Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 46 of 70)
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Students may enter any class upon submitting exam-
ples of work showing the necessary skill. Applicants for
admission to the evening Life Class must submit a draw-
ing of a full length figure from the Antique or Life.

Students who can pass tlie necessary examination may
study Modern Langujiges, History and Literature in
classes of the Undergraduate Department of the University.

The st^hool is fully equipped with models, casts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms ai*e adjacent to the galleries of the
Museum. The building erected during the past year was
especially designed to meet the needs of the various
classes of the school and, in its appointments, art students
will find every convenience for study.



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SCHOOL OF FINK A UTS. 87

The artists connected with the school as teachers have
received their training in the Art Schools of Europe.

All Jinished icork mtint he left in the school or if re-
moved by sitecial permission^ mxist he retuiiiied before the
dose of the school year for final examination by the com-
mittee appointed for that purpose.

Instruction in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree of
proficiency only.

An admission fee of $2.00 is charged each student on
enrolling in the classes of the day school, and $1.00 to
each student enrolling in the night school.

TUITION FEES.

TriTiox Fekh are due ami payable to the Treasurer of
Washiiijrtoii University, in advance, on enrollment,
and on the ttrst of each term. For convenience, tlie
Secretary of the school will receive the fee and trans-
mit it to the Treasurer.

Enkollmknt Fkk. Each student pays this fee once . . $2 00
The hicome from enrollment fees is used in library
extension work. Students withdrawing before the
end of tlie year in which the fee is paid may continue
tlie use of the library to the close of tlie year.

Ratks of Tuition. Antique, T.ife and Portrait Classes,

either or all classes, per t^rm 25 00

Katks of TriTiON. Saturday Class, Antique or Sketch

Class, per term 5 00

Students will be admitted to the Day School, per
month, with the privilege of one or more classes per

day, tlrst month 12 50

Each following mouth during the year 10 00



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88 WASHINGTON UNIVKH8ITT.

EvKNiNO Life Class. Drawing or Modeling^ three times

per week, for term of twelve weeks $7 50

Evening Class. Antique or Sketcliing from Life, tliree

times per week, for term of twelve weeks .... 5 00
Evening Class. Elementary, three times per week, for

term of twelve weeks 5 00

Evening Class. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing,

three times per week, for term of twelve weeks . . 5 00
EvENiN(} Class. Modeling?, tiiree times per week, for

term of twelve weeks .5 00

CLASSES IN 1)ESI(;N .\N1) APPLIKI) AKT.

Hej^ularly enrolled Art Students will i-eceive instruction

in Desif^n without extra charge.
For instruction in A])plied Art an additional fee, per term,

of 1^7.00 will be charged.
Special students will be admitted to these classes per

term of twelve weeks ^25 00

Students enrolled for one month, first month .... 12 50

Each succeeding month 10 00

For a i)eriod less tlian one month, including freedom of

Museum and Library, per week 5 00



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SCHOOL OP FINK ARTS. 89



ARRANGEMENT OF CLASSES.

MORNING.

CLASrtKS IN TIIR ANTlQrE.

Drawing from the CaHt, elementary and advanced, daily, 9 to
12 a. m. Charlen P. Davis and Justina V. A. Phillips,
Instructors.

LIFE CLASS, NTDK AN1> imAPKII.

Drawing and Palntiil^ from the Nude and Costumed Model hi
Charcoal, Pa«*tel and Oil Color, daily, t> to 12 a. m. Kdmund
H. Wuerpel, Instructor.

CKKAMU' I'AIXTIXCi.

Decoration of China, Porcelain, and (ilass. Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays, 9 to 12 a. m. Henrietta Ord Jones,
Instructor.

COMPOSITION IN t'OLOK.

Thursdays, 11 :80 to 12:30. Kdmund H. Wuerpel, Instructor.

COMPOSITION AND ILLCSTUATION IN HLACK AND WIIITK.

Wednesdays, 1 1 :30 to 12 :30. Charles P. Davis, Instructor.

SKKTCIl CLASS IN KLACK AND WIIITK.

Daily, 12 :30 to 1 p. m. Free to all students.

PKRSPKCTIVK.

Mechanical and Freehand Perspective, Shades and Shadows.
Winter tenn, Tuesdays and Fridays, 12 to 12:30 p.m.
Charles Ward Rhodes, Instructor.

