Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 48 of 70)
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hereafter have the benefit of such scholarship for more
than one year. As far as practicable, the scholarships
will be equally divided between the two classes — depend-
ing uj)on the number and the success of the candidates
for scholarship in either class.

Two members of each class have an opportunity to earn
their tuition and a small salary in addition , by service as
librarians, and in other capacities connected with the
work of the School. Applications for such positions
must be made in person, on or before the fifteenth day of
September.



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LAW SCHOOL. 127



ADVANCED CLASS.



An Advanced Course, on the law of Extraordinarr
Remedies, open to all graduates of this school and to
members of the bar, is conducted during the school year,
by Hon. Jacob Klein, Judge of the St. Louis Circuit
Court. Tuition, twenty dollars.

For further information, inquiries may be addressed to
Wm. S. Curtis, Law School Building, 1417 Locust
Street, St. Louis, Mo., or the Secretary of Washington
University.



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ST. LOUIS AND MISSOURI MEDICAL
COLLEGE.

(medical department of WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)



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CALENDAR.

1899-1900.

Session Opens Thursday, September 28.

Christmas Vacation, December 22 to January 1, inclusive.

Commencement (Graduating Exercises), Thursday, April 26,

1900.
Holidays: Thursday of Fair Week, Thanlcsgiving Day,

Washington's Birthday.



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st. louis and missouri medical
collegp:.

BOARD OF OVERSEERS.

KLISHA H. GREGORY, Chairman.

GEORGE. E. LEIGIITON. G. BAUMGARTEN, M. I)., Sec\v.

HENRY HITCHCOCK. HERMAN TUHOLSKE, M. 1).

JAMES E. YEATMAN. HORATIO N. SPENCER, M. D.

WASHINGTON E. FISCHEL, M. I>.

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS.

J. B. JOHNSON, M. I).,
ProfeMor EmerUu» of the Principies and Practice of Medicine.

P. GERVAIS ROBINSON, M. 1)., LL.D.,
Profeuor Emeritus of the Principles and Practice of Medicine.

J. K. BAUDUIT, M. D., LL.D.,
Professor Emeritus of Psychological Medicine and Diseases of the Nervous

System.

J. M. SCOTT, M. D.,
Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, LL.D.,
Chancellor of the University.

ELISHA H. GREGORY, M. D., LL.D.,
Professor of the Principles of Surgery.

G. BAUMGARTEN, M. D.,
Professor of the Practice of Medicine, Dean.

H. TUHOLSKE, M. D.,
Professor of the Practice of Surgery.



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132 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

T. F. PREWITT, M. D.,

Professor of the Principles of Surgery.

*H. U. MUDD, M. D.,

Professor of the Practice of Surgery atui Clinical Surgery ^ Dean.

W. E. FISCHEL, M. D.,
Professor of Clinical AfetUcine.

ROBERT LUEDEKING, M. D.,

Professor of the DiHtfuies of Children.

JOHN P. BRYSON, M. 1).,

Professor of (Jenito- Urinary Surgery, Treas.

JUSTIN STEER, M. !>.,

Professor of Clinical Medicine.

W. A. HARDAWAY, M. I)., LL.D.,

Professor of DiseaJtes of the Skin and .Syphilid.

H. N. SPENCER, A. M., M. D., LL.D.,

Professor of Otology.

W. C. GLASGOW, A. B., M. D.,

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Laryngology.

HENRY SCHWARZ, M. D.,

Professor of Obstetrics.

PAUL Y. TUPPER, M. D.,

Professor of Applied Anatomy and Operative Surgery.

E. W. SAUNDERS, M. D.,

Professor of Diseases of Children and Clinical Midwifery.

N. B. CARSON, M. D.,

Professor of Clinical Surgery.

J. B. SHAPLEIGH, M. D.,
Professor of Otology, Secretary.



• Died, November 20, 1899.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 133

SIDNEY P. BUDGETT, M. D.,

Professor of Physiology, Registrar.

