Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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Washington University took place with appropriate exer-
cises in University Hall and an oration delivered by Hon.
Edward Everett, in the Mercantile Library Hall. An
advanced scientific class was organized at that time. An
Academy, now known as Smith Academy, had then
been in operation about three years. The College and
Mary Institute w^ere organized in 1859, and the first
class was graduated from the College in June, 18()2.
The Law School was organized in 1867, the Polytechnic
School, now known as the School of Engineering, in 1870,
the School of Fine Arts and the Manual Training School in
18 7i), the School of Botany in 1885. The St. Louis Medical
College, founded in 1842, was admitted as a department
of the University in 1891, and the Missouri Dental Col-
lege in 1892. In 1899 the Missouri Medical College,
wliich was founded in 1840, was united with the St.
Louis Medical College to form the Medical Department
of this University.

To show the principle on which endowments are invited,
the fifth, sixth, and seventh articles of the Constitution
are here insei"ted.

** ARTICLE V.

" ENDOWMENT OF PROFKSSOUSHIPS.

'* Any person may endow in whole or in part a speci-
fied professorship in the said University ; and if, in the
opinion of the Board of Directors, said endowment shall
be sufficient for the support of said professorship, said
professorship shall bear the name of its founder forever,

2



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18 WitSHINGTON UNIVKKaiTT.

unless at the time of the endowment he shall otherwise
direct.

"ARTICLE VI.

'' ENDOWMENT OF DEPARTMENTS.

'^ Any person may found, by an adequate endowment,
a specified department in said University ; provided the
plan of its organization and its purposes are approvetiby
the Board of Directors, and if said endowment shall, in
the opinion of said Board, be sufficient for the perpetual
support of said department, it shall bear the name of the
founder thereof forever, unless he shall otherwise direct
at the time of endowing the same,

"ARTICLE VII.

" SPECIFIC FUNDS.

"All funds and property of whatever nature and
descri])tion, contributed to the endowment or foundation
of a professorship or department, shall forever be faith-
fully applied to the specific purpose for which contrib-
uted, and to no other object whatsoever, without the
written consent of the donor or founder thereof, or his
heirs and assigns, and also the written consent of two-
thirds of the Directors first had and obtained; provided,
however, that said funds and property in this article
named shall never be diverted from the purposes of said
Universitv."



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WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMPREHRND8:

I. UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT:

lNCLUI>IXn TIIK COLLKGU AND THR HCHOOL OF KNGINKKRING.

Washington Avenue and Seventeenth Street.

II. HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.

1724 Washington Avenue.

III. ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

Nineteenth and Locust Streets.

IV. ST. LOUIS LAW SCHOOL.
1417 Locust Street.

V. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.
1806 Locust Street.

VI. MISSOURI DENTAL COLLEGE.

1814 Locust Street.



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2U WASHIKGTON UNIVEBfllTT.

The following schools have also been organised under the
charter of the University: —

I. SMITH ACADEMY.

Washington Avenue and Nineteenth Street.

CHARLKS P. CURD^A.M., Ph.D., Principal.

II. MARY INSTITUTE.

Ijocuflt and Beaumont Streets.

EDMUND H. SEARS,A.M., Principal.

III. MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL.

Washington Avenue and Eighteenth Street.

CALVIN M. WOODWARD,Ph.D., Director.

For particulars in regard to these schools see special cata-
logues, to ))e liad on application to the Principals or Director.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT.

THE COLLEGE.
THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.



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. REMOVAL TO THE NEW SITE.

The Undergraduate Department of the Universitj,
which includes the Collie and the School of Engineer-
ing, will in the near future be removed to its new site
immediately north and west of Forest Park, which con-
tains one hundred fifty-three acres of land, admirably
adapted to university purposes. The cost of the land,
about $350,000, was subscribed by generous citizens of
St. Louis.

