Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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and library maintained there, and now comprising
about 300.000 sheets of specimens, something over
30.000 books and pamphlets, and a large collection of
wood veneers and sections ; and no effort is spared to
make the Garden equipment as complete as possible
in any line of work taken up by competent investi-
gators.



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SCHOOI, OF BOTANY. 77

The instrumental equipment of the laboratory in-
cludes one microscope by Zeiss, with the necessary
objectives, ranging from A. A. to 1-18 in. oil immer-
sion, and accessories for spectroscopic studies and
work with polarized light; twenty microscopes by
Leitz, with the objectives needed for the best work
(including five 1-12 in. oil immersion lenses, one 1-16
in. oil immersion, and one 1-20 in. oil immersion),
polariscope, camera lucidas of several patterns, etc.;
sixteen dissecting microscopes by Bausch and Lomb ;
two dissecting microscopes by Leitz, one of them pro-
vided with camera lucida; a projecting apparatus for
delineating objects under a low power of enlarge-
ment ; a simple outfit comprising all that is necessary
for ordinar;^ bacteriological investigation ; and the ap-
paratus needed for histological work and elementary
physiological experimentation. Students are provided
by the laboratory with all necessary instruments and
supplies (excepting razors or other cutting instru-
ments) without charge except for breakage or other
injury and for slides and cover glasses used for pei*-
manent preparations ; but when alcohol or other ex-
pensive substances are used in quantity, as in work on
bacteria, a special charge may be made for material
used.

The working year of the School of Botany is of the
same extent as that of the Undergraduate Department
of the University, and is similarly divided, except for



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78 WASHINGTON UNXVfiRSlTY.

a few special teachers' classes corresponding to the
usual school terms.

The work offered students is of two classes : under-
graduate studies, including at present fifteen stated
electives, — the equivalent of nearly three full years'
work, — and post-graduate or special courses for ad-
vanced students, planned in each case to meet the
needs of the student. For the convenience of students
nearly all elementary instruction is given at the lab-
oratory, near the other University buildings, where
the principal instrumental equipment is kept, but the
study of living plants, and advanced herbarium and li-
brary work, are provided for at the Garden. All
courses capable of being so taught are given in the
laboratory, and supplemented by lectures and quizzes
by the teacher. The few lecture courses offered are
illustrated wherever possible by specimens exhibiting
the subject under consideration, and by wall charts
and the stereopticon.

A list of the undergraduate electives is given above
(p. 39), in the general infoniiation concerning the
Undergraduate Department. Under the advice of the
Dean of the College, and the professor of botany,
students who wish to make a specialty of botany
through their course may arrange to take all of tliese
electives and to follow them by a piece of investigation
on which a thesis is to be based ; and regularly enrolled
special students who are not candidates for a degree



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SCHOOI^^OP BOTANY. 79

may give the greater part of their time to botanical
study, subject to such regulation as is prescribed by
the Faculty.

Special classes for the benefit of teachers, and other
persons not in attendance at the University, are formed
from time to time, and such persons may be admitted
to any of the regular electives on the payment of a
tuition fee conformed to the general rates of the Uni-
versity, namely, $15.00 for each full course (of three
exercises per week during a term), and $7.50 for
each half course (of less than three exercises per week
for the same length of time). Graduates of the Uni-
versity and of the Mary Institute are not subject to
any charge for tuition.

Graduate students who are eligible under the rules
of the Faculty to candidacy for higher degrees, if suit-
ably prepared, may elect research work in botany as
their principal study for such degrees.

Applications for the formation of special classes, and
all correspondence concerning the School of Botany,
should be addressed to

W11.1.1AM Trelkask,

Shaw School of Botany,

St Low's, Mo.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

(art department of WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)

19th and Locust Streets.



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I



CALENDAR 1898-99.

First Trrm, Day Schooi,, begins Monday, September 19,

1898.
First T^rm, Day Schooi., ends Saturday, December 10th,'

1898.
First Tkrm, Night Schooi,, begins Monday, October 31st,

1898.
First Term, Night Schooi,, ends Saturday January 28, 1899.
Skconi) Tkrm, Day Schooi^, begins Monday, December 12th,

1898.
Sp:cond Tkrm, Day School, ends Saturday, March llth,

1899.
Skcond Tkrm, Night School, begins Monday, January 30th,

1899.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 22d,

1899.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 13, 18?>9.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 3, 1899.
KxHiBiTioN OF Students' Work, June 6th-8th, 1899.

