Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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from the school in June with the highest record, and the
other to the student graduating in January with the highest
record. These scholarships entitle the holders to free
tuition in the Undergraduate Department.

One scholarship is also held by the School Board of
Kansas City for the benefit of the graduates of the Kan-
sas City High School. This scholarship entitles the
holder (who is to be selected by the School Board) to
free tuition in the College or the School of Engineering.
Reports of the standing of the student will be made to
said Board annually by the Dean.

A trust fund of $30,000 has been accepted by the
University from the Wkstkun Sanitary Commission, for
the establishment of twenty free scholarships in the
Undergraduate Department, to be filled by children or
descendants of Union soldiers . who served in the late
civil war. In default of such applicants, candidates will
be appointed by the Chancellor of the University with
the advice of the F'aculty. Preference is given to those



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INDKUGRADIJATK DEPAKTMENT. 73

in straitened circumstances, and no student fs accepted or
continued vho is not of (jood moral character^ who does
not sustain satisfactory examinations or who fails to com-
ply tcith the ndes of the University.

From the same source a Sfstkntatiox Fund of $10,-
000 has been accepted, the income of which is expended
in aid of students in straitened circumstances, giving
preference always to the descendants of Union soldiers,
as above.

EXAMINATIONS.

The examinations in the Undergraduate Department
are frequent and rigid. No promotions to higher classes
are made except upon conclusive evidence that the ante-
cedent subjects have been well mastered. Reports of the
standing of individual students will be made by the
Deans to parents or guardians, if such are requested.



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74 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



DEGREES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE
DEPARTMENT.

I. IN THE COLLEGE.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon
the satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses.

II. IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.

1. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred on
the satisfactory completion of four years' work.

2. The professional degrees of Civil Engineer, Mechan-
ical Engineer and Electrical Engineer are conferred only
after three or more years of actual and successful engi-
neering practice, one year of which must have been spent
in responsible charge of engineering work, and the pre-
sentation of an acceptable thesis ; both the thesis and the
experience to be such as to show an ability to design and
execute engineering work.

The Bachelor degrees are in three grades indicated by
the words cum laude^ magna cum laude and summa cum
laude, respectively.

Every member of the graduating class who has at-
tained nint'ty per cent of the maximum mark on the
general scale for the four years may be recommended for
a degree suninid cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (not recom-
mended for the degree of sujuma cum laude^ who has



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UNDKRGRADUATK DKPARTMENT. 76

attained eighty-Jive per cent of the maximum mark on the
general scale for the four years may be recommended for
a degree magna cum laude.

Every member of the graduating class (not recom-
mended for a degree of summa or magna cum laude) who
has attained eighty per cent on the general scale for the
four years may be recommended for a degree cwm laude »

No student will be recommended for a degree who has
not passed all his examinations and handed in such
projects or theses as may be required.

The diploma fee is three dollars, payable in advance.

ADVANCED DEGREES.

The degree of Master of Arts^ which is granted after
not less than one year of residence and study, is open to
all who have received from this University the degree of
Bachelor of Arts.

The degrcQ of Master of Science, which is granted after
not less than one year of residence and study, is open to
all who have received from this University the degree of
Bachelor of Science, of Civil Engineer, of Mechanical
Engineer, of Electrical Engineer, .of Engineer of Mines,
or of Chemist.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy, which is granted
after not less than two years of residence and study (the
two years of residence and study may include the year of
preparation for the Master's degree), is open to all who
have received the degree of Master from this University.

The degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, and
Doctor of Philosophy are open to graduates of other



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76 washin(;tox vnivkksity.

institutions who shall have satisfied the Committee on
Advanced Degrees of their fitness.

Applications for candidacy for the degree of Master of •
Arts, Master of Science, or Doctor of Philosophy are
referred to a committee of five members of the Faculty of
the Undergraduate Department, annually appointed,
known as the Committee on Advanced De/jreen,

The Committee decides upon the admission of the can-
didate ; determines the course of study which the candi-
date is to pursue; determines by examination, thesis, or
both, whether a candidate is suitably prepared for the
degree ; and recommends the granting of the degree to
the Faculty of the Undergraduate Department.

REQl'IKKMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE.

