Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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be competent for the St. Louis Circuit Court, or the
St. Louis Court of Common Pleas, to compel the
Board of Directors, by mandamus, to perform their
duty in investigating such charge, and to show their
performance of such duty to the satisfaction of the
Court having cognizance of the matter, and all pro-
ceedings under this section shall be summary, and
conducted to a conclusion with as little delay as possi-



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GENERAL STATEMENT. 15

ble ; and the power hereby given to said courts may
be exercised by the judge of either of said tribunals in
vacation."

On the 22d of April, 1857, the formal inauguration
of Washington University took place with appropriate
exercises in University Hall, and an oration delivered
by Hon. Edward Everett, in the Mercantile Library
Hall. An advanced scientific class was organized at
that time. An Academy, now known as Smith
Academy, had then been in operation about thre«* years.
The College and Mary Institute were organized in
1859, and the first Senior Class was graduated from
the College in June, 1862. The Law School was
organized in 1867, the Polytechnic School, now known
as the School of Engineering, in 1870, the School of
Fine Arts and the Manual Training School in 1879,
the School of Botany in 1885. The St. Louis Medical
College, founded in 1842, was admitted as a depart-
ment of the University in 1891, and the Missouri Dental
College in 1892.

To show the principle on which endowments are
invited, the fifth, sixth and seventh articles of the
Constitution are here inserted.

**ARTICTE V.

**ENDOWMENT OF PROFESSORSHIPS.

'*Any person may endow in whole or in part a
specified professorship in the said University ; and if,
in the opinion of the Board of Directors, said endow-
ment shall be sufficient for the support of said profes-



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16 WASHINGTON rNIVBSSITY.

sorship, said professorship shall bear the name of its
founder forever, nnless at the time of the endowment
he shall otherwise direct.

"ARTICLE VI.

'* ENDOWMENT OP DEPARTMENTS.

*'Any person may found, by an adequate endow-
ment, a specified department in said University; pro-
vided the plan of its organization and its purposes are
approved by the Board of Directors, and if said endow-
ment shall, in the opinion of said Board, be sufficient
for the perpetual support of said department, it shall
bear the name of the founder thereof forever, unless
he shall otherwise direct at the time of endowing the
same.

** ARTICLE VII.

''specific funds.

**A11 funds and property of whatever nature and
description, contributed to the endowment or founda-
tion of a professorship or department, shall forever be
faithfully applied to the specific purpose for which
contributed, and to no other object whatsoever, with-
out the written consent of the donor or founder thereof,
or his heirs and assigns, and also the written consent
of two -thirds of the Directors first had and obtained;
provided, however, that said funds and property in
this article named shall never be diverted from the
purposes of said University.''



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WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

comprehends:
I. UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT;

INCLUDING THE COLLEGE AND THE SCHOOL OF ENQINEKRING.

Washington A venae and Seventeenth Street.

II. HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OK BOTANY.
1724 Washington A venae.

III. ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.
Nineteenth and Locast Streets.

IV. ST. LOUIS LAW SCHOOL.
1417 Locast Street.

V. ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE.

1806 Locust Street.

VI. MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE.

1814 Locust Street.



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18 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

The following schools have also been organized ander the
charter of the University ; —



I. SMITH ACADEMY.
Washington A venae and Nineteenth Street.

Chables p. Curd, A. M., Principal,

II. MARY INSTITUTE.
Ijocast and Beaamont Streets.

Edmund H. Sears, A. M., Principal,

III. MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL.

Washington A venae and Eighteenth Street.

Calvin M. Woodward, Ph. D., Director,

For particulars in regard to these schools see special cata-
logues, to be had on application to the Principals or Director.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT.



THE COLLEGE.
THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT.

IJfCLCDING THE COLLIOB AXD THE SCHOOL OP KXGIKXSRING.

PROFESSORS.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN,
Cfuincellor.