1899-1900.
First Term,'Day School, begins Monday, September 25th,

1899.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 16th,

1899.

First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November 6th,

1899.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, February 3rd,

1900.
Second Term, Day vSchool, begins Monday, December 18th,

1899.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 17th,1900.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 5th,

1900.
Second Tp:rm, Night School, ends Saturday, April 28th,

1900.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 19th,

1900.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 9th, 1900.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 12th-14th, 1900,



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

REORGANIZED MAY 22, 1879.

The establishment of an Art School upon a broad
and permanent foundation has always been part of the
plan of Washington University. For nearly twenty-
five years Art instruction has been embodied in the
course of study. In 1875, special students were ad-
mitted to the Drawing Department, and class and pub-
lic lectures were given on Art History. The same
year an evening school was opened.

On May 22, 1879, the Directors of the University
adopted an ordinance establishing a Department of
Art in Washington University, from which the follow-
ing extracts are taken : —

"A Department of Art is hereby established as a
special Department of Washington University, to be
known as The St. Louis School of Fikk Arts.

"The objects of said Department shall be : Instruc-
tion in Fine Arts; the collection and exhibition of
pictures, statuary, and otlicr works of art, and of
whatever else may be of artistic interest and appropri-
ate for a Public Gallery or Art Museum; and, in gen-
eral, the promotion by all proper means of aesthetic or
artistic education."



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BOARD OF CONTROL.

ELLIS WAIXW'RIGHT, President.
WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, Chancei^LOR, ex officio.
HARRISON I. DRUMMOND.
ALFRED L. SHAPLEIGH.
CHARLES PARSONS.
CHARLES NAGEL.
GEORGE D. BARNARD.
DAVID C. BALL.
EDWARD R. HOYT.
H.AXSEY C. IVES, Director, ex officio.



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS.

HALSKY C. IVKS, Director.

ROBERT r. BRINGHURST.

EDWARD M. CAMPBELL.

CHARLES PERCY DAVIS.

JT'STINA V. A. PHILLIPS, Librarian.

EDMUND H. WUERPEL.

AIJCK M. MORE, Skcrktary.

W. H. PALMER.

CHARLES WARD RHODES.

CHARLES A. WINTER.

LAURANCE EWALD.
NoTK. — All communications in regard to the School
skould be addressed: ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OP FINE
ARTS.



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GENERAL INFORMATION.

There are three terms in the year.

Students will be admittea at any time, but not for less than
one term, except by special arrangement with the Director.

The school furnishes instruction in Drawing, Model-
ing, Painting, Artistic Anatomy, Perspective, Compo-
sition, Architectural and Mechanical Drawing.

The rooms are open for the study of drawing, paint-
ing and modeling, every day during each term from 9
a. m. to 4 p. m. and for the study of drawing from the
Antique and Life, mechanical drawing and modeling
three evenings in the week, from November to May.

Students may enter any class upon submitting ex-
amples of work showing the necessary skill. Appli-
cants for admission to the evening Life Cla^s must
submit a drawing of a full length figure from the An-
tique or Life.

Students who can pass the necessary examination
may study Modern Languages, History and Literature
in classes of the Undergraduate Department of the
University.

The school is fully equipped with models, caSts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms are adjacent to the galleries of the
Museum. The building erected during the past year
was especially designed to meet the needs of the va-
rious classes of the school and, in its appointments,
art students will find every convenience for study.

The artists connected with the school as teachers



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86 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

have received their training in the Art Schools of
Europe.

All finished work must be left in the school or if rermued
by special permission, must be returned before the close of the
school year for final examination by the committee appointed
for that purpose.

Instruction in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree
of proficiency only.

An admission fee of $2.00 is charged each student
on enrolling in the classes of •the day school, and $1.00
to each student enrolling in the night school.

TUITION FEES.

Tuition Fkks are due and payable to the Treas-
urer of Washington University, in advance, on
eurollnumt, and on the first of each term. For
convenience, the Secretary of the school will re-
ceive the fee and transmit it to the Treasurer.

Rnrou,mknT Fee — Each student pays this fee

once $2 00

The Income from enrollment fees Is used In li-
brary extension work. Students withdrawing
before the end of the year in which the fee Is
paid may continue the use of the library to the
close of the year.

