Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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tice in the Infirmary, and for work in the Chemical Lab-
oratory.

Students of all classes are required to register each
year at the beginning of the session.

No student of any class will be registered after the
28th day of the session.

THREE YEARS COURSE.

Attendance on three annual sessions is required of all
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine.

LECTURES.

The course of lectures included in the curriculum of
this College has been so classified and arranged as to give
the student the best facility for gaining a thorough knowl-



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MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE. 167

edge of the branches taaght. Two or more of the studies
embraced in the separate courses will be completed
during each year, and consequently the students will be
free to pursue the remaiuing studies in the succeeding
years.

A portion of the lectures to dental students is given
in the St. Louis Medical College, in connection with the
medical classes, furnishing a rare opportunity for the
dental student to acquire the comprehensive knowledge
of the science of medicine, so indispensable to the suc-
cessful practice of any specialty.

The Museum, Anatomical Rooms and Chemical Labor-
atory of the St. Louis Medical College are as free to
the dental as to the medical student. The arrangement
with this institution is such, that by taking additional
branches in connection with the work of three dental
terms, the dental student may qualify himself for admis-
sion to the Senior Class in the Medical College, and may
then become a candidate for the degree of Doctor of
Medicine at the close of the term in the following April.

In addition to the regular course of instruction, there
will be clinical lectures and demonstrations by a number
of dentists, eminent in the profession as successful
practitioners.

INFIRMARY.

The College Infirmary, under the direction of the
Superintendent, Dr. Joseph B. Kimbrough, and the
demonstrators, will be open daily, furhishing ample
opportunity for instruction in practical dentistry. The
Surgical Clinics at the City, Sisters', St. Luke's and



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168 WASHINGTON DNIVERSITT.

other hospitals, and at the College Dispensary, afford
opportunities for instruction that cannot be found except
in large cities.

The record of the Infirmary work from March, 1895,
to March, 1896, shows the amount of clinical material
furnished the student.

Gold Fillings .... 1706 Gold plates .... 15

Amalgam Fillings . . 1484 Bridges 41

Other Fillings . ... 121 Gold Crowns .... 168

Full Plates 135 Richmond Crowns . . 185

Partial Plates .... 142 Teeth Extracted . . . 4518



DENTAL OPERATING ROOM.

This room, 84'x2C', having one side of continuous
windows reaching from floor to ceiling, fitted with Mor-
rison chairs, brackets, spittoons, and wall cabinets to
hold student's entire operating outfit, makes an ideal
place for the student to learn the practical part of his
profession.

Special efforts will be made in the Surgical Clinics, to
demonstrate surgical diseases of the mouth, and lectures
on tumors of the jaw will be given.

The Superintendent, Dr. J. B. Kimbrough, will be in
daily attendance at the Infirmary.

A progressive course of Clinical Lectures accompanied
with practical demonstrations will be given covering the
entire field of prosthesis and orthodontia.

The Junior and Middle classes will be divided into
sections and each individual student required to perform
under the eye of the Superintendent or his assistants, the



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MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE. 169

successive steps as presented, and no student will be
allowed to take up new work until he has mastered the
technique of the old. By the observance of this rule,
the student at the end of the three years' course will be
as well qualified practically, as graduates heretofore have
been theoretically.

A large Clinic is already established at the new In-
firmary, supplying abundant material for practical work
in operative dentistry, prosthesis and orthodontia.

MECHANICAL DENTISTRY.

This branch is taught theoretically and practically by
the Professor, as well as by the Demonstrators and Clin-
ical Instructors, who give the practical work in the lab-
oratory and at the chair. It embraces the following
subjects : —

The treatment of the mouth preparatory to the inser-
tion of artificial dentures ; — The materials, appliances
and methods employed in obtaining impressions of the
mouth ; — Plaster models ; — The making of dentures
on the plastic bases — rubber and celluloid. Vulcaniz-
ing, pressing and finishing.

Metallic dies and counter-dies. Taking the bite. The
selection and arrangement of teeth.

The refining of gold. Making alloys of gold and con-
verting them into the required form for dental purposes.
The properties of the various metals used. in Prosthetic
Dentistry; gold, silver, copper, aluminum, zinc, lead,
tin, platinum, antimony, bismuth, together with their
most important alloys.



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170 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITT.

The laboratory work connected with crown and bridge
work. Obsenrations on fuels and the various methods of
generating and applying heat. The making and the use
of appliances for regulating the teeth.

DENTAL SCIENCE.

