eye.

DR. HENRY C. HARTMANN,

Orthopaedic Surgery,

DR. A. E. TAUSSIG,
Clinical Medicine.

DISPENSARY PHYSICIANS.

DR. E. S. SMITH, DR. H. FRUMSON,
DR. H. W. BEWIG, DR. A. B. TAUSSIG,
Medical Clinic.

DR. H. C. HARTMANN, DR. H. NIETERT,
Surgical Clinic.

DR. WILLIS HALL, DR. W. C. MARDORF,

Gyna:cological Clinic.

DR. WILLIAM A. SHOEMAKER, DR. JOS. W. CHARLES,
Ophthalmic Clinic.

DR. E. C. BURNETT, DR. H. McC. JOHNSON,
Clinic for Diseases of the Qenito- Urinary Organs, and Syphilis.

DR. G. S. MILLER, DR. G. M. TUTTLE,

Clinic for Diseases of Children.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 137

DR. MALCOLM BLISS.
Clinic for Diseases of the Nervous System.

DR. J. F. VALLf:, DR. J. M. SCOTT,

DR. WILLIS HALL, DR. HENRY SCHWARZ.

DR. W. C. MARDORF, DR. F. A. GLASGOW,

Obstetrical Clinic.

DR. 0. L. SAHLENDER,
In Charge Obstetrical Out-Clinic.

DR. CHAS. J. ORR,
Clinic for Diseases of the Throat.

DR. J. P. HOEFFER,
Clinic for Diseases of the Skin.

DR. A. F. KOETTER,
Clinic for Diseases of the Ear.



ST. LOUIS MULLANPHY HOSPITAL.

PROFESSOR E. H. GREGORY,
Surgeon in Chief,

CLINICAL LECTURERS.

PROFESSOR E. H. GREGORY,
Surgery.

PROFESSOR N. B. CARSON,
Surgery.

PROFESSOR PAUL Y. TUPPER,
Surgery.

DR. L. L. McCABE,
Medicine.



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138 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

PROFESSOR J. P. BRYSON,
QenitO' Urinary Surgery,

PROFESSOR FRANK A. GLASGOW,
Diseases of Women,

PROFESSOR £. M. SENSENEY,
Diseases of the Nosey Throat and Chest,

DR. ELISHA H. GREGORY, Jr.,
Chief of Surgical Clinics,



ST. LOUIS CITY HOSPITAL.

CLINICAL LECTURERS.

PROFESSOR H. H. MUDD,

Surgery,

PROFESSOR HARVEY G. MUDD.

Alternate,

PROFESSOR W, E. FISCHEL,

Medicine.

DR. E. S. SMITH,
Alternate,



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 139



ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE, SESSION 1896-97.

NAME. RKSIDBMCE.

Abeken, Fred Missouri.

Ashcar, Charles Josepli Missouri.

Amos, Newton Woodbury Missouri.

Altliouse, George Henry, A. B Missouri.

Ball, William Franklin Arkansas.

Bassell, William Benedict Missouri.

Bamett, Isaac Newton Missouri.

Bland, Warren Wilson, B. S Missouri.

Bleuler, Ernest Alfred Illinois.

Binney, Robert Webster Illinois.

Bittman, Eugene Jacob Missouri.

Bottom, Emmitt Hilbert Illinois.

Buchanan, Thomas Woodsou Missouri.

Byrd, Richard Lilburn Missouri.

Bryan, Richard Shepard Missouri.

Clark, William Alfred, A. M Missouri.

Caldwell, Robert Lee, B. S Missouri.

Clarke, Boone William ....... Missouri.

Cross, William Walter, D.D.S California.

Cowan, Robert Mosby, A. B Missouri.

Cnrrie, Donald Herbert Missouri.

Churchill, Roy Henry Illinois.

Davis, Homer Willard Illinois.

Davis, Holland Archer Missouri.

De Lisser, Glenwood Medcalfe .... Missouri.

Digges, William Lloyd Missouri.

Duckworth, Franklin Muron Indian Territory.

Early, James Francis Missouri.

Eberlein, Edwin William, Ph. G Missouri.

Elsey, James Ralph Minnesota.

Farmer, Percy Joseph Missouri.



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140 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

NAME. RKSroBNCB. '

Fischer, Oscar Herman^ Ph. G Missouri.

Gradwobl, Rutherford Birchard Hayes . . Missouri.