The new buildings will be as follows : A hall which
will include the administration offices of the University
and such subjects of instruction as do not require labor-
atories, to cost $200,000, the gift of Mr. Robert S.
Brookings ; two buildings for the engineering depart-
ments, civil, mechanical and electrical, together with
architecture, to cost $250,000, the gift of Mr. Samuel
Cupples ; a building devoted to chemistry to cost $100,-
000, the gift of Mr. Adolphus Busch ; and a dormitory
to cost $100,000, the gift of Mrs. John E. Liggett.
The Board also holds the gifts of the late Mr. Stephen
Ridgley, amounting now to about $100,000, which are
to be expended in the construction and maintenance of a
library building. Work on these buildings has already
begun and they will be completed and equipped as soon
as possible. It is reasonably certain that they will be
ready for occupancy by September, 1902.



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RECENT ADDITIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT
FUNDS.

Since the last catalogue of the University was issued,
the University has received as a gift from Messrs. Samuel
Cupples and Robert S. Brookings, the entire property
known as '* Cupples Station," which comprises a large
number of stores and warehouses occupied by wholesale
merchants. It is estimated that the University will re-
ceive from these stores a net annual income of about
$120,000; only a small portion of which, however, will
be available for educational purposes for some years to
come.



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1:NDERGRADL ATE DEPAKTilENT.



INCLUI>I>'G THE COIXBOR AND THK (KTHOOL OF KXGINBKKING.



WIN FIELD 8. CHAPLIN,

CkanrrUor.

PROFESSORS.

SYLVESTER WATERHOUSE,

ProfeM90T of Grrek.

CALVIN M. WOODWARD,

Prnfrttor of MathemtUic* and ApplieH Mrrkanies.

GEORGE E. JACKSON,
ProffMor of Lotin.

MARSHALL S. SNOW,
ProftMor of IlUtory and Dean of the College.

FRANCIS E. NIPHER,

Profeuor of Physics.

EDMUND A. ENGLER,

ProftMHor of Mnthemtitirg and Descriptive Geometry and Dean of the

School of Engineering.



ProftHHor of Mathematics and Astronomy.

WILLIAM TRELEASE,

Professor of Botany.

JAMES MAIN DIXON,
Professor of English.

OTTO HELLER,

Professm' of German.



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UNDBB6RADUATB DEPABTMBNT. 25

JOHN H. KINEALY,
Pro/estor of Mtchanical Engineering.

EDWARD H. REISER,

Pro/esior of Chemietrff.

JOHN LANE VAN ORNUM,
Professor of Civil Engineering.

GUSTAV HAMBACH,
Adjunct Professor of Geology.



INSTRUCTORS.

HOLMES SMITH,
Instructor in Dratoing.

GASTON DOUAY,
Instructor in French.

HERMANN VON SCHRENK,
Instrtictor in tlotany.

ROBERT F. HOXIE,

Instructor in Economics.

GELLERT ALLEMAN,

Instructor in Chemistry.

ALEXANDER S. LANGSDORF,
Instructor in Physics.

HERBERT F. ROBERTS,

Instructor in Botany.

WILLIAM H. ROEVER,
Instructor in Astrotwmy.

JAMES A. CHILES,
Instructor in Oerman.

GEORGE STANLEY MACOMBER,
Instructor in Physics.



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26



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



STUDENTS.



SENIOR CLASS.



NAJf£8. COURSE.

Alt, Arnold Dettmar . . . Arts . .

Bartlett, Roy Mech.Eng.

Beckert, John Henry . . . Arts . .
Bennett, Maude Wame . . Arts . .
Black, Gurdon Gilmore . . Civ. Eng.
Bo wen, Sherman Worcester . Civ. Eng.
Brown, Mabel Wolcott . . Arts . .

Bryan, Grace Aits . .

Chamberlin, Caroline . . . Arts . .
Crecellus, Florence Lesette . Arts . .
Cummings, Ruth Rozelle . . Arts . .

Eilers, Ralph Arts . .

Erskine, Lucille .4rts . .

