Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 24 of 70)
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HENRY W. ELIOT 2635 Locust st.

SAMUEL CUPPLES ../... 3673 Piue St.

WILLIAM L. HUSE 9 Westmoreland pi.

HENRY C. HAARSTICK .... Russell & Louisiana avs.

E. C. SIMMONS 21 Westmoreland pi.

WM. H. DANFORTH* (Class of 1887) 5625 Gates av.
W. S. CHAPLIN, Chancellor . . . 3636 West Pine st.

C. M. WOODWARD,

Secretary,
Office at the University.

*ODe member of this Board Is elected annually by the Alumni
Associaiion, at its Banquet In June.



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OFFICERS AND TEACHERS.

W. 8. CHAPLIN, LL.D., CJiancellor . 8686 West Pine st.
C. M. WOODWARD, Ph. D., Director. 8018 Hawthorne bvM.
GEORGE W.KR ALL, Assistant in Charge

ol Third-Tear Class, and Teacher of

Physics and Literature 4001 Olive st.

CHARLES H. SPOONER, A. B., Assist-
ant in Charge of Second- Year Class,

and Teacher of English and Mathe-
matics 26 Nicholson pi.

WM. R. VICEROY, Ph. B., Assistant

in Charge of First- Year Class, and

Teacher of Algebra and English . . 8029 Washington av.
CHARLES E. JONES, Instructor in

Forging and Auditor of Shop Accounts 291 4 University st.
OSCAR W. RAEDER, Instructor in

Drawing 2227 Warren st.

GEORGE B. SW AFFORD, Instructor in

Wood- work 5910 Theodosia av.

MARIAN E. COX, Ph. B., Instructor in

Chemistry and History 2127 Oregon av.

GEORGE ARROWSMITH, Instructor in

Wood-work and Molding 7024 Stanley av.

JANET C. GLOSS, Ph. M., Instructor

in Modern Languages 2828 Washington av.

CLARA L. WOODWARD, Instructor in

Latin and English 3013 Hawthorne bv'd.

CHARLES N. McFARLAND (Graduate,

Class 1892) , Instructor in Machine-Shop

Practice 1204 Goodfellow av.

WILLIAM H. ALLEN, A. B. (Graduate,

Class 1890), Instructor in Mathematics

and Civics 3839 Russell av.

14



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210 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

HERMANN VON SCHRENK, A. M., In-
structor in Biology and Botany ... 48 Nicholson pi

WILLIS HENRY GROCOTT, B. E.
(Graduate, Class of 1891), Instructor in
Drawing 1812 Coleman st.



ORGANIZATION.

The Manual Training School is a secondary or pre-
paratory school between the District or Grammar School
on the one hand, and the Engineering or Polytechnic
School on the other. It was organized to effect several
ends:

1. To furnish a broader and more appropriate founda-
tion for higher technical education.

2. To serve as a developing school where pupils could
discover their inborn capacities and aptitudes, whether in
the direction of literature, science, or the practical arts,
while securing a liberal elementary training. Its useful-
ness is by no means limited to those who have a fondness
for mechanics. Its training is of general educational value.

3. To furnish those who look forward to industrial
life opportunity lo become familiar with tools, materials,
drafting, and the methods of construction, as well as with
ordinary English branches.

The ordinance establishing the Manual Training
School was adopted by the Board of Directors of the
University, June 6, 1879.* The ordinance declared: —



♦ Shop-work had already been maintained for seven years

among the classes of the Engineering School in buildings on
the University grounds.



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 211

' ' The students will divide their working hours, as nearly
as possible, equally between mental and manual exer-
cises. They shall be admitted, on examination, at not
less than fourteen years of age, and the course shall con-
tinue three years."

On September 6, 1880, the school opened with a single
class of about 50 pupils. It is accordingly now in its
Seventeenth Year.

During the summer of 1882, the large addition front-
ing on Washington avenue v^as built and furnished ; this
nearly doubled the capacity of the school.



