Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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partment has been erected and furnished at a total cost
of about $10,000. The large hall, 50x70 feet and nearly
thirty feet high, heated by steam, is supplied with all
necessary apparatus. While encouraging and even re-
quiring systematic and wholesome exercise, the University
does not wish to foster undue interest in the feats of
athletes, and discourages exercises which involve personal



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96 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

risk to the performers. All class exercises are conducted
by a professional instractor.



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS.

Instraction in Military Science and Tactics is given to
students in the Undergraduate Department, the Smith
Academy and the Manual Training School. First Lieu-
tenant William F. Hancock of Fifth United States Artil-
lery, has been detailed by the War Department for duty
in the University. The cadets are uniformed at their own
expense, and are armed and equipped by the United
States Government. The large hall in the Armory has
been secured, so that the drills may be continued through-
out the winter.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

One perpetxLal scholarship, founded by the payment of
$5,000 and entitling the holder to all the advantages of
all the departments of the University forever, has been
placed at the disposal of the Mercantile Library Associa-
tion with the recommendation *' that when applicants
for scholarship are of equal merit, the preference shall
be given to one for some mechanical pursuit."

One scholarship is also held by the St. Louis High
School which entitles the ranking student of the gradu-
ating class of each year to free admission to the Under-
graduate Department, in accordance with a resolution of
the Board of Directors when the College was organized.

One scholarship is also held by the School Board of
Kansas City for the benefit of a graduate of the Kansas



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THS UNDBRORADUATE DBPARTMENT. 97

City High School. This scholarship entitles the holder
(who is to be selected by the School Board) to free
taition in the College or the School of Engineering.
Reports of the standing of the stadent will be made to
said Board annually by the Dean.

A trust fund of $20,000 has been accepted by the Uni-
versity from the Western Sanitary Commission, for the
establishment of twenty free scholarships in the Under-
graduate Department, to be filled by children or descend-
ants of Union soldiers who served in the late civil war.
[n default of such applicants, candidates will be appointed
by the Chancellor of the University with the advice of
the Faculty. Preference is given to those in straitened
circumstances, and no student is accepted or continued
who is not of good moral character, who does not sustain
itatisfactory examinations, or who fails to comply with the
rules of the Institution.

From the same source a Sostentation Fund of $10,000
has been accepted, the income of which is expended in
aid of students in straitened circumstances, giving pref-
erence always to the descendants of Union soldiers, as
above.

PRIZES IN RHETORIC AND DECLAMATION.

1. A prize of $15 to the Senior or Junior who shall pro-
nounce the best original oration at a public contest in
Memorial Hall on the evening of the third Friday in
April ; and to the second in merit a prize of $10.

2. A prize of $10 to the Sophomore or Freshman who
shall best pronounce a selected declamation at the same



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98 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

place and time as above ; and to the second best in merit
a gift of books.

3. A prize of $15 for the best original ai*ticlQ contrib-
uted to Student Life during the year 1896-96, to be
awarded at the end of the year.

Frizes. were awarded in 1895; —

1. For orations: A first prize to Warren Hilton of the
Senior Class and a second prize to Harry Levy Stern of
the Junior Class.

2. For declamations : A first pi ize to Sue Van Duzer
of the Sophomore Class and a second prize to William
Pettker of the Freshman Class.



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Henry Shaw School of Botany.

(a OBPARTMENT of WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.



RSTABLI8HKD JUNK 8, 1885.



ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

THE CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY, ex officio.
WILLIAM G. FARLOW, M. D.
GEO. J. ENGELMANN, M. D.
GEORGE E. LEIGHTON.
WILLIAM L. HUSE.

INSTRUCTORS.
WILLIAM TRELEASE,

RNOBLMANN PROFRS80R OF BOTANY.

WILLIAM H. RUSH,

GBNRRAL INSTRUCTOR.

ORVILLE L. SIMMONS,

INSTRUCTOR IN CRYPTOGAMIC BOTANY.

ELLEN C. CLARK,

ASSISTANT AT THR MARY INSTITUTK.



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 101



GENERAL INFORMATION.