AFTERNOON.

PAINTING FROM THK HEAD.

Drawing and Painting from the Head in Charcoal, Pastel and
Oil Color, daily, 1 to 4 p. m. Charles A. Winter, Instructor.



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dO W^HIXGTON L'NIVEKSITY.

PAINTING FROM STILL LIFK.

Oil and Water Color, daily, 1 to 4 p. m. Edward M. Campbell,
Instructor.

('KKAMIC PAINTING.

Decoration of China, Porcelain, and Glass, Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays, 1 to 4 p. m. Henrietta Ord Jones,
Instructor.

I'LASSKS IN DK8IGN AND APPLIED ART.

Book Cover Designing, Drawing for Illustration, Decoration of
Wood and I>eather by means of Pyrography (wood burning)
and the Application of Color, Stained Glass Designing,
Designing for Posters and Advertising Purposes, Decorative
Composition, and Surface Decoration as applied to China,
Embroidery and other surfaces, daily, 1 to 4 p. m. Frederick
L. Stoddard, Instructor.

MODELING.

From Architectural Ornament, the Antique, and Life, daily, 1 to
4 p. m. Robert P. Bringhurst, Instructor.

tkaciierh' course.

Free-hand Drawing from Model, Object, Antique, and Life.
Mechanical and (Jeometrical Drawing. Graphical Solution
of Problems in Plane (icometry. Plans, Sections, and
Elevations. Perspective, Shades and Shadows. Color —
Simple Forms in Wash and Water Color. Sketching from
Simple Forms in Still Life. Oil Color, Still Life; Sketching
from Nature, Landscape and Life, in Oil, Water Color, and
Black and White. Decoration of Various Forms, Porcelain,
Pottery, etc.

Modeling — Simple Forms from Nature and Cast; Life. Appli-
cation of Modeling to Various Fonns of Decoration.

Lectures — History of Art, Architecture, Sculpture, and I'aint-
ing. Print**. Application of Historic Ornament to Dec-
oration. Daily, 1 to 4 p. m. Charles Ward Khodes In
charge.



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SCHOOL OF FINE AKTt*. 91

EVENING (M.ASSES.

ANTIQITR, KLKMKNTAKY, AND ADVANCKI).

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Charles
P. Davis and Edward M. Campbell, Instructors.

LIFK CLASS KROM TlIK Nri>K.

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Edmund
H. Wuerpel, Instructor.

M<>I>KL1NG.

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Robert
P. Brinpfhurst, Instructor.

MKCIIANICAL DKAWIX<i.

(Geometrical Solids and Machine Details, etc. Monday, Tuesday,
and Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Laurence Ewald,
Instructor.

AlU'IIITKCTrUAL UKAWING.

Plans, Elevations and Assembled Drawings, Perspective,
Orthoj^raphic Projection, etc. Monday, Tuesday, and
Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Laurence Ewald, Instructor.

SATl'HDAY CLASSES.

.irVKMLK CLASS.

Drawing from the Cast and Still Life. Slietchinj; in Water
Color. 9 to 12 a. m. .lustina V. A. Phillips, Instructor.

CLASS IN ILLCSTUATIOX IN BLACK AND WHITE.

9 to 12 a. m. Charles A. Winter, Instructor.

CLASS IN ILLCSTKATION AND SKKTCIIIN(J IN COLOK.

9 to 12 a. m. Edmund II. Wuerpel, Instructor.

SKKTCIIINU IN WATKR COLOK FOR TKACHKRS.

9 to 12 a. m. Fredericl< L. Stoddard, Instructor.

OUT-OF-DOOR SKETCHINO, LANDSCAPE AND FKJCRE.

Cpon 1-ecommendations from their teachers classes will be
formed from amon^ the advanced students during the month of
May, daily, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Criticisms by the various
Instmetors.



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1)2 WASHINGTON UNIVBBSITY.

NOTES ON COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.

I.

In the Antique Classes the method of instruction aims
to teach the student to construct their drawings in a simple
and correct manner. B\' the use of antique and modern
forms as models from which to draw, the student is
trained to perceive planes and values, light and shade,
and is taught to economize time and effort when striving
to produce an effect. By this means a foundation is laid
for the further training of the draughtsman, modeler and
painter in the more advanced classes.