JOHN GREKN, M. D.,

Special Professor of Ophthalmology.

FRANK R. FRY, M. D.,

Professor of Diseases of the Xerrous System.

V. A. GLASGOW, M. I).,
Professor of Clinical Gynecology.

H. G. MIDI), M. D.,

Professor of Fractures and Dislocatiotis, and Clinical Surgery.

E. M. SENSENEY, M. D.
Professor of Diseases of the Throaty Xose, and Chest.

A. J. STEELE, M. D.,

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery.

JOSEPH GRINDON, M. D.

Professor of Clinical Dermatology and Syphilis.

A. V. L. BROKAW, M. D.,

Professor of Clinical Gynecology.

AMAND RAVOLD, M. D.,

Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene.

CHARLES NAGEL, LL.B.,

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence.

W. H. WARREN, Ph. D.,

Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

R. J. TERRY, M. D.,

Assistant Professor of Anatomy. '

ELSWORTH SMITH, Ju., M. D.,
Clinical Profeasor of Medicine,

D. C. GAMBLE, M. D.,
Clinical Professor of Diseases of (he Kur,



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134 WASHINGTON 1:NIVKR81TY.

CHARLES H. DIXON, M. D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Surgery.

HENRY L. WOLFNER, M. D.,
Clinical Lecturer on IHieaset of the Eye.

GREENFIELD SLUDER, M. D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Diseases of the Nose, Throat, and Chett.

EDWIN C. BURNETT, M. D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Syphilis.

VILRAY B. BLAIR, M. D.,

Lecturer ofi Descriptive Anatomy.

A. E. EWING, M. D.,
Clinical Lecturer on IHseases of the Kye.

LOUIS H. BEHRENS, M. D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Diseases of the Chest.

ALBERT E. TAUSSIG, M. D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Medicine.

JOSEPH MASERANG, Jr., Ph. G.,
Lecturer on Materia Medica and Pharmacy.

THEODOR KODIS, M. 1).,
Lecturer on Pathology, and Curator of the Mtiseum.

HENRY C. HARTMAN, M. D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery.

GIVEN CAMPBEI.L, Jr., M. D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Dixeases of the Nerrous System,

GEORGE M. TUTTLE, M. D.,

Lecturer on Therapeutics.



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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLKGE. 136



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL
DEPARTMENT.

THE ST. LOUIS AND MISSOURI MEDICAL
COLLEGE.

SESSION 1899-1900.

Towards the close of the last scholastic year the re-
spective Facalties of the St. Louis Medical College and
the Missouri Medical College took certain preliminary
steps looking to the union of these two institutions. With
this end in view both faculties resigned, and in due
course combined to form the Medical Department of
Washington University.

The Missouri Medical College was founded in 1840,
and with the exception of the years of the Civil War has
given continuous instruction up to the present time.

The St. Louis Medical College was founded in 1842,
and has just completed its 57th consecutive annual
course. Under an ordinance enacted in 1891, it was
created the Medical Faculty of the Washington Univer-
sity, and has continued in that relation up to the present
year.

This union of the two oldest and most representative
of the medical colleges in the West was undertaken and
successfully consummated solely in behalf of a broader
and more thorough training, and we firmly believe that
this object will be accomplished.



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136 WASHINGTON INIVERSITY.

Ah will be seeu in another place, there has been a con-
siderable increase in the size and effectiveness of the
teaching force, the University has at its disposal two new
and finely equipped college buildings, and the facilities
for clinical work have been greatly multiplied.

The graded course of study now some time established
has been elaborated and extended as experience has
dictated, and always in the direction of higher standards
and broader teaching. Now that four years of attendance
prior to graduation have been adopted and required from
all candidates, it has become possible to introduce new
features in the plan of instruction, by which the student
will gain greater leisure for his work and more liberty in
the selection of his studies.

