Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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tunneling through different materials. The nature and
use of explosives. Three hours a week.

20. Water and Sewage Purification. A course of four weelcs

on ttie sanitary analysis of water and sewage under Dr.
Keiser in the chemical laboratory, followed by a study in
detail of methods and adequacy of different systems of
water and sewage purification. Students intending to
elect this course must elect Bacteriology for the preced-
ing term. Three lectures a toeek,

21. Suspension, Cantalever, Arch and Lift Bridges. Analytical

study of stresses and principles governing the design and
erection of these styles of structures; consideration of
typical examples of such bridges. Three lectures a week.

22. (a) Steel Frame wo rlt of Buildings. The various systems

of construction for tall office buildings analytically con-
sidered, with the principles and details of design of this
increasingly important class of structures.
(b) Combination Construction. The principles involved in
structures built of steel and concrete in combination;
the details of the most important systems of such
construction. Three lectures a week,

23. Harbors, Rivers and Canals. The regimen of rivers; tides

and tidal currents; the application of hydraulic and
structural principles to the design, construction and
maintenance of harbors, rivers and canals. Three lectures
a week.



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COURSRS OF INSTRUCTION. 63

24. EDgineerlng Design. Draughting and design supplementary

to Courses 12, U, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Nine
hours a toeek.

25. Graduation Thesis. A. complete study or design, involving

original investigation or experiment.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
Professor Kinealy and Assistants.

1. Kinematics of Machinery. Tiie principles of mechanism,

rolling curves, camsj teeth of wheels, link work and trains
of mechanism. Tkree hours a week,

2. Machine Designing. Study of the principles. Three hours a

toeek.

3. Machine Designing and Mill Engineering. Shafting, gear-

ing, belts and ropes, mill and factory construction.
Three hours a week.

4. Elementary Steam Engineering. Elements of thermodynam-

ics and the theory of tlie steam engine; types of engines;
valves and valve diagrams; indicator cards; boilers and
chimneys. Three hours a week.

5. Machinery Drawing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 1. Three hours a week.

6. Machinery Drawing. Details of the steam engine; link

motions and valve diagrams. Three hours a week.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. Standardizationof instruments; oil

testing. Three hours a week.

8. Mechanical Laboratory. Lining up and adjusting the steam

engine; use of the indicator; valve setting; tests of the
steam engine. Three hours a iceek.

9. Advanced Steam Engineering. Thermodynamics; applica-

tion of thermodynamics to steam and other heat engines.
Three hours a week.

10. Steam Engine Designing. Three hours a week.

11. Boiler and Chimney Designing. Threo hours n week.

12. Heating and Ventilation. Three hours a toeek.



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54 WASHINGTON UNIYESSITT.

13. Pumps^ CooliDg Towers, Air Compressors, Refrigeration

Machinery, etc. Three hours a week .

14. Engine Designing. Worlc in the drawing-roora to accom-

pany Course 10. Six hours a week.

16. Boiler Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Coarse 11. Three hours a week.
IG. Mechanical Laboratory. Tests of the steam and gas en-
gines. Six hours a week.

17. Mechanical Laboratory. Boiler tests; visits to manu-

facturing establishments. Six hours a toeek.

18. Thesis. A complete study or desigu, involving original

investigations or experiments.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
Assistant-Professor Langsdorf and Assistants.

1. General introduction to the study of electrical machinery.

Electrical units, and the characteristics of dyoamo-
electric machinery. This course is especially designed
for students in Civil Engineering. Three hours a week.

2. Extension of Course 1. Treatment of the subject in greater

detail, and an introduction to the elemeats of alternating
currents. Three hours a week.

3. Laboratory work with direct current machinery. Determi-

nation of characteristics of direct current generators and
motors. Three hours a week.

4. Lectures and recitations on the design of direct current

machinery; generators, motors, and electro-magnets.
Three hours a week.

5. Lectures and recitations on the design of alternating current

machinery. Three hours a xceek.
(>. Work in drawing room to accompany Course 4; detail design

of machine of specitled performance. Six hours a week.
7. Work in drawing room to accompany Course 5; detail

desinn of a polyphase generator, motor, or transformer.

Sir fiiturs <i trcek.



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 55

8. Laboratory work; efficiency and core loss tests, determi-

nation of wave forms, etc. Six hours a week.

9. Laboratory work witli alternating currents ; special investi-

gations. Nine hours a week.

10. Lectures on methods of electrical testing, and calculation

of sizes of wires for distributing networks. Two hours a
week.

