Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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such as is found in any text-book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools ;
of Greece and Rome, such as is found in
Pennell's or Smith's Small Histories.

VII. Elementary Physics. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books
as Gage's* * Introduction to Physical Science, ' '
or Appleton's "School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to
the first forty experiments in Hall and Ber-
gen's "Text- Book of Physics."

Spp:cial Students.

Special Students may be admitted to one or more
courses in the college upon the following conditions :

1. That evidence of proper preparation, satisfac-
tory to the committee and to the instructors con-
cerned, be submitted before admission to any course
or courses.

2. That candidates for degrees who fail in the
work of the regular courses shall not have the privi-
lege of becoming Special Students, unless such fail-
ure shall come from physical inability to do the re-
quired work.

3. That Special Students shall not be regarded as
candidates for a degree.

All matters concerning Special Students are re-
ferred to a standing committee of the Faculty, which
is composed of Professors Snow, Waterhouse and
Sanger. Applications should be made to Professor
Snow, Chairman.



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60 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE
COLLEGE.

Freshman Vear.
* Prescribed Studies.
English, Courses 1 and 2.

German, Courses 1 and 2, or French, Courses 1 and 2, for
those who do not present both of these languages for ad-
mission.

Elective Studies,
In addition to the prescribed studies, every Freshman is
required to talte each term elective studies amounting to
three full courses. No Freshman may elect more than one
course in the same subject without the consent of the Dean.
The following courses are open to Freshmen:
Greeli, 1, 2.
Latin, 1, 2.
English, 1, 2.
(lorman, 1, 2.
French, 1, 2.
History, 1, 2.
Mathematics, 1, 2.
Drawing, 1, 2.
Physics, 1, 2.
Chemistry, 1, 2.
Botany, 1, 2.
A Freshman who is qualified to take a higher course in
any study named above may do so, with the permission of
the Instructor in the course and tlio Dean of the College.
Sophomore and Junior Years.
The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Junior years
consists of:
English, Courses 3, 4 and 5, G.

"•The Inures indicate the numbers of the Courses of Instruction.
*>ee pp. 30-46.



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THK COIXEGE. 51

besides the prescribed courses every ^phomore and
every Junior is required to take each term four elective
courses, or an equivalent amount of courses and half
courses.

Senior Year.

liight courses, all elective, are required for the Senior
year.

CHOICE OF STUDIES.

Every student is required to give notice in writing
to the Dean of the College on the first day of each
term of his choice of studies for that term.

Changes may be made only by permission of the
Dean, to whom application must be made in writ-
ing, with a full statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any course for
which his previous training has not fully prepared
him.

REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHEI.OR
OF ARTS.

The satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses
of one term each, with three recitations a week (or
their equivalent), is necessary to fulfill the require-
ments for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.



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THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.

Admission.

Candidates for admission to the School of Engi-
neering will present themselves for examination on
Monday, June 12, 1899, in room No. 8, east wing of
the University Building, at 9 o*clock a. m. A second
examination will be held on Tuesday, September 26,
for such candidates as cannot be present in June.

Division of the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take
the entire examination at one time; or he may di-
vide it (i) between two years, or (2) between June and
September of the same year ; provided he is prepared
at the first examination in not less than four of the
subjects named in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials

All candidates for admission are required to fur-
nish testimonials of good moral character, and stu-
dents from other institutions are required to present
certificates of honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must fur-
nish their testimonials at the time of their final ex-
Simination for admission.



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1.



^ THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 53

^ Requirements for Admission to the Freshman

r ' Class.



:.!



I. Elements of English. Neat and readable hand-
writing; correct spelling, punctuation and use
of capitals; proper construction of sentences;

(clearness and conciseness of expression.
Candidates are advised to study the following:
^ A grammar containing a clear and simple system of

analysis of sentences such as is found in Longman's
School Grammar, Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice,
Addison's Roger de Coverly papers from The Spec-
tator, Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, George
Eliot's Silas Mamer, Longfellow's Evangeline^ and
Emerson's essays on Friendship. Manners, Compen-
sation, History, Character.

II. Algebra, including radicals and equations of

the second degree.