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION.

Candidates for admission to the First- Year class must
be at least fourteen years old, and each must present a
certificate of good moral character signed by a former
teacher.

They must also, unless presenting diplomas as ex-
plained below, pass a good examination on the following
subjects: —

1. Arithmetic, including the fundamental rules ; com-
mon and decimal fractions ; the tables of weights, meas-
ures, and their use ; percentage ; interest ; and analysis
of miscellaneous problems. Candidates will be examined
orally in mental arithmetic.

2. Common School Geography, including map-drawing
from memory.

3. Spelling and Penmanship.



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212 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

4. The writing of good descriptive and narrative En
glish, with the correct use of capitals and punctuation.

5. Beading aloud with distinctness and correct ex-
pression.

6. The History of the United States.

Candidates for the Second-Year class must be at least
fifteen years old. All that is specified above will be
required of them, and, in addition, the studies of the
First- Year class.

Similar advanced requirements apply to those desiring
to enter the Third-Year class.

ALL PUPILS ARE ADVISED TO TAKE THE FULL COURSE.

All pupils are advised to enter the First- Year class
rather than to aim to save a year's expense by waiting
to enter the Second Year. The drawing and shopwork
of the First Year cannot fully be made up, and the boy
who skips the first year is more or less handicapped in all
the subsequent work. ApupU cannot as a rule recite wUh
one grade and work in the shop with another.

CERTIFICATES.

When candidates can present diplomas showing that
they have completed a thorough course of study pre-
paratory to a high school, or have done satisfactory work
in a high school or school of equal grade, they may be
admitted without examination.

Occasionally boys living at a distance from St. Louis
are examined at their homes, on questions furnished by
the Director.

Vacancies may be filled at any tivie^ provided the ap-
plicants are prepared to enter existing classes.



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 213

A MID-TEAU CLASS.

A new and complete class will be admitted to the
school at the end of the First Term in January, 1897. A
special examination will be held on

SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1897.

Candidates having certificates of promotion to first-
grade high schools can enroll at any time by presenting
their certificates. All others will be examined as explained
above.

The Mid- Year class will begin the studies of Algebra,
Botany > Latin (or English Grammar), English Litera-
ture, Drawing, and Joinery.

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS IN JUNE AND SEPTEMBER.

A second examination of candidates for admission will
be held at the school on Thursday, June 17, beginning at
nine o'clock. A third examination will be held on
Friday, September 17.

The scope of the examinations for admission is best
shown by old examination papers, which will be sent by
mat. on application.



THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION

covers three years, and embraces five parallel lines — as
follows: —

First — A course of pure Mathematics, including Mental
Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Plane Trigonometry.

Second - A course in Science, including Zoology,
Botany, Chemistry, and Physics, all with la])oratory
practice.



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214 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Third — A course in Language and Literature, includ-
ing English, Latin, French or German, Spelling, Rhetoric,
Composition, Literature, English and Ancient History,
and the elements of Civics and Political Economy.

No student takes all this work but he selects one lan-
guage and one literature course each year.

Fourth — A course in Vertical Penmanship, Free-hand
and Instrumental Drawing.

Fifth — A course of Tool Instruction, including Join-
ery, Wood-Carving, Wood-Turning, Molding, Pattern-
Making, Soldering, Forging, and Bench and Machine
Work in Metals.

The arrangement of studies, tool- work, etc., by years
is substantially as follows. No pupil is permitted to
omit studies or exercises which he may not like, nor
can he take shopwork in advance of his academic grading.

[An " hour " generally means 50 minutes ]
FIRST YEAK.

Alorbra : Three hours a week for the year. Fundamental pro-
cesses, factoring, fractions, equations of one and of two
unknown quantities, aud problems involving the same.
Text-book: Wells's Academic Algebra.

Mental Arithmktio: One hour a week for the year. Special
attention to the use of fractions.
Text-book: Stoddard's I utelloctual Arithmetic.