This course embraces lectures on the special and
minute anatomy of the teeth. Their origin and develop-
ment, normal and abnormal, including their histological
characteristics. The eruption of the teeth and the dis-
eases incident thereto. The pathological relation of the
teeth to other parts of the organism, together with the
symptoms, causes and treatment of diseases which involve
the dental structures.

The phenomena of inflammation.

The etiology, classification, symptomatology and treat-
ment of the various forms of pulpitis, pericementitis and
of the degenerations and the atrophies.

The phenomena of caries. The influence of bacteria in
caries and other pathological conditions.

A classification of the remedial agents, local and
systemic, employed in dental practice.

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY.

The lectures will embrace a description of the teeth
and their surfaces. Dental caries. The preservation of
the teeth, crown and bridge work, and the operations of
Dental Surgery will be considered.

Careful consideration will be given the instruments



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MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGB. 171

and appliances used in operations upon the teeth, as well
as the different materials used for stoppings.

These lectures are supplemented by a course of
Operative Technics under the direction of the Demon-
strator of Operative Dentistry, so as to make the instruc-
tion not only theoretical but very practical.

SCHEDULE OF STUDIES.

FIRST OR JUNIOR YEAR.

Subjects Completed the First Year.

Dental Anatomy.

Materia Medica.

Comparative Anatomy, with Dissection.

Pharmacy.
Subjects Taken First Year and Continued During Second Year.

Descriptive Anatomy.

Practical Anatomy.

Therapeutics.

Mechanical Dentistry.

Dental Technology, Lecture and Laboratory Work.

Metallurgy.

SECOND OR MIDDLE YEAR.
Subjects Completed the Second Year.

Descriptive Anatomy.

Therapeutics.

Chemistry.

Mechanical Dentistry.

Metallurgy.

Orthodontia.
Subjects Taken Second Year and During Third Year.

Physiology.

Operative Dentistry.

Institutes of Dental Science.



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172 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITT.

THIRD OR SENIOR YEAR
Subjects Completed the Third Year.
Physiology.
Hygiene.

Surgery and Clinical Surgery.
Operative Dentistry-
Institutes of Dental Science.

EXAMINATIONS.
I.— Of the Junior Yhar:

(1) In Anatomy: (a) Dental Anatomy;

(Jb) Practical Anatomy;

(2) In Materia Medica and Therapeutics:

(a) General properties of drugs, and

Pharmacy.
Students are required to pass in the subjects upon which
examinations are appointed to be held at the end of the Junior
year, before entering upon the work of the Middle year.

II. — Of the Middle Year :

CI) In Anatomy: (c) Descriptive Anatomy.

(2) In Materia Medica and Therapeutics:

(b) Therapeutics.

(3) In Chemistry: (a) General Chemistry (written, in

January) .

(b) Qualitative Chemistry (practical).

(4) In Mechanical Dentistry :

(a) Final Examination.
Students are required to pass in the subjects upon which
examinations are appointed to be held at the end of the Middle
year, before entering upon the work of the Senior year.

III. — Of the Senior Year:
. (5) Physiology,

(6) Principles and Practice of Surgery.

(7) Operative Dentistry.

(8) Institutes of Dental Science.

(9) Hygiene.



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MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE. 173



REQUISITES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
DENTAL MEDICINE.

The candidate for graduation must be twent^^-one years
of age.

He must have attended three regular annual courses
(no two courses of which shall have been taken during
the same year) of dental instruction, the last of which
must have been the Senior Course of this College.

He must treat thoroughly patients requiring all the
usual dental operations, and under the eye of the Demon-
strator, or Superintendent of the Infirmary, construct
practical artificial cases. He must undergo a satisfactory
examination on all the branches taught in the College.

Graduates of reputable mediaal colleges will be ad-
mitted to the second-year course and will be excused from
lectures and examinations upon general anatomy, general
pathology, chemistry, physiology and materia medica and
therapeutics, but will be required to take the courses in
operative and prosthetic technics.

Application for examination for the degree of D.M.D.
must be made in writing by the 1st of April, each year,
stating the claims of the applicant for such a degree.

This application should be accompanied by at least
three letters of recommendation attesting good moral
character from prominent citizens of the place of resi-
dence of the applicant.



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174 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITT.



FEES.



Matriculation Fee (paid but once) $5 00

Tuition, eacli Session 100 00

No charge for demonstrator's ticket or diploma.

The entire fee is due and must be paid at tSe begin-
ning of each term. No student wiU be permitted to take
final examination unless tuition fees have been paid.