11. Lectures on street railway working. Generation, distri-

bution, and utilization of power. Two hours a week.

12. Detailed treatment of some engineering project, involving

the preparation of estimates and specifications, together

with the presentation of an argument supporting the

solution adopted. Two hours a week.

In addition to the above the following courses given in the

Medical Department of the LTnlversity are open to students in

the College, and will be credited towards a medical degree for

those students who enter the Medical College later.



ANATOMY.

a.* Osteology and Syndesmology : Lectures and Laboratory
Work. Three hours a week. Professor Terry.

b. Splanchnology and Neurology: Anatomy of the Thoracic and

Abdominal Viscera, and Brain and Spinal Cord. Lectures
and Demonstrations. Three hours a week.

Professor Terry.

c. Myology, Angiology, and Neurology: Anatomy of the Mus-

cular System, of the Circulatory System, and of the
Distribution of Peripheric Nerves. Lectures and Dem-
onstrations. Three hours a tceek. Dr. Blair.



• The letters o, 6, etc., refer to the announcement of courses as
given in the catalogue of the Medical Department, to which stqdents are
referretl for ndtlitional <4etaili^i



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56 WASHINGTON UNIVBB8ITT.

d, e. Practical Anatomy: Dissection of Typical Vertebrates and
Human Dissection. Three afternoons a week.

Professor Terry and Dr. Blair.

f, g. Special Dissections : Work arranged by the teaciiers in

regard to ttie wants and predilections of the individual
student. These courses can be taken only after d and e
have been certified. Three afternoons in the first term and
two afternoons in the second term.

Professor Terry and Dr. Blair.

HISTOLOGY.

a, b. Laboratory Work with Explanatory Lectures. Six hours
a loeek. Professor Budgeti.

PHYSIOLOGY.

a. First Half of Physiology, j/cctures and Detnonstrations.

Three Jiours a week Professor Budgett.

b. Second Half of Physiology. Lectures and Demonstrations.

Three hours a week. Professor Budgett.

c. Laboratory work in Physiological Chemistry. Four hours a

week. Professor Budgett.

PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY.

Lectums on Bacteriology. One hour a week.

Professor Ravold.

g. Laboratory Course in Bacteriology. Four hours a week.

Professor Bavold.

. HYGIENE.

Lectures and Demonstrations on Hygiene and Sanitary Medicine.
Two hours a xcevk. Professor Jiavold,



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^



COUR8K8 OF INSTRUCTION. 67

FORENSIC MEDICINE.

A Course of Lectures. Three hours a week. Comprising tlie
following subjects : Chemistry and Detection of Poisons^
by Prof, Warren. Symptoms and Treatment of Poi-
soning; by Dr. Tuttle. Microscopy of Blood Stains,
Hair, etc., by Prof. Budgett. Abortions, Diagnosis of
Recent Labor, Rape, etc., by Prof. Schwarz. Legal Aspects
of Insanity, Injuries to the Nervous System, Alcoholism,
Sunstroke, etc., by Prof. Fry. Legal Aspects of Trauma-
tism and Surgical Injuries; Post-mortem Examinations,
by Dr. Kodis. Medical Jurisprudence, by Prof. Nagel.



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THE COLLEGE.

Admission.

Candidates for admission to the College will present
themselves for examination on Monday, June 17, 11^01,
in room No. 8, east wing of the University Building,
1704 Washington avenue, at 9 o'clock a. m. A second
examination will be held on Tuesday, September 24, at
the new temporary site of the University, on the north-
east corner of Locust and Beaumont streets, for such
candidates as cannot be present in June.

Division of the Examination.

A candidate for admission may, at his option, take the
entire examination at one time ; or he may divide it (1)
between two years, or (2) between June and September
of the same year ; provided he is prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

Testimonials.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other colleges are required to present certificates of
honorable dismissal.

Candidates who divide the examination must furnish
their testimonials at the time of their final examination
for admission.



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the college. 59

Rkqi'IKEmknts fok Admission to the Fueshman Class.

Candidates for admission presenting certificates signed
by the Principals of the following schools will be ad-
mitted without examination to the Freshman Class : —

Smith Academy, St. Louis.
Mary Institute, St. Louis.
Hosmer Hall, St. Louis.
Central High School, St. Louis.
Kirkwood High School, Kirkwood, Mo.
Webster Groves High School, Webster Groves, Mo.
Central High School, Kansas City, Mo.
St. Joseph High School, St. Joseph, Mo.
Chillicothe High School, Chillicothe, Mo.
Blees Military Academy, Macon, Mo.
Atlantic High School, Atlantic, Iowa.
Plattsmouth High School, Plattsmouth, Neb.
Township High School, Evanston, 111.
Township High School, Joliet, III.
East St. Louis High School, East St. Louis, 111.
Evansville High School, Evansville, Ind.
All other candidates for admission will be examined in
the following subjects : —

1. Elements of English. Neat and readable hand-
writing ; correct spelling, punctuation and use of
capitals, proper construction of sentences ; clear-
ness and conciseness of expression.

