Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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aims to turn out practical chemists, well grounded in
theory, who are fitted to take positions in any uianu-
factorv. or to become teachers.



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76 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



CURRICULA,

Showing the distribution of the above ''courses" for
different years in the several professional departments.

CURRICULUM FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS.
FRESHMAN YEAR.

FIRST TBRM.

Mathematics II Chemistry I

Physics I English I

French or ) l or 3 Drawing: I

German | ■ • • •

SKGOND TKRM.

Mathematics Ill Chemistry 2

Physics II English 2

French or ) 2 or 4 I^rawing II

German / • • • •

VACATION WORK.

Preparation of a " Summer Report/' *

* This Report should be written on standard letter paper with salt-
able ** pen -and -ink" or " Instramental " drawings Interleaved. The
sabject of the Report should be some simple oonstractlon wfaioh during
the summer actually came under the writer's personal observaUon, and,
if possible, in which the writer took part. A few days of work would
give the writer all the facts and experience needed for the preparation
of the Report. Books are not to be consulted, nor is the imagination to
be drawn upon. The text may vary between eight and twelve pages.

The Report should always be handed to the Dean on the morning of
the first day of the fall term ; it will enter into the records as a part of
the Sophomore year.



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CIVIL EMGINEEKING.



I. CDRRICDLUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.

Students who coaiPLETE four tears of this work
will receive the degree, ^^ bachelor of science in
Civil Engineering;" those who complete the five
tears will receive the degree, ** civil engineer."

(For Conditions of Admission, see pp. 47 and 48.)
(For the Studies of tlie Frenhman year, see p. 76.)

SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mathematics . .IV Descriptive Geometry . . I



Physics Ill Surveying 1

French or 1 3 or 5 Drawing II

German ( - ■ • ■ Shop-work ... I



SKCOND TERM.

Mathematics V Surveying . .... II

Physics IV Drawing IV

Mechanics I Shop- work ... II

Descriptive Geometry . . IL

VACATION work.

Summer School of Land Surveying. Civil Engineering, III.
JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Civil Engineering . . IV, V Electricity and Magnetism V

Mineralogy (Chemistry) . 14 Shop-work Ill

Applied MechanicB ... II

SECOND TERM.

Civil Engineering . . VI, X Applied Mechanics . . .Ill
Mechanical Engineering . Ill Electricity and Magnetism VI



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78 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Civil Engiueeriug, Applied Mechanics . . IV

VII, XI, XII, XIII Descriptive Astronomy* . 1
Mechanical Engineering. XXI

SECOND TKRM.

Civil Engineering, Applied Mechanics . . V

IX, XI, XIV, XV, XVI Practical Astronomy* 2

Mechanical Engineering X

FIFTH OR GRADUATE YEAR.

FIRST TKRM.

Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering . VII

XVII, XVIII, XIX, XXI Mathematics . . . VIII

Mechanical Engineering XIII Political Kconomyf . . 1

SKCOND TKRM.

Civil Engineering, Mathematics VII

XX, XXI, XXII Metallurgy (Chemistry) . 18
Applied Mechanics . . VI

II. CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING.
Students who compi.ete four years will receive the
DEGREE, *' Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engi-
neering ; " THOSE WHO COMPLETE THE FIVE TEARS WILL
RECEIVE THE DEGREE, '' MECHANICAL ENGINEER."

(For Conditions of Admission, see pp. 47 and 48.)
(For the Studies of the Freshman Year, see p. 76.)

SOPnOMOKK YEAR.

FIRST TCRM..

Matliematics ... IV Descriptive Geometry . I

Physics Ill Civil Engineering ... I

♦ See pajje 43. t See page 36.



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MECHANICAL ENGINEKKlNtt. 79

French or 1 Drawing HI

German / ■ • • 3or6 ghop-work I

SKCOMD TERM.

Mathematics .... V Civil Engineering ... II

Physics IV Drawing IV

Mechanics I Shop-work II

Descriptive Geometry . II

VACATION WORK.

Summer School of Land Surveying. Civil Engineering, III.
JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TBKM.

Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics .... VI

I, II, IV. Applied Mechanics . . II

Electrical Engineering . V. Shop-work Ill

SKCOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Applied Mechanics . . Ill

I, III, IV, V Electrical Engineering . VI
Civil Engineering . VIII, X

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Applied Mechanics . . IV

VI, VII, VIll, XIII Electrical Engineering . VII
Civil Engineering . XI, XII

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering . Xf, XVI

VIIMX, X, XI, XII, XIII Applied Mechanics . . V

FIFTH YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, Matlieniatics . . . VIII

XIV, XV, XVI Electrical Engineering . IX

Political Economy* ... 1 Astrouomyt 1

* See page 36. t See page 48.