INSTRUMENTS.

The operating rooms and laboratory at the Infirmary
are amply supplied with stationary furniture, such as
chairs, lathes, benches, furnaces, etc. Students are re-
quired to provide themselves with such articles of chemi-
cal apparatus as test-tubes, beakers, small evaporating
dishes, etc., and also to make good any loss by breakage
or destruction of apparatus belonging to the College.

TEXTBOOKS.

LATEST EDITIONS ONLY.

Anatomy — Gray.

Chemistry — Long^s Experimental and Analytical Chemistry.

Physiology— Foster's Text-Boolj of Physiology.

Pharmacy — United States Pharmacopceia.

Materia Medica and Therapeutics — H. C. Wood's.

PriiuUples and Practice of Dentistry — Harris.

Mechanical Dentistry — Essig. American Text-Book of Pros-
thetic Dentistry.

Orthodontia — Angle.

Surgery — "An American Text-Book of Surgery."— Keen and
White.



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MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE. 175

Operative Dentistry - Tedt.

Dental Anatomy and Pathology — Bode<5kcr. Tomes.

Jffeihods of Filling Teeth — Ottolengni.

Histology — Plersol.

Crovon and Bridge Work — Evans.

Books of Beference — ^m^vXcsM System of Dentistry; Harris
Dental Dictionary; Garretson or Tomes Dental Surgery;
Talbot — Orthodontia; Kingsley and Coles — Oral Deformi-
ties; Newth's Inorganic Chemistry; Simon Manual of
Chemistry.

PRIZES.

Prizes will be awarded for proficiency in the different
branches taught in the College.

The Missouri Dental College Faculty Prize. — An
elegant gold medal to the graduate receiving the highest
vote on final examination.

The S. S. White Dental Manufactunng Company
Prize. — A set of Varney Pluggers to the graduate
excelling in Operative Dentistry.

The John Rowan Dental Depot Prize. — A No. 2 Bon-
well Engine Mallet to the graduate standing second best
in practical Operative Dentistry.

The St. Louis Dental Manufacturing Company Prize. —
A laboratory lathe for the best specimen case of artificial
teeth.

For further information concerning the Dental College
apply to the Secretary of Washington University or to

Dr. H. H. Mudd,
Dean of the Dental College,

2640 Locust St.



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SMITH ACADEMY.

(4 DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)



J2



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CALENDAR.



189G-1897.

Entrance Examination, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday.

September 21, 22, 23.
First Tkrm begins Thursday, September 24.
Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 26.
Vacation, December 24, 1896, to Januarys, 1897, inclusive.
First Term ends Friday, January 29.
Second Term begins Monday, February 1.
Holiday, Washington's Birthday, Monday, February 22.
UNivERfiiTY Holiday, Friday, May 14.
Entrance Examination, Saturday, June 12.
Graduating Exercises, Tuesday, June 15.
Vacation, June 18 to September 28.

1897-1898.

Entrance Examination, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,

September 20, 21, 22,
First Term begins Thursday, September 23.
Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 26.
Vacation, December 24, 1897, to January 2, 1898, Inclusive.
First Term ends Friday, January 28.
Second Term begins Monday, January 31.



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OFFICERS OF GOVERNMENT AND INSTRUCTION.



WINPIKLD S. CHAPLIN, A. M.,

LL.D., Chancellor of the University . 3636 W. Pine boul.
CHARLBS P. CURD, A. M., LL.B.,

Principal 5641 Von Versen av.

WILLIAM W. GALE, A. B., Teaclier

of Greek and History 3111 Lucas av.

EDWARD F. JACKSON, A. B , E. M.,

Teacher of Latin and History . . . 4400 Morgan st.
LOUIS L. HOOPER, A. B., Teacher of

Mathematics 3113 Washington av.

HARVEY KAY COLEMAN, A. M.,

Teacher in charge of Fourth Year

Class 5678 Cabanne pi.

CLARENCE H. WOOLSEY, A. M.,

Teacher in charge of Third Year

Class 352 Spring av.

ALFRED H. ROUDEBUSH, A. B.,

Teacher in charge of Second Year

Class 5838 Cates av.

EDMUND A. BURNHAM, A. B.,

Teacher in charge of First Year Class 3844 Delmar boul.
LUTHER SMITH, A. B , Teacher of

Higher English and Elocution . . .2910 Pine st.
EDWARD L. BURDICK, S. B , Teacher

of Physics, Chemistry and Drawing . 3331 Morgan st
HENRY A. BAKER, A. B., Teacher of

German 2910 Pine st.

