Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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rolling curves, cams, teeth of wheels, link work and trains
of mechanism. Three hours a week.

2. Machine Designing. Study of the principles. Three hours

a leeek.



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46 WASHINGTON UN1YKB8ITT.

3. Machine Designing and Mill Engineering. Shafting, gear-

ing, belts and ropes, mill and factory constmction. Thref
hours a week,

4. Elementary Steam Engineering. Elements of thermodynam>

ics and the tlieory of the steam engine ; types of engines ;
valves and valve diagrams; indicator cards; boilers and
chimneys. Three hours a %reek.

5. Machinery Drawing. Worl? in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 1 . Six hours a treek.
<). Machinery Drawing. Details of the steam engine; link
motions and valve diagrams. Six hours a tceek.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. Standardization of instruments;

oil tesling. Three hours a week.

8. Mechanical Lal)oratory. Lining up and adjusting the steam

engine; use of the indicator; valve setting; tests of the
engine. Three, hours a ireek.

9. Advanced Steam Engineering. Thermodynamics; application

of thermodynamics to steam and other heat engines.
Three hours a iceek,

10. Steam Engine Designing. Three hours a week.

11. Boiler and Chimney Designing. Three hours a week.

12. Heating and Ventilation. Three hours a week.

13. Specifications and Projects.

(a.) The law of contracts as applied to engineering work,
together with typical forms of specifications.
Taken with the students in Civil Engineering,
18 (a). (Me hour a tceek.

{b.) The study of some project in mechanical engi-
neering. Each student will be required to solve
the problem In his own way ; to prepare plans and
specifications in accordance with his solution; and
to present an argument in support of his method of
solution. Two hours a tceek.

14. Engine Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 11. Six hours a week*



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COURSES OP INSTRUCTION. 47

15. Engine Designing. Worlc in tlie drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 11^ for students in Electrical Engineering.
Three hours a week.

16. Boiler Designing. Worlc in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 12. Nine hours a week.

17. Mechanical Laboratory. Tests of the steam and gas engines.

Three hours a week.

18. Mechanical Laboratory. Boiler tests; visits to manufactur-

ing establishments. Three hours a week.

19. * Hydi-aulics and Hydraulic machinery, ll^ree hours a week.

In addition to the above the following courses given in the
Medical Department of the University are open to students in
the College^ and will be credited towards a medical degree for
those students who enter the Medical College later.

ANATOMY.
a.* Osteology and Syndesmology : Lectures and Laboratory
Work. Three hours a week. Asst. Prof. Terry.

b. Splanchnology and Neurology : Anatomy of the Thoracic and

Abdominal Viscera^ and Brain and Spinal Cord. lectures
and Demonstrations. Three hours a toee.k.

Asst. Prof. Terry.

c. Myology^ Angiology^ and Neurology: Anatomy of -the

Muscular System, of the Circulatory System, and of the
Distribution of Peripheric Nerves. Lectures and Dem-
onstrations. Three hours a week. Dr. Blair.

dy e. Practical Anatomy: Dissection of Typical Vertebrates
and Human Dissection. Three afternoons a week.

Asst. Prof. Terry and Dr. Blair.

/, g. Special Dissections : Work arranged by the teachers in regard
to the wants and predilections of the individual student.
These courses can be taken only after d and e have been cer-
ti^ed. Three afternoons in the first term and two afternoons
in the second term. Asst. Prof. Terry and Dr. Blair.



* For the present year Theoretical Hydraulics will be taught by Pro-
fessor Woodward.



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48 WASHINGTON rNIVKRSITY.

HISTOLOGY.

a, b. Laboratory Work with Explanatory Ixjctures. Six hours
a iteek. Prof. liud<jett.

PHYSIOLOGY.

a. First Half of Physiology. lectures and Demonstrations.

Three hours a ireek. Professor Budget t.

h. Second Half of Physlolo^. Lectures and Demonstrations.

Three hours a week. Professor Budgett.

r. Laboratory Work in Physiolojjical Chemistry. Four hours a

ireek. Professor Budgett.

P.4TH0L0GY AND BACTERIOLOGY.

/. lectures on Bacteriology. (Me hour a treek.

Professor Harold,
g. Laboratory Course in Bacteriology. Four hours a Keek.

Professor Jiarold.
HYGIENE.

Lectures and Demonstrations on Hygiene and Sanitary Medicine.
Tiro hours a ireek. Professor Harold.

FORENSIC MEDICINE.

