Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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13. Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory

work. Determination of minerals by means of the
blow-pipe. Three hours a tceek,

Adjunct-Professor Jlunirke.
Course 13 must be preceded by course 12.

14. Assaying. Fire assays of gold, silver and lead ores and

smelting products. Laboratory work. Three hours a

week. Adjunct- Professor Hunicke,

Course 14 must be preceded by courses 3-4, 5-6,12 and 13.

15. General Metallurgy. Lectures. Outlines of metallur-

gical processes for the production of the most c«»mmon
metals. Three hours a week.

Adjunct- Professor Hunicke,
Course 15 must be preceded by courses 3-4, 6-6, 12
and 13.

16. Chemical Technology. Lectures and conferences. The

discussion of processes of manufacture of acids, alka-
lies, and salts ; cements, ceramics, and glass. Three
hours a ireek. Adjimct- Professor Hunicke,

17. Chemical Technology. The industries of the fats and

oils ; destructive distillation of wood and coal ; starcli,



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COURSES* OP INSTRUCTION. 37

sa^ar, beer and spirits; fertilizers; fibre indastries;
working up of bye products. Three hours a week.

Adjunct 'Professor Hunicke,
Coarses 16-17 must be preceded by courses 3-4, 6-6, 7-B,
and ^10.

18-19. Research in Theoretical Chemistry. Laboratory work
and reference to chemical journals. Investigation of
some subject in inorganic or organic chemistry.
Preparation of a thesis. Professor Sanger.

20-21. Research in Applied Chemistry. Laboratory work and
reference to chemical journals. Investigation of
some subject of direct practical value in sanitary
chemistry, technical chemistry or analytical chemis-
try. Preparation of a thesis.

Professor Sanger and Acijunct-Profe^sfjr ffunicke.



BOTANY.
Prttfessor Trelease and two Assistants. Three times a week.

1. Elementary Morphology and Organography, with refer-

ence to Ecology and Systematic Botany. Lectures
and demonstrations.

2. Elementary Anatomy and Phanerogamic Botany. Lab-

oratory work.

3. Synoptical Study of the Cryptogams. Laboratory work.

4. A special study of some group of Cryptograms.

5. Methods of Vegetable Histology. Laboratory work.

6. Histology and Morphology of the Higher Plants.

Laboratory work.

7. A laboratory study of the minute anatomy of the lower

Cryptogams.

8. Technical Microscopy of Timbers. Laboratory work.

Two hmrs a xc^ek.



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an WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

9. Economic Botany. Lectures and laboratory demon.
St rations.
10-11. Applied Mycology. Laboratory work.
12-13. Garden Botany. Laboratory study of cultivated plants,

at the Botanical Garden.
14-16. Vegetable Physiology. Laboratory work.
16-17. Bacteriological Technique. Laboratory work.

18. Demonstrations in Bacteriology. Ttro hours a week.
It is intended that course 1 shall always be followed by
course 2, the two being preparatory to other electives. For
the present, unless especial reason to the contrary exists,
courses 1 and 2 only will be given each year, the remaining
electives being offered the alternate years, as follows: —
For 1897-98,

First term, courses 1, 5, 8, 10, 16 and 18.
Second term, courses 2, 6, 7 and IL
For 1898-99.

First term, courses 1, 3, 12, 14, 16 and 18.
Second term, courses 2, 4, 9, 13, 15 and 17.
Students who have taken courses 1 and 2, or have had their
equivalent elsewhere, are admitted to any of the other element-
ary electives which can be taken without conflict with other
University work ; but students who desire to equip themselves
as botanists are advised to take the electives as nearly as pos-
sible in the order in which they are offered, and on the com-
pletion of the elective courses should expect to devote not less
than ten hours a week through an entire year to some piece
of research work, selected under the advice of the Professor of
Botany.

Special post-graduate study or investigation is planned to
meet the needs of students, so far as the facilities of the School
of Botany and the Botanical Garden permit.



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION.

ASTRONOMY.

Professor



1. Descriptire Astronomy. Lectares and recitations, with

occasional work at the Obserratory. Three htmrs a week.

2. Practical Astronomy. Applications of Astronomy in deter-

mination of Time, Latitude, Lougitade and Azimuth. Two
Jumrs recitation, tico hours observatory work. Spherical
Trigonometry will be required for entrance to either of
these courses.

ZOOLOGY.