WM. H. fiOEHM, fi. S., M. M. E.

Teacher of Drawing 906 N. Compton av.



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180 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

GEORGE M. TUTTLE, A. B., M. D.,
Teacher of Physiology 2942 Washington ar.

AUGUST H. MUEGGB, Teacher of
Gymnastics 2712 Franklin av.

WILLIAM H. POMMER, Teacher of
Vocal Music 777 Euclid av.

MME. JUVET-KAUFMANN, Teacher
of French 4323 Morgan st.

MISS MABEL EVANS, Ph. B., Assist-
ant Teacher of Second Year Class . 3511 Bell av.

t MISS ANNA H. CHANDLER, Assist-
ant Teacher of Second Tear Class . .6716 Cates av.

MISS LENA K. DIETERICH, Assistant
Teacher of Second Year Class . . . 3613 N. Broadway.

MRS. ANNA C. HILLMAN, Teacher in
charge of Second Year Class, Prepar-
atory Department Webster Groves.

MRS. ISABELLE H. LARE, Assistant
Teacher in Preparatory Department . 3109 St. Vincent av.

MRS. EMMA KAYSER, Tcaclier in
charge of First Year Class, Prepara-
tory Department 4927 Reber pi.

MISS CLARA Y. VAN NORSTRAND,
Assistant Teacher in Preparatory De-
partment 3015 Lucas av.

t On lea? e of absence In Germany.



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SMITH ACADEMY.



HISTORICAL STATEMENT.

Smith Academy was founded in 1^53, and began regu-
lar work in the following year.

The Academy building now occupied was erected in
1878 -79, and the name Smith Academy, was given to the
school in recognition of the munificence of James Smith
and Persis Smith, his wife, from whom the whole amount
($75,000) expended in the building, including the ground
and furniture, was received.



ADMISSION.

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT.

Pupils are admitted to the First Year Class at the age
of eleven years, provided they can pass a satisfactory
examination in reading, spelling, English language and
composition, penmanship, geography, and arithmetic as
far as percentage.

Pupils are admitted to any class, provided they can pass
a satisfactory examination in the studies pursued by the
class below the grade which they wish to enter. The
courses of study as now arranged are sufficient to meet
the requirements for admission to any college or scientific
school.



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182 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

No pupil will be received for less than one term, and
no abatement in tuition will be made for absence, whether
such absence occurs at the beginning, middle, or end of
the term.

COURSES OF STUDY.

The courses of stildy in this Department are three in
number. The Classical Course and the Course without
Greek extend over six years ; the Preparatory Scientific
Course extends over five years. All the courses are iden-
tical during the first two years, but no pupil is required
to take all the regular studies. At the beginning of the
third academic year, those pupils who wish to prepare for
the regular classical course in college and to obtain the
regular college degree of Bachelor of Arts take the Clas-
sical Course ; those who wish to prepare for the college
course in Philosophy take the Course without Greek.
This differs from the Classical Course only in substituting
Science and Modern Languages for Greek. The Pre-
paratory Scientific Course includes all those studies which
are required for admission lo any polytechnic school.

COMMERCIAL CLASS.

Pupils who are able to spend but one or two years in
school, and for that reason do not desire to enter upon
one of the regular courses of study, are permitted under
the direction of the Principal to select an equal amount
of work from the regular studies with the addition of
Book-keeping and to form a commercial class. The full
Academic Course, although especially designed for those
who intend to pursue the Collegiate Course, is nevertheless



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SMITH ACADEMY. 183

recommended lor those who are preparing for commercial
life unless lack of preparation prevents its adoption.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.

To meet the wishes of a large number of parents, a
Preparatory Department has been organized for boys
eight to eleven years of age. It is placed under the
immediate charge of competent ladies, but is under the
general supervision of the Principal of the Academy.
Pupils are admitted to this Department as soon as they
have sufficient knowledge of reading and writing to
enable them to commence the study of Arithmetic and
Geography.

PHYSICS.

The physical laboratory on the second floor of the
building recently erected, is well supplied with apparatus
to which additions are constantly being made. The
laboratory is provided with lecture and working tables
and affords abundant facilities for instruction by lectures
and for practical work in experimental physics.

CHEMISTRY.

Excellent facilities are offered pupils for thorough in-
struction in general chemistry and qualitative analysis.
The chemical laboratory is fitted with tables and appara-
tus for practical work, and instruction is given partly by
recitation, partly by lectures, and partly by laboratory
work.