Graves, John Bunyau Missouri.

Greiner, Theodore Missouri.

Green, John, Jr., A. B Missouri.

Goodrich, Charles Frances, Jr Missouri.

Gowans, Charles Illinois.

Grimes, Robert Bruce, Jr Wyoming.

Harviell, Charles Poplin Missouri.

Harris, Thomas Eugene Missouri.

Hasting, William Edward Indiana.

Hays, William Harrison Missouri.

Heeley, Oliver Jasper Illinois.

Hicklin, Franlt Edward Missouri.

Holke, Theophil James Illinois.

Hovey, Walter Clark Illinois.

Kane, Robert Emmet, A. B Missouri.

Keehn, Leonard Missouri.

Kuhls, Frank George Illinois.

Lademan, Oscar Emil Missouri.

Lawless, Charles Lester Missouri.

Liss, Julius Illinois.

McKenzie, Robert Ewing Illinois.

McCormick, James Edward Missouri.

Marple, Harry Nelson Missouri.

Moore, Henry Morgan, A B Missouri.

Niebruegge, Henry John Missouri.

Ogle, Oliver Lee Illinois.

Paine, George Franklin Missouri.

Park, Percival Albert Illinois.

Printz, Felix Charles Missouri.

Quinan, Clarence California.

Richards, Emmett Earl Missouri.

Romeiser, Theo. Hilgard Illinois.

Romero, Felipe Benicio New Mexico.

Stahl, Herbert Leroy, Ph. B Illinois.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLKQE. 141

NAMS. BB8IDBNCK.

Scherrer, Elmer Alexaader Colorado.

Semple, Nathaniel Meacom, A. M Missouri.

Stewart, Samuel Smith Missouri.

Simpson, Bernard Samuel Missouri.

Smith, Ulysses Scott Missouri.

Scott, Burt Loraine Texas.

Scudder, David Arrell Indiana.

Studer, Joseph Valentine Missouri.

Sluslier, Ernest Warren Missouri.

Taphorn, Henry Illinois.

Taussig, Frederick Joseph, A. B Missouri.

Thierry, Charles William, A. B Missouri.

Vogelsang, Edward Jacob Missouri.

Watsou, John Maxw^ell Indiana.

West, Washington, Jr Illinois.

Zimmermann, William, A. M Illinois.

Zimmermann, Ernst, A. M Illinois.

Zimmermann, Carl August William, A. M. . Illinois.



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142 WASHINGTON UNIVEESITT.

The St. Louis Medical College was founded in 1842
as the Medical Department of St. Louis University. In-
corporated by special charter in 1855, its annual courses
of instruction were continued by the same Faculty, which
under an ordinance enacted April 14, 1891, was created
the Medical Faculty of Washington University. In
October, 1892, the College opened, in its new building,
its fifty-first consecutive annual session.

The regular graded course of study covering three
college years, established by the St. Louis Medical Col-
lege in 1880, has been carefully elaborated, from year to
year, as riper experience has dictated and always in the
direction of higher standards and broader teaching.
The annual sessions are of seven calendar months, and
ample opportunities for clinical study are afforded
throughout the entire year. To students fitted by ade-
quate preliminary training to profit by a comprehensive
and thorough course of medical study this college offers
exceptional advantages.

A distinctive feature of the St. Louis Medical College
is the requirement of and full provision for extended
laboratory work, by every student, in all the fundamental
subjects of medical study. The extent and scope of the
required practical work in Anatomy and in Chemistry
have been greatly enlarged, and full laboratory courses
are given in Histology, in Medical Chemistry, in Patho-
logical Anatomy and Histology, and in Bacteriology. In
extent and completeness of laboratory equipment, the
St. Louis Medical College ranks with the best and moat
progressive educational institutions of this country; in
the comprehensiveness and thoroughness of its laboratory



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 148

instruction it is now, as it has been for many years,
greatly in advance of other medical schools in St. Louis.

The methods of clinical teaching followed in the St.
Louis Medical College are characterized by the same
attention to individual training as in its laboratory
instruction. Thorough practical courses in the technique
of Surgical Dressings and Antisepsis and of Physical
Diagnosis are given in the Junior Year, and systematic
use is made of all the general and special clinics of the
College in the further study of diagnostic methods as
illustrated and tested in the personal examination of
patients.