SYLVESTER WATERHOUSE,

Professor of Oreek,

CALVIN M. WOODWARD,
Prnfensor of MaUumuUtcs and Applied Mechanics.

GEORGE E. JACKSON,
Professor of Latin,

MARSHALL S. SNOW,
Professor of History, and Dean of the College,

FRANCIS E. NIPHER,
Professor of Physics.

EDMUND A. ENGLER,

Professor of Mathematics and Descriptive Oeometry, and Dean

of the School of Engineering.



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UNDBBOBADUATB DSPARTMBNT. 21



Professor of McUhematics and Astronomy.

JOHN B. JOHNSON.
Professor of CivU Engineenng.

WILLIAM TRELEA8E,
Professor of Botany,

CHARLES R. SANGER,
Professor of Chemitftry.

JAMES MAIN DIXON,
Professor of English.

OTTO HELLER,
Professor of Chrmttn.

JOHN H. KINEALY,
Professor of Mechaniail Engineering,

GUSTAV HAMBACH,
Adjunct- Professor of Geology.

HENRY AUGUST HUNICKE,
Adjunct-Professor of Applied Chemistry.



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22 WASHINGTON UNIVXR8ITY.



INSTRUCTORS.

HOLMES SMITH,
Iiutructor in Drawing.

AUGUST H. MUEQGE,
Instriwtor in Oymnastics.

HENRY RAND HATFIELD,
Instructor in Economics,

CARL KINSLEY,
Instructor in Physics,

WILLIAM H. RUSH,
Instnictor in Botany.

GASTON DOUAY,
Instructor in French,.

HERMAN VON SCHRENK,
Instructor in Botany.



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STUDENTS.



SENIOR CASS.

Nambb. Ooursb. Rbsidbiicb.

Allen, George Wa]briclge....Elec. EDg..3139 Lucas av.

Bamham, Grace Arte 2942 Laclede av.

OoDzelman, John Edward..Giv. £ng...2901 Morgan Bt.

Evans, Charles Orrick, Jr...Art8 Kirkwood, Mo.

Frankenthal, Maurice Al-
bert Arts 1827Kennett pi.

Knapp, Charleys Speck Mech. £ng.2915 Lucas ave.

Langsdorf, Alexander Sus8..Mech. Eng.3133 Laclede av.

Rapp, Frank Arthur Civ. Eng.. .1315 Taylor av.

Ruth, Anna Harding Arts 2626 Thomas st.

Sessinghaus, Bertha Char-
lotte Arts 2901 Ranschenbach av.

Stix, Cora. Arts 3135 Washington av.

Willits, Edward Everett Arts 4648 Kennerly av.

Total, 12.

JUNIOR CLASS.

Adams, Grace Arts 1010 Newetead av.

AdkiuB, James, Jr Civ. Eng... 1414 S. Ewing av.

Avis, Mabel Dean Arts 4115 Delmar boul.

Bonnet, Frederick, Jr Chem 2719 Russell av.

Bouton, Walter Scott Civ. Eng... 2909 Park av.

Bryan, Archibald Moore.. ..Civ. Eng... Washington, Mo.

Cave, Rhodes Estil Arts 8921 Delmar bool.

Evers, Helen Margaret Arts 1861 N. Market st.

Hendrich, Charles Angnst.Civ. Eng.. .2805 Lafayette av.
HoBpes, Theresa Bertha Arts Old Orchard, Mo.



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24 WASHINGTON UNIVBR8ITY.

NamSS. OOUBSB. RB8II»mCE.

Kimball, Arthur Campbell.. Arte Kirkwood, Mo.

Kirchner, Elida Caroline... Arte 4234A Easton nv.

Pettas, Charles Parsons Arte 2834 Chestnat st.

Robinson, Arthar Dwight...Mech.Eng.4174 West Belle pi.

Shields, Walter Civ. Eng...3860Delmar boul.

Tyler, Eleanor Mardoch Arte 3215 Lacas av.

Wittier, William Stephen... Arte 1134 Ratgerst.