DRAWING.

The drawing room is well lighted and furnished with
drawing stands, models, and all necessary conveniences.



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184 WASHINGTON UKIVERSITT.

Free-hand and geometrical drawing may be taken, in
addition to the regular studies, by the pupils of any class
in which it is not already required. The Course in draw-
ing may thus extend through a period of four years,
beginning with the outlines and proportions of simple
geometric figures, proceeding to the more complex and
ornate forms of decorative art, and including the study of
light and shade, with pencil and brush, both from the flat
and the round, or the solid object. Geometrical drawing
will include the use of instruments, scales, the more im-
portant problems in Plane Geometry, orthographic pro-
jections, intersections and development of surfaces, cast
shadows, perspective, together with mechanical and
architectural constructions.



GYMNASIUM.



On the first floor of the building recently erected is a
large gymnasium, handsomely furnished with the most
serviceable apparatus of modern pattern. Four sets of
the larger apparatus are supplied, so that a class of
sixty boys can all get sufficient exercise in a short time.
Each class is sent to the gymnasium near the middle of
the school session every day under the direction of a care-
ful instructor. Every pupil unless physically disabled
and regularly excused at the request of parent or pliysi-
cian is required to go with his class.

The object is to give a systematic physical training not
only to those who enjoy athletic sports and would prac-
tice them of their own accord, but also to the large num-



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SMITH ACADEMY. 185

ber wbo neglect bodily exercise, unless an opportunity is
furnished them. The effect upon the health and bearing
ol the pupils, after a short trial, amply proves the wisdom
of requiring daily gymnastics.



MONTHLY REPORTS.

Reports will be made of the attendance, deportment,
standing and general progress of each pupil to which the
attention of parents and guardians is specially invited.

Pupils are expected to prepare at home a part of the
lessons assigned for each day, and their hoars of study
should be regular and free from interruption.

Every absence from the regular exercises of the school
is a serious hindrance to the progress of the individual
pupil and the class to which he belongs, and sickness or
some urgent necessity should be regarded as the only
legitimate excuse.



DIPLOMAS.

Diplomas will be conferred upon those members of the
class who have taken any one of the regular courses of
study, and have passed satisfactorily the required ex-
aminations. Certificates will also be given on the same
conditions, which entitle graduates to enter the corre-
sponding course in the College or School of Engineering
of Washington University without examination.

The courses of study in the Academy include all the
subjects required in the examinations for admission to



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186 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITT.

the best colleges and scientific schools. The methods
of instruction are such as prevail in the oldest and .
most popular preparatory schools of New England.
The increasing demand for a school of high grade in
St. Louis has been fully met, so that parents need not
send their sons away from home at the most critical
period of their lives, in order to have them prepared
to enter the college of their choice. Although the
Academy is especially designed to prepares tudents for
the Undergraduate Department of Washington Univer-
sity, and a majority of its graduates enter that depart-
ment, the training they receive has proved amply suffi-
cient to satisfy the requirements of any university.



TUITION.



Preparatory Class, per term of 20 weeks $50 00

First Year " «' *« 60 CO

Second Year •' »» " 60 00

Third Year ** '' •* 56 00

Fourth Year '' •* *' 62 60

Fifth Year '' '* ** 76 00

Sixth Year ^' ** *- 75 00

.Commercial •« " ** 76 00

These rates are for the current year only.

Bills are payable in advance.

No extra charge of any kind will be made.

N. B. — No pupil will be received for less than one
term, and no abatement will be made for absence whether
such absence occurs at the beginning, middle, or end of
tlie term.



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SMITH AOADBMY. 187

GENERAL INFORMATION.

The School year consists of two terms of twenty weeks
each. The Academy does not furnish text-books, but
each pupil mast provide for himself tbe books and neces-
sary articles prescribed for the class to which he belongs.

The Academy has no dormitory system, but rooms and
board for boys whose homes are not in the city may be
obtained in private families at prices ranging from $20 to
♦30 a month. The Principal of the Academy will cheer-
fully give recommendations and assistance to parents
who desire to obtain for their sons rooms and board in
the city.



COURSES OF STUDY.

CLASSICAL COURSE.
FIRST YEAR CLASS.

Mathematics — Robinson's Complete Arithmetic beginning at

Percentage; Stoddard's Mental Arithmetic.
History — Eggleston's History of the United States.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 22 of 70)