Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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the same subject without the consent of the Dean.

The following courses are open to Freshmen : —

Greek, 1, 2.
Latin, 1,2.
English, 1, 2.
German, 1, 2.
French, 1, 2.
History, 1,2.
Mathematics, 1, 2.
Drawing, 1, 2.
PliysicH, 1,2.
Chemistry, 1,2.
Botany, 1, 2.

.4 Freshman who is qnaiitied to taite a higher course in any
study named above may do so, with the permission of the In-
structor in the course and the Dean of the College.

* The liffures indicate tlic numbers of the Courses of Instruction.
See pp. H2-49.



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54 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR YEAIiS.

The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Juuior Years
consists of : —

English; Courses 3^ 4 and 5^ 6.

Besides the prescribed courses every Sophomore and every
Junior is itiquired to take each term four elective courses, or an
equivalent amount of courses and half courses.

SENIOR YEAR.
Eight courses, all elective, are required in the Senior year.

CHOICE OF STUDIES.

Every student is required to give notice in writing to
the Dean of the College on the first day of each term
of his choice of studies for that term.

Changes may be made only by permission of the Dean,
to whom application must be made in writing, with a full
statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any course for
which his previous training has not fully prepared him.

requiremp:nt for the degree of bach-

ELOR OF ARTS.

The satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses of
one term each, with three recitations a week (or their
equivalent), is necessary for the degree of Bachelor of
Arts.



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THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERINCJ.

Admission.

Candidates for admission to the School of Engineering
will present themselves for examination on Monday,
June 17, 1901, in room No. 8, east wing of the Univer-
sity Building, at J) o'clock a. m. A second examination
will be held on Tuesday, September 24, for such candi-
dates as cannot be present in June.

Division of the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take the
entire examination at one time; or he may divide it (1)
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year; provided he is prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other institutions are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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66 WASHINGTON UNIVER8ITT.

Requikements for Admission to the Freshman Class.

I. Elements of English, Neat and readable handwrit-
ing ; correct spelling, punctuation and use of cap-
itals ; proper construction of sentences ; clearness
and conciseness of expression.

Candidates are advised to study the following: A
grammar containing a clear and simple system of analysis
of sentences such as is foand in Longman's School
Orammary Shaltespeare's Merchant of Venice, Addison's
Roger de Coverley papers from TAe Spect-ator, Gold-
smith's Vicar of Wakefield, George Eliot's Silas Mar-
neTj Longfellow's Evangeline, and Emerson's essays on
Friendship, Manners, Compensation, History, Character.

II. Algebra^ including radicals and equations of the
second degree.

III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry. Wells* or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IV. Language,* a, 6, c, or d,

a, French. Facility in reading ordinaiy prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into French.

b, German. Facility in reading ordinary prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into German.

* It is assumed Ihat a thorough course in any one of these languages
extending over two years of, say, thirty-flve weeks each, three hours a
week, or its equivalent, will be suflicient to prepare a candidate to meet
the above requirement.



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THE SCHOOL OF BN6INBEBING. * 67

c. Spanish. Facility in reading ordinary prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into Spanish.

d. Latin. In place of a modern language an
acquaintance with Latin acquired by two years*
successful study will be accepted. This should
comprise : First, in grammar, a good knowledge
of etymology and syntax, special attention
being given to inflections and the construction of
cases and moods ; second, the translation of four
books of Caesar or equal amounts of such equiv-
alents as Nepos and Sallust. Reading of easy
Latin at sight may be substituted for two books
of Caesar.

V. History, Of the United States and of England such
as is found in any text-book on history intended
for the use of preparatory schools.

N. B. — In j)lace of the work in the History of England,
an equivalent amount of work in the history of some
otlier country, in Ancient History, or In General History
will be accepted.

VI. Elementary Physioi. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books as
Gage's "Introduction to Physical Science," or
Appleton's *' School Physics.'*

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
'' Text-book of Physics."



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58 * WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL
OF ENGINEERING.

The courses of study in the School of Engineering are
five in number : —

I. Civil Enginekuing.
II. Mechanical Engineering.

III. Electrical Engineering.

IV. Chemistry.

V. Science and Literature.
VI. Architecture.

♦FRESHMAN YEAK.
The same for all Courses.
first term.
English, l.t Mathematics, i.

German, 1 or i ,^* Physics, 1.

French, 1 J Chemistry, 1.

History, 1. Drawing, 1.

second term.



English, 2. Matliematics, 2.

German, 2 or 1 Physics, 2.