Woermann, Frederick

Christian Civ. Eng...2800 Cass av.

Total, 18.

SOPHOMORE CLASS.

Bargess, Samael Allen 2933 Harper st.

Chandler, Albert Barboar Kirkwood, Mo.

Dicke, Edward Christian 1911 Hebert st.

Eilers, LeRoy Matthew 1616 King's Highway.

Farnham, Anna May 2943 Thomas st.

Goebel, Julias Christian 1216 S. 14th st.

Grimm, Henry England 3213 Eads av.

Henby, William Hastings 2631 Russell av.

Hill, Tilly 1743 Preston pi.

Horwitz, Alexander Earle 1323 Carr st.

Kammerer, Alfred Louip 2724 Dayton et.

Klem, Mary Jeneatte 1940 Arsenal st.

Koken, Ernest C. F 3622 Hawthorne boul.

Leavitt, Sherman .6615 Cabannepl.

Lewis, John James Webster Groves, Mo.

McClnre, Ralph Stanton 6814 Smiley av.

Memer, Blanche 3968 Finney av.

Phillips, Silas Bent 4442 Morgan st.

Pierson, Rath Howard 1211 N. Garrison av.

Pollock, Robert Bowers .3967 West Pine bonl.

Rhodes, Arthar M 4414 Washington boal.

Ritochy, Lewis John 2744 Russell av.

Schmedtje, Adolph Henry 2337 8. 13th st.



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UNDBBGRADUATB DBPABTMKNT. 26

Namxs. Bksiobscb.

Simpson, William Simeon, Jr 2110 Lafayette av.

Snyder, Allen Lane 4054 McPheraon av.

Steinbreder, Alvina Loaisa 4758 Hammett pi.

Stokes, Victor Hago East St. Louis, 111.

Toensfeldt, Hans Carl 912 8. 9th st.

True, Clinton Utterbach 6837 Von Versen av.

Woelk, William John Belleville, 111.

Total, 30.

FRESHMAN CLASS.

Alt, Arnold Dettman 3819 West Pine bonl.

Baamgarten, Karl 2643 Chestnat st.

Bennett, Maad Wame 2903 Dickson st.

Black, Gordon Gilmore Clayton, Mo.

Brady, Leon Hobart Kansas City, Mo.

Brown, Mabel Woloott 1332 N.King'sHigh way

Brokaw, Paul 3200 Lacas av.

Bryan, Grace 3746 Windsor pi.

Candler, Arthur Van Baren 6703 8. Sixth st.

Crecilias, Florence Lesette 1110 Dillon st.

Catts, Francis Thacher 3887 Washington bonl.

Davenport, Ralph 1319 Blackstone av.

Davis, Dwight Klrkwood, Mo.

Eliot, Henry Ware, Jr , 2635 Locnst st.

Erakine, Lacille 4976 Nabada st.

Fischel, Walter 3&\7 Washington av.

Flickner, Martha Ver Bryck 2200 Salisbury st.

Frocbte, Mand Mercedes 3658 Finney av.

Fulhage, Louise 1709 Chouteau av.

Forth, Blanche Stella 3919 West Pine boul.

Greenslelder, Albert Preston Central, Mo.

Haber, Otto W 3863 Olive st.

Hageman, Henry 1602 N. 19th st.

Harting, Otto Frederick ^705 N. 11th st.

Haydock, Daniel Winters Normandy, Mo.



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26 WAflHINQTON UNIVBB8ITT.

NAMB8. RBSIDBHOB.

Hudson, Marjorie Hannah ....1S20 O' Fallon at.

Jndd, Nellie 1431 Locast at.

Kaoffman, Richard King Wehster Groves, Mo.

Koken, William Theodore, Jr 3522 Hawthorne boal.

Lyon, Dora Laarina 4416 Kennedy av.

Magill, Frank H 1131 N. 18th st.

Meier, Arthar Ernst 2649 Miami st.

Mueller, Laara Carlyn 5058 Kensington av.