Rates of TrrriON — Antique, Life and Portrait

Classes, either or all classes, per term 25 00



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SCHOOI, OF FINE ARTS. 87

Ratks of Tuition — Saturday Class, Antique or

Sketch Glass, per term 5 00

Students will be admitted to the Day School,
per month, with the privilege of one or more

classes per ' day, first month 12 50

Each following month during the year 10 00

Evening Life Ci^ass — Drawing or Modeling,
three times per week, for term of twelve
weeks 7 60

Evening Class — Antique or Sketching from Life,

three times per week, for term of twelve weeks. . 6 00

Evening Class — Elementary, tbree times per

week, for term of twelve weeks 5 00

Evening Class — Architectural and Mechanical
Drawing, three times per week, for term of
twelve weeks 5 00

Evening Class — Modeling, three times per week,

for term of twelve weeks 6 00

PROGRAMME.

morning.

Elementary Model and Object Class, daily, from 9 to 12

o'clock.
Antique Class, daily, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Life Glass (model nude), dally (except Saturdays), from 9 to
12 o'clock.

afternoon. (Kxcept Saturdays.)

Modeling Class, daily, from 1 to 4 o'clock.

Painting Class (Still-life, Drapery, etc.), daily, from 1 to

4 o'clock.
Head Painting Class, daily, from 1 to 4 o'clock.

SATURDAY.

Elementary Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Antique Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Water Color Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.



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88 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Sketch Class (models in costume), from 9 to 12 o'cIocIl.
Modeling Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

SATURDAY JUVENII.K CI^SS.

Drawing from objects, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Modeling, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

NIGHT.

Life Class (model nude), Monday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day, from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Portrait Class, Monday, .Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30

to 9:30 o'clock.
Elementary Class in Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and

Thursday, from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Antique Class, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30

to 9:30 o'clock.
Mechanical Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday,

from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Architectural Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday,

from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Modeling, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30 to

9:30 o'clock.

Advance students are afforded opportunity for
study from life — draped and nude models — forty
hours per week.

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.
The course of instruction is as follows : —

ELEMENTARY.

From the beginning the student is taught to draw

from the object. Models are provided with simple

contours such as casts from leaves, fruit, foliage, Greek

vases, architectural forms, fragments of the human



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SCHOOI, OF FINK ARTS. 89

figfure, etc., and the student is required to make out-
line and shaded drawings from these until he has fully
mastered the difficulties due to the form and position
of the object. This method is carried through all
grades of the school ; no copying of any kind is per-
mitted.

ANTIQUE.

In the Antique Class the methods in use are severe
and require close observation combined with great
patience and perseverance. All stump processes are
discarded; all results are due to careful study and
painstaking; no chance is allowed for "accidental
effects." The education of the eye is considered of
greater importance than the training of the hand, not
only in simple line work and the study of superficial
forms, but in the general, yet no less certain, laws
which underlie and distinguish the work of every great
master in sculpture or painting. Little attention is
paid to pictorial finish, and in many cases where a
tendency toward pictorial finish seems to interfere
with the students' progress in acquiring a compre-
hensive method of drawing, it is rigorously discour-
aged.

LIFE.

Work in the Life Classes consists in drawing and
painting from the living model, both draped and nude,
and either from a whole or a portion of the figure, one
class being entirely devoted to the study of the head.



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90 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

More attention is given to drawing than to painting,
and students who paint are required to draw a portion
of the time. In all cases a careful study of the model
and conscientious search for contours and construc-
tion, requiring continual use of the mind, are insisted
upon. No effort is made to bring the students to a
uniformity of method ; except to the extent of instruc-
ting them to see forms as they really exist ; beyond this
each student is permitted to develop or follow a style
of his own. Special attention is given to the import-
ance of viewing the subject to be placed upon the pa-
per as a whole, thus bringing the parts of the figure in-
to proper subordination and avoiding the natural ten-
dency to exaggerate the importance of details. Spe-
cial emphasis is placed on the importance of self-
reliance in the determination of the form of each por-
tion of the figure, and of bestowing as conscientious
care upon the modeling of the hand and foot as upon
the expression of the face, with tlie purpose of train-
ing the eye to comprehend and the hand to reproduce
precisely what is seen and not what may be known to
exist from a general knowledge of the subject or from
any preconceived ideas of whatever kind. This method
is carried to the smallest details with the intention of
compelling the student to rely entirely on the natural
form which is before him.



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SCHOOI* OP FINK ARTS. 91

MECHANICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

Classes in these subjects are held only at night.
Owing to the variety of knowledge and ability pos-
sessed by the student, the instruction is largely indi-
vidual.