(/. At least one year of residence and study.

h. Every candidate must pass such written examina-
tions as the Committee on Advanced Degrees may see fit
to prescribe.

f. In addition to the work specified in each case, every
candidate shall present a satisfactory thesis, which must
be submitted not later than May 1 of the year in which
the degree is to be conferred.

RECiriKKMENTS F'OR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE.

(t. Two years of residence and study.

h. PL very (candidate must satisfy the Committee -on
Advanced Degrees that he has a reading knowledge of
French and German.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. i i

c. Every candidate shall present an acceptable thesis,
which shall be the result of original investigation. This
thesis must be presented not later than April 1 of the
year in which the degree is to be conferred ; and every
candidate must furnish the Committee on Advanced
Degrees with 200 printed copies of his thesis, after its
acceptance, before he can be recommended for the degree.

FEES .

Every candidate for the Master's degree is required to
pay flfty dollars, and every candidate for the Doctor's
degree one hundred dollars ; one half to be paid as a con-
dition of admission to candidacy, and ttie remainder
before the conferring of the degree.

The diploma fee is five dollars, payable in advance.

COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED DEGREES FOR 1900-1901.

The following members of the Faculty constitute the
Committee for 1900-1901: Professors Snow (chairman),-
Nipher (secretary), Engler, Heller, and Keiser.

TUITION.

Tuition in the Undergraduate Department for students
in full standing is $150 a year, payable semi-annually,
in advance if required, and always before the middle of
the term.

A matriculation fee of five dollars, payable in advance,
is required of all candidates for degrees.

Tuition for special students is $.15.00 for each course.



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78 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

BOARD AND LODGING.

Students living at a distance from the University have
no difficulty in securing rooms and board at reasonable
rates. The yearly expenses may range between the fol-
lowing estimates, according to taste and habits of
economy : —

Tuition $150 (K) — $150 00

Board, lodging, and washing, 9 montlin . . 200 00 to 3<J0 00

Books and instruments 10 00 *» 20 00

Incidentals 15 00 *' 30 00

Total for one year $375 00 to $500 00

Books and instrument's may be obtained at cost from
the ('o-fjperntivp AssfjciatioN, organized and managed by
the students of this Department.



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.



(A DBFARTMBNT OF WASHINGTON I^NIVKRSITY.)



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.

BSTABLTSIIBD JUNK 8, 1885.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

THE CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY, ex officio,

WILLIAM G. FARLOW,M.I).

GEO. J. ENGELMANN,M.1>.

GEORGE E. LEIGHTON.

WILLIAM L. HI SE.

INSTRUCTORS.
WILLIAM TRELEASE,

DIRKCTOR AND
ENOKLMANN PROFKSSOR OK BOTANY.

HERMANN VON SCHRENK,

INSTRICTOR IN CRYPTOOAMIC BOTANY.

HERBERT F. ROBERTS,

(JKNKRAL lNHTRrCT(»R.

ELLEN (\ CLARK,

ASSISTANT AT TIIK MARY INSTITI'TK.



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 81



GENERAL INFORMATION.

In June, 1885, Mr. Henry Shaw, of St. Louis, author-
ized the Chancellor of the University to place before the
Board of Directors a plan of action for the establishment
of a School of Botany, as follows : —

That he proposed, with the concurrence of the Direct-
ors, to endow a School of Botany as a department of
Washin^n University, by donation of improved real
estate, yielding over $6,000 revenue, and to place it in
such relation with the largely endowed Missouri Botanical
Garden and Arboretum as would practically secure their
best uses, for scientific study and investigation, to the
professor and students of the said School of Botany, in
all time to come.

At a meeting of the Board of Directors held June 8,
1885, the following resolutions were, therefore, offered, in
grateful acceptance of Mr. Shaw's proposal : — ;

1. That a School of Botany be established as a special depart-
ment of Wasliington University, to be known as the Henry
Shaw School of Botany.

2. That a professorship of Botany Ixj therein established, to
i>e linown as the Eugelraann Professorsliip.

3. That Professor Wm. Trelease, of the University of Wis-
consin, be invited to fill the same; liis duties to begin at the
commencement of tlie next academic year, September 17.