III. Elementary Plane ana Solia Geometry. Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometr>^ or an equivalent.

IV. Modem Language. Either French or German

at the option of the candidate ; facility in
reading ordinary prose at sight, and a knowl-
edge of elementary grammar shown by the
ability to translate easy sentences from Eng-
lish into French or German.

N. B.— In place of Requirement IV, advanced
work in Mathematics, Physics, or Chemistry, equiv-
alent to two courses in these subjects as given In
the School of Engineering, will be accepted, pro-
vided the candidate Is 18 years old and has satisfied



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54 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

the instructor that he has done the work in the sub-
ject he presents. A student thus admitted will be
excused from work in the subject for which he has
been given credit, but he will be required to do an
equivalent amount of work in some other subject
acceptable to the Faculty.

V. Hisfory. Of the United States and of England

such as is found in any text-book on history
intended for the use of ^preparatory schools.

N. B.— In place of the work in the History of
England, an equivalent amount of work in the his-
tory of some other country, in Ancient History, or
in General History will be accepted.

VI. Elementary Physics. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books
as Gage's "Introduction to Physical Science,"
or Appleton's "School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to
the first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
"Text-Book of Physics."

VII. Drawing, a. Free-hand drawing in outline

from groups of simple objects, b. Simple free-
hand lettering.



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UNDBRGRADUATR DRPARTMRNT. 61

they consult freely on assigned topics. There is also
a large assortment of drawings of the most interest-
ing engineering and architectural structures at home
and abroad. Many photographs and blue prints have
been collected illustrating all the more common styles
of bridges with their details.

77?^ Testing Laboratory — The facilities in the test-
ing laboratory are very complete. A floor space of
about 2,400 square feet is occupied with the following
appliances: Two Riehle universal testing machines
with a capacity of 100,000 lbs. and 20,000 lbs. respec-
tively, a beam testing machine, with a capacity of
100,000 lbs. on a length of 24 feet; two beam testing
machines with a capacity of 6,000 lbs. on a length of
five feet with micrometer deflection measuring appa-
ratus; a column testing machine with capacity of 1,000,-
ooolbs.ona length of 36 ft. or less; cement testing ma-
chines of the Fairbanks, the Riehle, and the Olsen
types; a complete standard set of German briquet
making and testing machines and scales, with pound-
ing apparatus ; an extensometer apparatus reading to
ten thousandths of an inch; one eight-horse-power
steam engine; one five-horsc-power dynamo; one
planer and one lathe for iron work ; one wood planer,
one band saw, and one cutting off circular saw for
shaping timber specimens; two drying ovens and
three sets of scales; a dry kiln with steam coil and
exhaust fan for drying lumber ; complete sets of
bench and carpenter's tools, standard gauges, scales,
etc.



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62 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

APPLIANCES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEER-
ING.

Drawings and photographs illustrating the best
practice in all branches of mechanical engineering,
including a number of drawings of the machinery of
ships for the U. S. Navy, and examples of the best
practice in the construction of locomotives, station-
ary engines, and machine tools are provided. Stu-
dents have access to a small but modern and care-
fully selected technical library, and to a number of the
best technical journals.

The laboratory contains a steam engine, a West-
inghouse air compressor, a Bogart gau and gasoline
engine, a Carpenter steam calorimeter, a pair of
Crosby indicators, a planimeter, a tachometer, a
Thompson coal calorimeter, a pryometer, a complete
set of apparatus for testing lubricants, a standard gas
meter, a standard test gauge, a Prony brake, ther-
mometers, revolution counters, and such tools as are
necessary.

Students have access to the shops of the Manual
Manual Training School, in which they receive a
training in the use and care of metal and wood work-
ing tools and machinery.

APPLIANCES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEER-
ING.

The Electrical Engineering Laboratory contains a
high speed Buckeye Engine of twenty horse-power;
two Gramme dynamos, the one being a series and the



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. «3

Other a shunt-wound machine ; smaller motors of va-
rious types; voltmeters, amperemeters aiid galvano-
meters of various types and capacities ; a Brackett
cradle-ergometer, upon which one dynamo is mount-
ed, and by which the power applied to it can be
measured; a Wheatstone bridge; a Prony brake; a
Siemens electro-dynamometer; a mercury cokimn
fifty feet in height, which is arranged for testing
steam gauges and indicator springs at any tempera-
ture, and a compression air pump capable of working
to twenty atmospheres.