Themks: Five hours a week for one term. A one-page theme
four times a week, aud a long theme, with «* brief " for the
same, once a week on subjects chosen principally by the
pupils from observation or from experience.

English History: Fire hours a week for one term. From the
Beginnings through the Georges.
Text-book: ** Leading Facts of English History."



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 215

Or Latin (If the student is well prepared in English) : Five
hours per week for the year, Latin, Grammar and Reader.

LiTKRATURK : One hour a week for the year. A study of a few
typical early English ballads, some of Wordsworth* s lyrics,
Shakespeare^s Macbeth, and George Eliot^s Silas Mamer
with a view to cultivHte an ability to appreciate literature.
(The boys taking Latin, write and revise one theme a week
in connection with this study.)

Biology : Five hours a week for sixteen weeks. The study of
Typical Animal forms, their structure and habits. Refer-
ence Book: Burnet's •* School Zoology." All instruction
is given in the biological laboratory, and the pupils study
actual specimens of insects, fishes or animals, with the aid
of magnifying glasses and instruments. Drawings and
written descriptions arc required of all pupils.

Kinds and Uses of Wood : Fifteen exercises.

Botany : Five hours a week for fifteen weeks. A study of the
growth and structure of plants.
Textbook: Bergen's ^' Elements of Botany."

Frbe-Hand Drawing: Five hours a week for fourteen weeks.
Projection of points, lines, and solids in space; lettering in
many different alphabets ; and elements of surface decora-
tion.

IKSTRUMBNTAL DRAWING : Five hoHvs a week for twenty-four
weeks. One sheet of straight lines and circular arcs in an
interlaced design ; one of line shading; and two sheets of
machinery details from free-hand sketches. The prepara-
tion of drawings for the exercises in woodwork.

Joinery : Ten hours a^week for fourteen weeks. The use of the
different hand tools, and the making of simple joints.

Wood Carving: Ten hours a week for five weeks. The use of
carving tools in ornamental line work and the shaping of
simple designs in low relief.

Wood-Turning: Ten hours a week for nineteen weeks. Face-
plate and center turning. Polishing and simple designing



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216 WASHINGTON UNIVER8ITT.

SECOND YEAR.

Algebra : Five hours per voeekfor twenty weeks. The use of frac-
tional exponents, redaction and combination of radicals, the
solution of quadratic equations and equations containing
radicals. The graphical interpretation of equations of first
and second degrees is considered, and simultaneous values
are illustrated.

Gkoicstry: Five hours per week far twenty weeks. Five books
of Wells's Geometry are thoroughly mastered. The ability
to reason correctly is cultivated not only by standard dem-
onstrations, but by numerous independent theorems and
problems.

English: Five hours per week for twenty weeks. Standard
books in prose and poetry (Dickens, Goldsmith, Scott or
Holmes) are carefully read and used as the basis of frequent
themes.

History: Four hours per week for twenty weeks. English His-
tory for those who did not have it during the First Year ;
otherwise, Ancient History, especially Persian and Grecian.

Or Latin (in place of English and History) : Three Books of
Csesar or an equivalent of Latin prose.

Or French: Five times per week. G^rammar — Witney's Prac-
tical French, La Langue Francaise (Bercy).

Or German : Five times per week. Grammar : Joynes-Meissner ;
Conversation — Fisher's Practical Lessons; Reading —
Der Zerbrochens Krug (Zschokke) .

Composition: One hour a week for twenty weeks. Themes
written from field notes and obser orations among the indus-
tries of St. Louis.

Chemistry: Fwir hours per week for twenty or forty weeks (as
per electives). First term, sixty experiments are made
and recorded by each student. Additional and more diflScult
experiments are made by the teacher and recorded by pupils.
Second term, Remsen's Manual is completed by the class*

Drawing : Five hours per week for forty weeks. Orthographic
projections of intersecting solids and the development of



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 217

their surfaces; Tinting with brash; Free-hand Detail
Sltetches, and Instrumental drawings from the sketches;
Isometric Drawing and Graining; Geometrical Drawing;
Ornamental Lettering and Border Design.