II. STILL LIFE PAINTING CLASS.

Students begin the study of color in this class. They
are lirst taught to observe and represent simple masses
of form and color such as are found in fruits and vege-
tables. They are then given more difficult combinations,
reflected lights and values such as are found in objects
made in richly colored metals or other materials. They
are also encouraged to make careful studies of drapery.
The student may work in oil or water color, but whatever
medium may be used, a truthfulness in form, color and
value, simplicity of ti-eatment, and close study of texture
are required.

III. MODELING CLASS.

The work of the modeling class is of a threefold nature.
First, there are a small number of students who study
modeling with the intention of becoming sculptors ; these



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS. 93

students have every opportunity to study from the living
model and also receive instruction in anatomy. Second,
a large proportion of students study modeling in order
to gain a more accurate knowledge of form and propor-
tion to aid them in their drawing and painting. These
students work from the cast as well as from the living
model, both nude and draped. The third class is com-
posed largely of artisans working to acquire a knowledge
of decorative form and ornament as used in architecture.
To this end they work chiefly from casts of ornaments and
figures from the antique and renaissance periods.

IV.

The purpose of study in the Head and Portrait Class
is to accustom the student to grasp the essential char-
acter of the model.

Firm construction in drawing is insisted upon ; also
attention to the salient characteristics in form and color.

Students are taught to sacrifice unimportant and un-
necessary details in form and in color, by this means
gaining simplicity and strength in their work. Freedom
of conception and execution is encouraged. The study
of color values is insisted upon as more important than
brush work and technique.

V.
The last step in the academic training of the art student
is the study from the living model. In the study from
the nude, facility in construction, observation of char-
acter, correctness of proportions and values and a fear-
lessness of execution are essential. In painting from the



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94 WASHINGTON UNIVEESITY.

nude, simplicity of form, value and color, must follow
good drawing. Method of execution is entirely indiTidual
whether in black and white or in color. The placing of
the figure or object on canvas, with a view to composHion,
is demanded. In the advanced studies, the background
is called for, and atmospheric relief expected.

VI. DRAWING FOR ILLUSTRATION.

The purpose of this class is to give the student a
knowledge of drawing and pictorial composition and to
apply this knowledge to the production of illustrations in
various forms. At first the work is from casts, natural
forms and drapery and later drawings are made from the
living figure draped and nude. Constant effort is directed
to the cultivation of a quickness of observation, the
ability to draw correctly, the selection and arrangement
of the material within the picture and an absolute sim-
plicity of expression.

The various methods used are : The Point, the pencil,
pen, and chalk — The Brish, in gouache and wash : and
Color, in oil, aquarelle, and pastel.

In black and white the student is urged to search for
indicative rather than an absolute or real method of exj)res-
sion. Freedom of individual execution is encouraged.

In color the value and correctness of tone are consid-
ered above finish and execution.

In addition the student is impressed with the limita-
tions imposed by the processes through which his drawing
is transferred to the printed page. The aim is to famil-
iarize the student with the requirements of these processes



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SCHOOL OF FIKE ART8. 96

as well as to develop artistic feeling and the technical
capacity to express it,

VII. CLASS IN APPLIED ART.

CRltAMIC DKCORATION.

The aim of this class is to give the students a practical
knowledge of painting on china, glass, etc. Particular
attention is given to the development of originality in
design, and simplicity in treatment. The student is first
taught to make a careful and intelligent study of the
shape to be decorated and the space to be covered.
Special attention is given to the application of conven-
tional ornament as well as realistic forms. All firing is
done in the building of the school so that a thorough
knowledge may be obtained in the use of the Kiln.

The students of this class will have the privilege of
studying the large collections of decorated porcelain in
the galleries of the Museum, comprehending examples of
Doulton, Royal Worcester, Crown Derby, Danish, and
Swedish ware. There are also collections of Old Chinese,
Wedge wood and Rosenberg potteries.

VIII.

In accordance with the announcement made some time
ago arrangements have been completed for the organiza-
tion of classes in Design and Applied Art. Instruction
will be given in the following subjects: Book Cover
Designing, Drawing for Illustration, Decoration of Wood
and Leather by means of Pyrography (wood burning)
and the Application of Color, Stained Glass Designing,



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96 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Designing for Posters and Advertising Purposes, Deco-
rative Composition, and Surface Decoration as applied to
China, Embroidery and other surfaces.