A distinctive feature of the Medical Department of the
Washington University is the requirement of and full
provision for extended laboratorj- work, by every student,
in all the fundamental subjects of medical study. The
extent and scope of the required practical work in Anat-
omy and in Chemistry have been greatly enlarged, and
full laboratory courses are given in Histology, in Medical
Chemistry, in Pathological Anatomy, and in Bacteriology.
The actual making of post-mortem examinations by the
student himself will be made a feature of the instruction.

In general the method of teaching pursued in this insti-
tution will be, so far as practicable, that of direct personal
instruction of each student. In addition to the usual
methods of lectures, didactic and clinical, there will be
recitations from the text-books, and clinical conferences,
in which the student examines the patient and submits a



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ST. LOrW MEDICAL COLLKCiK. 137

written report of his diagnosis for criticism and dis-
cussion.

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

Especial attention is called to the unusual clinical
advantages offered the student in connection with the
large number of Hospitals and Dispensaries directly
under the control of the Medical Department of the
Washington University.

SAIXT LOUIS MILLANPHY HOSPITAL.

This is the oldest and most widely-known general
hospital in the West. Its extensive general and special
clinics are conducted by members of this Faculty, and
are devoted wholly to the instruction of its students.

SAINT John's hospital.
Saint John's Hospital, recently enlarged by new build-
ings, is in charge of the Sisters of Mercy. Its medical
and surgical management is entirely controlled by this
Faculty. This institution is situated within a few blocks
of the college. In addition to the hospital proper there
is a large out-door attendance of patients in the several
dispensaries.

POLKVLINIC hospital AND DISPKNSARIKS.

The Policlinic Hospital, which adjoins one of the main
buildings of the college, contains a number of wards and
rooms that are especially maintained for the reception of
patients treated in the college clinics, a matter of great
convenience and utility in teaching. The disi)en8aries
in connection with the Hospital are unusually largely at-



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138 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

tended, and are so organized in general and special
clinics that the greatest abundance of material for instrac-
tion can always be utilized. In addition to the usual
reception and consultation rooms, pharmacy, etc., there
is a handsome surgical amphitheater capable of seating
over four hundred students.

BKTHKSDA HOSPITAL.

The Bethesda Hospital, with its maternity and found-
ling departments, is under the direct supervision of Pro-
fessor E. W. Saunders, and is accessible to the senior
students of this college only. Opportunity is here
afforded lor exercises in obstetrical diagnosis, and in
acquiring practical experience in midwifery. At the
Foundling Hospital the student is made familiar with
infantile diseases and artificial feeding.

<) 'FALLON DLHPENSARY.

The O 'Fallon Dispensary is a special clinical depart-
ment of the college with general medical and surgical
clinics and the various special clinics fully represented.

An Obstetrical Out-clinic attached to the Dispensary
affords the senior students special opportunities for prac-
tical work in this important branch of medicine.

At the City Hospital, the Female Hospital, the Insane
Asylum, and the Poor House, the coU^e stands on equal
terms with others in the privilege of visiting and clinical
instruction.

The attention of students is called to the fact that a
corps of assistant physicians to the various municipal



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ST. LOUIS HKDICAL COLLEGE. 139

hospitals is appointed each year after competitive exami-
nation, to which all members of the graduating class are
eligible.

We beg to direct attention to the fact that hitherto
four-fifths of the positions in the city hospitals have been
filled by the graduates of the Saint Louis and Missouri
Medical Colleges.

THE COURSE OF STUDY.

The curriculum is based upon the amount and kind of
work required to be done by candidates for the degree.
The courses to be followed are graded in such a manner
that all the fundamental studies and general courses are
required to be taken before special courses and advanced
work can be pursued. Of the latter a certain part is
optional or elective ; and of the large amount of clinical
work a considerable part is made elective in order that
the student may enjoy some liberty in the pursuit of the
higher studies and specialties. Thus the greater part of
work required for the degree shall consist of obligatory
courses and the remainder may be chosen out of a large
assortment of electives. In the choice of electives the
student will be advised by members of the Faculty.