A Course of Lectures. Three hours a ireek. ("omprising the
following subjects : Chemistry and Detection of Poisons,
by Aast. Prof. Warren. Symptoms and Treatment of
Poisoning, by Dr. Tuttle. Microscopy of Blood Stains,
Hair, etc., by Prof. Budgett. Abortions, Diagnosis of
Recent Labor, Rape, etc., by Prttf. Srhxcarz. Legal Aspects
of Insanity, Injuries to the Ner\'ous System, Alcoholism,
Sunstroke, etc., by Prof. Fnj. Legal Aspects of Traumatism
and Surgical Injuries; Post-mortem Examinations, by Dr.
Kodis. Medical .lurispnidence, by Prof, Xaget.

* The letters a, b, etc., refer to the announcement of courses as given
in the catalogue of the Medical Department, to which students are
referred for additional details.



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THE COLLEGE.



Admission.



Candidates for admission to the College will present
themselves for examination on Monday, June 18, 1900,
in room No. 8, east wing of the University Building, at
9 o'olock a. m. A second examination will be held on
Tuesday, September 25, for such candidates as cannot
be present in June.

Division op thr Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take the
entire examination at one time ; or he may divide it ( 1 )
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year ; provided he is prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other colleges are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.

4



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50 washin<;t<>n inivkusity.

REQriBKMKNTS FOR ADMISSION' TO THE FrESHMAN CLAi*S.*

1. ElemeuUi of English, Neat and readable hand-
writing ; correct spelling, punctuation and use of
capital8, proper construction of sentences ; clear-
ness and conciseness of expression.

Candidates are advised to study the following: A
grammar contaiuiug a clear and simple system of
analysis of sentences such as is found in Lontjman*9
School Grammar; Shakespeare's Merchant of Venicm;
Addison's Uoger de Coverley papers from The Sp*T-
tator. Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakejield, George Kllot's
SilaH Marnery Ix)ugfellow's Evangeline, and Emerson's
essays on Friendship, Manners^ Compensation^ His-
tory, Character.
II. Ahjebra^ including radicals and equations of the
second degree.

III. Elfmentary Plane and Solid Geometry . Wells' or

Went worth's Greometry or an equivalent.

IV. Latin. Grammar, four books of Ciesar, seven

orations of Cicero, and six books of the iEneid
of Virgil. Prose Composition.
V. Modern Lantjuage. Either French or German at
the option of the candidate ; facility in reading
ordinary j>ro8e at sight and knowledge of ele-
mentary grammar shown by the ability to trans-
late easy sentences from English into French or
German.

* Note. — f/rfrJl* is not required for admission ; but randidatps who in>
t«nd to continue the study of Greek after admission to the CoUejre must
fulfill the following requirements : —

(loodwin's Grammar and Reader; or iirammar, four books of the
Anabasis, and three books of the Iliad; prose composition.



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THK COLLEGE. 51

VI. History, Of the United States and of England,
such as is found in any text-book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools ; of
Greece and Rome, such as is found in PenneU's
or Smith's Small Histories.
VII. Elementary Physics, Either a or b,

a. As much as is contained in such books as
Gage's "Introduction to Physical Science," or
Appleton's " School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
" Text-Book of Physics."

Special Studkxts.

Special Students may be admitted to one or more
courses in the college upon the following conditions : —

1. That evidence of proper preparation, satisfactory to
the committee and to the instructors concerned, be
submitted before admission to any course or courses.

2. That candidates for degrees who fail in the work of
the regular courses shall not have the privilege of becom-
ing Special Students, unless such failure shall come from
physical inability to do the required work.

3. That Special Students shall not be regarded as
candidates for a degree.

All matters concerning Special Students are referred to
a standing committee of the Faculty, which is composed
of Professors Snow, Waterhouse and Keiser. Applica-
tions should be made to Professor Snow, Chairman.



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52 WASHINGTON ITNIVKRSITY.



ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE
COLLEGE.

FRESHMAN YEAR.

* Prescribed Studies.
English, Courses 1 and 2.

(Terman, Courses 1 and 2, or French, Courses 1 and 2, for
those who do not present both of these languages for admission.

Elective Studies.

In addition to the prescribed studies, every Freshman is
required to take each term elective studies amounting to three
full courses. No Fresliman may elect more than one course in
the same subject without the consent of the Dean.

The following courses are open to Freshmen : —

• Greek, 1, 2.
Latin, 1,2.
English, 1,2.
(xerman, 1,2.
French, 1, 2.
History, I, 2.
Mathematics, 1, 2.
Drawing, 1, 2.
Physics, 1,2.
Chemistry, 1, 2.
liotany, 1, 2.