In June, 1885, Mr. Henry Shaw, of St. Louis, autbor-
ized the Chancellor of the University to place before the
Board of Directors a plan of action for the establishment
of a School of Botany, as follows: —

That he proposed, with the concurrence of the Direct-
ors, to endow a School of Botany as a department of
Washington University, by donation of improved real es-
tate, yielding over $5,000 revenue, and to place it in such
relation with the largely endowed Missouri Botanical
Garden and Arboretum, as would practically secure their
best uses, for scientific study and investigation, to the
professor and students of the said School of Botany, in
all time to come.

At the meetiug of the Board of Directors held June 8,
1885, the following resolutions were, therefore, offered,
in grateful acceptance of Mr. Shaw's proposal: —

1. That a School of Botany be established as a special depart-
ment of Washington University, to be known as the Henry Shaw
School of Botany.

2. That a professorship of Botany be therein established^ to
be known as the Engelmann Professorship.

8. That Professor Wm. Trelease, of the University of Wis-
consin, be invited to fill the same ; his duties to begin at the
commencement of the next academic year, September 17.

4. That said School of Botany be placed under the special
care and direction of an advisory Committee, to consist of five
members, of whom two shall be members of this Board, and
two shall be selected outside of thje Board, — the Chancellor of
the University being a member ex officio.



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102 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

This report was accepted and the resolutions unani-
mously adopted. The record of such action was then
submitted to Mr. Shaw and approved by him.

On this foundation, the School of Botany was opened
in the autumn of 1885. In his will, admitted to probate
in 1889, Mr. Shaw further provided for the maintenance
of the income of the School up to a certain limit, and
took steps calculated to secure the proposed close co-op-
eration between the School of Botany and the Botanical
Garden.

The laboratory of the School of Botany is temporaril}'
located at 1724 Washington avenue, and a small library,
containing the usual laboratory manuals and class books,
which is kept at the laboratory for reference, is added to
as new books, needed for class work, appear. In addition
to alcoholic and imbedded material, a small herbarium is
being formed, which is intended to contain representatives
of the local flora. Advanced students, some of whose
work' is done at the Garden, also have the privilege
of consulting, under necessary restrictions, the excellent
herbarium and library maintained there, and now com-
prising about 250,000 sheets of specimens, something over
20,000 books and pamphlets, and a large collection of
wood veneers and sections ; and no effort is spared to
make the Garden equipment as complete as possible in
any line of work taken up by competent investigators.

The instrumental equipment of the laboratory' includes
one microscope by Zeiss, with the necessary objectives,
ranging from A A to 1-18 in. oil immersion, and accesso-
ries for spectroscopic studies and work with polarized
light ; twenty microscopes by Leitz, with the objectives



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SCHOOL OP BOTANY. 103

needed for the best work (including five 1-2 in. oil immer-
sion lenses* one 1-16 in. oil immersion, and one 1-20 in. oil
immersion), polariscope, camera lucidas of several pat-
terns, etc. ; sixteen dissecting microscopes by Bauscb
and Lomb ; two dissecting microscopes by Leitz, one of
them provided with camera liicida ; a projecting apparatus
for delineating objects under a low power of enlargement ;
a simple outfit comprising all that is necessary for ordinary
bacteriolc^cal investigation ; and the apparatus needed
for histological work and elementary physiological experi-
mentation. Students are provided by the laboratory with
all necessary instruments and supplies (excepting razors
or other cutting instruments) without charge except for
breakage or other injury and for slides and cover glasses
used for permanent preparations; but wlien alcohol or
other expensive substances are used in quantity, as in
work on bacteria, a special charge may be made for
material used.

The working year of the School of Botany is of the
same extent as that of the Undergraduate Department of
the University, and is similarly divided, except for a few
special teachers' classes corresponding to the usual school
terms.