Flickner, Martha Ver Bryck . Arts . .
Fuhlhage, I^uisc Her mine . Arts . .
Greensf elder, Albert Preston. Civ. Eng.
Griffin, Everett Paul . . . Arts . .
Harting, Otto Frederick . . Civ. Eng.
Haydock, Daniel Winters . . Arts . .
Hudson, Marjorie Hannah . Arts . .

Judd, Nellie Arts . .

Lyon, Dora Laurina . . . Arts . .
Miller, Jeanette Charlotte . Arts . .
Mueller, Laura Carlyn . . . Arts . .
Olrastead, Mabel .... Arts . .
Seuseney, Eugene Towner . Arts . .
Shahan, William Ewing . . Arts . .
Terry, Robert James, M.D. . Arts . .
Thornton, Frances Roberta . Arts . .
Wiederholdt,Eniest Ferdinand Mech.Eng



RBSIDKNCK.

3819 West Pine bouL
. 3021 Eads av.
6604 Michigan av.
4034 Page boul.
Clayton, Mo.
6941 CoteBrilliante av.
1333 N. King's h' way.
3746 Windsor pi.
3119 Lucas av.
1110 Dillon St.
3514 Olive st.
4935 Easton av.
4975 Wabada av.
4466 Page boul.
1709 Chouteau av.
Central, Mo.
2842 Lawton av.
1101 Montgomery st.
Normandy, Mo.
1820 O'Fallon st.
4323 Morgan st.
4415 Kennerly av.
3628 Cass av.
5058 Kensington av.
4348 Garfield av.
2829 Washington av.
3333 Washington av.
2726 Washington av.
3688 Laclede av.
.1211 Morrison av.

Total, sio.



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UNDBBGRABUATE DBPABTHEXT.



27



JUNIOR CLASS.



NAMSS.


COURSE.


RESIDENCE.


Battle, Anita Traviss .


. Arts .


2714 Stoddard st.


ChampliD, Edith . . .


. Arts . .


3414 Washington av.


Cutts, Francis Thacher


. Civ. Eng.


3887 Washington boul


Dawes, Henry Arthur .


. Arts . .


3626 Garfield av.


Flanigan, Blanche . .


. Arts . .


r»019 Raymond av.


Forder, Samuel Walker


. Chem.


St. Louis County.


Freeman, Mary Louise


. Arts . .


6347 Bartmer av.


Gladfelter, Edith Edna


. Arts . .


4720 N. 20th st.


Jacobs, Max William


. Arts . .


2307 S. 9th St.


Kelleter, Paul D.elmar .


. Arts . .


3114 Illinois av.


Muench, Alice Frances


. Arts . .


3117 Longfellow boul


Murphy, Robert Lincoln


. . Civ. Kng.


2115 Oregon av.


Pollard, Harry Moses .


. Arts .


3015 Washington av.


Schade, Florence Garrell


. . Arts . .


2221 Benton st.


ScheeljFrederick Engelma]


an . Arts . .


Belleville, III.


Stephens, Joseph Lafayett


B . Arts . .


IGU Missouri av.


Tittmann, Alice Fabian


. . Arts .


2732 Russell av.


Williams, Joseph Adler


. Arts .


4292 Page boul.

Total, 18



SOPHOMORE CLASS.

Anderson, Alban Jennings 3858 Windsor pi.

Armstrong, Frederick, Jr 4236a Garfield av.

Black, Albert Eugene 2800 Caroline st.

Bratney, John Frederick 1755 Preston pi.

Brey, William Wilson 3429 Bell av.

Codding, Frank Souther • . 4526 Page boul.

Coste, Miriam 48 Nicholson pi.

Curtis, Edward Glion 2140 Lafayette av.

Denton, Francis Douglas 5404 Maple av.

Glasgow, Clemens Knglesing .... 2847 Washington av.

Hellmuth, Edgar Philip 3107 Brantner pi.

Hunt, Jennie Ida 74 Vandeventer pi.