The rooms are wired conveniently for practical
measurements upon the electric plant, and for the
measurement of candle power of lamps. The alternat-
ing current from the public mains of the Missouri
Electric Light and Power Company is carried to the
laboratory switchboard, and is thus available for ex-
perimental work.

LRCTURK FOUNDATIONS.

A Lecture Endowment Fund, amounting to twen-
ty-seven thousand dollars ($27,000), was created in
1875 ^y one of the early friends of the University,
Mr. William Henry Smith. It was given without any
restrictions, except that the fund should be increased,
if practicable, by accruing interest, to $30,000, which
has been accomplished, and that no part of the princi-
pal should be expended.

The beginning of a fund for the encouragement of



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64 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

the study of American History has been made by a
gift of $15,000 by Mrs. Mary Hemenway, of Boston,
Massachusetts.

Upon this foundation a University Professorship of
American History has been established, and the chair
was filled in 1884 by the appointment of Dr. John
Fiske, of Cambridge, Mass.

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.

Necessary books of reference are provided, and
also a good selection of periodical literature. No at-
tempt is made at present to gather a general library.
During the year 1880 a gift of about three thousand
volumes was received from the family of the late
Joseph Coolidge, of Boston. The collection, known
as the Coolidge Library, is especially rich in excellent
editions of Italian and French authors, and is a very
material addition to the usefulness of the library.

Through the liberality of a number of citizens of
St. Louis an arrangement has been made by which
the privilege of using the Mercantile Library has
been extended, under prescribed conditions, to such
members of the University as may be designated by
the Chancellor.

Property valued at $66,000 was given to the
University by the late Mr. Stephen Ridgley, of St.
Louis, upon the condition that the income shall accu-
mulate until, in the judgment of the Board of Direct-



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UNDKRGRADUATE DKPARTMKNT. 65

ors, the amount shall be sufficient to erect and main-
tain a fire-proof Library Building. The gift was
thankfully accepted upon that condition.

GYMNASIUM.

A gymnasium for the use of the Undergraduate
Department is supplied with all necessary apparatus.
While encouraging systematic and wholesome exer-
cise, the University does not wish to foster undue in-
terest in the feats of athletes, and discourages exer-
cises which involve personal risk to the performers.
All class exercises are conducted by a professional in-
structor.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

One perpetual scholarship, founded by the payment
of $S,ooo and entitling the holder to all the advant-
ages of all the departments of the University forever,
has been placed at the disposal of the Mercantile Li-
brary Association, with the recommendation "that
when the applicants for scholarship are of equal mer-
it, the preference shall be given to one for some me-
chanical pursuit."

One scholarship is also held by the St. Louis High
School, which entitles the ranking student of the
graduating class of each year to free admission to the
Undergraduate Department, in -accordance with a
resolution of the Board of Directors when the College
was organized.



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66 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

One scholarship is also held by the School Board
of Kansas City for the benefit 'Of a graduate of the
Kansas City High School. This scholarship entitles
the holder (who is to be selected by the School
Board) to free tuition in the College or the School of
Engineering. Reports of the standing of the student
will be made to said Board annually by the Dean.

A trust fund of $30,000 has been accepted by the
Universit>' from the Western Sanitary Commission,
for the establishment of twp:nty free schoi^arships
in the Undergraduate Department, to be 'filled by chil-
dren or descendants of Union soldiers who served in
the late civil war. In default of such applicants, can-
didates will be appointed by the Chancellor of the
University with the advice of the Faculty. Preference
is given to those in straitened circumstances, and no
siuaent is acceptea or continuea who is not of good moral
character, who aoes not sustain satisfactory examinations, or
who fails to comply with the rules of the University. ^

From the same source a Sustentation Fund of
$10,000 has been accepted, the income of which is ex-
pended in aid of students in straitened circumstances,
giving preference always to the descendants of Union
soldiers, as above.

