Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 29 of 70)
Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 29 of 70)
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from time to time, and such persons may be admitted
to any of the regular electives on the pajinent of a



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SOHOOL OF BOTANY. 76

tuition fee conformed to the general rates of the Uni-
versity, namely, $15.00 for each full course (of three
exercises per week during a semester), and $7.50 for
each half course (of less than three exercises per week
for the same length of time). Graduates of the Uni-
versity and of the Mary Institute are not subject to
any charge for tuition.

Graduate students who 'are eligible under the rules
of the Faculty to candidacy for higher degrees, if suit-
ably prepared, may elect research work in botany as
their principal study for such degrees.

Applications for the formation of special classes, and
all correspondence concerning the School of Botany,
should be addressed to

William Trelease,

Shaw School of Botany,

St. Louis, Mo.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FliNE ARTS.

(art department op WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)
19th Street and Lacas Place.



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CALENDAR 1897-98.



First Term, Day School, beg:in8 Monday, September 20, 1897.
First Term, Day School, ends Satorday, December 11th, 1897.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November Ist,

1897.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday , January 29th, 1898.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 13th,

1897.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 12th, 1898.
Second Term, Night School, b^ns Monday, January Slst,

1898.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 23d, 1898.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 14th, 1898.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 4th, 1898.
Exhibition op Students' Work, June 7th-9th, 1898.

1898-1899.

First Term, Day School, begins Monday, September 19, 1898.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 10th, 1898.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, October 3l8t,

1898.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, January 28th, 1899.
Second Teem, Day School, begins Monday, December 12th,

1898.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 11th, 1899.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, January 30th,

1899.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 22d, 1899.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 13th, 1899.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 3d, 1899.
Exhibition op Students* Work, June 6th-8th, 1899.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

REORGANIZED MAY 22, 1879.



The establishment of an Art School upon a broad
and permanent foundation has always been part of the
plan of Washington University. For nearly twenty-
five years Art instruction has been embodied in the
course of study. In 1875, special students were ad-
mitted to the Drawing Department, and class and pub-
lic lectures were given on Art History. The same
year an evening school was opened.

On May 22, 1879, the Directors of the University
adopted an ordinance establishing a Department of
Art in Washington University, from which the follow-
ing extracts are taken: —

**A Department of Art is hereby established as a
special Department of Washington University, to be
known as The St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

**The objects of said Department shall be: Instruc-
tion in Pine Arts; the collection and exhibition of
pictures, statuary, and other works of art, and of
whatever else may be of artistic interest and appropri-
ate for a Public Gallery or Art Museum; and, in gen-
eral, the promotion by all proper means of aesthetic or
artistic education."



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BOARD OF CONTROL.

ELLIS WAINWRIGHT, President.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, Chancellor, «r. officio,

HARRISON I. DRUMMOND.

ALFRED L. SHAPLEIGH.

CHARLES PARSONS.

CHARLES NAGEL.

GEORGE D. BARNARD.

DAVID C. BALL

HALSEY 0. IVES, Director, ex officio.



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS.

HALSEY C. IVES, Director.
ROBERT P. BRINGHDR8T.
EDWARD M. CAMPBELL.
CHARLES PERCY DAVIS.
JUSTINA V. A. PHILLIPS, Librarian.
WM. PELL PULIS.
CHARLES F. VON SALTZA.
EDMUND H. WUERPEL.
ALICE M. MORE, Secretary.
W. H. PALMER.
CHARLES WARD RHODES.

Note. — All commanicatioDS in regard to the School shoald
be addressed: ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.



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GENERAL INFORMATION.

There are three terms in the year.

Students will be admitted at any time, but not for less
than one term, except by special arrangement with the
Director,

The school furnishes instruction in Drawing, Model-
ing, Painting, Artistic Anatomy, Perspective, Compo-
sition, Architectural and Mechanical Drawing.

The rooms are open for the study of drawing, paint-
ing and modeling, every day during each term from 9
am. to 4 p. m. and for the study of drawing from the
Antique and Life, mechanical drawing and modeling
three evenings in the week, from November to May.

Students may enter any class upon submitting exam-
ples of work showing the necessary skill. Applicants
for admission to the evening Life Class must submit
a drawing of a full length figure from the Antique or
Life.

Students who can pass the necessary examination
may study Modem Languages, History and Literature
in classes of the Undergraduate Department of the
University.

The school is fully equipped with models, easts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms are adjacent to the galleries of the
Museum. The building erected during the past year
was especially designed to meet the needs of the various
classes of the school and, in its appointments, art
students will find every convenience for study.