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80 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SECOND TKRM.

Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics .... Vil

XV1I,XVIII,XIX,XX, Metallurgy (Chemistry; . 18

III. CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING.

Students who complete four years will receive
the degree, " bachelor ok science in electrical
Engineering ; ' ' those who complete the five years

WILL receive the DEGREE, '* ELECTRICAL ENGINEER. * '

(For Conditions of Admission, see pp. 47 and 48.)
(For Studies of Freshman year, see p. 76.)

SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mathematics .... IV Descriptive Geometry . . I

Piiysicsl Ill Civil Engineering ... I

French or) q ^^ - Drawing Ill

> . . . t) or o
German j Sliop-work I

SECOND TERM.

Matliematics .... V Civil Engineering ... II

Piiysics IV Drawing IV

Meclianics I Sliop-work II

Descriptive Geometry. . II

VACATION WORK.

Summer Scliool of Land Surveying. Civil Engineering, III.
JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

I^lectrical Eugiueeriuj: V Matliematics VI

Mechanical Engineering, Applied Mechanics ... II
r, II, IV Shop-work Ill



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KLECTRICAL ENGINKERING. 81

SECOND TERM.

Electrical Engineering . VI Applied Mechanics . . .Ill
Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering . VI 11, X

I, III, IV, V

SENIOR YEAR

FIRST TERM.

Electrical Engineering .VII Applied Mechanics . . .IV
Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering . XT, XII

VI, VII, VIII

SECOND TERM.

Electrical Engineering . VIII Applied Mechanics ... V
Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering . . .XI

VIII, IX, X

FIFTH OR GRADUATE YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Electrical Engineering, Mathematics . . . . VIII

VllI, IX Political Economyt • . 1
Astronomy* 1

SECOND TERM.

Electrical Engineering X Mathematics .... VII

Mechanical Engineering . X Applied Mechanics . .VI
Thesis. Civil Engineering . . XVI

• See page 43. t See page 86.



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82



WASHINOTON UNIVERSITT.



IV. CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING.

Stddemts who complete four tears will rbceivb
the degree olf '' bachelor op science in mlning en-
GINEERING." Students taking a fifth tear either in

THE DIRECTION OF MiNING OR MeTALLURGT, WILL RECEIVE

THE Degree of '* Engineer of Mines."

(For Conditions of Admission, see p. 47 and 48.)
(For Studies of the Fresliman Year, see p. 76.)



SOPUOMOKE YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mathematics IV Chemistry

Physics Ill Shop -work

Krenchorl _ . . g ^r 6
German i

SECOND TERM.

Mathematics ..... V French or 1

Mechanics I German /

Physics IV Chemistry

Shop- work



Sand 18
. . I



i 4 or

I 6

4 and 14

. . H



Mining Engineering
Chemistry . . . .
Geology* . . . ,



JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

. . I Mathematics VI

5 and 15 Applied Mechanics . . II
4 and 6 Physics V



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MINING EMGIN£BKIMG. 88



SKCOND TBRH.

Mining Engineering . . II Physics VI

Mechanical Engineering III Chemistry .... 6 and Ki

Civil Engineering . VIII, IX Geology* .... 6 and 7
Applied Mechanics . . .Ill

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERBt.

Mining Engineering, Mechanical Engineering . I

III and IV Civil Engineering ... XI
Chemistry . . . . 7, 18, 20

SKCOND TKRM.

Mining Engineering, Civil Engineering . . .XII

V, VI, VII Mechanical Engineering . X
Chemistry 8, 19

FIFTH YEAR.

The fifth year is entirely elective, with only the restriction
that the work shall be in the direction of either Mining or
Metallurgy . All engineering courses are open to the fifth-year
student. The worlc in the University will consist largely of
reference reading and laboratory work while opportunity is
afforded of spending a large part of the time about mines and
metallurgical plants to cultivate the power of observation.

Written reports will be required of all outside work, and
these will be discussed with the instructor, reference being
made at the same time to current literature.

At the end of the yearns work, an elaborate thesi.^ on some
?iven subject will be required.

* See page 44.



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84 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



V. CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY.

Students who complete four tears will receive the
DEGREE *' Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; " those
who complete five years will receive the degree
*' Master of Science."