In the construction and furnishing of its new College
building in 1892, at a cost of $160,000.00, the Faculty
availed itself to the utmost of its previous experience in
developing new and better methods of medical instruc-
tion. Five Lecture halls, three of which are of theater
arrangement, three Chemical laboratories (4,683 square
feet of floor), two Physiological laboratories (8,000
square feet). Practical Anatomy rooms (2,330 square
feet), a laboratory of Microscopy (2,330 square feet), a
fully equipped Bacteriological laboratory, and a spacious
reading room, afford ample and convenient accommoda-
tion without crowding in any department. The different
laboratories are abundantly provided with the best appli-
ances for individual work, as well as for special demon-
stration and research.

The O' Fallon Dispensary, a special Clinical Depart-
ment of the College, with its general Medical and Sur-
gical Clinics, and its special Clinics for Diseases of
Children, for Diseases of the Eye, for Genito-Urinary



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144 WASHIHGTON UNITEBSITT.

Surgery, for Diseases of Women, for Diseases of the
Skin, for Diseases of the Ear, for Orthopaedic Surgery,
for Syphilis, for Diseases of the Nose, Throat and Chest,
etc., is accommodated in the lower story. About 8,000
square feet of floor space, in six divisions, together with
a spacious and admirably constructed operating theater
with its waiting rooms and annexes, are devoted to this
Department and amp]}' meet its large and varied re-
quirements.

The extensive general and s[)ecial Clinics of the St.
Louis Mullanphy Hospital are conducted by members of
the Faculty and physicians connected with the St. Louis
Medical College, and are devoted wholly to the instruc-
tion of its students. At the City Hospital, the Female
Hospital, and the City Insane Asylum and Poor House,
the College shares on equal terms with others in the
privileges of visiting and of clinical instruction. Weekly
Surgical and Medical Clinics are held at the City Hos-
pital by Professors H. H. Mudd and W. E. Fischel, and
are attended by the Middle and Senior Classes.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.

Candidates for admission to the College will be re-
ceived, for the session of 1896-97, upon the conditions
reciuired by the Missouri State Board of Health. These
requirements are obligatory on all candidates for ad-
mission to the study of medicine in any Medical School
in Missouri; they are specified by the Board as fol-
lows : —

*'(a) Creditable certificates of good moral standing.
(6) Diplomas of graduation from a literary or scientific



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 145

college or high school, or, in lieu thereof, an examination
by the State Supcrintenilent of Public Schools in the
following branches: English grammar and composition,
arithmetic, algebra as far as quadratics, elementary
physics, (Jnited States history, geography, and Latin
equivalent to one year in a high school." •

Convenient dates for the inspection of diplomas and
for the examination of candidates are arranged in Sep-
tember, before the opening of the College Session ; these
dates are furnished by the Dean of the College on appli-
cation.

Students are advised in all cases to conform to the
regulations governing the practice of Medicine in the
State in which they intend to practice.

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.

Students who have attended one course of lectures in
an accredited regular School of Medicine, or who are
graduates of an approved School of Biology, may enter
the Middle Class upon presentation of a satisfactory
grade from their former school in the studies of the
Junior Year, or upon examination in these studies, t



* AH diplomas of ffradaatlon or other coriiflcates of a like character
mo9t be aaVmitted to the State Saperlntendent of Public Schools, who
will pass upon them and decide whether they shall be accepted ; all can-
didates for admission to any medical school who do not present a
diploma, together with those whose diplomas may be regarded by him
as Insafflclent, will be examined by him in the subjects speciiied. The
certificate of the State Saperlntendent of Pabllc Schools Is made an
abaolate reqalrement for admission to any Medical School in the State.

t Students from other colleges who fail to pass in some of the Janior
examinations, may be received into the Middle class on condition that
they pass these examinations at the end of the Middle year.

10



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146 WASHINGTON UNIVKRfllTT.

Students who have attended two courses of lectures in
an accredited regular School of Medicine may enter the
Senior Class upon presentation of a satisfactory grade
from their former school in the studies of the Junior
and Middle years, or upon examination in these studies.

COURSES OF STUDY.

The following courses of study ai'e open to students,
viz. : —

THREE YEARS COURSE.

Attendance on three annual sessions is required of
all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine.
The studies are graded throughout the course, and are
so arranged that the work of each year constitutes a



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 20 of 70)