A Freshman who is qualified to take a higher course in any
study named al)ove may do no, with the permission of the in-
structor in the course and the Dean of the College.



• The llgiires indicate the nnnibers of the Courses of Instruction.
See pp. 32-4«.



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THE COLLEGE. 53

SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR YEARS.

The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Junior years
consists of : —

English^ Courses 3; 4 and 5, 0.

Besides the prescrli)ed courses every Sophomore and every
Junior is required to take each term four elfctire rouraeit, or an
equivalent amount of courses and half courses.

SKNIOH YEAR.

Eight courses, all elective, are required for the Senior year.

CHOICE OF STUDIES.

Every student is required to giye notice in writing to
the Dean of the College oa the first day of each term
of his choice of studies for that term.

Changes may be made only by permission of the Dead,
to whom application must be made in writing, with a full
statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any course for
which his previous training has not fully prepared him.

REQUIREMENT FOR THE DE(;REE OF BACH-
ELOR OF ARTS.

The satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses of
one term each, with three recitations a week (or their
equivalent), is necessary to fulfill the requirement^ for
the degree of Bachelor of Arts.



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THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.

Admission.

Candidates for admission to the School of Engineering
will present themselves for examination on Monday,
June 18, 1900, in room No. 8, east wing of the Univer-
sity Building, at 9 o'clock a. m. A second examination
will be held on Tuesday, September 25, for such candi-
dates as cannot be present in June.

Division of thk Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take the
entire examination at one time : or he may divide it ( 1)
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year ; j)rovided he is prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other institutions are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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the school of knginkerin<i. 55

Requirements for Admission to the Freshman Class.

I. Elementa of Enyluh, Neat and readable handwrit-
ing ; correct spelling, punctuation and use of cap-
itals ; proper construction of sentences ; clearness
and conciseness of expression.

Candidates are advised to study the following: A
grammar contaiiihig a clear and simple system of analysis
of sentences such as is found in Longman^s School
(irammnr, Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Addison's
Roger de Coverly papers from The Spectator, Gold-
smith's Vicnr of WakefieMy George Eliot's Silas Mar-
nery Longfellow's Evangeline, and Emerson's essays on
Friendship, Manners, Compensation, History, Char-
acter.

II. Ahjebra^ including radicals and equations of the

second degree.
III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry, Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.
IV. Modern Langifaye,* Either «, />, c, or d,

n. French. Facility in reading ordinary prose at
siglit, and a Itnowledge of elementary grammar shown
by the ability to translate easy sentences from English
into Frencli.

h. German. Facility in reading ordinary prose at
sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar shown
by the ability to translate easy sentences from English
into German.



* It is assumed that a thorough coarse in any one of these languages
extending over two years of, say, thirty-flve weeks, each three hours a
week, or its equivalent, will be sufficient to prepare a candidate to meet
the above requirement.



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66 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

c. Spanish. Facility in reading ordinary prose at
sight; and a knowledge of elementary granunar as shown
V)y the ability to translate easy sentences from English
into Spanish.

d. Latin. In i)lace of a modem language, an ac-
quaintance with I^atin acquired by two years' successful
study will be accepted. This should comprise: First,
in grammar^ a good knowledge of etymology and syntax,
special attention being given to inflections and the con-
struction of cases and moods; second, the translation
of four books of Caesar or equal amounts of such equiv-
alents as Nepos and Sallust. Reading of easy I^tin at
sight may be substituted for two books of Caesar.

V. History. Of the United States and of £nglaud such
as is found in any text-book on history inteuded
for the use of preparatory schools.

N. B. — In place of the work in the History of Kngland,
an equivalent amount of work in the history of some
other country, in Ancient History, or in General History
will be accepted.

VI. Elementary Physics. Either a or h.

a. As much as is contained in such books as
Gage's "Introduction to Physical Science," or
Appletou's " School Physics."

h. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
*' Text-book of Physics."



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STUDIKS IN THE* SCHOOL OK K><^INKEKIN(i. 57



ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL
OF ENGINEERING.

The courses of study in the School of Engineering are
five in number : —

I. Civil En<;inekki\'o.
II. Mechanical ENGiNEEUiN(i.

III. ELECTKICALEN(iI>EERIN(J.

IV. Chemistky.
V. Science and Liteiiatiuk.

♦FRKSUMAN YEAR.

The same for all Courses.

KIKHT TERM.

English, l.t Mathematics, 1.

German, 1 or \ *» Physics, 1.