4. That said School of Botany lie placed under the special
care and direction of an advisory committee, to consist of live
members, of whom two shall be meml)ers of tliis Board, and
two shall be selected outside of the Board — the Chancellor of
the Univei-sity being a member ex officio.

6



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82 WASHINGTON TNIVERSITY.

This rejx)rt was accepted aud the resolution unani-
mously adopted. The record of such action was then
submitted to Mr. Shaw and approved by him.

On this foundation, the School of Botany was opened
ill the autumn of 1885. In his will, admitted to probate
in 1881), Mr. Shaw further provided for the maintenance
. of the income of the School up to a certain limit, and
toolc steps calculated to secure the proposed close co-
operation between the School of Botany and the Botanical
Garden.

The laboratory of the School of Botany is temporarily
located at 1724 Washington avenue, and a small library,
containing the usual laboratory manuals and class books,
which is kept at the laboratory for reference, is added to
as new books, needed for class use, appear. In addition
to alcoholic aud imbedded material, a small herbarium is
being formed, which is intended to contain representatives
of the local flora. Advanced students, some of whose
work is done at the (Jarden, also have the privilege of
consulting, under necessary restrictions, the excellent
herbarium and library maintained there, and now compris-
ing about 350,000 sheets of specimens, about 35,000
books and pamphlets, and a large collection of wood
veneers and sections ; aud no effort is spared to make the
Garden eciuipmeut as complete as possible in any line of
work taken up by competent investigators.

The instrumental ecpiipment of the laboratory includes
one microscope l)v Zeiss, with the necessary objectives,
riingiug from AA. to 1-18 in. oil immersion, and acces-
sories fr)r spo(ttr(>s(M>pic studies and work with polarized



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 83

light; twenty microscopes by Leitz, with the objectives
needed for the best work (including five 1-12 in. oil
immersion lenses, one 1-16 in. oil immersion, and one
1-20 in. oil immersion), polariscope, camera lucidas of
several patterns, etc. ; sixteen dissecting microscopes by
Bausch and Lomb ; two dissecting microscopes by Leitz,
one of them provided with camera lucida ; a projecting
apparatus for delineating objects under a low power of
enlargement ; a simple outfit comprising all that is neces-
sary for ordinary bacteriological investigation; and good
microtomes and other apparatus needed for histo-
logical work and elementary physiological experimenta-
tion. Students are provided by the laboratory with all
necessary instruments and supplies (excepting razors or
other cutting instruments) without charge except for
breakage or other injury and for slides and cover glasses
used for permanent preparations ; but when alcohol or other
expensive substances are used in quantity, as in work on
bacteria, a special charge may be made for material used.

The working year of the School of Botany is of the
same extent as that of the Undergraduate Department of
the University, and is similarly divided, except for a few
special teachers' classes corresponding to the usual school
terms.

The work offered students is of two classes : under-
graduate studies, including at present seventeen stated
electives — the equivalent of nearly three full years'
work, — and post-graduate or special courses for advanced
students, planned in each case to meet the needs of the
student. For the convenience of students, nearly all ele-



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84 WASHINGTON UNIVEBSITT.

mentary instruction is given at the laboratory, near the
other University buildings, where the principal instru-
mental equipment is kept, but the study of living plant>s,
and advanced herbarium and library work, are provided
for at the Garden. All courses capable of being so
taught are given in the laboratory, and supplemented by
lectures and quizzes by the teacher. The few lecture
courses offered are illustrated wherever possible by speci-
mens exhibiting the subject under consideration, and by
wall charts and the stereopticon.

A list of the undergraduate electives is given above
(p. 32), in the general information concerning the Under-
graduate Department. Under the advice of the Dean of
the College and the Professor of botany, students who
wish to make a specialty of botany through their course
may arrange to take all of these electives and to follow
them by a piece of investigation on which a thesis is to be
based ; and regularly enrolled special students who are
not candidates for a degree may give the greater part of
their time to botanical study, subject to such regulation
as is prescribed by the Faculty.

Special classes for the benefit of teachers, and other
persons not in attendance at the University, are formed
from time to time, and such persons may be admitted to
any of the regular electives on the payment of a tuition
fee conformed to the general rates of the University,
nameh^ $16.00 for each full course (of three exercises
per week during a term), and $7.50 for each half course
(of less than three exercises per week for the same length
of time).