Ordinarily, a course of three hours a week or four to
six hours laboratory work for one semester is counted as
one unit of work. Whenever a student has completed a
unit satisfactorily the teacher will issue to hira, with or
without examination, as seems necessary to determine his
standing, a certificate which shall be final evidence of the
student's having passed in the respective course. In case



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140 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

the student does not attain to a satisfactory mark in that
unit, he must go over the subject a second time or pre-
sent himself for examination in it at the end of the next
semester. Entrance upon studies of the third and fourth
year will be permitted only upon evidence that he has per-
formed the total amount of work required for the first and
second year. At the end of the fourth year the degree
will be conferred upon presentation of evidence of satis-
factory performance of all work required for the third
and fourth year, or upon final examination in these.

TOTAL WOKK REQUIKED.

To fulfill the conditions for graduation, the minimum
of work to be done in the First and Second Year is 28
units, viz. : the required work in Chemistry 4 units,
Anatomy 6, Histology 2, Physiology 2, Materia Medica
and Therapeutics 3 J, Patht)logy and Bacteriology 6,
Medicine, 22, Dermatology i —total, 26 J ; the remainder
(of at least If units) must be chosen out of (5| units
of) electives.

The minimum of work required in the Third and
Fourth Year is 40 units. A large part of this is clinical
work, which is to a great extent elective ; it must be so
chosen that the candidate presents certificates of satisfac-
tory work in

Medicine (exclusive of 2i uuits in Second Year, but
including Clinics of Diseases of Nose, Throat,

and Chest, | units) 8 units.

Pediatrics 3 *'

Diseases of the Nervous System IJ *'



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ST. LOUIS MBDICAL COLLEGE.



141



Surgery (including Orthopedics | units) .... 10 units.

Geni to-Urinary Surgery 1| "

Gynecology I "

Obstetrics 4| "

Dermatology 1 ^*

Ophthalmology 1

Otology 1 ^'

Hygiene I ^'

Forensic Medicine 1 '*

Total 33^ units,

the remaiuder (()| units) to be made up of electives and
a large variety of clinical instruction, allowing the indi-
vidual student considerable liberty of choice.

The following table exhibits the distribution of obli-
gatory and elective courses by Semesters : —

OBLIGATORY. KLECTIVK.

First Year. 1st Semester:

Chemistry (2 units)

Anatomy (3)

Histology (1)

Materia Medica etc. (1)
2d Semester:

Chemistry (2)

Anatomy (2)

Histology (I)

Physiology (1)

Materia Medica etc. (I)
Second Year. 3d Semester :

Physiology (1) Chemistry (1)

Mat. Med. & Therap. (|) Anatomy (1)

Pathology (3) Physiology (1)

Medicine (1)



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142



WASHINGTON UNIVKR8ITY.



OBLIGATDKY.




KLKCTIVK.




Second Year. 4th Semester


:






Anatomy


(1)


Anatomy


(1)


Mat. Med. & Ther.


(1)


Pathology


(1)


Pathology


(3)


Clinics


(1)


Medicine


(If)






Dermatology


(4)






Third Year. 5th Semester:








Medicine


(11)


Clinics


(7i)


Pediatrics


(1)






Dis. Nervous System


(i)






Surgery


(1)






Obstetrics


(1)








(*)






6th Semester:








Medicine


(1)


Clinics


W


Pediatrics


(t)






Surgery


(1*)






Obstetrics


(1)






Ophthalmology


(*)






Otology


(i)






Fourth Year. 7th Semester








Medicine


(1)


Clinics


(m)


Pediatrics


(*)






Surgery


(1)






Genlto-Urlnary Surgery


(1)






Obstetrics


(*)






Ophthalmology


(*)






Hygiene


(1)






8th Semester:








Medicine


(1)


Dis. Nervous System


(*)


Surgery


(t)


Gen.-Ur. Surgery


(*)


Obstetrics


(*)


Clinics


(lOi)


Forensic Medicine


(1)







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ST. LOUIS MEDICAL COLLEGE. 148

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.