The artists connected with the school as teachers
have received their training in the Art Schools of
Europe.



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82 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

All finished work must be left in the school or if re-
moved by special permission, must be returned before the
close of the school year for final examination by the
committee appointed for that purpose.

Instruction in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree of
proficiency only. Students are at liberty to work as
much or as little as they desire between the hours of
9 a. m. and 4 p. m.

An admission fee of $2.00 is charged each student
on enrolling in the classes of the day school, and $1.00
to each student enrolling' in the night school.

TUITION FEES.

(Payable in advance to the Treasurer of Washin^n
University.) .
To go into effect Sept. 19, 1898.

Taition per term, with privileges of any or all classes

and lectures .'. $25 00

Saturday Glass for adults and juveniles, per term 7 50

Evening Class, Antique or Sketching from Life, three

times per week for term of twelve weeks 5 00

Evenins Life Class, three times per week for term of

twelve weeks 7 60

Evening Class, Elementary, three times per week for

term of twelve weeks 6 00

Evening Class, Architectural and Mechanical Praw-
ing, three times per week for term of tirelve
weeks 5 00

Evening Class, Modeling, three times per week for

term of twelve weeks 6 00

Students will be admitted to the Day School per
month, with the privilege of one or more classes
per day. First month 12 50

Each following month during the year 10 00



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS.



PROGRAMME.



Elementary Model and Object Class, daily, from 9 to 12

o'clock.
Antique Class, daily, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Life Class (model nade) daily (except Saturdays), from 9 to

12 o'clock.

AFTERNOON.

Modeling Class, daily, from 1 to 4 o'clock.

Painting Class (Still-Life, Drapery, etc.), daily, from 1 to 4

o'clock.
Head Painting Class, daily, from 1 to 4 o'clock.

SATURDAY.

Elementary Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

Antique Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

Sketch Class (models in costume), from 9 to 12 o'clock.

Modeling Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

SATURDAY JUVENILE CLASS.

Drawing from objects, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Modeling, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

NIGHT.

Life Class (model nude), Monday, Tuesday and Thursday,
from 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 o'clock.

Portrait Class, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7 : 30 to
9: 30 o'clock.

Elementary Class in Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day, from 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 o'clock.

Antique Class, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7 : 30 to
9: 30 o'clock.



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84 WASHINGTON UNIVSBSITT.

Mechanical Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from

7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Architectural Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from

7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Modeling, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30 to 9:30

o'clock.

Advance students are afforded opportunity for study
from life — draped and nude models — ^forty hours per

week.



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.

The course of instruction is as follows: —

ELEMENTARY.

From the beginning the student is taught to draw
from the object. Models are provided with simple
contours such as casts from leaves, fruit, foliage, Greek
vases, architectural forms, fragments of the human
figure, etc., and the student is required to make out-
line and shaded drawings from these until he has fully
mastered the difficulties due to the form and position
of the object. This method is carried through all
grades of the school; no copying of any kind is per-
mitted.

ANTIQUE.

In the Antique Class the methods in use are severe
and require (?lose observation combined with great
patience and perseverance. All stump processes are



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 86

discarded; all results are due tx) careful study and
painstaking; no chance is allowed for ** accidental
effects." The education of the eye is considered of
greater importance than the training of the hand, not
only in simple line work and the study of superficial
forms, but in the general, yet no less certain, laws
which underlie and distinguish the work of every great
master in sculpture or painting. Little attention is
paid to pictorial finish, and in many cases where a
tendency toward pictorial finish seems to interfere
with the students' progress in acquiring a compre-
hensive method of drawing, it is rigorously discour-
aged.

LIFE.

Work in the Life Classes consists in drawing and
painting from the living model, both draped and nude,
and either from a whole or a portion of the figui*e, one
class being entirely devoted to the study of the head.
More attention is given to drawing than to painting,
and students who paint are required to draw a portion
of the time. In all cases a careful study of the model
and conscientious search for contours and construction,
requiring continual use of the mind, are insisted upon.
No effort is made to bring the students to a uniformity
of method; except to the extent of instructing them to
see forms as they really exist; beyond this each stu-
dent is permitted to develop or follow a style of his
own. Special attention is given to the importance of
viewing the subject to be placed upon the paper as a
whole, thus bringing the parts of the figure into



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86 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

proper subordination and avoiding the natural ten-
dency to exaggerate the importance of details. Spe-
cial emphasis is placed on the importance of self-
reliance in the determination of the form of each por-
tion of the figure, and of bestowing as conscientious
care upon the modeling of the hand and foot as upon
the expression of the face, with the purpose of train-
ing the eye to comprehend and the hand to reproduce
precisely what is seen and not what may be known to
exist from a general knowledge of the subject or from
any preconceived ideas of whatever kind. This method
is carried to the smallest details with the intention of
compelling the student to rely entirely on the natural
form which is before him.

MECHANICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

Classes in these subjects are only held at night.
Owing to the variety of knowledge and ability
possessed by the student, the instruction is largely
individual.

Mechanical drawing includes the following branches:

I. Plane Cleometrical Drawing, Orthographic Pro-
jection, Intersection of Solids and Develop-
ment of Surfaces.
II. Drawing of Alachine Details from measurement.

III. The making of Assembled Drawings.

IV. Tracing.

The purpose of the instruction is to teach students
how to make practical working drawings, and to read
them with ease.



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SCHOOL OF FINS ARTS. 87

In the Architeetnral Drawing Class beginners are
taught how to use their instruments, and to make neat
and accurate line drawings. Instruction is given in
the preparation of plans, elevations and working draw-
ings for various kinds of buildings. Advanced stu-
dents are taught Perspective Drawing, and the Draw-
ing of ornamental forms for decorative purposes.

MODELING.

The work of modeling in the day class of the school
is intended principally to supplement the work in
drawing and painting, for the purpose of giving stu-
dents a more detailed knowledge of the form and struc-
ture of the models which they have studied in their
work in drawing. In the night class the work is quite
different. Most of the students are artisans who de-
sire to acquire a knowledge of modeling for specific pur-
poses, principally for use in exterior decoration and in
architectural work. On account of this difference the
work in thfe day class is of a more general character,
and intended more to cultivate the mind, while that
of the night class is necessarily special in character,
and intended more particularly to give the hand skill
in producing well-known forms.
LECTURES.

From time to time class and public lectures are given
on subjects pertaining to art history and on other
allied subjects, which it is thought may be for the
benefit of the students. These lectures are arranged,
not only for the purpose of instructing the student by
the matter directly presented, but to awaken a desire



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88 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITY.

for information on a variety of subjects, lit-erary and
historical as well as artistic, and to suggest a proper
course of reading for the prosecution of any line of
study which individual taste may prefer. Some are
purely technical and deal with the various methods
employed at different periods, while others are in-
formal and conversational. AH are intended to give
the student the latest and best information on the sub-
jects treated, and wherever possible are illustrated
either by models and objects or stereopticon views.

All lectures are given by specialists; the general sub-
jects treated are history, literature, philosophy, anat-
omy, perspective, decorative design.

During the year 1896-97, there were given class and
general lectures on the following subjects: —

HISTORY OF PAINTING.— Prof. H. C. Ivea 1

Mr. Chas. F. vonSaltza... 2
Mies A. M. More 18

— 21
COMPOSITION.— Prof. H. C. Ives....; 1

Mr. E. H. Waerpel 20

Mr. Chas. F. vonSaltza... 11

Mr. Ghaa. Percy Davis 9

Mr.RobertP. Bringharst.. 6

— 46
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS.— Prof. H. C. Ivee 2

Mr. E. H. Waerpel 2

Mr. Chas. F. von Saltza... 2

Mr. Chas. Percy Davis 1

Mr. Chas. W. Rhodes 2

Mr. E.M.Campbell 6

Mr. R. P. Bringharst 2

— 17
PERSPECTIVE.— Mr. M. P. McArdle .12 12

Total, 96



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 89



COLLECTIONS.

The Museum of the school contains a carefully
selected collection of about five hundred casts from
antique and medisdval sculpture, and several marbles
and works in bronze; also collections of examples of
art work in porcelain, glass, metal and wood (originals
and reproductions), and of fictile ivories and laces.

The Picture Galleries contain a collection of paint-
ings, rare engravings and etchings. Examples are
added, when possible, with a view to affording the
student the best possible opportunity for pursuing the
study of art history by such subjects.

Students are free to visit the galleries of the Museum
at all times when open. Every possible advantage
will be afforded them for work.

The collections for the use of students comprise:
Several hundred autotype reproductions, from sket<5he8,
studies and paintings by celebrated masters from the
fifteenth century to the present time; a set of carbon
prints (numbering 1,041) illustrating the historical
development of art made from various collections of
the British Museum. The latter is divided into six
parts: I. Prehistoric and Ethnographical Series; IL
Egyptain Series; IIL Ass>Tian Series; IV. Grecian
Series; V. Etruscan and Roman Series; VI. Mediieval
Series.

A Reference Library is being formed for the use of
students. The reading room has on file the leading
art magazines of the world.