Adjunri- Professor Hambach. Three times a week.

1-2. Lectures and laboratory demonstrations.

GEOLOGY.

Adjwict' Professor Hambach,

1. General Coarse. Two hours a week,
2-3. Elementary and Systematic Geolo^. Three hours a week,
4-5. Palaeontology. Three htpurs a tpeek,

6. Petrography. Three hours a week.

DRAWING.

Mr. Smith.

1. Freehand Drawing in outline of groups of objects, both from
the objects themselves and from memory. The accurate
observation of form and its correct expression . The study
of proportions* and the laws of perspective involved in
freehand drawing from objects.
Freehand Drawing and Shading from objects with pencil,
pen and ink, and brush. The study of light and shade as
a means of expressing form on a flat surface. The
methods of suggesting in sketches the character of differ-
ent materials. Six hours a week.



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40 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

2. Practical Freehand Lettering for ase on plates and working^

drawings.
Geometrical Drawing. Those problems in constraction
that are needed in the study of descriptive geometry,
machine design, etc. Six hours a toeek.

3. Machine Drawing. The making of working drawings from

actual measurement of machines and parts of machines.

The making of tracings and blue prints.
Isometric Drawing from actual measurement or from

sketches. In this work the drawings are line shaded.
The essentials of Linear Perspective, with problems. Four

hours a xceek.

4. Machine Drawing, Isometric Drawing, Perspective. Course

3 continued. Ttoo hours a ireek.

DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY.
Professor Engler. Three times a week.

1. General problems of points, lines and planes ; single curved,

double curved and warped surfaces.

2. Tangency, intersections, shades and shadows, linear per-

spective.

CIVIL ENGINEERING.
Professor Johnson.

1. Elements of Surveying. The use and adjustment of all

the ordinary surveying instruments ; simple land sur-
veying and leveling. Ttro recitations a treek, mth
fieUl practice Saturday forenoon,

2. Topographical, Mining and Hydrographic Surveying.

Topographical surveying by the transit and stadia
method and also by the plane table; problems in
laying out simple and compound curves and turn-
outs, the passing of obstructions, adjustment of curves,
etc., in railroad surveying. T\rn recitations a tceekf
m'th field practice Saturday forenoon.



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 41

3. Surveying in the Field. Three weeks devoted to field

practice. This practice includes the topographical
survey of a considerable tract of ground with an
irregular surface, for the purpose of mapping it with
five-foot contours, this survey being based on a sys-
tem of triangulation and levels which forms a part of
the work of the survey. A railroad line is also located
from a contour map which is made in the field, and
the earth-work upon it computed. Determinations
are also made by the students for latitude, time and
azimuth, and various other special problems worked
out practically. The map of this survey is drawn
after return from the field. The class goes to a suit-
able point at a distance from the city for this work.

4. Higher Surveying. City, railroad and geodetic sur-

veying, with the principles of the construction of
maps, the principles governing the economic location
of railways; also the drawing of the map of the Field
Survey. Four recitations a xoeek, field practice Satur-
day forenoon, and four hours a week in the drawing room,

5. Stereotomy. Application of Descriptive Geometry to

stone cutting, including groined, cloistered and skew
arches. Three hours a we^k. Prof. Engler,

6. Theanalysisof Stresses in Framed Structures. Analyti-

cal and graphical determinations of stresses in vari-
ous styles of roof trusses, and of highway and railway
bridges for distributed and concentrated, fixed and
moving loads. Three recitations a week,

7. The D^gning of Framed Structures. The analysis of

suspension, draw and arch bridges, and an analytical
study of the principles involved in the designing of
the general and detail portions of the more common
styles of bridges and roofs ; the preparation of draw-
ings showing all the detaiils of some existing iron
bridge, made from actual measurements taken by the



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42 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITY.

students, and complete original designs of a plate
girder, of a trussed roof, and of a highway bridge.
Four recitations a week, and eight hfjurs a tceek drawing-
roifni work,

8. Masonry Structures. Building masonry foundations,

retaining walls, dams, arches, chimneys, etc., to-
gether with the study of the strength of the material
involved. Two recitations a tceek,

9. Engineering Materials. A review of the principles of

mechanics relating especially to the strength of ma-
terials, both inside and beyond their elastic limits,
together with the description of methods of testing
the strength of materials and a discusion of the
essential properties of the more common materials of
engineering construction. Three recitations a week,

10-11. Testing Laboratory Practice. Experimental tests made
by the student on the strength of various kinds of
engineering materials. Three hours a week,

12. Sanitary Engineering and Irrigation. Modern irriga-

gation methods, including the elements of a com-
plete irrigation scheme, and the methods of drainage
of land.