Candidates for admission to the College will be received
apon the following conditions : —

1. Satisfactory certificates of good moral standing.

2. (a) The presentation of a College degree in Letters
or Science, (5) of a diploma or certificate of graduation
from an Academy or High School, or (c) of a certificate
showing that the candidate has passed the entrance exam-
ination to an accredited College or Scientific School, or
(d) the special preliminaiy examinations prescribed by
State regulations for admission to the study of medicine,
or (e) passing an examination in the following branches '•
English grammar and composition, arithmetic, algebra as
far as quadratics, elementary physics. United States
history, geography, and Latin equivalent to one year in a
High School."*

These examinations will be conducted by examiners
appointed by the Chancellor of Washington University.^

Inasmuch as the requirements preliminary to the study
of medicine and to the registration of physicians vary
somewhat in the different States, it is particularly en-
joined upon all students to conform in all respects, to the
special regulations governing admission to medical prac-
tice in the State in which they intend to reside.



* Candidates who fail in the examination in Latin will be given an
opportunity to make up the deficiency before the beginning of their second
year.

t Regular entrance examinations will be iield on September '25th and
26th, 1900. Candidates may, however, arrange for special examination
daring the summer by applying to the Dean.



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144 WA.8HINGTON- I'NIVERSITY;

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.

Regular students candidates for the degree will be
admitted to the Second Year class upon evidence of hav-
ing completed a majority of the studies of the First Year.
Entrance upon the work of the Third Year is conditioned
upon satisfactory completion of all the work required in
the first two years, but a student defective in one branch
only will be admitted to the Third Year class on condition
that he make up the deficiency by the end of the Third
Year.

Students who have pursued one or more years of study
in other reputable medical schools will be admitted to the
class to which the work already done entitles them ; the
evidence of this to consist of certificates from the former
school, or examination in the respective branches.

Graduates of Colleges of Letters or Science who have
followed a sufficient course in Biology may enter the Sec-
ond Year class and receive credit for so much of the First
Year work as they have already done.

GRADUATE COURSES.

Physicians, graduates of an accredited regular school
of medicine, are admitted to any of the courses of in-
struction given in the College, subject to such restrictions
as may grow out of the assignment of hours in the pro-
grammes of work laid out for the several classes, and to
the single further restriction that, in the case of those
desirous of taking advanced laboratory work, such pro-
ficiency in elementary work as may be necessary for its



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ST. LOriS MKDK^AL COLLKUK. 145

successful prosecution will be required. A certificate
of actual attendance will be given upon request.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION.

(1) The candidate must be twenty-one years of apje.

(2) He must be of pood moral character (which includes
unexceptionable conduct while at College).

(3) He must have attended not less than four regular annual
courses of medical instruction, the last of which must have l>een
in this College.

(4) He must, by the flrst of April, have notified the Dean, in
writing, of his intention to present himself as a candidate for tlie
degree.

(5) He must have discharged all indebtedness to the C'oUege.
(H) He must present evidence of satisfactory performance of

at least the minimum amount of worlc required in the course.

FEES.

(PAYABLK IN SKPTRMBKK OF KACU YKAR.)

Matriculation Fee (payable but once) . ^ 5 00
Fees for each year 100 00

No charge is made for laboratory supplies or use of anatomical
material.

No charge is made for demonstrators' or hospital tickets, or
for graduation.

The matriculation fee (^6.00), and the fee for the year
(#100.00), are payable to the Dean or the Registrar at the time of
matriculation, at the beginning of the college year, in September.

Students are required to provide themselves with such articles
of chemical apparatus as test-tubes, watch-glasses, small evapo-
rating dishes, etc., and also to make good any loss by breakage
or destraction of apparatus belonging to the College.