EXAMINATIONS.

The examinations in the Undergraduate Depart-
ment are frequent and rigid. No promotions to high-
er classes are made except upon conclusive evidence



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 76

that the antecedent subjects have been well mastered.
Reports of the standing of individual students will
be made by the Deans to parents or guardians, if
such are requested.



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68



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



DEGREES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE
DEPARTMENT.

I. In the Coi^lkge.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts ig conferred upon
the satisfactory completion of the requisite number of
courses.

II. In the Schooi, of Engineering.

1. On the satisfactory completion of four years'
work the degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred.

2. The professional degrees of CM Engineer, Mechan-
ical Engineer and Electrical Engineer are conferred only
after three or more years of actual and successful
engineering practice, one year of which must have
been spent in responsible charge of engineering
work, and the presentation of an acceptable thesis;
both the thesis and the experience to be such as to
show an ability to design and execute engineering
work.

The Bachelor degrees are in three grades indicated
by the words cum laude, magna cum laude and summa cum
laude, respectively.

Every member of the graduating class who has at-
tained ninety per cent, of the maximum mark on the
general scale for the four years may be recommended
for a degree summa cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (not recom-
mended for the degree of summa cum lauae) who has



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DBGRKES IN THK UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 69

attained eighty-five per cent, of the maximum mark
on the general scale for the four years may be recom-
mended for a degree magna cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (npt recom-
mended for a degree of summa or magna cum laude)
who has attained eighty per cent, on the general scale
for the four years may be recommended for a degree
cum lauae.

No student will be recommended for a aegree who has not
passed all his examinations successfully and handed in such
projects or theses as may be required.

The diploma fee is three dollars, payable in ad-
vance.

ADVANCED DEGREES.

The degree of Master of Arts, which is granted af-
ter not less than one year of residence and study, is
open to all who have received from this University
the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

The degree of Master of Science, which is granted
after not less than one year of residence and study,
is open to all who have received from this University
the degree of Bachelor of Science, of Civil Engineer,
of Mechanical Engineer, of Electrical Engineer, of
Engineer of Mines, or of Chemist.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy^ which is
granted after not less than two years of residence and
study (the two years of residence and study may in-
clude the year of preparation for the Master's degree).



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70 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

is open to all who have received the degree of Mas-
ter from this University.

The degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science,
and Doctor of Philosophy are open to graduates of
other institutions who shall have satisfied the Com-
mittee on Advanced Degrees of their fitness.

Applications for candidacy for the degree of Mas-
ter of Arts, Master of Science, or Doctor of Philoso-
phy are referred to a committee of five mem-
l)ers of the Faculty of the Undergraduate Depart-
ment, annually appointed, known as the Committee on
Aduancea Degrees.

The Committee decides upon the admission of the
candidate; determines the course of study which the
candidate is to pursue; determines by examination,
thesis, or both, whether a candidate is suitably prepar-
ed for the degree; and recommends the granting of
the degree to the Faculty of the Undergraduate De-
partment.

REQUIRDMEXTS FOR THE MASTl^^R'S DEOREE.

a. At least one year of residence and study.

b. Every candidate must pass such written ex-
aminations as the Committee on Advanced Degrees
may see fit to prescribe.

c. In addition to the work specified in each case,
every candidate shall present a satisfactory thesis,
which must be submitted not later than May i of the
year in which the degree is to be conferred.



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DEGREES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 7l

KBQUIBBiMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEOREE.

a. Two years of residence and study.

b. Every candidate must satisfy the Committee
on Advanced Degrees that he has a reading knowl-
edge of French and German.

c. Every candidate shall present an acceptable
thesis, which shall be the result of original investiga-
tion. This thesis must be presented not later than
April I of the year in which the degre is to be con-
ferred; and every candidate must furnish the Com-
mittee on Advanced Degrees with 200 copies of his
thesis, after its acceptance, before he can be recom-
mended for the degree.

DIPLOMA FEB.
The diploma fee is five dollars, payable in advance.

COMMITTKK ON ADVANCED DKGREEvS FOR 1898-99.

The following members of the Faculty constitute
the Committee for 1898-99: Professors Snow (chair-
man), Nipher (secretary), Engler, Sanger and Heller.