Huse, Mary 4047 West Belle pi.

Kammerer, Edward Charles .... 2724 Dayton st.
Kenney, Willis Pritchard 3628 Finney av.



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28 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

IfAMSS. RS8IDB1ICK.

Levy, Maurice Frank 4452 Washington boul.

Martin, James Saronel 5620 Minnesota av.

Mitchell, riara Fanita Kirk wood, Mo.

Sale, Llewellyn 5115 Westminster pi.

Samuel, Newman 3407 Washington av.

Schanll, Hans lM4S.4th8t.

Sessingiiaus, Eugene Frederick . . . 2901 Ran scheni)achav.

Snow, Roger Don 4171 Shenandoah av.

Steidemann, Oscar Franklin . . . . 41 ION. 11th st.
Weidmann, William C'iiristopher . . . Belleville, Ills.

White, Philip Benajah Kirkwood, Mo.

Wilderman, Eunice Emma Belleville, Ills.

Total. 27.
FRESHMAN CLASS.

Anderson, Biron Corwin 4025 Morgan st.

Bischoff, Julius Montgomery . . . .2714 Russell av.
Brown, George Herbert Mather . . . Kirkwood, Mo.

Clayton, Burkett Sale Kirkwood, Mo,

Cram, I/croy Vernon 6813 Von Versen av.

Dennis, Arthur Edward Belleville, His.'

DeWolf, Herbert 5469 Bartmer av.

Drabelle, Herschel John 4524 McPherson av.

Evens, Edward Paul 1861 N. Market st.

Farrar, Christy Morgan 6024 Emma av.

Gayler, Linuie 2917 Henrietta st.

Grine, Henry Adam 3627 Weber road.

Harnett, Lylian Vernon Wellston, Mo.

Harris, William John, Jr 3514 Lucas av.

Hathaway, Frank Bacon Denisou, Texas.

Hoffmann, Philip George 2309 University st.

Homsby, Francis Evremont . . . . 6615 Michigan av.

Jones, Sargeant 4122 Juniata st.

Kayser, Oiga 2322 S. Compton av.

KIssack, Alfred Broughton 5709 Vernon av.

Leschen, Arthur Adolph 8616 Palm st.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 29

NAMES. RE8IDBNCS.

Lockwood, Richard John 2731 Lawtoii av.

Long; Lyda 1122 Leonard av.

Niesen^ Adela Julia St. Louis Co.

Niplier, Edith Cope 3021 Dicltson st.

Pritcliard, John Cliarles 4245 Evans av.

Rice, Charles Marcus 3733 West Pine l)oul.

Rosenberg, Gabriel Llewellyn .... 909 Morrison av.

Schaum, Arthur Henry 1429 Penrose st.

Schnurmacher, Stella 36(>fi Flora av.

Stevens, Benjamin Chandler . . . . 2807 Russell av.

Thomas, Woodlief Franklin, Tenn.

Tittmann, George Fabian 2732 Russell av.

Toensfeldt, Kurt 2203 Park av.

Valier, Charles Eugene 43r>2 Washington boul.

Washington, Francis Joseph . . . . 1321 N. 14th st.

Woods, Helen Elizabeth 0211 Virginia av.

Total, 37.

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES NOT CLASSIFIKD.

Bovie, Ellzabetii 3940 West Belle pi.

Clute, Marion Morrill 4808 Ilammett pi.

Greensfelder, Ella Belle Central, Mo.

Jenkins, Elizabeth Backus Kirkwood. Mo.

Lawton, Rachel 25 N Spring av.

Lyon, Aimee Henrietta 41. ')7 West Belle pi.

Miller, Arthur Carl Webster .... 3628 Cass av.

Richey, (iuida Hoen 555.5 Cabanne pi.

Trueblood, Alva Cooper 939 Ailanthus st.

Total, 9.

SPECIAL STUDENTS.

Ahrens, Leo 102() S. 9tli st.

Ronton, May Innes 2909 Park av.