Mechanical drawing includes the following-
branches :

I. Plane Geometrical Drawing, Orthographic
Projection, Intersection of Solids and Develop-
ment of Surfaces.
II. Drawing of Machine Details from measure-
ment.

III. The making of Assembled Drawings.

IV. Tracing.

The purpose of the instruction is to teach students
how to make practical working drawings, and to read
them with ease.

In the Architectural Drawing Class beginners are
taught how to use their instruments, and to make neat
and accurate line drawings. Instruction is given in
the preparation of plans, elevations and working draw-
ings for various kinds of buildings. Advanced stu-
dents are taught Perspective Drawing, and the Draw-
ing of ornamental forms for decorative purposes.
MODELING.

The work of modeling in the day class of the school
is intended principally to supplement the work in
drawing and painting, for the purpose of giving stu-



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92 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

dents a more detailed knowledge of the form and struc-
ture of the models ,which they have studied in theu-
work in drawing. In the night class the work is quite
different. Most of the students are artisans who de-
sire to acquire a knowledge of modeling for specific
purposes, principally for use in exterior decoration and
in architectural work. On account of this difference
the work in the day class is of a more general charac-
ter, and intended more to cultivate the mind, while that
of the night class is necessarily special in character,
and intended more particularly to give the hand skill
in producing well-known forms.

LECTURIvS.

From time to time class and public lectures are giv-
en on subjects pertaining to art history and on other
allied subjects, which it is thought may be for the
benefit of the students. These lectures are arranged,
not only for the purpose of instructing the student by.
the matter directly presented, but to awaken a desire
for information on a variety of subjects, literary and
historical as well as artistic, and to suggest a proper
course of reading for the prosecution of any line oi
study which individual taste may prefer. Some are
purely technical and deal with the various methods
employed at different periods, while others are in-
formal and conversational. All are intended to give
the student the latest and best information on the sub-



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SCHOOI. OF FINE ARTS. 93

jects treated, and wherever possible are illustrated
either by models and objects or stereopticon views.

All lectures are given by specialists ; the general sub-
jects treated are history, literature, philosophy, anat-
omy, perspective, decorative design.

During the year 1897-98, there were given class and
general lectures on the following subjects: —
The Parthenon — Prof. John Picard.
Paris — Mr. E. H. Wuerpel.
The Renaissance, Music and Painting; with Violin

Obligato — Mr. Edward Remenyi.
Truth in Art as Exemplified by Musical Instruments

— Mr. Edward Remenyi.
Modern Painting and Sculpture in Germany, France

and America — ^Mr. Charles Ward Rhodes.
Munich — Mr. Charles Ward Rhodes.
Historical Development of Art (three lectures) — Prof.

H. C. Ives.
Perspective (fourteen lectures) — Mr. Charles Ward

Rhodes.
Anatomy (four lectures) — Mr. E. H. Wuerpel.
Museum Collections (three lectures) — Mr. E. H.

Wuerpel.
Composition (eighteen lectures) — Mr. E. H. Wuerpel.
(fifteen lectures) — Mr. Chas. Percy Da-
vis,
(five lectures) — Mr. Robt. P. Bringhurst.
Total, 68 lectures.



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94 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

The reading room is open daily from 9 a. m. to 5
o'clock p. m. and on such evenings of the week as the
work of the school may demand. The current art pub-
lications and monthly publications of current litera-
ture are on file.

It is the intention of the authorities of the school to
add books of reference as rapidly as possible to those
already acquired.

The Awards in the School of Fine Arts for the year
1897-98 were as follows : —

June 8, 1898.
Prof. Halsey. C. Ives,

Director St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

Dear Sir : — ^The Jury of Awards appointed to judge
the work submitted in competition for honors tor the
year 1897-98 take pleasure in congratulating you and
your fellow workers and the students upon the very
high order of excellence which marks the exhibition.
The judges found themselves seriously embarrassed
in selecting the best because of this general superiori-
ty, and wished many times that the number of hon-
ors were greater.

The following are recommended : —
Antique Class.

Mr. Thomas 11. Magee, 1st, Silver Medal.

Miss Beatrice Benson, 2n(l. Bronze Medal.

Miss Bettio Smitli. ^rd, Honorable Mention.
StiU Life Painting Ciass.

Miss Belle A. Malin, 1st, Silver Afedal.