The work offered students is of two classes : under-
graduate studies, including at present fifteen stated
electives, — the equivalent of nearly three full years*
work, — and post-graduate or special courses for ad-
vanced students planned in each case to meet the needs
of the student. For the convenience of students, nearly
all elementary instruction is given at the laboratory, near
the other University buildings, where the principal instni-



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104 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

mental equipineDt is kept, but the study of living plants,
and advanced herbarium and library work, are provided
for at the Garden. All courses capable of being so
taught are given in the laboratory, and supplemented by
lectures and quizzes by the teacher. The few lecture
courses offered are illustrated wherever possible by
specimens exhibiting the subject under consideration,
and by wall charts and the free use of the crayon.

A list of the undergraduate electivcs is given above
(p. 41), in the general information concerning the Under-
graduate Department. Under the advice of the Dean of
the College, and the professor of botany, students who
wish to make a specialty of botany through their course
may arrange to take all of these electives and to follow
them by a piece of investigation on which a thesis is to
be based, and regularly enrolled special students who are
not candidates for a degree may give the greater part of
their time to botanical study subject to such regulation
as is prescribed by the Faculty.

Special classes, for the benefit of teachers and other
persons not in attendance at the University, are formed
from time to time, and such persons may be admitted to
any of the regular electives on the payment of a tuition
fee conformed to the general rates of the University,
namely, $15.00 for each full course (of three exercises
per week during a semester), and $7 50 for each half
course (of less than three exercises per week for the
same length of time). Graduates of the University and
of the Mary Institute are not subject to any charge for
tuition.

Graduate students who are eligible under the rules of



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SCHOOL OF BOTANT. 105

the Facalty to candidacy for higher degrees, if suitably
prepared may elect research work in botany as their
principal study for sach degrees.

Applications for the formation of special classes, and
all correspondence concerning the School of Botany,
should be addressed to

William Tkelease,
Skatv School of Botany,
St. Louis y Mo.



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St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

(art DBPARTMBNT of WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)

lOth Street and Lucas Place.



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CALENDAR.



1895-1896.
First Term, Day SchooL; begins Monday, September 23, 1895.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 14th, 1805.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November 4tli,

1895.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, February 1st, 1896.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 16th,

1895.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 1 4th, 1896.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 3d,

1896.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 25th, 1896.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 16th, 1896
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 6th, 1896.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 9th-llth, 1896.

1896-1897.
First Term, Day School, begins Monday, September 21st, 1896.
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 12th, 1896.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, November 2d,

1896.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, January 30th, 1897.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 14th,

1896.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 13th, 1897.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 1st,

1897.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 24th, 1897.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 15th, 1897.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 6th, 1897.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 8th-10th, 1897.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.



RKORGANIZKD MAT 22, 1879.



The establishment of an Art School upon a broad and
permanent foundation has always been part of the plan
of Washington University. For nearly twenly-five years
Art instruction has been embodied in the course of study.
In 1875, special students were admitted to the Drawing
Department, and class and public lectures were given on
Art History. The same year an evening school was
opened.

On May 22, 1879, the Directors of the University
adopted an ordinance establishing a Department of Art
in Washington University, from which the following ex-
tracts are taken : —

'* A Department of Art is hereby established as a spe-
cial Department of Washington University', to be known
as The St. Louis School of Fink Arts.

"The objects of said Department shall be: Instruc-
tion in the Fine Arts ; the collection and exhibition of
pictures, statuary, and other works of art, and of what-
ever else may be of artistic interest and appropriate for
a Public Gallery or Art Museum ; and, in general, the
promotion by all proper means of sBsthetic or artistic
education."



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BOARD OF CONTROL.



ELLIS WAINWRIGHT, Prbsidbnt.

WINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, Chancbllor, ex officio.

J. G. CHAPMAN.

DANIEL CATLIN.

GEO. E. LEIGHTON.

CHARLES PARSONS.

CHARLES NAGEL.

ISAAC W. MORTON.

GEORGE D. BARNARD.

DAVID C. BALL.

HALSEY C. IVES, Dirkctor, ex officio.



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INSTBUCTORS.



HALSBY C. 1V£S, Dirkctor.
HOLMES SMITH. GEO. F. HARVEY.

EDMUND H. WUEKPEL. ROBERT BRINGUURST.

ALICE M. MORE. CHARLES P. DAVIS.