French, 2. / Cliemistry, 2.

History, 2. Drawing, 2.



* In the School of Knpineering all the studies for each course are
prescribed; there is no choice except as indicated.

** German is required of those who present French for admission :
French of those who present German.

t The ligures indicate the numbers of the Courses of Instruction. See
pp. 32-49.



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STUDI1«:8 IN THE SCHOOL OF EN6INKKBING.



60



SOPHOMORE YEAR.

The same for all Courses.

KIK8T TKKM.

Chemistry, 3.
Drawing;, 3.

Descriptive Geometry, 1.
Civil Engineering, 1.

8KCON1) TKKM.

Geology, 1.

Descriptive Geometry, 2.

Civil Engineering, 2.



German, 3 or^
Frencli, 3 i
Matliematics, 3.
Pliysics, 3.

Matliematics, 4.
Mechanics, \.
Physics, 4.
Chemistry, 4.

N. B. — In addition to the above, vShop-work 1-2 (3 hours a
week) is required of students who have not had Shop-work
before admission.

I. CIVIL ENGINEERING.



Mathematics, 5.
Mechanics, 2.
Piiysics, 5.
Botanv, 8.



FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.
(See above.)

JUNIOR YEAR.

KIHST TKKM.

Civil Engineering, 3.



Mechanics, 3.

Physics, 6.

Mechanical Engineering, 4.

Civil Engineering, 8.



Civil Engineering, 5.
Civil Engineering, (5.
Civil Engineering, 7.

SECOND TKKM.

Civil Engineering, 9.
Civil Engineering, 12.
Civil Engineering, 13.



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60 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TRRM.

Mechanics, 4. Civil EnglDeeriug, 4.

Mechanical Engineering, 19. Civil Engineering, 10.

Astronomy, 1. Civil Engineering, 11.

Economics, 3. Botany, 16.

SECOND TERM.

Mechanics, 6. Civil Engineering, 16.

Astronomy, 2. Civil Engineering, 17.

Civil Engineering, 15. Civil Engineering, 18.

Civil Engineering, 19.

II. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

AND

III. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.

(See p. 58.)
JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mathematics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 1.

Mechanics, 2. Mechanical Engineering, 2.

Physics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 5.

Civil Engineering, 3. Mechanical Engineering, 7.

N. B. — Students wiio have not had instruction in Shop-work
before admission are required to omit Mechanical Engineering
7, and for a part of Mechanical Engineering 5 to sabstitnte
Shop worlc 3.

SKCOXI) TERM.

Mechanics, 3. Mechanical Engineering, 3.

Physics, 6. Mechanical Engineering, 4.

Civil Engineering, 12. Mechanical Engineering, 6.

Civil Engineering, 14. Mechanical Engineering, 8.

N. B. — Students who have not had instruction in Shop-work
before admission are required to substitute Shop- work 4 for
Civil Engineering 14.



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STl'DIBS IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 61

II. MECHANICAL EN(;iNEERING.
SENIOR YEAR.

FIH8T TKUM.

Mechanics^ 4. Mechanical Eugineerinp:, 9.

Physics, 7. Meclianical Eiigineerlnpj, 10.

Physics, 8. Mechanical Enj<ineering, U.

Mechanical Engineering, 19. Mechanical Engineering, 17.

SECOND TKHM.

Mechanics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 16.

Mechanical Engineering, 11. Mechanical Engineering, 18.

Mechanical Engineering, 12. Thesis.
Mechanical Engineering, 13.

N. B. — Students who have not had instruction in Shop-work
before admission are required to take Civil Engineering 14, in
addition to the above.

III. ELECTRICAL EN(UNEEKING.
SENIOR YEAR.

FIHHT TKUM.

Mechanics, 4. Mechanical Engineering, '.).

Physics, 7. Mechanical Engineering, 10.

Pliysics, 8. Mechanical Engineering, lo.

Pliysics, 9. Mechanical Engineering, 19.

SK('()Nl> TKHM.

Mechanics, 5. Mechanical Engineering, 11.

Physics, 10. Mechanical Engineering, 12.

Physics, 12. Thesis.
Physics, 14.

N. B. — Students who have not had instruction in Shop-work

before admission are required to take Civil Engineering 14 in
addition to the above.



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62



WASHINGTON UNIVBBSITY.



Mathematics, 5
Mechanics, 2.
Pliysics, 5.
Chemistry, 5.



IV. CHEMISTRY.

FRKSHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.

(See p. 58.)
JUNIOR YEAR,

KIUST TKKM.