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SCHOOL OF PINE ARTS. 05

Miss Katlierlne D. Cogswell, 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Miss Agnes Richmond, 3rd, Honorable Mention.
I*ortralt Class in Black and White.

Dr. David H. MacAdam, 1st, Silver Medal.

Mr. James II. Lowell, 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Mr. William J. Hurlbut, 3rd, Honorable Mention.
Portrait Class In Color.

Mr. George A. Harlser, 1st, Sliver Medal.

Miss Alice M. Beach, 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Miss Emilie M. Gross, 3rd, Honorable Mention.
Life Class in Black and White.

Miss Laura E. Menne, 1st Silver Medal.

Mr. George A. Harker, 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Mr. James H. Lowell, 3rd, Honorable Mention.
Life Class in Color.

Miss Alice M. Beach, 1st, Silver Medal.

Mr. John O. Spurr, 2nd, Bronze Medal.

Miss Emilie M. Gross, 3rd, Honorable Mention.
Composition Class.

Miss Emilie M. Gross, 1st, Silver Medal.
Saturday Sketch Class, Color.

Mr. George A. Harker, 1st, Silver Medal.

Miss Alice M. Beach, 2nd, Bronze Medal.
Saturday Sketch Class, in Black and White.

Mr. David H. MacAdam, 1st, Book.

Mr. William J. Hurlbut, 2nd, Honorable Mention.
Modeling Life.

Miss Florence Sharman, 1st. Silver Medal.
Modeling Antique.

Mr. W. Berkmann, 1st. Honorable Mention.
The Wayman Crow Medal awarded to Mr. William J.
Hurlbut. Respectfully,

Chairman of Jury.



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96 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

THE ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS.

The Museum of Fine Arts has a valuable permanent
collection of statuary, paintings, pottery, carvings,
etc., which affords the public, as well as students, an
indispensable aid to the study of art; and in order
that opportunity may be given for studying the meth-
ods of the different schools of painting and the works
of celebrated artists, arrangements have been made for
a series of fine exhibitions of oil and water color paint-
ings, architectural drawings and engravings.

Any one desiring to become a member of the Mu-
seum of Fine Arts may do so by the annual payment of
$10.00. This membership entitles him, with his
family and non-resident guests,, to the privilege of
visiting the Museum at all times when open to the
public, and to all lectures, receptions, and special ex-
hibitions given under the auspices of the Board of
Control.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 97



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

Students enrolled from date of issue of last catalogue,
January 1, 1898, to March 28, 1899.

FULI/ TIME STUDENTS.

NAME. RESIDEN'CK.

Alford, Comfort -1114 Maryland av.

Barry, Jessie H 941 Hamilton av.

Barstow, Jessamine Kirkwood, Mo.

Bay. Lillian KOO Clarksou pi.

Benson, Beatrice West Plains, Mo.

Blackman, Barbara A « Rartmer pi.

HoUman, Adele 1115 Dillon St.

Butler, Mary Susan 3029 Westminster pi

Brokaw, Anna Clotilde :^2()0 Lucas av.

Brown, Judith Kirkwood, Mo.

Brown, Nannie )5osworth, Mo.

Brownlee, Isabel D o51S Washington av.

Chamberlain, Mai*y A ti218 Wagner av.

Clark, Minna Towner EdwardsvlUc, 111.

Cogswell, Katheryn Diggs 4211 Page av.

Cotton, Robert Leo 2922 Lucas av.

Crumb. Chas. P r.463 Maple av.

Dunn, Virginia C 4202 Piue st.

Eliot, Charlotte C 26a5 Locust «t.

Eno, Julia 3874 Washington av.

Fassett, Bonnie Leslie St Joseph. Mo.

Fitch. Evelyn 494;; Rebcr pi.



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98 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

NAMK. RESIDENCE.

Franklin, Ethel C Kirk wood, Alo.

Franklin, I^ura I. T Ivirkwood, Mo.

Frisfby, Emma W 4G34 Wagoner pi.

FuUerton, Alice Verena 1724 Olive ^t.

Gehner, Cora Harriet 3630 W. Pine st.

(Jottschalk, Max 1020 Iowa a v.

Gray, Florence Isabel 1139 Walion av.

Gross, Herman W Webster Grove*?, Mo.

Harris, Florence I 1713 Waveriy i-i.

Hazard, Grace Kirkwood, Mo.

Heltzell, Ida G :illi) Franklin av.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 37 of 70)