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90 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

The reading room is open daily from 9 a. m. to 5
o'clock p.m. and on such evenings of the week as the
work of the school may demand. The current art pub-
lications and monthly publications of current literature
are on file.

It is the intention of the authorities of the school to
add books of reference as rapidly as possible to those
already acquired.

The Awards in the School of Fine Arts for the year
1896-97 were as follows: —

June 10, 1897.
Prof. Halsey C. Ives,

Director ISt. Louis School of Fine Arts,

Dear Sir: — The Jury of Awards appointed to judge
the work submitted in competition for honors for the
year 1896-97 takes pleasure in congratulating you and
your fellow workers and the students upon the ver>'
high order of excellence which marks the exhibition.
The judges found themselves seriously embarassed in
selecting the l)est because of this general superiority and
wished many times that the number of honors had
been greater.

The following are recommended : —

Antique Class.

75 Miss Evelyn Fitch 1st, Silver Medal.

28 Miss Lotta Shank 2nd, Bronze Medal.

22 Mr. Louis F. Graner 3rd, Honorable Mention.

Still Life Painting Class.

66 Mrs. 8. G. Hirst let, Silver Medal.
21 Miss Ealabee Dix 2nd, Bronze Medal.
142 Miss E. Mansfield 3rd, Honorable Mention.



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school of fine arts. 91

Portrait Glass in Black and White.

3 Mr. Geo. A. Barker let, Bronze Medal.
20 Miss Emilie M. Gross 2nd, Honorable Mention.

Portrait Class in Color.

10 Mr. Robert A. Kissack let, Gold Medal.
I Mr. Geo. C. Aid 2nd, Silver Medal.

Life Class in Black and White.

99 Miss Emma Siboni Ist, Bronze Medal.

16 Mr. J. Oliver Spurr 2nd, Honorable Mention.

Life Class in Color.

10 Mr. Robert A. Kissack 1st, Gold Medal.
20 Miss Emilie M. Gross 2nd, Bronze Medal.
13 Miss Alice M. Beach 3rd, Honorable Mention.

Composition Class.

3 Mr. Geo. A Barker Ist, Silver Medal.
87 Mififl Bertha E. Banter 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Saturday Sketch Class in Color.

10 Mr. Robert A. Kissack Ist, Gold Medal.
3 Mr. Geo. A. Barker 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Saturday Sketch Class in Black and White.
79 Mr. L. Sanford Ist, Book.
35 Mr. B. Jas. Lowell 2nd, Bonorable Mention.
22 Mr. Loais F. Graner 3rd, Honorable Mention.

Modeling Class from Life.

Miss Clara Pfeifler Ist, Silver Medal.

Miss Florence Sharman 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Modeling from Antique.

Mrs. E. B. Goodrich 1st, Bonorable Mention.

The Wayman Crow Medal awarded to Mies Nancy L. Scales

Respectfully yours,

(Signed) James William Pattison,

Chairman of the Jury,



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92 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

THE ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS.

The Museum of Fine Arts has a valuable permanent
collection of statuary, paintings, pottery, carvings,
etc., which affords the public, as well as students, an
indispensable aid to the study of art. And in order
that opportunity may be given for studying the
methods of the different schools of painting and the
works of celebrated artists, arrangements have been
made for a series of fine exhibitions of oil and water
color paintings, architectural drawings and engrav-
ings.

Any one desiring to become a member of the Museum
of Fine Arts may do so by the annual payment of
$10.00. This membership entitles him, with his
family and non-resident guests, to the privilege of
visiting the Museum at all times when open to the
public, and to all lectures, receptions, and special ex-
hibitions given under the auspices of the Board of
Control.



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SCHOOL OF PINE ARTS.



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

Stadents enrolled from date of issae of last catalogae,
February Ist, 1897, to January Ist, 1898.

FULL TIME STUDENTS.
NAME. RESIDENCE.

Atkinson, May 3G02 Lafayette av.

Ball, Emma 3308 Shenandoah st.

Barrington, Katherine St. Paul, Minn.

Beach, Alice May 4464 Labadie av.

Bell, Cora Hillsboro, 111.

Benson, Beatrice West Plains, Mo.

Bollman, Adele 1115 Dillon st.

Boycr, Evelyn Easton, Mo.

Brokaw, Anna Glotilde 3200 Lucas av.

Cartwright, Amanda Holman Verrell, Tex.

Chamberlain, Mary Ann 6218 Wagner av.

Chopin, Lelia 3317 Morgan st.

Cogswell, Catherine Diggs 4211 Page av.

Dozier, Martha Elizabeth Nashville, Tenn.