Pattbrn-Making and Moulding: Ten hours per week for ten
weeks. Patterns made, molded, and cast in plaster; cores
made and baked. The principles of soldering are acquired
and sheet metal forms are produced.

Forging: Ten hours per week for thirty weeks. All elementary
processes of the forge are learned including welding iron,
and forging and tempering a set of steel tools for each
pupil. Projects of ornamental wrought iron or steel work.

THIRD YEAR.

Geomktry: Five hours per week for thirty weeks, Wells^s
solid Geometry is completed.

Trigonometry : Five hours per week for about ten weeks. The
functions of angles and their relations studied. The formu-
lae for plane triangles derived and applied. The nature and
use of logarithms.

Physics and Laboratory Practice : Four hours per week for
forty weeks. Elementary principles illustrated and funda-
mental laws tested and Interpreted by the use of apparatus
especially constructed for this laboratory. On the basis of
this work, general theories are developed and complex
operations are discussed.

Civics and Political Economy : Five hours per week for forty
weeks. The functions of municipal, State and national
governments; the duties of the citizen and the officer.
The structure of society, the nature and relations of indus-
trial, commercial and educational institutions. Frequent
themes and reports.

Or, French : Five times per week. Whitney's Practical French
continued. Selected Readings, Sight-reading and Written
Exercises.



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218 WASHINGTON UNIYER8TTT.

Or, German : Five times per week. Grammar contiDoed ; CoU'
rersation; Der Einsiedler (Wildermuth); Sight- Beading —
Selected.

LiTKRATCRE : One hour a week for forty weeks. The reading of
one of Shakespeare^s plays, and the Stody of Classic
Myths.

Drawing: Five hours per week for forty weeks. Higher
geometrical drawing, conies, cycloids and helices; shades
and shadows ; house plans ; brush shading and conventional
drawing; orders of architectural oroament; sketching and
project drawing.

Tool- Work: Ten hours per week for forty weeks. Metal work
by machine and hand tools; the nature and uses of all the
tools in the shop, in connection with exercises devised to
bring out those uses. Each student takes part in the con-
struction of a ** project ^' or finished machine intended to
embody a great range of tool practice and constructive
skill.



THE DAILY PROGRAM.

The daily session consists of six periods of fifty minutes
each, beginning at 9 a. m., and closing at 2:30 p.m.,
thirty minutes being allowed for lunch. Each pupil
recites daily three lessons, which are for the most part
learned at home. Each class consists of several ''di-
visions'' containing from twenty to twenty- five students
each.

The order in which recitations and shop exercises fol-
low each other is different with different divisions. Some
begin work in the shop at nine o'clock, others at 10:40,
and still others at 12:50.



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 219

CHARACTER OF THE TOOL WORK.

All the shop-work is disciplinary; special. trades are
not taught, nor are articles manufactured for sale ; as a
rule the products of the shop have no value except as
they illustrate typical forms and methods. Occasionally
projects^ or *' final" pieces of practical value are con-
structed which may belong either to the school or to the
niakers.

SHOPS, TOOLS, ETC.

The school has five large shops. Two are for wood-
work, having 150 sets of cutting tools, 50 benches, and
50 special speed lathes driven by the main engine.

One is a molding room with benches, sand, flasks, &c.,
for twenty-four workmen. Pupils make their own pat-
terns and cores, and generally cast with plaster.

The forging shop has 25 forges, anvils and full sets of
tools. Each pupil learns all the fundamental processes
of the forge while executing a carefully graded series of
exercises in lead, iron and steel.

The machine shop has sixteen screw-cutting lathes, five
speed lathes, two plaoers, two drills, a shaper, a dry and
a wet emery grinder, a gas forge, a dozen vises and full
sets of hand tools.



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220 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



GENERAL INFORMATION.