TUITION.

Tuition in the Undergraduate Department is $150
a year, payable semi-annually, in advance if required,
and always before the middle of the term.

A matriculation fee of five dollars is charged to all
who enter this Department, payable in advance.



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72 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITV.

BOARD AND LODGING.

Students living at a distance from the University
have no difficulty in securing rooms and board at
reasonable rates. The yearly expenses may range
between the following estimates, according to taste
and habits of economy :

Tuition $150 00 — |150 00

Board, lodging, and washing, 9 months. . 200 00 to 300 00

Books and Instruments 10 00 " 20 00

Incidentals 15 00 " 30 00

Total for the year $375 00 to $500 00

Books and instruments may be obtained at cost
from the Co-operatiue Association, organized and
managed by the students of this Department.



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.



(A DKPARTMVNT OF WASHINGTON ONIVKRSITY.)



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.

ESTABLISHED JUNE 8, 1885.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

THE CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY, ex-officio.

WILLIAM G. FARLOW, M. D.

GEO. J. ENGELMANN, M. D.

GEORGE E. LEIGHTON.

WILLIAM L. HUSE.

INSTRUCTORS.
WILLIAM TRELEASE,

DIRECTOR AND
KNGKI.MANN PROFKSSOR OF BOTANY.

WILLIAM H. RUvSH;

GRNKRAL INSTRUCTOR.

HERMANN VON SCHRENK,

INSTRUCTOR IN CRYPTOGAMIC BOTANY.

ELLEN C. CLARK,

ASSISTANT AT THR MARY INSTITUTE.



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SCHOOI* OF BOTANY. 75

GENERAL INFORMATION.

In June, 1885, Mr. Henry Shaw, of St. Louis, au-
thorized the Chancellor of the University to place be-
fore the Board of Directors a plan of action for the es-
tablishment of a School of Botany, as follows : —

That he proposed, with the concurrence of the Di-
rectors, to endow a School of Botany as a de-
partment of Washington University, by donation of
improved real estate, yielding over $5,000 revenue,
and to place it in such relation with the largely en-
dowed Missouri Botanical Garden and Arboretum, as
would practically secure their best uses, for scientific
study and investigation, to the professor and students
of the said School of Botany, in all time to come.

At the meeting of the Board of Directors held June
8, 1885, the following resolutions were, therefore, of-
fered, in grateful acceptance of Mr. Shaw's pro-
posal : —

1. That a School of Botany ho established as a special
departiiH^nt of Washlnsfton ITuiversity, to be known as the
Henry Shaw School of Botany.

2. That a professorship of Botany be therein establislKMl.
to be known as the Engelmann Professorship.

o. That Professor Wm. Treloase, of the University of
AViseonsIn, be Invited to fill the same; his duties to bejriu
at the commencement of the next academic year, Septoni-
ber 17.

4. That said School of Botany be placed imder the sp(»-
cial care and direction of an advisory committee, to con-
sist of five members, of whom two shall be members of
this Board, and two shall be selected outside of the Board, -
the Chancellor of the University being a member ex officio, j



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76 WASHINGTON UNIVHRSITY.

This report was accepted and the resolutions unani-
mously adopted. The record of such action was then
submitted to Mr. Shaw and approved by him.

On this foundation, the School of Botany was
opened in the autumn of 1885. In his will, admitted
to probate in 1889, Mr. Shaw further provided for the
maintenance of the income of the School up to a cer-
tain limit, and took steps calculated to secure the pro-
posed close co-operation between the School of Bot-
any and the Botanical Garden.

The laboratc^ry of the School of Botany is tempor-
arily located at 1724 Washington avenue, and a small
library, containinc^ the usual laboratory manuals and
class books, which is kept at the laboratory for refer-
ence, is added to as new books, needed for class ma-
terial, appear. In addition to alcoholic and imbedded
material, a small herbarium is being formed, which is
intended to contain representatives of the local flora.
Advanced students, some of whose work is done at
tlie Garden, aUo have the privilege of consulting,
imder necessary restricticMis, the excellent berbarium



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 36 of 70)