Eno, Julia Coalter 3874 Washington av.

Federer, Charles Aloyius 908 Russell av.

Fitch, Evelyn 4943 Reber pi.

Fitzgerald, Denis James 2408 N. Grand av.

Franklin, Ethel Chandler Kirkwood, Mo.

Gray, Florence Isabella 1139 Walton av.

Goodrich, Ella Hunter 3663 Blain av.

Gross, Emilie Mary Webster, Mo.

Gruner, Louis Frederick 10 Nicholson pi.

Harker, George Albert 2940 Laclede av.

Harris, Florence Use Waverly pi.



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94 WASHINGTON UNIVBRSITY.

NAMB. RBSIDBNCE.

Hazard, Grace Kirkwood, Mo.

Heltiell, Ida Grace 3119 Franklin av.

Hinckley, Theodore Charles 3010 Locust st.

Houck, Tula Vivian 1742 Waverly pi.

Hurlbnt, William James Belvedere, 111.

Ittner, Anne Rebecca 2103 Park av.

Jenkins, Henrietta Averil 1362 Bayard av.

Knapp, Genevieve 4467 Lindell av.

Knapp, Lucie B 3528 Olive st.

Lesser, Eva 3512 Chestnut st.

Lippincott, Eleanor Edwards Webster Groves.

Lodge, Beatrice Sailor 2106 Lafayette av.

Lovell, Florence Carolena 3419a Bell a v.

Lowell, James Henry Holton, Kas.

Malin, Belle Augusta 3634 Russell av.

Magee, Thomas Henry 1207 Tyler st.

Mansfield, Emily 4934 Berlin av.

Matthews, Lillian K 4130 West Bell pL

Mac Adam, Davis Hastings Kirkwood, Mo.

McKeen, Emma Catherine 3749 Delmar av.

McShan, Loutie Verona, Miss.

Menne, Laura Estelle 4387 W. Pine.

Middleton, James 7811 8. 6th st.

Nickerson, Edmonda Augusta Warrensburg, Mo.

Pearce, Florence May Jerseyville, 111.

Pattison, Alice M. G 4246 Olive st.

Ringen, Hattie 4367 Delmar av.

Rosebrongh, Lee 4733 Hammettpl.

Sayers, Frank Charles 2189 Clark av.

Scales, Nancy Logan 1210 GoodfeM^w av.

Schrader, Walter Roland 3106 Rauschenbach av.

Sharman, Florence 2124 S. Compton av.

Smith, Bettie Malvern, Ark.

Snyder, Elizabeth 4064 McPherson av.

Souther, Mary Lizzie 4329 West Bell pi.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 95

NAME. RBSIDENCB.

Stafford, Vida Trenton, Tenn.

Steinbargge, Hany Edward Hillside P. O., Mo.

Stone, Jasmine Edson 6662 Clemens av.

Span-, John Oliver 6356 Page av.

Sullivan, Ella Mary ".3228 Pine st.

Tidball, Edna Austin Fort Worth, Tex.

Trares, August 5463 Vernon av.

Treloar, William Mitchelson Mexico, Mo.

Trueblood. Stella. 939 Ailanthus st.

Untersinger, Bernard Fr 3146 Arsenal st.

Wand, Ollie Jessie 3846 Page av.

Westervelt, Robert Davis 6301 S. Sixth st.

Willensen, Lillie Elise 1729 Mississippi av.

Students working full time 73

Students working part time.... 70
Students working in Night

Classes 116

Total num ber en rol led 259



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ST. LOUIS LAW SCHOOL

(law DKPABTMBNT op WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)



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CALENDAR 1897-98.

Law School opens Thareday, September 23, 1897.
Holiday, Thankboivinq Day, Tharsday, November 26, 1897.
Vacation, December 24, 1897, to January 2, 1898, inclosive.

Holiday, Washington's Birthday, Tuesday, February 22,

1898.

University Holiday, Friday, May 13, 1898.

Commencement, Thursday evening, June 16, 1898.

Vacation, from June 16 to Thursday, September 22, 1898.

Examinations por Entrance to Senior Glass, Tuesday,
September 20, 1898.

Law School opens Thursday, September 22, 1898.

Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 24, 1898.

Vacation, from December 24, 1898, to January 1, 1899, in-
lusive.



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LAW SCHOOL.



FACULTY.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, LL.D.,
Chancbllob op Washington University.

WILLIAM 8. CURTIS, LL.B.,
Dean op the Law Faculty.

RODERICK E. ROMBAUER (Presiding Justice St. Louis
Court op Appeals),

Propessor, Real Property Law and Equity.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 29 of 70)