The collection, storage, pumping, settling, filtering and
distribution of potable waters, as modified by the
conditions governing the supply, and the demands of
city service.

Sewerage and Drainage of Cities. The practical de-
signing of systems of sewerage and drainage of cities,
together with the methods of sewage disposal, the
principles of house drainage, sanitary plumbing, etc.
Ffrnr reritntitnis a week

13. Specifications and Contracts. The law of contracts as ap-

plied to engineering work, together with typical forms
of specifications governing both the commercial and



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C0UB8B8 OF INSTRUCTION. 43

the technical featarea of engineeriDg constniction,
and of all the related documents pertaining to en-
gineering contracts. One recitation a xteek,

14. Structural Drawing. To accompany course 6. Six

hours a icee.k,

15. Engineering Design. Supplementary to courses 7, 8

and 13. Eight himrs a meek,

16. Graduation Thesis. An extended study or design, in-

volving original investigation or experiment.



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

Proffssor Kinealij,

1. Kinematics of Machinery. The principles of mechanism,

rolling curves, cams, teeth of wheels, link work, and
trains of mechanism. Four hours a xceek,

2. Machine Designing. Study of the principles. Two hours

a iteek.

3. Machine Designing. Shafting, gearing, belts and ropes.

Ttro hours a week.

4. Elementary Steam Engineering. Elements of thermo-

dynamics and the theory of the steam engine ; types of
engines; valves and valve diagrams; indicator cards ;
boilers and chimneys. Three hours a week.

5. Machinery Drawing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 1. Six h(furs a week.

6. Machinery Drawing. Details of the steam en^ne ; link

motions, and valve diagrams. Six hours a week.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. The standardization of instru-

ments; oil testing. Three hours a wefk.

8. Mechanical Laboratory. Lining up and adjusting the

steam engine; use of the indicator; valve setting ; tests
of the engine. Three hours a week.



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44 WASHINGTON UNIVBB8ITY.

9. Hydraulics and Hydraalic Machinery. Three hours a week.

Professor Woodxeatd.

10. Advanced Steam £ng:ineerinf(. Stady of the details of

different engines. Thermodynamics. Three h*mrs a

tceek.

11. Steam Engine Designing. Three hovrs a week.

12. Boiler and Chimney Designing. Three hours a week.

13. Mill and Factory Construction. Two hours a week.

14. Heating and Ventilating. Three hours a %oeek.

15. Engine Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 11. iSix hours a week.

16. Engine Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 11, for students in Electrical Engineering.
Three hours a week.

17. Boiler Designing. Work in drawing-room to accompany

Course 12. Nine hours n week.

18. Mechanical Laboratory. Tests of the steam and gas en-

gines. Thrte hours a xceek.

19. Mechanical Laboratory. Boiler tests; visits to manufac-

turing establishments. Three hours a week.



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THE COLLEGE.

Admission.

Candidates for admission to the College will present
themselves for examination on Monday, June 13, 1898,
in room No. 8, east wing of the University Building,
at 9 o'clock A. M. A second examination will be held
on Tuesday, September 20, for such candidates as
cannot be present in June.

Division op the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, tabe
the entire examination at one time ; or he may divide
it (1) between two years, or (2) between June and
September of the same year; provided he is prepared
at the first examination in not less than four of the
subjects named in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students
from other colleges are required to present certificates
of honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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46 WASHINGTON UNIVBBSITY.

Requirements for Admission to the
Freshman Class.*
I. Elements of English, Neat and readable hand-
writing; correct spelling, panctuation and
use of capitals; proper construction of sen-
tences ; clearness and conciseness of expression
Candidates are advised to stady the following:
A grammar containing a clear and simple system of
analysis of sentences sach as is found in Lojigman^s
School Grammfr; Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice,
Addison's Roger de Coverley papers from T?if Spec-
tator, Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, George Eliot's
Silas Marner, Longfellow's Evangeline, and Emerson's
essays on Friendship, Manners, Compensation,
History, Character.