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 85

Graduate students who are eligible under the rules of
the Faculty to candidacy for a higher degree (p. 76), if
suitably prepared, may elect research work in botany, as
their principal study for such degree.

Applications for the formation of special classes, and
all correspondence concerning the School of Botany,
should be addressed to

William Trelkase,

Shaw School of Botany ^

St. Lou is ^ Mo,



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

(art DKPARTMENT of WASHINGTON UNIVKHSITY.)

1 9th ami Locust Streets.



All communications in regard to the Sdiool should he
addressed

St. Louis School ok Fink Arts.



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CALENDAR.

1900-1901.

First Term, Day School, begins Monday, September 24, 1900.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 15, 1900.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November 5,

1900.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, February 2, 1901.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 17,

1900.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 16, 1901.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 4,

1901.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 27, 1901.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, Marcli 18, 1901.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 8, 1901.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 11-13, 1901.

1901-1902.

First Term, Day School, begins Monday, September 23, 1901.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 14, 1901.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November 4, 1901.
First Tekm, Night School, ends Saturday, February 1, 1902.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, Deceml^er 1(5,

1901.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, Marcli 15, 1902.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 3,

1902.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 26, 1902.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 17, 1902.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 7, 1902.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 10-12, 1902.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

RROROANIZBD MAY 22j 1879.



The establishment of the Art School upon a broad and
permanent foundation has always been part of the plan
of Washington University. For nearly twenty-five years
Art instruction has been embodied in the course of study.
In 1876, special students were admitted to the Drawing
Department, and class and public lectures were given on
Art History. The same year an evening school was
opened.

On May 22, 1879, the Directors of the University
adopted an ordinance establishing a Department of Art
in Washington University, from which the following
extracts are taken : —

** A Department of Art is hereby established as a
special Department of Washington University, to be
known as Thk St. Lui is School of Fine Arts.

*' The objects of said Department shall be : Instruction
in Fine -^Vits ; the collection and exhibition of pictures,
statuary, and other works of art, and of whatever else
may be of artistic interest and appropriate for a Public
Gallery or Art Museum ; and, in general, the promotion
by all proper means of sesthetic or artistic education."



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90 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



BOARD OF CONTROL.

ELLIS WAINWRIGHT, President.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, Chancellor, ex officio.

HARRISON I. DRUMMOND.

ALFRED L. SHAPLEIGH.

CHARLES PARSONS.

CHARLES NAGEL.

GEORGE I). BARNARD.

EDWARD R. HOYT.

HALSEY C. IVES, Director, ex officio.



INSTRUCTORS AND LECTURERS.

HALSEY C. IVES, Director.
Lecturer on the Historical Development of Art.
Pupil of Alexander Piatowski.

ROBERT P. BRINGHURST,

Modeling and Sculpture.
Atelier Dumont, I'Ecole des Beaux Arts.

EDWARD M. CAMPBELL,
Dratcing and Painting from Still Life.
Pupil of Bonl anger and Lcfebvre.

ALICE M. MORE, Secretary.

Lecturer on the ffistorg of Painting, Ilfnaissance and Modern SchoolM.
Pupil of the St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

CHARLES WARD RHODES,

Pergpective, Shade^l and Shadotcs.
Kgl. Acad era ie, Munich, and K. K. Kunstgewerbe Schule» Berlin.

EDMUND H. WUERPEL,

Draining awl Painting from Life, and Composition.

Pupil of Bougucreau, Ferrier, A roan -Jean, and I'Ecole des Beaux Arts.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ABTS. 91

CHARLES P. DAVIS,

Antique,
Pupil of N. Y. Art Students' League, Houguereau, Ferrier, and Fleury.

GRACE HAZARD,

Saturday CUvsses.
Pupil of St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

ALICE M. G. PATTISON,

Ltcturer on Engraving, Etching, and Allied Arts.

Pupil of Ross Turner, Wm, M. Chase, and ^ U. Koehler.

ELISE BLATTNER,

Lecturer on the History of Art.

University of Berlin.

LAURENCE EWALD,

Mechanical and Architectural Draicing.
Pupil of Columbia University, N. Y., and Marcel de Montclos, Paris.