Mr. Frederick L. Stoddard and Miss Henrietta Orti
Jones have been added to the corps of instructors of the
School. Classes in Design and Water Color will be
under the superxdsion of Mr. Stoddard, and those in
Ceramic Decoration will be under the instruction of Miss
Jones.

All students of the School have access to the Librai'v,
which contains a large collection of books and plates
referring to the above subjects.

By Applied Art is meant the practical carrying out of
the design in the material for which the drawing has been
made.

IX. MECHANICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

Classes in these subjects are held only at night.
Owing to the variety of knowledge and ability possessed
by the student, the instruction is largely individual.
Mechanical Drawing includes the following branches :
I. Plane Geometrical Drawing, Orthographic Pro-
jection, Intersections of Solids and Develop-
ment of Surfaces.
II. Drawing of Machine Details from measurement.
III. The making of Assembled Drawings.
IV. Tracing.

The purpose of instruction is to teach students how to
make practical working drawings, and to read them with
ease.



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS. 97

In the Architectural Drawing Class beginners are
taught how to use their instruments, and to make neat
and accurate line drawings. Instruction is given in the
preparation of plans, elevations and working drawings for
various kinds of buildings. Advanced students are
taught Perspective Drawing, and the Drawing of orna-
mental forms for decorative purposes.

CLASS LECTURES.

A course of Class Lectures upon the History of Paint-
ing, the Graphic Arts, Artistic Buildings and Localities,
and other subjects relating to the History of Art
Development from the earliest period to the present time,
are given in the Lecture Hall every Tuesday afternoon
from four to five o'clock, by a special corps of Lecturers.
The character and scope of these Lectures may be
judged from the following synopsis of the course for
1898-1899.

All lectures are fully illustrated by stereopticon views
and examples from the Museum Collections.

The Historic Cities of Spain (three lectures). Trof. II. C. Ires.
Prints, Old aud Modern (eight lectures). Alive M. G. PaUisan.
Tlie Oritriii and Develoi)ment of Ornament (four lectures).

IIiihiif'» Suiith.
Schools in Art (four lectures). Edmund If. Wucrpel.

Whistler (two lectures). Edmund H. WutrpeL

Recent Painting aud Sculpture in Germany, France and America.

Charles Ward Rhodes.
Perspective (fourteen lectures). Charles Ward Hhodes.

Historical Development of Modern Fainting (fourteen lectures).

A, Jf. More.
7



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J)H WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

The Awards in the School of Fine Arts for the year
lHi»8-1891), were as follows: —

St. I^>iTi», June «, 1899.

l»UOKK8SC)U H. C. IVKS,

IHrerUfr St. Louis School of Fine Arts^ City.
Dkau Sir: —The Jury of Awards in examining the work of
students of the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, submitted in
competition for honors for tlie year 1898-1899, found the stand-
ard of excellence so uniformly good that its task in deciding
was very difficult. We congratulate you upon the success of
the year's work and recommend the following students for
honors : —

Antiqitk Class.

1. Miss Barbara Blackman, St. Louis.

2. Miss Isabel 1). Brownlee, St. Louis,
a. Miss Tula V. Houck, St. Louis.

Still Life Painting Class.

1. Miss Katheryn Diggs Cogswell, St. Louis.

2. Miss Marguerite E. Martyn, Springfield, Mo.

3. Miss Anna Clotilde Bix)kaw, St. Louis.
Portrait Class in Black and White.

1 . Miss Augusta Knight, St. Louis.

2. Mr. Wm. M. Young, Upper Alton, Ills.

3. Miss Agnes M. Richmond, St. Louis.
Portrait Class in Color.

1. Miss Beatrice Benson, West Plains, Mo.

2. Mr. David H. MacAdam, Kirkwood, Mo.

3. Miss Laura E. Meune, St. Louis.
LiFK Class in Black and W^hitk.

1. Miss Evelyn Fitch, St. Louis.

2. Miss Grace Hazard, Kirkwood, Mo.

3. Miss Beatrice Benson, West Plains, Mo.
Life Class in Color.

1. Mr. David H. MacAdam, Kirkwood, Mo.

2. Miss Laura E. Menne, St. Louis.
8. Miss Evelyn Fitch, St. Louis.



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS. 99

Composition Class.