French, 1 / Ciiemistry, 1.

History, 1. Drawing, I.

SKCONl) TKKM.

Englisli, 2. Mathematics, 2.

German, 2 or 1 Pliysics, 2.

French, 2 J Chemistry, 2.

History, 2. Drawing, 2.

• In the School of Engineering all the studies for each course are pre-
scribed ; there is no choice except as indicated.

** German is required of those who present French for admission;
French of those who present German.

t The figures indicate the numbers of the Courses of Instruction. See
pp. 32-48.



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58



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



SOPHOMORE YEAR.

The same for All Courses.



FIRST TERM.



GermaU; 3 or )
French, 3 J
Mathematics, 3.
Phvsics 3.



Chemistry, 3.
Drawing, 3.

DeRcriptlve Geometry, 1.
Civil Engineering, 1.



SECOND TERM.



Geology, 1.

Descriptive Geolnetry, 2.

Civil Engineering, 2.



Mathematics, 4.
Mechanics, 1.
Physics, 4.
Chemistry, 4.

N. B. — In addition to the above, shop work 1-2 (3 hours a
week) is required of students who have not had shop work
before admission.

I. CIVIL ENGINEERING.

FKKSHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.

(See above.)

.irXIOR YEAR.



Matliematics,
Mechanics, 2.
Physics, 5,
Botany, H.



FIRST TERM.

Civil Engineering, 3.
Civil Eugineerlns, 5.
Civil Engineering, (».
Civil Engineering, 7.



SK(X>NI> TERM.

Mechanics, 3. Civil Engineering, 9.

Physics, «. (Mvil Engineering, 12.

Mechanical Engineering, 4. Civil Engineering, 13.
Civil Engineering, 8.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEBBIKG. 69

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mechanics, 4. Civil Engineering, 4.

Mechanical Engineering^ 9. Civil Engineering, 10.

Astronomy, 1. Civil Engineering, 11.

Economics, 1. Botany, 16.

SKCOND TERM.

Meclianlcs, o. Civil Engineering, U>.

Astronomy, 2. Civil Engineering, 17.

Civil Engineering, 15. Civil Engineering, 18.
Civil Engineering, 19.

II. MECHANICAL ENC^INEERING

AND

III. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.

(See p. 57.)

JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TKRM.

Mathematics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 1.

Mechanics, 2. Meclianical Engineering, 2.

Physics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 5.

Civil Engineering. 8. Mechanical Engineering, 7.

N. B. — Students who liave not liad instruction in Shop woriv
before admission are required to omit Mechanical Engineering
7, and for a part of Mechanical Engineering 5 to substitute
Shop-woric 8.

SECOND TIOIM.

Mechanics, B. Mechanical Engineering, 3.

Physics, 6. Meclianical Engineering, 4.

Civil Engineering, 12. Mechanical Engineering, (>.

Civil Engineering, 14. Mechanical Engineering, 8.

N. B. — Students who have not had instruction in Shop worli
before admission are required to substitute Shop work 4 for
Civil Engineering 14.



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60 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

II. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRHT TERM.

Mechanics, 4. Mechanical Engineering, 9.

Mechanical Engineering, 19. Mechanical Engineering, lu.

Physics, 7. Mechanical Engineering, 14.

Physics, 8. MechanicalJingineering, 17.

.S?:C'<)ND TKIIM.

Mechanics, r>. Mechanical Engineerins;, 13.

Civil Phigiueering, is. Mechanical Engineering, 1»>.

Mechanical Engineering, II. Mechanical Engineering, 18.

Mechanical Engineering, 12. Thesis.

N. B. - Students who have not had instruction in Shop work
before admission are required to take Civil Engineering 14, in
addition to the above.

III. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIK8T TKRM.

Mechanics. 4. Mechanical Engineering, 11».

Physics, 7. Meclnuiical Engineering. *.».

Physics s. Mechanical Engineering, 10.

Physics, 1>. Mechanical Engineering, 15.

SK<H>ND TKRM.

Mechanics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, II.

Physics, 10. Mechanical Engineering, 12,

Physics, 12. Thesis.

Physics, 14.

N. B. — Students who have not had instruction in Shop work
before admission are required to take Civil Engineering 14 in
addition to the above.



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.sTri)IK.S IN THK SCHOOL OF KNGINKKKINC;



fil



Mathematics^ 5.
MechanicR; 2.
Chemistry, 5.
Physics, T).



IV. CHEMISTRY.
FUKSHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEAHS.

(See p. 57.)
JUNIOR YEAR.