Chemistry, 7.
Chemistry, 13.
Botany, 1.



Mechanics, 3.
Pliysics, 6.
Cliemistry, 6.
Chemistry, 8.



Physics, 7.
Cliemistry, 9.
Chemistry, 11.



SKCOND TKKM.

Chemistry, U.
Chemistry, 15.
Mechanical Engineering;, 4.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TKRM.

Chemistry, 16,
Botany, U>.



SKCOND TKHM.

Botany, 1/.

Thesis.



Chemistry, 10.
C'hemistry, 12.
Cliemistry, 17.

V. scm^x^E and literature.

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS.
(See p. 58.)
JUNIOR YEAR.
The worii of the Junior year consists of nine courses, all
elective. The choice of studies must be approved by the Dean
of the School of Enj^ineeriug at tlie beginning of each terra.
SENIOR YEAR.
The work of the Senior year consists of nine courses, all
elective. The choice of studies must be approved by the Dean
of the School of Engineering at the beginning of each term.



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UNDERGEADUATE DEPAKTMENT. 63



COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE.

A four-years' course in Architecture will be added to
the curriculum of the School of Engineering in September,
1901. The following is a preliminary statement of the
work, subject to such modifications as may seem ad-
visable.

Students may undertake the work of the Freshman and
Sophomore years of this course in September, 1901 ; but
no instruction in the Junior and Senior years of the
course will be given before September, 1902.

INSTRUCTION TO BE PROVIDED.

ARCHITECTUKE.

1 . History of Ancient Architecture. Egyptian, Assyrian, Persian,

Greek, Roman. Three times a week. Every third year.
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors totjether.

2. History of Mediaeval Architecture. Byzantine, Roman-

esque, Gotliic. Three times a week. Every third year.
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors to(/€ther.

3. History of Renaissance and Modern Architecture. Tlic

Renaissance, Modern Revivals, Oriental and American
Architecture. Once a week. Every third year. S(fpho-
mores, Juniors, and Seniors together.

4. The Elements of Architecture. Analysis of the Five Orders

of Classic Architecture and exercises in drawing and
rendering them. One lecture or recitation, and six hours
drawing a iceek.

5. The Elements of Architecture. Analysis of the elements

employed in Classic and Renaissance Design, and ex-
ercises in drawing and rendering them. Mouldings,



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64 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

pedestals^ pilasters, i)ediments, iuter-coiumniatious,
arches and vaults, imposts, doors, windows, roofs,
spires, steps, stairs, domes. One lerinre or recitation^ and
six hours drawing a week.

6. Elementary Architectural Drawing. Elementary problems in

design, involving tlie use of the orders and tlie elements
of design. Theory of the composition of line drawings.
Rendering of architectural drawings in peu-and-inlv
freehand. Elementary application of India-ink and color
washes to architectural drawings. Sijr hours drateing a
ireek.

7. Sketch Design. Problems to be rendered in the form of

sketch designs in limited time of one or two days. Alter-
nating with course 8. The regular problems in design.
Six hours drawing a week.

8. Design. The development of the principles of compo-

sition and planning by the working out of problems in
design. Alternating with course 7. Ten hours drawing
a week.

9. Sketch Design. Advanced problems to l>e rendered In the

form of sketch designs, in limited time of one or two
days. Alternating with regular problems in design.
Six hours drawing a week.

10. Advanced Design. Application of the principles of pre-

ceding courses to advanced problems in planning and
composition. Eighteen hours drawing a week.

11. Thesis. An extended problem, involving original research

and study in advanced planning and composition, with
memoir and essay on materials and construction.
Twentif-four hours drawing a week.

12. Building Construction. Tiie nature and use of materials

employed in architectural construction. Approved
metliods of modern building. Specitlcations and work-
ing drawings. Lectures. Drawing room work and visits
of inspection. One hour lecture and two hours drawing
a tceekj throughout two years.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 66

13. History of Sculpture and Paiuting. A course of lectures on
the history of sculpture and painting and their relation
to architecture, with researcli and use of text-book.
One lecture a treek'.

DRAWING.

1. Freehand Drawing. Freehand drawing in outline of groups

of objects, both from the objects themselves and from
memory. The accurate observation of form and its cor-
rect expression. The study of proportions and the laws
of perspective involved in freehand drawing from objects.
Freehand drawing and shading from objects with pencil,
pen and inlc, and l)rush. The study of light and shade as
a means of expressing form on a flat surface. The
methods of suggesting in sketches tlie character of
different materials. Klementary arcliitectural methods
of freehand drawing. Ten hours a week.