Tuition fees, — The school year consists of two terms
of twenty weeks each. The fee for each term is payable
in advance. The rates for the present are as follows: —

First- Year Class, $37.50 per term .... or $76 per year.

SecoDd-Year Class, $50 pes term or $100 per year.

Third-Year Class, $60 per term or $120 per year.

Incidental Expenses and Board, — Pupils furnish their
own books, drawing instruments and paper, their own
aprons and overalls, and certain small pocket tools.
The school furnishes shop tools and materials. Losses
and breakages are charged to pupils when they are the
result of carelessness. Books and drawing materials do
not cost on an average more than $10 per year. Board
and lodging for those whose homes are out of the city
can be obtained in private families for from $18 to $25
per month.

There is no opportunity in the school for the pupil to
pay his way by labor.

The school has no lodging house, but the Director is
always ready to recommend good homes to non-resident
boys.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

The founders of the school desire that its advantages
may be within the reach of boys from every class in the
community. A few free, or partially free, scholarships
will therefore he. kept filled. It is desirable that they



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MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 221

should in general be given as rewards of merit to prom-
ising boys in straitened circumstances.

These scholarships are as a rule under the control of
individual members of the Board of Managers. By
special arrangement, single perpetual scholarships have
been assigned to each of the following organizations: —

The Kirkwood Public Schools.

The St. Louis Brotherhood of Stationary Engineers.

The National Association of Stationary Engineers.

The St. Louis Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers,
No. 48.

ALUMNI SCHOLABSHIPS. *

An Alumni Scholarship has been established by the
General Alumni Association.

Ten Alumni have also established a special scholarship
which they have seen fit to name the ** Woodward
Scholarship."

A special illustrated catalogue giving in full all details
of methods, the names of students, and the record of
graduates, will be sent if asked for.

All inquiries and applications should be addressed to
C. M. WOODWARD, Director,

Manual Training School, St. Louis,
Or to Geo. M. Bartlett,

Secretary of Washington University.



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SUMMARY OF GRADUATES.

Of thr College 184

Of tub School of Engineering 168

Of the Law School 665

Of the Medical College 2,065

Of the Dental College 835

3,317
Honorary Graduates 12

3,329



SUMMARY OF MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

r-1895-96^ r-1896-97-.

Stu, Itistra. Slu. Instra.

College AND School OF Engineering 155 30 151 27

Law School 165 15 165 15

Medical College Hi 33 85 83

Dental College 101 17 99 17

Total Graduate and Undergrad-
uate Departments 535 95 500 92

PREPARATORY SCHOOLS.

Smith Academy 310 28 801 23

Mary Institute 361 29 353 29

Manual Training School ... 245 15 241 15

916 67 895 67

Total Graduate, Undergradu-
ate, AND Preparatory Depart-
ments 1^451 162 1395 169

School of Fine Arts 872 13 274 ll

Total Connected with the Uni-
versity 1,823 175 1669 170

15



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OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS.



UNDBRGRADUATR DEPARTMENT.

President: Mr. William H. Bryan.

Vice-President: Mr. Thomas K. Skinker.

Secretary and Treasurer: Mr. Thomas 6. Rutlbdge.

Executive Committee: Mr. William H. Brtan, Mr.
Thomas K. Skinker, Mr. Thomas 6. Kutlrdgb, Mr. West-
ern R. Bascomb, Mr. Daniel N. Kirbt, Mr. Anthony F.
Ittnbr.

LAW department.

President: Mb. William E. Garvin.
First Vice-President: Mr. Isaac H. Orr.
Second Vice-President: Mr. Edgar Rombauer.
Secretary: Mr. Daniel G.Taylor.
Treasurer: Mb. Henry S. Caulfield.
Executive Committee: Mr. E. C. Eliot, Mb. Charles W.
Bates, Mb. Clabence S. Taussig.

MEDICAL department.

President: Dr. E. C. Runge.