1. Miss £mma C. McKeeu^ St. Lonis.

2. Mr. David H. MacAdam, Kirkwood, Mo.
Saturday Sketch Class^ Color.

1. Miss Lanra E. Menne^ St. Louis.

2. Mr. David H. MacAdam, Kirkwood, Mo.

3. Miss Evelyn Fitch, St. Louis, HoDorable Mention.
Saturday Sketch Class, Black and White.

1. Miss Beatrice Benson, West Plains, Mo.

2. Miss Evelyn Fitch, St. Louis.
Modeling, Life.

1. Miss Grace Hazard, Kirkwood, Mo.

Miss Florence Sharman, having previously received the
highest honors of the class, is debarred from further '
competition.
Modeling, Antique.

Mr. Chas. P. Krum, St. Louis.

We would also recommend that the following students be
mentioned as having done most excellent work In the classes
named and as having made the task of the judges most diffi-
cult: —

Life Class.

Miss Beatrice Benson.
Head Class, Black and White.

Mrs. Sue Hirst.
Head Class, Color.

Miss Evelyn Fitch.
Saturday Sketch Class, Black and White.

Mr. Wm. M. Young.
Still Life Class.

Miss Agnes M. Bichmond.

Respectfully,

Wm. a. Griffith,
F. L. Stoddard,
0. G. Waldbck,

Jury,



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100 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

The VVayman Crow Medal awarded for the most satisfactory
progress iu all classes is mianimouslv voted by the iDstructors
to Mr. William Marie Young, of Upper Alton, Ills.

Halsby C. Ivks,

DirecUft.

THE ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS.

The Museum of Fine Arts has a valuable pennanent
collection of statuary, paintings, pottery, carvings, etc.,
which affords the public, as well as students, an indis-
pensable aid to the study of art; and in order that
opportunity may be given for studying the methods of the
different schools of painting and the works of celebrated
artists, arrangements have been made for a series of fine
exhibitions of oil and water color paintings, architectural
drawings and engravings.

Any one desiring to become a member of the Museum
of Fine Arts may do so by the annual payment of $10.00.
This membership entitles him, with his family and non-
resident guests, to the privilege of visiting the Museum at
all times when open to the public, and to all lectures,
receptions, and special exhibitions given under the
auspices of the Board of Control.



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS. 101



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

Students enrolled from date of issue of last catalogue, March
28, 1899, to February 1(>, 1900.

FULL TIME STUDENTS.

NAMKS. RESID1SNCB.

Alexander, Frances 3147 Laclede av.

Barry, Jessie H 941 Hamilton av.

Batterton, Virginia B 3734 Olive st.

Bay, Lillian 3729 Delmar av.

Bell, Cora 1814 Wash iufirton av.

Bell, Emma Falling Water, Teun.

Berry, Eugenia Old Orchard, Mo.

Blackman, Barbara Adelaide .... .5843 Bartmer av.

Blood, Sophy Evelyn 3750 Finney av.

Brokaw, Anna Clotilda 3200 Lucas av.

Brown, James Alexander 2841 (»amble st.

Brownlee, Isabel I>oan 4210 Westminster pi.

Boyer, Clara Pearl 5334 Maple av.

Brinson, Sarah E 1355 Bayanl av.

Bninner, Ilerminc (i22 Bates st.

Bush, Hugh 3111 Olive St.

Butler, Emily Mansfield Westmoreland Hotel.

Cadwallader, Clarence L 15 Parkland pi.

Cliamberlaln, Mary Anne ($218 Wagner pi.

Chase, Lyna Metcalfe Hillside, Mo.

Chase, Rhoda Campbell 3334 Washington av.

Clements, Ferdinand Owensbo rough, Ky.

Cogswell, Katheryn Dlggs 4211 Page av.

Conrey, Lee 2014 N. 10th st.

Comellson, Patsey McWlUlams . . . 4937 Terry av.

Corwin, Cora Bridges 3572 Clemens av.



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102 WASHINGTON UNIVKKSITT.

RAMBS. RB8IDKNC1E.

EichbAimiy Mar? Elizabeth Brooklyn, Mich.

Ennis, George Peirse 1259 Delaware av.