2. Practical Freehand Lettering. Practical freehand lettering

for use on plates and working drawings. Greometrical
Drawing. Those problems in construction that are
needed In the study of descriptive geometry, machine
design, etc. Elementary architectural methods of in-
strumental drawing. Ten hours a ioeek.

3. The Making of Tracings and Blue-Prints. Isometric Draw-

ing of Architectural Subjects. The Essentials of Linear
Perspective, with Problems. JSU hours a week.

4. Advanced Ifree-hand Drawing. Drawing in Charcoal from

casts of architectural ornament, and from casts of parts
of human form. Four hours a week.

5. Water-Color Drawing. Drawing in water-color from still-

life and from nature. Four hours a week.

6. Water-C-olor Rendering. Advanced studies in the rendering

of architectural perspectives. Foiir hours a iceek.

7. Drawing from the Antique. Four hours a iceek.



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GO



WASHINGTON LNIVKRSITY.



ARRANGExMENT OF STUDIES.



English, 1.
GermaD^ 1 or 1
French, 1. /
History, 1.

English, 2.
German, 2 or ^
French, 2. /
History, 2.



FRESHMAN YEAR.

FIRST TRKM.

Mathematics, 1.
Pliysics, 1.
Chemistry, 1.
Drawing, 1.*

SECOND TRRM.

Mathematics, 2.
Pliysics, 2.
Chemistry, 2.
Drawing, 2.*

SOPHOMORE YEAR.



FIRST TERM.

German, 3 or i Drawing, 3.*

French, 3. J Architecture, 1.

Mathematics, 3. Architecture, 4.
Descriptive Geometry, I.

SECOND TERM.

Mathematics, 4. Descriptive Geometry, ;

Mechanics, 1. Architecture, 1.

Physics, 4. Architecture, 6.

Geology,!. Architecture, 6.



Matliematics, 5.
Mechanics, 2.
Drawing, 4.*
Drawing, 5.*



JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Architecture, 2.
Architecture} 7.
Architecture, 8.
Architecture, 12.



* The nj?ures after the courses in Drawing refer to the courses ^iven
on page 65.



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UNDBBGBADUATE DEPARTMENT.



67



Drawing, 4.*
Drawing, 6.*
Architecture, 2.
Arcliitecture, 7.



Architecture, 3.
Architecture, 9.
Architecture, 10.
Arcliitecture, 12.



Architecture, 3.
Architecture, U.
Architecture, 12.
Architecture, 13.



SECOND TERM.

Architecture, 8.
Architecture, 12.
Civil Engineering, 12.

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Architecture, 13.
Drawing, 6.*
Drawing, 7.*
Mechanical Engineering, 12.

SECOND TERM.

Drawing, 6.*
Drawing, 7.*
Civil Engineering, 16.



APPLIANCES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.

Surreffiiiff InstrumentH, — The equipment includes
three transits for ordinary field work, one altazimuth
instrument for triangulation and astronomical work,
reading to ten seconds of arc on both horizontal and
vertical circles, two engineers' levels, two needle com-
passes, one sextant, one plane table, one 300-foot steel
tape standardized, with all the necessary accompanying
apparatus for field and office. work, such as stadia roils,
level rods, stadia slide rules, chains, tapes, signals, pro-
tractors, parallel rules, etc.

♦ The figures after the conrses in Drawing refer to the courses given
on page 65.



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68 wASHnfGTOx uxivKKsmr.

There is also a complete miniDg transit, adapted to the
use of the stadia, which may be ased for topographical
work if required.

Library^ Models^ and Drawings. — There is a well
sele(;ted working library accessible to students which
they consult freely on assigned topics. There is also
a large assortment of drawings of the most interesting
engineering and architectural structures at home and
abroad. Many photographs and blue prints have been
collected illustrating all the more common styles of
bridges with their details.

The Testhifj Laboratory, — The facilities in the testing
laboratory arc very complete. A floor space of about
2,400 square feet is occupied with the following appli-
ances: Two Richie universal testing machines with a
capacity of 100,000 lbs. and 20,000 lbs., respectively ; a
beam testing machine, with a capacity of 100,000 lbs.
on a length of 24 feet ; two beam testing machines with
a capacity of 6,000 lbs. on a length of five feet with
micrometer deflection measuring apparatus; a column
testing machine with capacity of 1,000,000 lbs. on a length
of 30 ft. or less ; cement testing machines of the Fair-
banks, the Riehle, and the Olsen types; a complete
standard set of German briquet making and testing
machines and scales, with pounding apparatus ; an
cxteiisomcter apparatus reading to ten thousandths of an
incli ; one eight-horse-power steam engine ; one iive-
horse-power dynamo ; one planer and one lathe for iron
work ; one wood planer, one band saw, and one cutting
off circular saw for shaping timber specimens ; two drying



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LNDERGUADIATE DKrAUTMKNT. 69

ovens and three sets of scales ; a dry kiln with steam coil
and exhaust. fan for drying lumber; complete sets of
bench and carpenter's tools, standard gauges, scales, etc.