Candidates are advised to study tlie following: A
grammar contiilninj? a clear and simple system of
analysis of sentences sucli as is found in LomjmmVs
School (irainmar; Shakespeare's J/<»rcArtMf o/ Venice.;



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60 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Addison's Roger de Coverley papers from The Spec-
tatOTy Goldsmith's Vicar of Wak^ld^ George Eliot's
SilaM'Marner, Longfellow's Evangeline, and Emerson's
essays on Friendship^ Manners^ Compensation, His-
tory, Character,
II. Algebra, including radicals and equations of the
second degree,
III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry. Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.
ly. Latin. Grammar, four books of Caesar, seven
orations of Cicero, and six books of the ^neid
of Virgil. Prose Composition.
^Oreek: Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-IV.

Homer's Iliad, Books I~III, omitting catalogue

of ships in Book II.
Composition, First forty exercises in Woodruff's

Exercises in Greek Prose Composition.

The examination will be based apon the supposi-
tion that the candidate has studied Greek three
school yearS; reciting not less than four times a week.
The questions asked will concern ordinary construc-
tions, common conditional sentences^ indirect dis-
course, forms, accents, etc.

In Homer the epic forms with their corresponding
Attic forms will constitute an important part of the ex-
amination. The candidate should be able to separate
lines of Homer into feet, marking the quantity of each
syllable.

In composition involved sentences will not be
given, but the candidate should show ability to write
simple connected narrative.

* Grvuk is uot rciiuiri'd for ttdmissioii except from cnndidates who
intend to continue the study in College.



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THE COLLEGE. 61

Substitution. Other Books of Homer, either from
the Iliad or the Odyssey may be presented for those
named above, if the request is made in writing not
later than June 1st previous to the examination.

Woodruff's Exercises in Greek Prose Composition
is mentioned only to give an idea of the amount of
work one is supposed to have had. Any of the vari-
ous works upon Gi*eek prose composition will be
acceptable.
V. Modern Language, Either French or German at
the option of the candidate ; facility in reading
ordinary prose at sight and knowledge of ele-
mentary grammar shown by the ability to trans-
late easy sentences from English into French or
German.
VI. History. Of the United States and of England,
such as is found in any text-book on history
intended for the use of preparatory schools ; of
Greece and Rome, such as is found in Pennell's
or Smith's Small Histories.
VII. Elementary Physics. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books as
Gage's " Introduction to Physical Science," or
Appleton's '* School Physics."

b. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
'* Text-Book of Physics."

Special Students.

Special Students may be admitted to one or more
courses in the college upon the following conditions : —



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62 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

1. That evidence of proper preparation, satisfactory to
the committee and to the instructors concerned, be
submitted before admission to any course or courses.

2. That candidates for degeees who fail in the work of
the regular courses shall not have the privil^e of becom-
ing Special Students, unless such failure shall come from
physical inability to do the required work.

3. That Special Students shall not be r^arded as
candidates for a degree.

All matters concerning Special Students are referred to
a standing committee of the Faculty, which is composed
of Professors Snow, Keiser and Lovejoy. Application
should be made to Professor Snow, Chairman.

ARRANGEMENT OF STUDIES IN THE
COLLEGE.

FRESHMAN YEAR.
^Prescribed Studies.

English; Courses 1 and 2.

German, Courses 1 and 2, for those who present French for
admission.

French, Courses 1 and 2, for those who present German for
admission.

Elective Studies.

In addition to the prescribed studies, every Freshman is
required to take each terra elective studies amounting to three
full courses. No Freshman may elect more than one course in
the same subject without the consent of the Dean.



• The Allures indicate the number of the Courses of Instruction.
See pp. 34-^7. t



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THE COLLRGK. 63

The following courses are open to Freshmen : —

Greek; 1, 2.
Latin, 1, 2.
English , 1,2.
German, 1, 2.
French, 1, 2.
History, 1, 2.
Mathematics, 1, 2.
Drawing, 1,2.
Pliysics, 1, 2.
Chemistry, 1,2.
Botany, 1, 2.
Zoology, 1, 2.