W. H. PALMER. C. F. VON SALTZA.

EDWARD M. CAMPBELL.

Assistants in Elbmkntary Work.

LAURA P. BRYAN.

JUSTINA V. A. PHILLIPS.



NoTB — All comroouicatioas in regard to the school should
be addressed: ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.



A. M. MORE,

Secretary.



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112 >¥ASHINQTON UNIVERSITY.



GENERAL INFORMATION.

There are three terms ia the year.

Students wiU be admitted at any time, but not for less
than one term, except by special arrangement toith the
Director.

The school furnishes instraction in Drawing. Modeling,
Painting, Artistic Anatomy, Perspective, Composition,
Architectural and Mechanical Drawing.

The rooms are open for the stud}- of drawing, painting,
and modeling, every day during each term from 9 a. m.
to 4: 30 p. m., and for the study of drawing from the
Antique and Life, mechanical drawing and modeling,
three evenings in the week, from November to May.

Students may enter any class apon submitting exam-
ples of work showing the necessary skill. Applicants for
admission to the evening Life Class must submit a draw-
ing of a full length figure from the Antique or Life.

Students who can pass the necessary examination may
study Modern Languages, History and Literature in
classes of the Undergraduate Department of the Univer-
sity.

The school is fully equipped with models, casts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms are well lighted and ventilated and
excellently adapted to the purposes of the school.

The artists connected with the school as teachers have
received their training in the Art Schools of Europe.



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SCHOOL OP pnnc arts. 113

All finished voork must he left in the srhool or if re-
moved by special permissions must be returned before the
close of the school year for final examination by the com-
mittee appointed for that purpose,

InstructioQ in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree of
proflcienc}' only. Students are at liberty to work as
much or as little as they desire between the hours of 9
a. m. and 4 : 30 p. m.

8



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114 WASEnNGTON UMITEHSITT.



TUITION FEES.

(Payable in advance to the Treasurer of Washington
University.)

♦ Tuition per term, with privileges of all classes and lec-

tures JU37 50

* Saturday class for adults and juveniles, per term . . 10 00
Evening Class, Antique or Sketching from Life, three

times per weelt for term of twelve weelis .... 6 00
Evening Life Class, three times per week for term of

twelve weeks 7 50

Evening Class, Elementary, three times per week for

term of twelve weeks 6 00

Evening Class, Architectural and Mechanical Drawing,

three times per week for term of twelve weeks . . 6 00
Evening Class, Modeling, three times per week for term

of twelve weeks 6 00



* In the case of studente enroll iDg in the school daring the first term
and oontinniDg through the year tbe tuition fee for the third term will
be remitted.



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SCHOOL OF FIMB ABT8. 115



PROGRAMME.

MORNING.

ElemeDtary Model and Object Class, daily, from 9 to 12 o^clock.
Antique Class, daily, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Life Class (model nude) daily (except Saturdays), from 9 to 12
o'clock.

AFTERNOON.

Modeling Class, daily from I to 4 o'clock.

Fainting Class (Still- Life, Drapery, etc.)? daily, from 1 to 4

o'clock.
Head Painting Class, daily, from 1 to 4 o'clock.

SATURDAY.

Elementary Model and Object Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Antique Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Sketch Class (models in costumes), from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Modeling Class, from 9 to 12 o'clock.

SATURDAY JUVRNILB CLASS.

Drawing from objects, from 9 to 12 o'clock.
Modeling from 9 to 12 o'clock.

XIGHT.

Life Class (model nude), Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from

7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Portrait Class, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:80 to

9 :30 o'clock.
Elementary Class in Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday,

from 7:80 to 9 :30 o'clock.



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116 WASHINGTON CNIVERSITT.

Antique Class, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7 :3() to

9:30o*clock.
Mechanical Drawing, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from

7:80 to 9:90 o'clock.
Architectural Drawing, Mouday, Tuesday and Thursday, from

7:30 to 9:30 o'clock.
Modeling, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30 to 9:30

o'clock.

Advanced students are affonled opportunity for stud3'
from life — draped and nude models — forty hours per
week.