CHARLES A. WINTER,

Drawing and Painting from Life, and Composition.

Pupil of Bouguereau and Ferrier.

HENRIETTA ORl) JONES,

Ceramic Painting.

Pupil of Fran2 Bischoff and Otto Punsch.

FREDERICK L. STODDARD,

Design and Water Color.

Pupil of Bouguereau, Ferrier, Laurens, and Constant.

In addition to the regular staff of instructors, pupil teachers are added
from time to time from the advanced students working in the school.



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WASHINGTON UNIVER8ITT.



GENERAL INFORMATION.

There are three terms in the year.

Students will he admitted at any time, hut not for less
than one term, except hy special arrangement with the
Director,

The school furnishes instruction in Drawing, Modeling,
Painting, Artistic Anatomy, Perspective, Composition,
Design and Applied Art, Architectural and Mechanical
Drawing.

The rooms are open for the study of drawing, painting and
modeling, every day during each term from 9 a. ra. to 4
p.m. and for the study of drawing from the Antique and
Life, mechanical drawing and modeling three evenings in
the week, from November to May.

Students may enter any class upon submitting examples
of work showing the necessary skill. Applicants for
admission to the evening Life Class must submit a draw-
ing of a full length figure from the Antique or Life.

Students who can pass the necessary examination may
study Modern Languages, History and Literature in
classes of the Undergraduate Department of the University.

The school is fully equipped with models, casts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms are adjacent to the galleries of the
Museum. The building erected during the past years was
especially designed to meet the needs of the various
classes of the school and, in its appointments, art students
will find every convenience for study.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 93

The artists connected with the school as teachers
have received their training in the Art Schools of Eu-
rope.

All finished tcork must be left in the school or if re-
moved by special permission^ must be returned before the
close of the school year for final examination by the com-
mittee appointed for that purpose.

Instruction in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree of
proficiency only.

An admission fee of $2.00 is charged each student on
enrolling in the classes of the day school.

TUITION FEES.

Tuition Fkks are due and payable to the Treasurer of
Washington University, in advance, on enrollment,
and on the tirst of each term. For convenience, the
Secretary of the school will receive the fee and trans-
mit it to the Treasurer.

Enrollment Feb. Each student pays this fee once . ^2 00
The income from enrollment fees is used in library
extension work. Students withdrawing i)efore the
end of the year in which the fee is paid may continue
the use of the library to the close of the year.

Katks ok TriTiox. Antique, Life and Portrait Classes,'

either or all classes, per term 2.') 00

Kates ok Tuition. Saturday Class, Antique or Sketch

Class, per term 5 00

Students will be admitted to the Day School, per
month, with the privilege of one or more classes per

day, ttrst month 12 50

Each following month during the year 10 00



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94 WASHIXUTOX CXIVKRSITY.

KvKNiNG Life Class. Drawing or Modeling, three times

per week, for tenn of twelve weeks 87 50

EvKNiNG Clahr. Antique or Sketching from Life, three

times per week, for term of twelve weeks .... 5 00
EvKNiNO Class. Elementary, three times per week, for

term of twelve weeks 5 00

EvKNiNG Class. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing,

three times per week, for term of twelve weeks . . 5 00
Evening Class. Modeling, three times per week, for

term of twelve weeks 5 00

(^lasses in design and applied art.

Regularly enrolled Art Students will receive instruction

in Design without extra charge.
For instruction in Applied Art an additional fee, per term,

of 1^7.00 will be charged.
Special students will be admitted to these classes per

term of twelve weeks 825 tK)

Students enrolled for one month, first month .... 12 50

Each succeeding month 10 00

For a period less than one month, including freedom of

Museum and Library, per week 5 00



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 96



ARRANGEMENT OF CLASSES.
MOUNING.

CLASSKS IN THE ANTIQUE.

Drawiug from the Cast, elementary and advanced, daily, 9 to
12 a. m. Charles F. Davis, Instructor.

LIFE CLASS, HVDK AND DRAPED.

Drawing and Palntinsj from the Nude and Costumed Model in
Charcoal, Pastel and Oil Color, daily, to 12 a. m. Edmund



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 54 of 70)