Vice-President: Dr. Joseph Grindon.

Secretary: Dr. Floyd Stewart.

Treasurer: Dr. W. Baumgartbn.

Executive Committee: Dr. Joseph Grindon, Dr. W. C.
Mardorf, Dr. E. H. Gregory, Jr., Dr. V. P. Blair, Dr. E.
C. Runge.

DENTAL department.

President: Dr. J. G. Harper.
Vice-President: Dr. O. H. Manhabd.
Secretary : Dr. J. B. Kimbrough.
Treasurer: Dr. C. E. Schumachbb.

Executive Committee: Dr. C. E. Schumacher, Dr. A. H.
Fuller, Dr. T. L. Poeppebling.



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GENERAL INDEX.



Paob.
Admibbion to ~

College 51

School of BngineerlDg ... 56

Law School 118

Medical School 144

Dental School 165

Manaal Training School . . . 211

Mary Institnte 205

Smith Academy 181

ADTISBRB TO STDDBNTB ... 54
ADVIBOBT OOMMTITBR Of the

Henry Shaw School of
Botany 78

A8TBONOMT, Instrnction In . . 41

Board of Control
of the St. LoulB School of Fine
Arts 86

Board, Advisory and Exam-
ining,
of the St. Louis Law School . 105

Board of thb Manual Train -
ZNo School, Managing . 208

Botant, Instraotlon in .... 40

Botany, Thb Henry Shaw
School OF 77

Advisory Committee of the
Henry Shaw School of
Botany 78

Instrnctors in the Henry Shaw
School of Botany . « . . . 87



Page.

Information in regard to the
Henry Shaw School of

Botany 79

Special Classes in the Henry

Shaw School of Botany . . 82

Calendar of the ~

University 3

School of Fine Arts .... 84

Law School 102

Medical School 130

Dental School 158

Mary Institute 1^)8

Smith Academy 178

Civil Engineering, Coarse of

Stndyin 48

Carricnlnm in 58

Appliances in 66

Chemistry, Coarse of Study in 38

Curriculum in 62

Collections,

School of Fine Arts .... 95

College, The

Courses of Study ..... 31

Admission to the College . . 51

Testimonials Required ... 51
Requirements for Admission
to the Freshman Class of

the College 52

Diyision of Examinations . . 51

Special Students 53



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226



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



Page. ' •



Prescribed Stadles of the
Freshman Year in the
College

Preecribed Studies of the So
phoinore Year in the College

Advisers to Students . .

Choice of Studies . . .

COMHITTRB Oy EXAMINATIONS

OF THE Law School . .

Constitution op thb Uni
teiisity



Paois.



Corporation

Course op Study in the —

College , .

School of Engineering .
St. Louis School of Fine Arts
St. Louis Law School . .
St. I^ouis Medical College
Missouri Dental College
Mary Institute ....
Manual Training School



107
15



36

:m

90
121
]4i>
166
201
213



Smith Academy



182, 187



Degree op —

Bachelor of Arts, Require-
ments for 72

Bachelor of Science, Require-
ments for 72

Doctor of Medicine, liequirc-
ments for 151

Doctor of Dental Medicine,
Requirements for .... 173

Degrees, advanced .... 73



Dental Department .



157



Klsctrical Engineering.

Curriculum in 61

Appliances in 68

Elocution and Dkbatb in
THE Law School .... 123



Endowment 17

Endowment, Law School . . 117

Engines ring, School of . . 66

English, Course of study in 31

Expenses of Students ... 75

Faculty of the —

Law Department ..... 103

Medical Department .... 133

Dental Department .... 160

Undergraduate Department . 22

Fine arts, St. Louis School

OP 83

French, Course op Study in 33

German, Courses op Study in 83

Geology,CoursesopStudyin 43

Greek, Instruction in ... 31

Gymnasium, The 70

History, Course of Study in 3ft

History of the University . 15

Infirmary of the Missouri

Dental College .... 167



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 24 of 70)