FIIWT TKR^xr.

Cliemistry, 7.
Chemistry, 13.
Botany, 1.



Meclianics, 3.
Physics, (i.
Cliemistry, (i.
Chemisti-y, rt.



Physics, 7.
(Chemistry, 9.
Chemistry, 1(J.

Chemistry, 10.
C'hemistry, 12.
Chemistry. 17.



SKC<)NI> TKRM.

Chemistry, 14.
Chemistry, 15.
Mechanical Enf^lneeriiij^, 4.

SECOND YEAR.

FIRST TKRM. ^

Chemistry, 11.
Botany, 1(5.

SKCONI) TKRM.

Botany, 17.
Tliesis..



V. SCIENCE AND LITERATURE.
FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.

(Seep. 57.)

JUNIOR YEAR.
The work of the Junior year consists of nine courses, ail
elective. Tlie choice of studies must be approved by the Dean
of the School of Engineering at the beginning; of each term.

SENIOR YEAR.
The work of tlie Senior year consists of nine courses, all
elective. The choice of studies must be approved by the Dean
of the School of Engineering at the beginning of each term.



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62 WASHINGTON UNIVKRHITY.



COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE.

A four-years' course In Architecture will be added to the
curriculum of the School of Engineering in September^ 1901.
This course will be open to all students who enter the School of
Engineering in or after September^ 1900. Details of the course
will be published in a subsequent edition of this catalogue.

APPLIANCES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.

Surveying Instrumeyits, — The equipment includes
three transits for ordinary field work, one altazimuth
instrument for triangulation and astronomical work,
reading to ten seconds of arc on both horizontal and
vertical circles, two engineers' levels, two needle com-
passes, one sextant, one plane table, one 300-foot steel
tape standardized, with all the necessary accompanying
apparatus for field and olfflce work, such as stadia rods,
level rods, stadia slide rules, chains, tapes, signals, pro-
tractors, parallel rules, etc.

There is also a complete mining transit, adapted to the
use of the stadia, which may be used for topographical
work if required.

Library, Models, and Drawings, — There is a well
selected working library accessible to students which
they consult freely on assigned topics. There is also
a large assortment of drawings of the most interesting
engineering and arehitectual structures at home and
abroad. Many photographs and blue prints have been
collected illustrating all the more common styles of
bridges with their details.



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LNDEUGBADUATK DKPAUTMKNT. 63

The Testing Laboratory, — The facilities in the testing
laboratory are very complete. A floor space of about
2,400 square feet is occupied with the following appli-
ances: Two Riehle universal testing machines with a
capacity of 100,000 lbs. and 20,000 lbs. respectively ; a
beam testing machine, with a capacity of 100,000 lbs.
on a length of 24 feet ; two beam testing machines with
a capacity of 6,000 lbs. on a length of five feet with
micrometer deflection measuring apparatus ; a column
testing machine with capacity of 1,000,000 lbs. on a length
of 36 ft. or less ; cement testing machines of the Fair-
banks, the Riehle, and the Olsen types; a complete
standard set of German briquet making and testing
machines and scales, with pounding apparatus; an
exteusometer apparatus reading to ten thousandths of an
inch ; one eight-horse-power steam engine ; one five-
horse-power dynamo ; one planer and one lathe for iron
work ; one wood planer, one band saw, and one cutting
off circular saw for shaping timber specimens ; two drying
ovens and three sets of scales ; a dry kiln with steam coll
and exhaust fan for drying lumber ; complete sets of
bench and carpenter's tools, standard gauges, scales, etc.

APPLIANCES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

Drawings and photographs illustrating the best prac-
tice in all branches of mechanical engineering, includ-
ing a number of drawings of the machinery of ships for
the U. S. Navy, and examples of the best practice in
the construction of locomotives, stationary engines, and
machine tools are provided. Students have access to



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64 WASHINUTOX INIVKKSITY.

a small but modern and carefully selected technical
library, and to a number of the best technical journals.

The laboratory contains a steam engine, a Westing-
house air compressor, a Bogart gas and gasoline engine,
a Carpenter steam calorimeter, a pair of Crosby indi-
cators, a planimeter, a tachometer, a Thompson coal
calorimeter, a pryometer, a complete set of apparatus for
testing lubricants, a standard gas meter, a standard test
gauge, a Prony brake, thermometers, revolution counters,
and such tools as are necessary.

Students have access to the shops of the Manual
Training School, in which they receive a training in the
use and care of metal and wood working tools and



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 44 of 70)