10



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146 WASHINGTON INIVER8ITY.

All indebteduess to the College must be discharged before
entering on the tlnai- examination for graduation.

Note. — Graduates of the St. Louis Medical College and of the Missouri
Medical College hare perpetual free admission, bat will be charged a
laboratory fee of $*20.00.

Graduates, under three years, of other medical schools, will be charged
the matriculation fee and twenty dollars, for attendance during a coUefre
year or part of a year ; they will also be charged a laboratory fee of $20.00.

Graduates of other medical schools, of three or more years' standing.
will be charged the matriculation fee and a laboratory fee of I30.O0L

Graduates in medicine who may be admitted to the College as candi-
dates for a degree will be charged the matriculation fee and the fe« for
one year.

Special Courses of Instruction may be arranged by applying to the
Dean.

SCHOL.VRSHIPS.

1. The Hknry Hitchcock Scholarship is held by
Hon. Henry Hitchcock, and entitles the beneficiarr to
one year's free tuition.

2. The Gkorgk F. Gill vScholabship, instituted in
memory of the late* Dr. George F. Gill, Clinical Pro-
fessor of Diseases of Children, entitles the holder to one
year's free tuition.

PRIZES.

Two '' GKoiKiK F. Gill" prizes are offered to the
students of the College, viz. : —

1. One prize of $50 to bo awarded at the end of the
First Year to the member of the class who shall have
made the highest grade in anatomical work assigned to
the First Year class.

2. One prize of $50 to be awarded to a member of the
graduating class, of high general standing, who shall have



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ST. LOl'IS MEDICAL (M)LLK(;K. 147

done specially good work in the department of Diseases of
Children,

3. A CuRTMAN prize will be awarded at the end of the
First Year to the member of the class who shall have
made the highest grade in Chemistry.

The George F. Gill prizes for 1899 were awarded to Dr.
Leonard Keehn, a member of the (graduating Class, for
high general average and meritorious work in the study of
Diseases of Children ; and to Mr. Justin E. Ross, a mem-
ber of the Junior Class, for the best work in Anatomy ;
Messrs. H. M. Loewenstein and A. L. Brandt receiving
honorable mention.

The Ct'RTMAN prizes in Chemistry for 1899 were awarded
to F. C. Simon, of the Senior Class ; J. P. Chandeysson,
of the Second Year Class ; and John Widney of the
First Year Class.



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148 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITY.



STUDENTS.

NAMB. BE8IDBNCE.

Aitken^ W. A Kansas.

Albrecht, F. B Missouri.

Althaus, C Missouri.

Apperson, E. D. . . . Missouri.

Barry, F. W Illinois.

Beatty, J. D. . ". Iowa.

Benner, W. J Illinois.

Beuway, W. H Missouri.

Blaliemore, J. E., M. I) Arkansas.

Boese wetter, R Missouri.

Bohn, J. C, Jr., Pli. B Illinois.

Boles, D. 8 Illinois.

Bradley, J. M Missouri.

Brandt, A. L Missouri.

Brown, E. R Missouri.

Brown, L. S Missouri.

Buchanan, J. McA Missouri.

Bunyan, M. V Illinois.

Bums, R.,Jr Missouri.

Campbell, R. L New York.

Cannady, E. W Illinois.

Caplan, L., M. I>. . ., Missouri.

Car\^er, F. H Missouri.

Cauglilin, W. T Canada.

Chandeysson, P. I France.

Chapman, O. G Missouri.

Cochran, F. B Missouri.

Comer, A. W Missouri.

Cox, B. F., M. D Missouri.

Craig, .1. A Missouri.

Crosby, T. A Missouri.

Crow^, C. C Illinois.

Cummings, R. N Arkansas.



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ST. LOUIS MKDK'AL COLLK<4K. 149

VAME. RSSTDBNCX.

l>avie, J IlUnois.

Davis, H. W Illinois.

Deichmann, O. H rilinols.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 48 of 70)