APPLIANCES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

Drawings and photographs illustrating the best prac-
tice in all branches of mechanical engineering, includ-
ing a number of drawings of the machinery of ships for
the U. S. Navy, and examples of the best practice in
the construction of locomotives, stationary engines, and
machine tools are provided. Students have access to
a small but modem and carefully selected technical
library, and to a number of the best technical journals.

The laboratory contains a steam engine, a Westing-
house air compressor, a Bogart gas and gasoline engine,
a Carpenter steam calorimeter, a pair of Crosby indi-
cators, a planimeter, a tachometer, a Thompson coal
calorimeter, a pyrometer, a complete set of apparatus for
testing lubricants, a standard gas meter, a standard test
gauge, a Prony brake, thermometers, revolution counters,
and such tools as are necessary.

Students have access to the shops of the Manual
Training School, in which they receive a training in the
use and care of metal and wood working tools and
machinery.

APPLIANCES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

The Electrical Engineering Laboratory contains a
high speed Buckeye Engine of twenty horse-power ; two



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70 WASHINGTON UNIVEE8ITY.

Gramme dynamos, the one beiug a series and the other
a shunt-wound machine ; smaller motors of various types ;
voltmeters, amperemeters and galvanometers of various
types and capacities ; a Braekett cradle-ergometer, upon
which one dynamo is mounted, and by which the power
applied to it can be measured ; a Wheatstone bridge ; a
Prony brake ; a Siemens electro-dynamometer ; a mer-
cury column fifty feet in height, which is arranged for
testing steam gauges and indicator springs at any temper-
ature, and a compression air pump capable of working to
twenty atmospheres.

The rooms are wired conveniently for practical meas-
urements upon the electric plant, and for the measure-
ment of candle power of lamps. The alternating current
from the public mains of the Missouri-Edison Electric
Light and Power Company is carried to the laboratory
switchboard, and is thus available for experimental work.

LKCTIJRE FOUNDATIONS.

A Lecture Endowment Fund, amounting to $27,000,
was created in 1875, by one of the early friends of the
University, Mr. William Henry Smith. It was given
without any restrictions, except that the fund should be
increased, if practicable, by accruing interest, to $30,000,
which has been accomplished, and that no part of the
principal should be expended.

The beginning of a fund for the encouragement of
the study of American History has been made by a
gift of $15,000 by Mrs. Mary Hemenway of Boston,
Massachusetts.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 71

Upon this foundation a Unicersittf ProfeasorHhip of
American Uistory has been established, and the chair
was filled in 1884 by the appointment of Dr. John
Fiske, of Cambridge, Mass.

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.

Necessary books of reference are provided, and also
a good selection of periodical literature. No attempt is
made at present to gather a general library. During the
year 1880 a gift of about three thousand volumes was
received from the family of the late Joseph Coolidge, of
Boston. The collection, known as the Coolidge Library,
is especially rich in excellent editions of Italian and
French authors, and is a very material addition to the
usefulness of the library.

Through the liberality of a number of citizens of St.
Louis an arrangement has been made by which the
privilege of using the Mercantile Library has been ex-
tended, under prescribed conditions, to such members of
the University as may be designated by the Chancellor.

GYMNASIUM.

A gymnasium for the use of the Undergraduate De-
partment is supplied with all necessary apparatus. While
encouraging systematic and wholesome exercise, the Uni-
versity does not wish to foster undue interest in the feats
of athletes, and discourages exercises which involve per-
sonal risk to the performers. All class exercises are con-
ducted by a professional instructor.



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72 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



SCHOLARSHIPS.



One perpetual scholarship, founded by the payment of
$5,000 and entitling the holder to all the advantages of
all the departments of the University forever, has been
placed at the disposal of the Mercantile Library Associa-
tion, with the recommendation ^^ that when the applicants
for scholarship are of equal merit, the preference shall be
given to one for some mechanical pursuit."

Two scholarships are also held by the St. Louis High
School, one of which is given to the student graduating



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 53 of 70)