Olmstead, Mabel 4348 Garfield av.

Poss, Edward Daniel 6870 Plymouth av.

Senseney, Eugene Towner 2829 Washington av.

Bessinghaus, Emilie .2901 Rauschenbach av.

Trail, Mary Wilson 3513 Laclede av.

Tuholske, Rose 2337 Locust st.

Vegely, Norman Oscar St. Joseph, Mo.

Wiederholdt, Ernest Ferdinand 1211 Morrison av.

Wright, Thraston 5336 Cabannepl.

ToUl, 42.

SPECIAL STUDENTS.

Barada, Marie Elise 1029 N. Grand av.

Bartlett, Roy 3021 Eads av.

Bowen, Sherman Worcester 5941 Cote Brilliante av.

Burg, Philip Melton 3251 Hawthorne boul.

Caldwell, Grace 5922 Horton pi.

Caldwell, John William 4119 McPherson av.

Castro, Leopoldo Monterey, Mexico.

Clopton, William Hugh, Jr 2846 Locust st.

Daudt, Otto Armin St. Charles, Mo.

Dyer, Lilia 4165 Lindell boul,

Eggers, Rose .^.3323 Russell av.

Forder, Samuel Walker Station B, St. Louis.

Fulks, Elbrtdge Byron California, Mo.

Gruen, William Henry* 1337 Hickory st.

Harris, Sheba Florence 3412 Pine st.



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UNDBBORADUATS DBPABTMENT. 27

NaMSS. RS8IDK1I0B.

Haydock, Anna Thompson Normandy, Mo.

Hinrichs, Carl Gaatav 3132 Lafayette av.

McKeighan, Nellie 74 Vandeventer pi.

Maginnis, Eagenie Cecile 4338 Washington boal.

Merriwether, John Davis 720 Leonard av.

Meyers, Estelle 4190 Morgan st.

Miller, Grace Montgomery 4116 Washington boal.

Rossell, Jennie Belle 1746 Missouri av.

Schwab, Leonore Ella 4393 Westminster pi.

Shelton, R. O Pulaski, lo.

Siddy, Eatherine Webster Groves, Mo.

Singer, Sophie 3252 Pine st.

Stuart, James Lyall 5346 Maple av.

Thompson, Frances Dulty 3969 Washington boal.

Thornton, Prances Roberta 11 8. Spring av.

Tredway, Mary 3738 Westminster pi.

Weinrich, Ella Amalie SO Benton pi.

Wesseler, William Julius 2819 8. 13th st.

Wood, Elizabeth Sumner 5327 Kingsbury pi.

Wright, Eleanor Wetherell w 30 Windemere pi.

Wuerpel, Laura 4733 Page av.

Total, 36.

SUMMARY.

Seniors 12

Juniors 18

Sophomores 30

Freshmen 42

Special students. 36

Total, 138



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WASHINGTON UNIVSRfllTT.



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION PROVIDED IN
THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT.

GREEK.
Professor Waterhouse. Three times a week.

1. Herodotas (selections).

2. Homer (selections). Isocrates; The Panegyric.

3. Demosthenes on the Grown ; Thacydides (selections).

4. Selections from the Tragedians.

5. Selections from the Tragedians.

6. Plato (selections).

LATIN.
Professor Jackson. Three times a week.

1. Livy; Second Panic War. Books XXI-XXX.

2. Horace ; Odes and Epodes ; Satires and Epistles (selections)

3. Cicero; Philosophical Works (selections); Letters.

4. Plautas, Terence, Javenal (selections).

5. Tacitus ; Annals and Histories (selections) .

6. Suetonius; Seneca, Moral Essays ; Quintilian.

7. Seneca, Tragedies ; Martial, Epigrams; Lucretius.

8. Pliny, Letters; CatuUis, Tibullus, Propertius (selections).

ENGLISH.