Brownson, Winnie i^.lla Belleville, 111.

Chaplin, Susan Elizabeth,A.B., 1897 . 303(5 West Pine boul.



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30 WAflHINGTOK UNIVEHSITT.

3«AMB8. BXSIDKNCK.

Gladfelter, Llsbeth M 4720 N. 20th St.

Golsan, I^ila Belle 4008 Delmar boul.

Greeiisfelder^ Hattie Ceatral, Mo.

Hart, William Augustus 19 Portland pi.

llempelmann, Walter Leo 1438 N. 9th st.

Holtnau, Charles Henry 3744 Finney av.

Klem, Mary Jeanette 1940 Arsenal st.

Koken, William Theodore, Jr. ... 3522 Hawthorne boul.

Lang, (Jeorge, Jr. 6206 Washington av.

Langenberg, Carl Haynes 5240 Washington av.

Lee, Wayne 4400 Westminster pi.

Miller, Nelda 3628 Cass av.

Orr, Joan Campbell 5608 Cabanne av.

Phillips, Bertha . 5617 Clemens av.

Piednoir, Hector A., Jr 4247 Laclede av.

Plant, Jolin William, Jr 8431 Caroline st.

Ravold, Edward .lames 2806 Morgan st.

Seaver, Helen 6706 Vernon av.

Shoenberg, Sidney Melville .... 3943 West Pine boul.

Splegellialter, Klla 2166 Lafayette av.

Tuholske, Rose 2837 Locust st.

Van Vieck, James Brackett,B.S., 1900,

N. Y. Univ. 4905 Lotus av.

Wallace, Isabel 2930 Laclede av.

Warren, William Homer 6535 Von Versen av.

Warren, Lucy S 5635 Von Versen av.

Wells, Harry Prescott 1833 Cass av.

Witt, John William Warrenton, Mo,

Total, 31.

CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES.

FOR THE DRGKEK OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY.

Webber, Herbert J.,

B.S., Univ. of Neb., 1889.

A.M., Uulv. of Neb., 1890. Botany . Washington, D. C.



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UNDERGSADUATE DEPARTMENT.



31



FOR THR DROHKK OF MASTRR OF ARTS.

Adams, Grace,

' A.B., Wash. Univ., 1898 . History .... St. Louis.
Gilbert, Heleu,

A.B., Wash. Univ., 1897 . History .... St. Louis.
Hospes, Cecilia Lizzette^

A.B., Wash. Univ., 1896 . German .... St. Louis.
Trail, Mary Wilson,

A.B., Wash. Univ., 1900 . History .... St. Louis.
White, Klizal^eth M.,

A.B., VassarColl., 1882 . Botany . . . . St. Louis.
Wittier, William Stephen,

A.B., Wash. Univ., 1898 . History .... St. Louis.

FOR TUR DRQRRE OF MAHTRR OF SCIRNCE.

Langsdorf, Alexander Suss,

B.S., Wash. Univ., 1898 . Elec. and Mag. . . St. Louis.
Selby, Augustine Dawson,

B.8., Ohio SUteUniv., 1893 Botany .... St. Louis.

Totol, 9.

SUMMARY.



Seniors 80

Juniors 18

Sophomores 27

Freshmen 37

112

Candidates for degrees not classified 9

Special Students 31

Candidates for Advanced Degrees 9



Total



IGl



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WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION PROVIDED IN THE
UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT.

GREEK.
Professor Waterhonse. Three times a week.

1. Herodotus (selections).

2. Homer (selections). Isocrates: T lie Panegyric.

3. Demosthenes on the Crown; Thucydides (selections).

4. Selections from the Tragedians.

5. Selections from the Tragedians.

6. Plato (selections).

LATIN.
Professor Jarkson. Three times a week.