II. Algebra, including radicals and equations of the
second degree.

III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry. Wells' or
Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IVt Latin. Grammar, four books of CsBsar, seven
orations of Cicero, and six books of the
^neid of Virgil. Prose Composition.
V. ^fodem Language, Either French or German at
the option of the candidate; facility in read-
ing ordinary prose at sight and knowledge of
elementary grammar shown by the ability to
translate easy sentences from English into
French or German.



* Sont'—Oreek Is not required for admission; bnt candidate* who
intend to continue the study of Greek after admission to the Collef(e
must fulfill the following requirements:—

Oood win's Grammar and Reader; or Grammsr, four books of the
Anabasis, and three booki of the Iliad; prose composition.



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THE COLLBGB. 47

VI. History, Of the United States and of England,
sncb as is found in any text -book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools ;
of Greece and Rome, such as is found in
PennelPs or Smith's Small Histories.
VII. Elementary Physics, Either a or 6.

a. As much as is contained in such books
as Gage's ** Introduction to Physical Science, *'
or Appleton's **School Physics."

h. An amount of laboratory work equal to
the first forty experiments in Hall and Ber-
gen's **Text-Book of Physics."

Special Students.
Special Students may be admitted to one or more
courses in the college upon the following conditions: —

1. That evidence of proper preparation, satisfactory-
to the committee and to the instructors concerned, be

submitted before admission to any course or courses.

»

2. That candidates for degrees who fail in the work
of the regular courses shall not have the privilege of
becoming Special Students, unless such failure shall
come from physical inability to do the required work.

3. That Special Students shall not be regarded as
candidates for a degree.

All matters concerning Special Students are referred
to a standing committee of the Faculty, which is com-
posed of Professors Snow, Waterhouse and Sanger.
Applications should be made to Professor Snow,
Chairman.



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48 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITT.

ARRANGEMENT OP STUDIES IN THE COLLEGE.

Freshman Year.
^Prescribed Studies,

English, coarses 1 and 2.

German, courses 1 and 2, <;r French, courses 1 and 2, for
those who do not present both of these languages for admis-
sion.

Eleclire IStudies.

In addition to the prescribed studies, every Freshman is re-
quired to take each term elective studies amounting to three
full courses. No Freshman may elect more than one course in
the same subject without the consent of the Dean.
The following courses are open to Freshmen: —

Greek, 1, 2.

Latin, 1, 2.

English, 1, 2.

German, 1, 2.

French, 1, 2.

History,!, 2.

Mathematics, 1,2.

Drawing, 1, 2.

Physics, 1, 2.

Chemistry, I, 2.

Botany, 1, 2.
A Freshman who is qualified to take a higher course in any
study named above may do so, with the permission of the
instructor in the course and the Dean of the College.

Sophomore and Junior Years.

The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Junior years
consists of:—
English, courses 3, 4 and 5, 6.



* Tbe figures Indicate the numbers of the Courses of Instruotlon.
See pp. 28- U.



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THE COLLEGE. 49

Besides the prescribed courses every Sophomore and every
Janior is required to take each term four alective cmirses, or an
equivalent amount of courses and half courses.

Senior Year.
Eight courses, all elective, are required for the Senior year.

ADVISERS.

A Standing Committee of five members of the
Faculty is appointed annually to advise students of the
College in the choice of studies and to assist them in
making a wise arrangement of their work. The Com-
mittee for the year 18a7-98 consists of Professors
Snow, Waterhouse, Pritchett, Trelease, Heller.

CHOICE OF STUDIES.

Every student is required to give notice in writing
to the Dean of the College on the first day of each
term of his choice of studies for that term.

Changes may be made only by permission of the
Advisers, to whom application must be made in writ-
ing, with a full statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any course for
which his previous training has not fully prepared him.

REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR
OF ARTS.

The satisfactory completion of thirty -eight courses
of one term each, with three recitations a week (or
their equivalent), is necessary to fulfill the require-
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.



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THE SCHOOL OP ENGINEERING.
Admission.

Candidates for admission to the School of Engineer-
ing will present themselves for examination on Mon-
day, June 13, 1898, in room No. 8, east wing of the
University Building, at 9 o'clock a. m. A second
examination will be held on Tuesday, September 20,
for such candidates as cannot be present in June.

Division op the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take
the entire examination at one time ; or he may divide
it (1) between two years, or (2) between June and
September of the same year; provided he is prepared
at the first examination in not less than four of the
subjects named in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students
from other institutions are required to present certifi-
cates of honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must fur-
nish their testimonials at the time of their final exami-
nation for admission.