Professor Dixon,

1. The elementary laws of all writing. Canons of correct
usage in language. The function of grammars and dic-
tionaries. Analysis of sentences. English idioms — aux-
iliary verbs, conditional sentences, relative pronouns.



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COUBSBS OP INSTRUCTION. 29

etc. Literary formfl— the paragraph, article, essay. The
rales of letter- writing. Exercises in composition and
analysis. Three hours a week,

2. Modem English prose, especially in the departments of

narrative and exposition. Framing of synopsis and
abstracts. Exercises in journalistic paragraphs. 'Ilvree
hours a week.

3. English prose from Sidney and Dryden to Arnold, Newman,

and Lowell. Lectures on the development of English
prose. Three hours a week.

4. Modern poetry : Keats, Tennyson, Browning. Sonnet lit-

eratare. Two hours a week.
The laws of versification, with exercises. One hour a
week.

5. Oratory as a branch of literatare. The composition of an

oration. Stndy of Bacon's essays. Two hours a week.
Rise and growth of the English novel. Exercises in story-
writing. History of journalism and the essay. One hour
a week,

6. Shakespeare ; his life and literary career ; the qaartos and

folios. English and German editors and commentators ;
textaal criticism. Critical reading of one play (1898,
Henry IV), Exercises in analyzing the structure of the
play, and the development and interaction of the char-
acters. Three hours a week,

7. Spenser, Milton (1898, Partidtse Lost, Bk. IV), Pope,

Wordsworth, Two hours a week.
Old English grammar and composition. lectures on phil-
ology. One hour a week,

8. Dialect literature. Ballad literature. Chaucer and Burns.

Two Tiours a week.
Seventeenth century prose. One hour a ueth.



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30 WASHINGTON UNIVEB8ITY.

GERMAN.
Professor Heller. Three times a week.

1-2. Elementary Coarses. Accidence; Translation from
Qerman into English and from English into German ;
German Conversation. Reading: ZschoMce, der
zerbrochene Erag; Fischer, die wandeinde Glocke,
Leander Trafimereien, Stormy Immense.
Prescribed for Freshmen who did not present Oerman far
admission,
3-4. German Syntax ; Prose Composition. Joynes-Meissner,
V Ja>ge7nann, Syntax and Composition ; German Con-
versation; Reading: SHfter, das Heidedorf; Freytag,
der Rittmeister von Alt-Rosen ; Meyer, Gostav Adoifs
Pag^, and a short con^edy.
^-6. Composition continued; History of German Literature
from its beginning to the death of Goethe. Reading:
Lessing, Minna von Bamhelm, Ooeihe, Hermann u.
Dorothea, Iphigenie aaf Tauris; Siguier, daa Lied
von der Glocke, Wallenstein ; Home-Reading.
7-8. History of German Literature from 1832-1897. Reading:
Works of Heine, Auerhach, CMbel, Scheffett Freytag,
Schuecking, Spielhagen, Heyse, fTilderibruch, BaunUnibh^
Seidel, Keller, Introduction to Seminar- work.
9-10. Introduction to the history of the German Language
(Weise), Middle-High-German Grammar (Paul);
Reading: Nibelungeiilied: Hartmann von Aue; Wcttr
ther von der Vogehveide ; Ulrich von Liet^Uenstein (in
the original) .
Courses 5-10 are conducted in German, 10 is offered pri-
marily to students of German parentage, and is the basis of a
four-years' graduate course. In 7-8 two different authors are
made the subject of special study each year. In 1897-8 these
are Heine (7) and Sch£ffel (8). For this reason these coarses
may be elected by graduates in conjunction with 9-10.



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COUB8B8 OF INSTRUCTION. 31

FRENCH.
Mr. Douay. Three times a week.

1. Elementary course : Pronunciation, elementary grammar,

easy colloquial French.

2. Elements of syntax. Reading and translation of French

prose.
A modem French comedy will be read as a part of Course 2.

3. Reading, conversation, dictation. French syntax. Trans-

lation of English into French.