Ei^er, Rose J Oakland, Mo.

Field, Lacetta L 4038 West Belle pi.

Fitch, Bveiyn 4943 Reber pi.

Franklin, Ethel Chandler Kirkwood Mo.

Franklin, Lanra I. P Kirkwood, Mo.

Fnlterton, Alice V 1814 Washington av.

Galbraith, Corinne Honey Grove, Texas.

Gimbel, H. Hortense 4262 Morgan st

Harris, Joseph Henr>', Jr Kansas City, Mo.

Haynes, Sallie G 522 Newstead av.

Hazard, Grace Kirkwood, Mo.

Hazard, Virginia Lorraine Webster Groves, Mo.

Heltzell, Ida G 3119 FrankUnav.

Herthel, Alice T 1209 Dolman st.

Hinde, Katharine Mexico, Mo.

Houck, Tula Vivian 1742 Waverly pi.

Humert, Carrie A 6634 Cates av.

Hyatt, Mary Olive Kirkwood, Mo.

Johns, Charles F 3968 Cook av.

Katz, Alma 6182 Cabanne pi.

Kendall, Alice Rosamond Kirkwood, Mo.

I^onard, Robb Bentley 4350 Maryland av.

Marshall, Elizabeth Winifred .... Webster Groves, Mo.

Martyn, Marguerite Springfield, Mo.

McKeen, Emma Katlierine 3749 Delmar av.

McKillopp, William 3631 Olive st.

Medley, Louise 4358 Washington av.

Meyer, Albert 4876 Chouteau av.

Moutroy, Pearl Chester, 111.

Ramsey, Jane Margaret 6476 Cabanue pi.

Richmond, Agnes Mary 1727 California av.

Sayers, Frank Charles 235 S. Jefferson av.

Scheel, Minnie BeUeville, 111.



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SCHOOL OF FINK ARTS. ICJ

NAMSS. RE8IDENCK.

„ , ^ „ (611 MisHOuri av.,

Scheutte, Henry \ ^, «^ t i th

' IK. St. Louis, 111.

Schlapp, Fannie Fort Madlsou, la.

Schuchmann, Alois 1525 Missouri av.

Scliwlnn, Mary Jane Kansas City, Mo.

Shank, Charlotte 8639 Parle av.

Sharman, Florence Marion 2124 S. Compton av.

Simpson, Li la Belle 2110 Lafayette av.

Souther, Lucy Abbott 4329 Bell av.

Spalding, Mary L Syracuse, N. Y.

Sterling, Mlmi Helena, Arli.

Stuart, John Guy 5436 Maple av.

Stuyvesant, Mary Crowninsheild . . . 5885 Cates av.

Sullivan, Nellie Belleville, 111.

Thompson, Alice Hay den 1339 Bayard av.

Thrasher, Sara Emily 2737 Olive st.

Timlcen, Cora Belle 4062 Lindell av.

Trexler, Beulah . . 8 N. Cardinal av.

Upchurch, Mary Isal>el Evansville, Ind.

Walt, Sibelle Greenville, 111.

Watkins, Elna F 4482a Delmar av.

Waugelin, Josle Klrcher Belleville, 111.

Wells, Margaret Springfield, Mo.

Wlllard, Modena 3333 Washington av.

Williams, Loula L 3308 Lucas av.

Wilson, Lucille Ix)gan Collinsville, 111.

Wilson, Sarah Dean Pinckneyville, 111.

Witter, Edward George 3662 Cleveland av.

Young, William Mark l^per Alton, 111.

Students working full time . . . h\)
Students working part time ... 74
Students working in night classes . 130

Total number enrolled . . . 293



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ST. LOUIS LAW SCHOOL.



(LAW DKrAKTMKNT WASHINGTON I'NIVKKiSlTY.)



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CALENDAR 1899-1900.

Law School opens Thursday, September 28, 1899.

Holiday, Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 23, 1899.

Vacation, December 23, 1899, to January 1, 1900, inclusive.

Holiday, Washington's Birthday, Thursday, February 22,
1900.

University Holiday, Friday, May 11, 1900.

Commencement, Thursday evening, June 21, 1900.

Vacation, from June 21 to Thursday, September 27, 1900.

Examinations for Entrance to Senior Class, Tuesday,



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 46 of 70)