1. Livy: Second Punic War. Books XXI-XXX.

2. Horace: Odes and Epodes; Satires and Epistles (selections).

3. Cicero: Philosophical Works (selections) : letters.

4. Plautus, Terence, Juvenal (selections).

5. Tat^itus: Annals and Histories (selections).

(>. Suetonius: Seneca: Moral Essays; Qulntiliau.

7. Seneca: Tragedies; Martial: Epigrams; Lucretius.

8. Pliny: Letters; Catullus, TibuUus, Propertius (selections).

ENGLISH.

Professor Dixon.

1. The elementary laws of all writing. Canons of correct usage
in language. The function of grammars and dictionaries.
Analysis of sentences. English Idioms — auxiliary verbs,
conditional sentences, relative pronouns, etc. Literary
forms — the paragrapli, article, essay. The rules of
letter-writing. Exercises In composition and analysis.
Three times a week.



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COrRSES OF INSTRUCTION. 33

2. Modern English prose, especially in the departments of narra-

tive and exposition. Framing of synopses and abstracts.
Exercises in joamalistic paragraphs. Three times a loeek.

3. English prose from Sidney and Drydeu to Arnold, Newman

and Lowell. Lectures on the development of English
prose. Three times a week.

4. Modem poetry: Keats, Tennyson, Browning. Sonnet litera-

ture. Twice a iceek.
The laws of versiflcatiou, with exercises. Once a week.

5. Oratory as a branch of literature. The composition of an

oration. Study of Bacon^s essays. Twice a week.
Rise and growth of the English novel. Exercises in story-
writing. Historyof journalism and the essav. Once a week.

6. Shakespeare; his life and literary career; the quartos and

folios. P^nglish and German editors and commentators;
textual criticism. Critical reading of one play (1900, The
Winter's Tale). Exercises in analyzing the structure of
the play, and the development and Interaction of the
characters. Three times a week.

7. Spenser, Milton (1900, Cow««), Po{)e, Wordsworth. Txoicea

week.
Old English grammar and composition. Lectures on phi-
lology. Once a week.

8. Dialect literature. Ballad literature. Chaucer and Burns.

Twice a tceek.
Seventeenth century prose. Once a week.

GERMAN.

Professor Heller. Three times a week.

1-2. Elementary Courses. Accidence; Translation from Ger-
man into English and from English Into German ; German
Conversation. Reading: Z^r^oA-Ac, derzerb roc bene Krug;
Fischer, die w^andelnde Glocke; Leander, Traiimereien;
Storm, Immense.
Prescribed for Freshmen who did not present Oerman for
admission.

8



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34 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

3-4. German Syntax and Prose Composition: Joynes-Meissner ;
r. JftfjetiMnn. German conversation, based upon the
boolcs read. Reading: SUfter, das Heidedorf; Freytagy
der Kronprinz; V. F. Meyer, Gustav Adolf s Page; Schil-
ler, Willieim Tell, and one or two sliort comedies.

5-6. Composition continued. Outline of tlie History of German
Literature from its beginnings to tlie death of Goethe.
Reading: Lessing, Minna von Bamhelm; Goethe, Her-
mann und Dorothea, Iphigenie auf Tauris; ^cAt7^, Bal-
lads ; das Lied von der Gloclte ; Wallenstein.

7-8. Outline of the History of German Literature from 1832-
1900. Reading: Selected works of Heine, Uhland, Geibely
Auerbachj Ilebbel, Keller, Heyse, Wildenbruchy Baumbach,
Seidel, iSudertnann, Ilauptmann, and other writers.
Written and oral reports on outside reading.

9-10. History of German Literature from the oldest times to
the present day. A lecture course.

11-12. Tlie metrical works of Goethe. An introduction to the
systematic study of a great writer. One and a half terms
are devoted to Fd%i8t, I. and II. ; the remaining half-term
is given to a more cursory study of Goethe^s other master-
pieces in verse.

18-14. History of the German Language. An introduction to
the study of Germanic Philology. Middle-High-German
Grammar. ^e9k6mg'. Nibelungenlied; ITartmann von Aue,
der arme Heinrich; Walther von der Vogelweide.