4. Reading. Conversation. Study of idioms. Elements of

French composition. Outside reading.
5-6. Brief account of the development of French literature

to the XVII century. French literature of the XVII

century with illustrative readings. French essays on

literary subjects.
7-8. French literature of the XVIII and XIX centuries, with

illustrative readings. French essays.
N. B. — Courses 5-6, 7-8 are conducted in French. Several
French lectures will be delivered during each term.

LOGIC.

Professor DIxoyi. Three times a week.

Province of Logic. Terms. Extension and intension ; Logic
and language. Propositions and their conversion; the
predicable; division and definition. The Syllogism ; reg-
ular, irregular and compound conditional arguments.
Fallacies and the best methods of treating them. Argu-
ment in orations and general literature.

PSYCHOLOGY.

Dr. Hatfield. Three times a week.

Elementary Psychology. A beginning course, using HOff-
ding's Outlines of Psychology as text-book, with collateral
reading in James' Psychology.



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32 WASHINGTON UNIVBB8ITT.

ECONOMICS.
Dr. Hatfield. Three times a week.

1. Elementary Economics. A beginning coarse in theory,

prerequisite for all other conrses, except Coarse 3.

2. Advanced Economics. A continnation of the stady of

theory, prereqaisite for Coarses 4, 5, 6 and 7.

3. Descriptive Economics. A practical coarse to sapplement

Course 1, for those who desire only a general knowledge
of Economic problems.

4. Economic History since 1763.

5. Financial History of the United States.

6. Money and Banking.

7. Tariff History of the United States.

8. Social Economics. Poor relief, immigration, monopolies,

co<operation, profit-sharing, trades anions.

HISTORY.
Professor Snow. Three times a week.

1. History of England from Henry VII. to the end of the

Stuart Period. Lectures and recitations.

2. History of England ; Modem Period.

3. History of France under the Bourbon Kings to the Revola-

tion.

4. The Revolution and the Empire.

5. Medieeval Germany ; The Holy Roman Empire to the Peace

of Westphalia.

6. Eastern Europe since the Fall of the Western Empire.

7. Constitutional History; Constitution of the United States;

Comparison of American and European Governments.

8. Elements of International Law, with Study of Treaties.

Half course.

9. General European History ; Review and Philosophical Dis-

cussion. Half course.



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C0UB8S8 OF INSTRUCTION. 33

HISTORY OF ART.
Mr. Holmes Smith. Three times a week.

1. Ancient Art: Development of Architectare, Sculpture and

Decoration in Ancient Egypt, Chaldo&a, Assyria, Persia,
Greece and Rome.

2. Mediseval Art: Early Christian, Romanesque and Gothic

Art, Architecture, Sculpture and Decoration.
Stitdents in these Gouraes may iHth advantage take Drawing 1.

MATHEMATICS.
Three times a week.

1. Higher Algebra. Frofessor Engler,

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Professor Engler,

3. Analytic Geometry. Professor Engler,

4. Differential Calculus. Professor Engler.

5. Integral Calculus. Professor Woodvyard.

6. Method of Least Squares. Professor Nipher.
?.• Higher Plane Carves, Pntfessor Engler.

8. Theory of Functions. Professor Engler.

MECHANICS.
Professor Wi)odward.

1. Graphical Statics. Stress Diagrams for Frames, Trusses and

Bridges analyzed and drawn to scale. Three hows a
week.

2. General Principles of Statics and Dynamics with illustrHtive

examples. Four hours a week.

3. Rotation of Rigid Bodies. Cliaracter and distribution of

Stress. Strength and Stiffness of Girders and Shafts.
Four hours a week.



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34 WASHINGTON UNIVEB8IIT.

4. Kinematics, Mechanism, including the general theory of

transmission of energy by Gearing, Liquids, Belts, etc.,
with and without friction. Two houn a wetk,

5. Deflection of beams and girders and the Torsion of Shafts.

TvK) hours a week,

PHYSICS.