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THE SCHOOL OF BMOINBBBINO. 51

Bequibements for Admission to the Freshman
Class.

I. Elements of English. Neat and readable hand-
writing; correct spelling, punctuation and
use of capitals; proper construction of sen-
tences; clearness and conciseness of expres-
sion.

Candidates are advised to study the following:
A grammar containing a clear and simple sys-
tem of analysis of sentences, snch as is foand in
Longman^ 8 School Grammar; Shakespeare's Merchant
of Venice; Addison's Roger de Ooverley papers from
The Spectator; GoMamith's Vicar of Wak^ld;GeoTge
Eliot's Silas Mamen^ I>ongfellow's Evangeline and
Emerson's Essays on Friendship, Manners, Com-
pensation, History, Character.

II. Algebra, including radicals and equations of
the second degree. .

III. Elementary Plane and 8olid Oeometry. Wells'

or Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IV. Modem Language. Either French or German

at the option of the candidate; facility in
reading ordinary prose at sight, and a know-
ledge of elementary grammar shown by the
ability to translate easy sentences from Eng-
lish into French or German.

N. B.— In place of Reqairement IV, advanced
work in Mathematics, Physics, or Chemistry, eqaiva-
lent to two courses in these subjects as given in the
School of Engineering, will be accepted, provided
the candidate is 18 years old and has satisfied the



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52 WASHINGTON UNIVBSSITY.

inetractor that he has done the work in the subject
he presents. A student thus admitted will be ex-
cused from work in the subject for which he has been
given credit, but he will be required to do an equiva-
lent amount of work in some other subject accept-
able to the Faculty.

V. History. Of the United States and of England,
snch as is fonnd in any text -book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools.

N. B. — In place of the work in the History of
England, an equivalent amount of work in the his-
tory of some other country, in Ancient History, or
in General History will be accepted.

VI. Elementary Physics. Either a or h.

a. As much as is contained in such books
as Gage's ** Introduction to Physical Science,"
or Appleton's ** School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to
the first forty experiments in Hall and Ber-
gen's ** Text -Book of Physics."

VIII. Drawing, a. Free-hand drawing in outline
from groups of simple objects, h. Simple
free-hand lettering.



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STUDIES IN THB SCHOOL OF KMOINBBRINO.



53



ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF
ENGINEERING.

The courses of study in the School of Engineering
are five in number: —
I, Civil Engineering.

Mechanical Engineering.

Electrical Engineering.

Chemistry.

Science and Literature.

*Fbbshman Ybar.
The same for all Courses,

FIRST TBRM.

Mathematics, 1.
Phyncs, 1.
Chemistry, 1.
Drawing, 1.

SECOND TBRM.

Mathematics, 2.
Physics, 2.
Chemistry, 2.
Drawing, 2,

SoPHOMORB Ybar.

The same for all Courses,

FIRST TBRM.

Chemistry, 3.
Drawing, 3.

Descriptive Geometry, 1.
Civil Engineering, 1.



II.

in.

IV.
V.



English, 1. t
'German o'ir i
Frcinch, j^*
History, 1.



English, 2.
■Crermanor-i
French, J ^'
History, 2.



^3.



•German or -j^ ^
French, J '
Mathematics, 3.
Physics, 3.



* In the School of Enirineering all the studies for each course are
prescribed; there is no choice except as indicated.

t The figures indicate the numbers of the Courses of Instruction.
:8ee pp. 28-44.



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54



Mathematics, 4.
Mechanics, 1.
Physics, 4.
Chemistry, 4.



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.
8B00ND TBHM.



Geology, 1.
Drawing, 4.
Descriptive Geometry,
Civil Engineering, 2.



N. B. — In addition to the ahove, Shop-work 2, (3 hoars ft.
week) is required in both terms of stadents who have not had
Shop- work before admission.



I. CIVIL ENGINEERING.

Freshman and Sophomore Years.
(See above.)

Junior Year.
FIRST term.



Mathematics, 5.
Mechanics, 2.
Physics, 5.
Botany, 8.



Mechanics, 3.
Physics, 6.
Botany, 18.
Civil Engineering, 6.



Civil Engineering, 3.
Civil Engineering, 4.
Civil Engineering, 5.



SECOND TERM.



Civil Engineering, 9.
Civil Engineering, 10.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 27 of 70)