A Freshman who is qualified to take a higher course in any
study named above may do so, with the permission of the in-
structor in the course and the Dean of the College.

SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR YEARS.

The prescribed work of the Sophomore and Junior Years
consists of : —

English, Courses 3, 4 and 5, 6.

Besides the prescribed courses every Sophomore and every
Junior is required to take each term four elpctive coursf^s, or an
equivalent amount of courses and half courses.

SENIOR YEAR.

Eight courses, all elective, are required in the Senior year,
and a thesis to be handed in by June 1st.

CHOICE OF STUDIES.

Every student is required to give notice in writing to
the Dean of the College on the first day of each term
of his choice of studies for that term.



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64 WASHDIGTOir UKIYSBSITT.

CluuigeB may be made only by permission of the Dean,
to whom application must be made in writing, with a full
statement of reasons.

No student will be allowed to elect any coarse for
which his previous training has not fully prepared him.

REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF BACH-
ELOR OF ARTS.

The satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses is
necessary for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

A course in any study is one term's work with three
recitations or lectures a week, or their equivalent in
laboratory work.



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THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND
ARCHITECTURE.

Conditions of Admission.

Candidates for admission to the School of Engineering
will present themselves for enrollment or examination on
Monday, June 16, 1902, in room No. 8, east wing of the
University Building, 1704 Washington 'Avenue, at 9
o'clock a. m. Candidates who cannot be present in
June may present themselves on Tuesday, September 23,
at the new temporary site of the University, in the main
building on the northeast corner of Locust and Beaumont
Streets.

Students may enter either on Certificate or by Exam-
ination .

Entrance on Certificate.

Graduates of the following schools will be admitted
without examination, provided they bring certificates
from the Principal that they have met the requirements
to the Freshman Class as printed below. These schools
have been inspected and examined by a representative of
the Faculty and placed upon the approved list. Addi-
tions will be made to this list as rapidly as schools apply
for such recognition and are found to be qualified : —

Central High School, St. Louis.

Smith Academy, St. Louis.

Manual Training School, St. Louis.

6



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(^6 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Central High School, Kansas City, Mo.

Manual Training High School, Kansas City, Mo.

High School, St. Joseph, Mo.

Township High School, Evanston, 111.

Township High School, Joliet, 111.

High School, East St. Louis, III.

High School, Cairo, 111.

High School, Chillicothe, Mo.

Blees Military Academy, Macon, Mo.

High School, Kirkwood, Mo.

High School, Webster Groves, Mo.

High School, Atlantic, Iowa.

High School, Plattsmouth, Neb.

High School, Evansville, Ind.

Entrance by Examination Upon Subjects Named
Below.

This examination will occupy two da3^s and will be
entirely in writing.

Candidates for admission may, at their option, take the
entire examination at one time ; or they may divide it
between two years, or between June and September of
the same year, provided they are prepared at the first
examination in not less than four of the subjects named
in the requirements for admission.

All candidates for admission are required to furnish
testimonials of good moral character, and students from
other collegiate institutions, who expect to enter in ad-
vance of the Freshman Class, are required to present cer-
tificates of honorable dismissal.



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THK S( HOOL OF EK6INEBRIN(4. H7

ReQUIBBMENTS fob ADMI8SI0N TO THE FreSHMAN ClA8S.

I. Elements of English, Neat and readable handwrit-

ing ; correct spelling, punctuation and use of cap-
itals ; proper construction of sentences ; clearness
and conciseness of expression.

Candidates are advised to study the following: A
grammar containing a clear and simple system of analysis
of sentences such as is found in Longman^s School
Grammar; ShakespetLre^s Merchant of Venice, Addison's
Roger de Coverley papers from The Spectator^ Gold-
smith's Vicar of Wakefield, George Eliot's Silas Mar-
ner, Longfellow's Erangeline, and Emerson's essays on
Friendship, Manners, Vomp^nsatioUy IJistonj, (Character,

II. Algebra, including radicals and equations of the

second degree.

III. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometry. Wells' or

Wentworth's Geometry or an equivalent.

IV. Language.* a, b, c, or cZ.

«. Fbench. Facility in reading ortli nary prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into French.

b. Gebman. Facility in reading ordinary prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into German.



* It is assamcd that a thorough coarse in any one of those languages
extending over two years of, say, thirty -five weeks each, with four or
live fnll hours a week, or their equivalent, will be sufllcieut to prepare
a candidate to meet the requirement, in a single language.