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SCHOOL OF FINE AKT8. 117



COURSE OF INSTRUCllON
The course of iDstruction is as follows : —

ELEMENTARY.

From the beginning the student is taught to draw from
the object. Models are provided with simple contours
such as casts from leaves, fruit, foliage, Greek vases,
architectural forms, fragments) of the human figure, etc.,
and the student is required to make outline and shaded
drawings from these until he has fully mastered the diffi-
culties due to the form and position of the object. This
method is carried through all grades of the school ; no
copying of any kind is permitted.

ANTIQUE.

In the Antique Class the methods in use are severe
and require close observation, combined with great
patience and perseverance. All stump [)rocesses are
discarded ; all results are due to careful study and pains-
taking; no chance is allowed for ^' accidental effects."
The education of the eye is considered of greater impor-
tance than the training of the hand, not only in simple
line work and the study of superficial forms, but in the
general, yet no less certain, laws which underlie and dis-
tinguish the work of every great master in sculpture or
painting. Little attention is paid to pictorial finish, and
in many cases where a tendency toward pictorial finish



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118 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

seems to interfere with the student's progress in acqair-
ing a comprehensive method of drawing, it is rigorously
discouraged.

LIFE.

Work in the Life Classes consists in drawing and paint-
ing from the living model, both draped and nude, and
either from a whole or a portion of the figure, one class
being entirely devoted to the study of the head. More
attention is given to drawing than to painting, and students
who paint are required to draw a portion of the time. In
all cases a careful study of the model and a conscientious
search for contours and construction, requiring continual
use of the mind, are insisted upon. No effort is made
to bring the students to a uniformity of method ; except
to the extent of instructing them to see forms as they
really exist; beyond this each student is permitted to
develop or follow a style of his own. Special attention
is given to the importance of viewing the subject to be
placed upon the paper as a whole, thus bringing the parts
of the figure into proper subordination and avoiding the
natural tendency to exaggerate the importance of details.
Special emphasis is placed on the importance of self-
reliance in the determination of the form of each portion
of the figure, and of bestowing as conscientious care upon
the modeling of the hand and fool as upon the expression
of the face, with the purpose of training the eye to com-
prehend and the hand to reproduce precisely what is seen
and not what may be known to exist from a general
knowledge of the subject or from any preconceived ideas
of whatever kind. This method is carried to the smallest



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 119

details with the intention of compelling the student to
relj entirely on the natural form which is before him.

MECHANICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

Classes in these subjects are only held at night.
Owing to the variety of knowledge and ability possessed
by the student, the instruction is largely individual.

Mechanical Drawing includes the following branches : —

I. Plane Geometrical Drawing, Orthographic Pro-
jection, Intersection of Solids and Develop-
ment of Surfaces.
II. Drawing of Machine Details from measurement.

III. The malcing of Assembled Drawings.

IV. Tracing.

The purpose of the instruction is to teach students
how to make practical working drawings, and to read
them with ease.

In the Architectural Drawing Class beginners are
taught how to use their instruments, and to make neat
and accurate line drawings. Instruction is given in the
preparation of plans, elevations and working drawings
for various kinds of buildings. Advanced students are
taught Perspective Drawing, and the drawing of orna-
mental forms for decorative purposes.

MODELING.

The work of modeling in the day class of the school is
intended principally to supplement the work in drawing
and painting, for the purpose of giving students a more



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120 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

detailed knowledge of the form and structure of the
models which they have studied in their work in drawing.
In the night class the work is quite different Most of
the students are artisans who desire to acquire a knowl-
edge of modeling for si^ecific purposes, principally for
use in exterior decoration and in architectural work. On
account of this difference the work in the day class is of'
a more general character, and intended more to cultivale
the mind, wliile that of the night class is necessarily
special in character, and intended more particularly to
give the hand skill in producing well-known forms.

LECTURES,

From time to time class and public lectures are given
on subjects pertaining to art history and on other allied
subjects, which it is thought may be for the benefit of the
students. These lectures are arranged, not only for the
purpose of instructing the student by the matter directly



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 6 of 70)