1. Elementary Mechanics, including the Mechanics of Fluids.

Ttro Ifctiirfft or rpcitatioiis and two htmrs of lahoraUfry icork
a mffk. Professor Xiph^ and Mr. Kinsley.

2. Optics. Tiro IfrUtres or reritations and ttco hfmrs of labora-

tor if irork a icffk. Professor Nipher and Mr. Kinsley.

3. Heat. Tmo lectures or recitations and two hours of laboratory

wttrk a iret'k. Professor Xipher and Mr. Kinsley.

4. Electricity and Magnetism. Tiijo lectures or recitations and

two hfmrs of laboratory loork a week.

Professor Nipher and Mr. Kinsley.

5. Laboratory instruction in Electrical Measurements, includ-

ing measurement of resistances, E. M.F. of batteries, the
calibration of amperemeters and voltmeters, electrolytic
measurements, magnetic determinations, heating effect
of currents, electrical determinations of Joule's equiva-
lent. Six hours a iceek. Prof. Xipher.

6. Introduction to the mathematical theory of Electricity and

Magnetism, including the theory of Potential ; capacity
of bodies ; energy of electrical systems ; electrometers
and electrostatic voltmeters, theory of magnetic measure-
ments, magnetic fields due to electric currents, electrical
induction, theory of dynamos and electric motors, alter-
nating currents, tri-phased systems. Three hours'a week.

Professor Xipher.

7. Dynamo-electric Machinery, including a discussion of the

theory of series, shunt and compound dynamos and
motors, conditions of eificiency of dynamos and motors,
conditions of economic operations, transformers and



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 35

transformer systems, electric lighting stations, electric
railways, power stations, and secondary batteries. Three
lectures a week. Mr, Kinsley.

8. Laboratory work in testing electrical machinery. Three

hours a week. Mr, Kiiisley,

9. Designing of electrical machinery. Six hours a week.

Mr. Kinsley.

10. Electrical Transmission of Power and Light, and the study

of the designing of machinery for specific output and
economy. Three hours a treek of lectures and two hours of
laboratory work. Mr. Kinsley*

11-12. Designing of Electrical Machinery. Six hours a tceek.

Mr. Kinsley,

lS-14. Laboratory Work. Six hours a week. Mr. Kinsley.

CHEMISTRY.

1-2. General Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures, laboratory
work and recitations. General theories of chemistry.
Description of the elements and their compounds. Six
hours a week. Professor Sanger.

Courses 1-2 must precede all others.
3-4. Qualitative Analysis. Mainly laboratory work. Six hours
a week, . Professor Sanger.

<5-6. Quantitative Analysis, Elementary. Mainly laboratory
work. Fundamental principles of gravimetric and vol-
umetric analysis. Six to twelve hours a v^eek.

Adjunct-Professor Hunicke.
Courses 5-6 may be taken with courses 3-4, with the con-
sent of the instructor.
7-8. Quautitative Analysis, Advanced. Laboratory work. An-
alysis of commercial and industrial materials and
products. Sanitary examination of foods, water, etc.
Gas Analysis. A knowledge of German is desirable.
Six to twelve hours a week.

Professor Samjer and Adjunrt-Professttr Ifunirke.
Courses 7-8 must be preceded by courses 5-6.



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36 WASHINGTON UNIVBBSITY.

9-10. Carbon Compoands. Lectaree on the syntheses of the
carbon compounds. Preparation of compoands illas-
trative of general j^ynthetic methods. A knowledge
of German is essential. Three to sfx hoftrs a week.

Professor Sanger.
(bourses 9-10 mast be preceded by courses 3-4 and 5-6.

11. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures on the his-

tory of chemistry and discussion of chemical theory.
Three hours a \reek. Professor Sanger.

Course 11 must be preceded by courses 3-4, 5-6, and
9-10.

12. Crystallography and Descriptive Mineralogy. Lectures

and conferences. Three hours a week,

Adjunct-Professor Hunicke.



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