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68 WASHINGTON rXTVERSITY.

c. Spanish. Facility in reading ordinary prose
at sight, and a knowledge of elementary grammar
shown by the ability to translate easy sentences
from English into Spanish.

d. Latin. In place of a modern lang^iage an
acquaintance with Latin acquired by two years'
successful study will be accepted. This should
comprise: First, in grammar, a good knowleilge
of etymology and syntax, special attention being
given to inflections and the construction of cases
and moods; second, the translation of four
books of Caesar or equal amounts of such equiv-
alents as Nepos and Sallust. Reading of easy
Latin at sight may be substituted for two books
of Caesar.

V. IliHtory, Of the United States and of England such
as is found in any text-book on history intended
for the use of preparatory schools.

N. B. — In place of the work in the History of England,
an equivalent amount of work in the history of some
other country, in Ancient History, or in General History
will be accepted.

VI. Elementary Physics. Either a or b.

a. As much as is contained in such books as
C4age's *' Introduction to Physical Science," or
Appleton's ** School Physics."

/;. An amount of laboratory work equal to the
first forty experiments in Hall and Bergen's
'* Text-book of Physics.



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STLDIBS IN THE SCHOOL OF KNGINKKRING . 69



COURSES OF STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF
ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE.

The Courses of Study are six in number : —

I. Civil ENGiNKKRiN<i.
II. Mechanical EN(;iNKKiiiN<;.

III. ElK(!TR1CAL EN<iINKKUIN<i.

IV. Chemical EN(iiNEEKiN<».

V. SCIKN(!K AND LlTKKATrUK.
VI. AUCHITECTUUK.

The arrangement of studies in the several Courses of
Study varies from time to time as need arises. All the
studies for each Course are prescribed ; there is no
choice except as indicated. For the year 1D02-3 they
will be as given on the following pages : —

I. CIVIL ENGINEERING.
FKESHMAN YEAK.

FIK8T TKKM.

English, 1 (Corapositioii). MatheraaticH, 2a ( Plane Tri^o-

German, 1 (Elementary Course nometry).



or



Chemistry, 1 C General De-
scriptive).
French, I (BlemenUry Drawing, 1 (Free-Hand).

Course). Drawing, 2 (Instrumental, and

Mathematics, 1 (Higher Al- Lettering).

f^^^^^y ; Shop, 1 (Wood Working).



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70



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



8BCOND TERM.



English^ 2 (Forms of Prose).
German, 2 (Elementary

Course), or
Freuch,2( Elementary Course).
Mathematics, 2b (Spherical

Trigonometry).
Mathematics, 3 (Analytical

Geometry).



Physics, 1 ( Elemeut&rr Me-
chanics).

Chemistry, 2 (Descriptive
Chemistry).

Drawing, 3 Geometrical, and
Lettering).

Shop, 2 (Pattern Work aoti
Molding).



SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FIRST TKKM.



German^ 3 (Reading, Compo- Physics, 2 (Ueat and Lij^ht



sition, etc.), or

French, 3 ( Reading. Compo-
sition, etc.).

♦Mathematics, 8 (Analytical
Geometry).

Mathematics. 8 (Descriptive
Geometry).



Chemistry, 3 (QualitAijve

Analysis).
Drawing, 4 (Mechanical. ai»l

Lettering).
Shop, 3 (Forge and Machine

Work).



SECOND TKKM.



♦*Civil Engineering, 1.
♦Matliematics, 4 (Differential

Calculus).
Mathematics, *3 (Descriptive

Geometry).



I Mechanics, 1 (Statics).
Physics, 3 (Electricity and

Magnetism).
Siiop, 4 (Machine Shop).



Civil Engineering students will take Civil Engineering :*
during the summer vacation.

♦ MAthcmatics 3 and 4 will occur one lorm earlier in lUfKM.

•♦ For a full description of the courses of instruction In Civil Knfnnc«-r

ing, t»ee below.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.



71



JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.



Civil Engineering, 4.
Civil Engineering, 5.
Civil Engineering, 6.
Civil Engineering, 1 (Electric
Machinery).



* Mathematics, 5 (Integral Cal-
culus).

Mechanics, 2 (Statics, Dis-
tribution of Stress).

Physics, 4 (Electrical Measure-
ments).



SECOND TERM.



Mechanical Engineering, 4

(Steam Engine).
Mechanics, 3 (Unbalanced

Forces).



Civil Engineering, 7.
Civil Engineering, 8.
Civil Engineering, 9.
Civil Engineering, 10.



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 62 of 70)