(For Conditious of Admission, see pp. 47 and 48.)
CFor Studies of Fresliman Year, see p. 76.)

SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Cliemistry . . 3, 5, and 13 Mathematics .... IV

Physics ...... Ill French or -<

^ ^ 3 or 6



German*



}. ..



second term.
Chemistry . . . 4, 6, 14 Mathematics .... V

Mechanics I French or ^^

Physics IV German* | • • ■ * or 6



JUNIOR YEAR.

first term.

Chemistry . . . 7, 9, 15 Mathematics .... VI

Physics V French or -i ^ ^

German [See foot note.*

second term.
Chemistry . . . 8, 10, 1 1 Scientific German . . .

Physics VII French or ^

Germao } See loot note. »

*MOTK ON THE 8TCTDT OF FRENCH AND 6BBHAN.

1. Stadents who have taken French daring the Freshman year will be
required to take German daring the Sophomore year unless especially
excused, in which case they will continae the study of French.

2. Students who have taken German daring the Freshman year will
continae the study during the Sophomore year.

3. Students who have taken German during the Freshman and Sopho-



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CHKMrSTRT. 85

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TRRM.

Chemistry 17 or 18, 20.

Elect! ves — These elective coarse8 will be selected, after cou-
saltation with the instr actors, according to the direction of
the stadent^s work. Among such courses may be men-
tioned : Electricity, Botany, Geology, and Bacteriology.

Research Work, Theoretical or Applied.

SKCOND TKRM.

Chemistry 12^ 16, 19,21.

ElectiTes — As specified under the work of the first term.
Research Work, Theoretical or Applied. Preparation of
Thesis.

FIFTH OR GRADUATE YEAR.

FIRST AND 8BCOND TERMS.

Chemistry — Research Work in Theoretical or Applied Chemis-
try, Inorganic or Organic, preparatory to tlie thesis for the
degree of *' Master of Science."

Electives — Such courses as may be in the opinion of the in-
structors advantageous or necessary to the student's w^ork.



mora yean will be reqalTod to take French daring the Junior year, nnleis
specially excnaed. Students who bave had one year of French and one
year of Qennan In the Undergraduate Department will continue the
latter daring the Junior year.

4. Students excused from French or German will substitute therefor
an elective oouree of three hours.



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86 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



VI. THE GENERAL CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE
AND LITERATURE.

Students who complete four tears will keoeiye the
DEGREE, ^^ Bachelor of Science;" those who com-
plete THE five years WILL RECEIVE THE DEGREE,

** Master of Science."

(For Conditions of Admission, see pp. 47 and 48.)

(For Course of Study during the Fresliman and Sopliomore

years, see pp. 76 and 77.)

JUNIOR YEAR.

The work of the Junior year is wholly Elective. Selections
shall be made from what is offered in the Technical Courses
for the Junior year, or from what is offered to classes in the
College. The year's work consists of nine full '* courses."
Elections must be submitted to the deau of the School of
Engineering and approved by him on or before the second day
of each term.

SENIOR YEAR.

The work of this year is wholly Elective, and must be equiv-
alent to nine " courses." Selections must be made as al)ove.

The student must submit during the tlrst week in June a
Thesis for the dej;ree of *' B. S." (Bachelor of Science).

FIFTH OR GRADUATE YEAR.

The student must take nine " courses " from what is specified
for the Senior and Fifth year classes of the School of Engineer-
ing, and he must submit a final Thesis on a scientific subject
for the degree of *' M. 8." (Master of Science).



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THE OBSBRVATORT. 87

THE OBSERVATORY.
The work of the Observatory comes under three heads :-^

1. Practical instruotion is given to the Senior class in
the determination of time, latitude and longitude, and the
ordinary observations of spherical astronomy. Students
desiring a special professional course in astronomy will
be given full facilities in both reading and practice.

2. A regular scheme of scientific work is carried on.
This work embraces equatorial observations of the planets
and double stars, together with a large amount of meri-
dian work.

3. As far as possible it is the intention to give in the
Observatory opportunities for popular instruction and for
viewing the more interesting objects.

The instrumental equipment has been greatly improved
during the past three years and is now well adapted for
instruction in Sidereal Astronomy. The following are the
principal instruments: —

The Equatoricd — Objective 6 1-2 inches, reground by
Clark ; mounted in most excellent style by Warner &
Swazy, Cleveland, Ohio. The mounting includes driving
clock, micrometers, circles and a complete battery of
eye-pieces.