Students are advised to take History 5 before electing German
5,ori)-10.

In place of the works quoted as reading texts for the above
courses, others of like degree of difficulty are frequently substituted.

The basal idea underlying the programme is the ultimate estab-
lishment of two parallel courses of four years each: one the usual
full German course offered to undergraduates of Anglo-American
parentage^ and the other a four years'* undergraduate course for
German-American students and such others as enter college with
the knowledge of German necessary for the work.



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 36

Courses 5-1 4 are conducted in German,

Courses 9-14 are offered primarily to students of German par-
entage. Although^ for the present, only tioo of the six can be given
each year, it is not impossible for any German-speaking undergrad-
uate to coniinue advaticed German through his entire college
course.

FRENCH.
Mr, Douay. Three times a week.

1. Elementary course : Pronunciation, elementary grammar, easy

colloquial French.

2. Elements of syntax. Reading and translation of French prose.
A modern French comedy will be read as part of Course 2.
Courses 1 and 2 are prescribed for Freshmen who did not

present French for admission.
Reading, conversation, dictation. French syntax. Trans-
lation of English into French.
4. Reading. Conversation. Study of Idioms. Elements of

French composition. Outside reading.
5-0. Brief account of the development of French literature to

the XVII. century. French literature of the XVII.

century with illustrative readings. French essays on

literary subjects.
7-8. French literature of the XVIII. and XIX. centuries, with

illustrative readings. French essays.
Courses 5-0, 7-8, are conducted in French. Becitations and
lectures.

LOGIC.

Professor Dixon. Three times a week.

Province of Logic. Terms. Extension and intension; Logic
and language. Propositions and their conversion; the
predicable; division and definition. The Syllogism ; reg-
ular, irregular, and compound conditional arguments.
Fallacies and the best methods of treating them. Argu-
ment in orations and general literature.



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36 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITT.

ECONOMICS.
Mr. Hoxie. Three times a week.

I. Elementary Courses.

1. Descriptive EcoDomics. A course In tlie development

and structure of industry.

2. Trinciples of Economics. An introduction to Eco-

nomic Tlieory.

3. Practical Economics. A brief descriptive and tlieo-

retical discussion, with special reference to the
influence of machinery and transportation.

II. Intermediate Courses.

4-5. Economic Tlieory and Practice. A further study of
Economic principles and a brief consideration of
important practical problems.
III. Advanced Courses.

G. Methods of Investif^ation. A course intended to give
traininj; in the assembly of materials, weighing of
evidence, use of statistics, organization of material
and writing.
7. Advanced b^conomics. Investigation of selected topics
in Economic history, theory and practice.
Coitrsett I and 'J are open to all college students except Fresh-
men; course S is giren only to students of the Schotd of Engi-
net'ring; course 4 is opni to all students icho have taken courses
7 and 2 ; cottrses ;"> and 6 are intended only for students who have
taken courses 2, 2 and -/, or their equivalents, and who are
approved by the instructor.

HISTORY.
Professor Snow. Three times a week.

1. England from Henry VII. to the end of the Stuart Period.

2. England; Modern Period.

3. France under the Bourbon Kings to the Revolution.

4. France: The Revolution and the Empire.



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COUR8KS OF INSTRUCTION. 37

6. Mediaeval Germany ; The Holy Roman Empire to tlie Peace
of Westpiialia.

6. Eastern Europe since tlie Fall of the Western Empire.

7. Constitutional History; Constitution of the United States;

Comparison of American and Euroi)ean Governments.

8. Elements of International Law, with Study of Treaties.

Half Course.

9. General European History; Review and Discussion. Half

Course.

HISTORY OF ART.
Mr. Holmes Smith. Three times a week.,

1. Ancient Art: Development of Architecture, Sculpture and

Decoration in Ancient Egypt, Chaldaca, Assyria, Persia,
Greece.

2. Roman and Mediaeval Art: Early Christian, Romanesque,



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