The Oeorge Partridge Transit Instrument — Objective
3 inches. The instrument was made by Fauth & Co. , and
is equipped in the most complete manner.

Chronograph — Bond Spring Governor.

BreakdrcuU Clocks — Mean-time clocks by Hohwii,



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88 WASHINGTON ITNIVEKSITT.

mean-lime clock by Howard and Sidereal clock by
Howard.

Chronometer (Breakcircuit) — By Dent.

Altazimuth — Circle 2 feet in diameter — mounted as
meridian circle.

A temperature box for delicate tests in thermometric
and horological work has been presented by the Waltham
Watch Company of Waltham, Mass.

Several hack clocks and a large amount of electrical
apparatus are used in the time service.

The time service of the Observatory has become an im-
portant feature of its work both in the city aud through-
out the Mississippi Valley.

The signals sent consist of automatic clock beats trans-
mitted over the wires and give the time referred to the
ninetieth meridian from Greenwich, known as ^* central"
time. They are sent daily over many thousands of miles
of wire and reach most of the railroad towns in Missouri,
Kansas, Iowa, Arkansas, Illinois and the more important
cities in Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Louisiana,
Mississippi and Alabama.

The longitude of the Observatory has been determined
from Washington by four independent exchanges involv-
ing change of observers to eliminate personal equation.
Its astronomical position is now among the best deter-
mined in the country. Tiiis fact, together with its posi-
tion at the center of a large telegraph system, makes it a
most convenient reference point for the determination of
Western and Southern longitudes.



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THE UNDBRORADUATE EPARTMEST. 89



EXAMINATIONS AND THESES.

The examinations in the Undergradutae Department are
frequent and rigid, and wlienever it is possible, in writing.
Upon them the teachers rely chiefly for information of
the progress of the students. No promotions to higher
classes are made except upon . conclnsive evidence that
the antecedent subjects have been well mastered. Re-
ports of the standing of individual students will he made
by the Deans of the Faculties to parents or guardians,
if such are requested.

Every applicant for a degree, besides passing satisfac-
torily all his examinations, must present a thesis, an
original essay, review, or investigation upon some sub-
ject, professional or otherwise, connected with the course
of study he has followed.

The thesis must be accompanied with all necessary
general and detail drawings. All such theses and
drawings are left in charge of the University.

The object in requiring a thesis is mainly to secure
evidence of the student's fitness to receive a degree ; con-
sequently a high standard of excellence is rigidly adhered
to. Incidentally the theses furnish much valuable infor-
mation to be used at the University by the professional stu-
dents, graduates, and all engaged in professional work.



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90 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

DEGREES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPART-
MENT.

1. In the College.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon the
satisfactory completion of the requisite number of courses.

II. In the School of Engineebing.

1. On the satisfactory completion of four years' work in
any Department the degree of Bachelor of Science is con-
ferred.

2. On the completion of a fifth year, degrees corres-
ponding to the departments of study are conferred, as
follows : —

1. Civil Engineer.

II. Mechanical Engineer.
Ilf. Electrical Engineer.
IV. Engineer of Mines.

V. Master of Science.
VI. Master of Science.

The Bachelors degrees are in three grades indicated b^-
the words cum laude, magna cum laude and summa -cum.
laude^ respectively.

Every member of the graduating class who has attained
ninety per cent of the maximum mark on the general
scale for the four years, may be recommended for a
degree summa cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (not recom-
mended for the degree summa cum laude) who has at-



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THE UNDBRGRADUATK DEPARTMENT. 91

tained eighty -flve per cent of the maximum mark on the
general scale for the four years, may be recommended
for a degree magjia cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (not recom-
mended for the degree summa or magtui cum laude) who
has attained seventy-five per cent on the general scale for
the four years, may be recommended for a degree cum
laude.

No student will be recommended for a degree who has not
passed aU his examinations successfully and handed in such
projects or theses as may be required.

The diploma fee is three dollars, payable in advance.

A.DVANCED DEGREES.

The Degree of Master of Arts is open to all who have
received from this University the degree of Bachelor of
Arts.

The Degree of Master of Science is open lo all who
have received from this University the degree of Bachelor
of Science, of Civil Engineer, of Mechanical Engineer,
Electrical Engineer, or of Engineer of Mines, but no
person will henceforth be considered eligible for the degree
of Master unless he shall be a resident- graduate for at
least one year, and shall devote his entire time during
that period to non-professional graduate work under the
direction of the Faculty.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is open to all who
have received the degree of Master from the University.

The degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science and
Doctor of Philosophy are open to graduates of other



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92 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

institutions who shall have satisfied the Faculty of the
Undergraduate Department, that the courses of study for
which they have received degrees are equivalent to those
for which such degi'ees are given in Washington University.

In no case will the degree of Doctor be conferred in
less than two years from the date of the Bachelor's degree ;
nor will the degree of Doctor or that of Master be recom-
mended except after at least one year's residence at the
University and upon satisfactory evidence, to be deter-
mined by examination, of a proper amount of study and
attainment in advance of Undergraduate work.

The Faculty of the Undergraduate Department will act
upon applications for advanced degrees, and will, from
time to time, adopt such rules as to the examination of
candidates as may be neGessar3\

Candidates for such degrees should present as early as
the first of October of each year a written statement of
their wishes as to subjects, courses of study, etc., for the
approval of the Faculty.

The diploma fee is five dollars, payable in advance.



TUITION FEES.

Tuition in the Undergraduate Department is $150 a
year, payable semi-annually, in advance if required, and
always before the middle of the term.

A matriculation fee of five dollars is charged to all who
enter this Department, paj'able in advance.



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THE DNDEBGRADUATE DKPARTMBNT. i'3

DISCIPLINE.

Regularity, promptness, a cheerful compliance with
every detail of the daily programme, and the manners and
habits of good society are expected of every student.
The records of Scholarship are based upon scholarship
alone. Misdemeanors of whatever sort are met with
reproof or censure ; but cases of persistent neglect of any
duty, or fli^ant misbehavior, if such should occur, are
met by temporary suspension, or dismission from the
University.

BOARD AND LODGING.

Students living at a distance from the University have
no difficulty in securing rooms and board at reasonable
rates. The yearly expenses may range between the fol-
lowing estimates, according to tastes and habits of
economy :

Tuition $150 00 — $160 00

Board, lodging, and washing, 9 months . . 200 00 to 300 00

Books and instruments 10 00 •* 20 00

Incidentals 15 00 " 80 00

Total for the year $876 (X) to $500 00

Books and instruments may be obtained at cost from
the Go-operative Association, organized and managed by
students of this Department.

Students wishing accommodations, and housekeepers
wishing boarders, are requested to communicate with the
Deans.



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94 WA8HINOTON UNIVERSITY.

LECTURE FOUNDATIONS.

A Lecture Endowment Fand, amounting to twenty-
seven thousand dollars ($27,000), was created in 1875, by
one of the early friends of the University, Mr. William
Henry Smith. It was given without any restrictions,
except that the fund should be increased, if practicable,
by accruing interest, to $30,000, which has been accom-
plished, and that no part of the principal should be
expended. The income is now used for the support of
lectures, with a view to the advancement of the interests
of the University, and the benefit of the public.

Some of these lectures are given in the hall of the Uni-
versity to the general public ; others, which maybe called
*' ClasS'Room,*' or '* Instruction Lectures y** are given in
smaller rooms, or in the laboratories, to classes limited in
number according to the nature of the subject treated,
and are designed to furnish to all persons instruction
similar to that given in the class-room work of the College
and the School of Engineering.

The beginning of a fund for the encouragement of the
study of American History has been made by a gift of $15,-
000, by Mrs. Mary Hemenway, of Boston, Massachusetts.

Upon this foundation a University Professorship of
American History has been established, and the chair
was filled in 1884 by the appointment of Professor John
Fiske, of Cambridge, Mass.

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.

Room No. 10 of the East Wing, University Hall, is
used as a reference library and reading room. Here all



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THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTHEMT. 95

necessary books of reference are provided , and also a
good selection of periodical literature.. No attempt is
made at present to gather a general library. During the
year 1880 a gift of about three thousand volumes was
received from the family of the late Joseph Coolidge, of
Boston. The collection, known as the Coolidge Library ,
is especially rich in excellent editions of Italian and
French authors, and is a very material addition to the
usefulness of the library.

Throagh the liberality of a number of citizens of St.
Louis, an arrangement has been made by which the privi-
lege of using the Mercantile Library has been extended,
under prescribed conditions, to such members of the
University as may be designated by the Chancellor.

Property valued at $66,000 has been given to the
University by the late Mr. Stephen Ridgley, of St. Louis,
upon the condition that the income shall accumulate until,
in the judgment of the Board of Directors, the amount
shall be sufficient to erect and maintain a fire-proof
Library Building. The gift has been thankfully accepted
apon that condition.

GYMNASIUM.

A gymnasium for the use of the Undergraduate De-



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 5 of 70)