Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

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Civil Engineering, 12.

Civil Engineering students will take Civil Engineering 3 dur-
ing the summer vacation.



SENIOR YEAR.



Civil Engineering, 13.
Civil Engineering, 14.
Civil Engineering, 15.
Civil Engineering, IG.
Mechanics, (Deflection,
and Torsion).



FIRST TERM.

ttElectlve (One to be chosen).

(a) Civil Engineering, 17.

(b) Civil Engineering, 18.

(c) Economics, 3 (Transporta-

tion, etc.).

(d) Physics, 6 (Mathematical

Tiieory of Electricity).

(e) Astronomy, 1 (Descriptive

Astronomy. )

(f) Botany, 16 (Bacteriology).



• Mathematics 5 will occar one term earlier in 1904-5.
tt Any Klcetive may be omitted when the number of
senting themselves for it is less than live.



indents pre -



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72 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

SECOND TERM.

Civil Bngineering, 19. ft Elective (one to be chosen).

Civil Engineering; 24. (a) Civil Engineering, 20.

Civil Engineering) 25. (b) Civil Engineering, 21.
Meclianics, 5 (Kinematic and (c) Civil Engineering, 22.

Mechanism). (d) Civil Engineering, 23.

Astronomy, 2 (^Practical As- (e) Geology, I (General

tronomy). Course).

DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN
CIVIL ENGINEERING.

1. Elementary Surveying. The use and adjustment of all the
ordinary surveying instruments; land surveying; prob-
lems in linear surveys, in laying out railway curves, etc. :
topographical surveying by the transit and stadia method
and also by the plane table. Two recitations and six hours
field practice a week.

2-3. Surveying in tlie Field. Three weeks devoted continuovsly
to field practice. This practice includes the topographical
' survey of a considerable tract of ground with an irregular
surface, for the purpose of mapping it with five-foot con-
tours, tliis survey being based on a system of triangula-
tion and levels which forms a part of the work of the
survey. A hydrographic survey, with locations by one
of the most approved methods, is made, and a railroad
line is also located from a contour map which is made in
tlie field, and the earth- work upon it computed. Deter-
minations are also made by the students for latitude,
time and azimuth, and various other special problems are
worked out practically. For this work the class goes to
a suitable point at a distance from the city the third
Monday before the beginning of the college year. A map
of this survey is drawn after return from the field.



tt Any Klectivc may be omitted when the number of students pre-
senting themselves for it is less than live.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 73

4. Stereotomy. The application of Descriptive Geometry to

stone cutting, including groined; cloistered and skew
arches, etc. One recitation and three hours drawing a
week.

5. Higher Surveying. Hydrographic, mining, cily and geodetic

surveying, with the mathematical principles involved and
the practical methods of operation used in the field;
earth-work computations, etc. Three hours a week.

G. Drawing. To accompany Courses 2 and 5. Nine hours a
week.

7. Stresses in Framed Structures. Analytical and graphical de-
terminations of stresses in various styles of roof trusses
and of highway and railway bridges for distributed and
concentrated, fixed and moving loads. Three hours a week.

H. Structural Drawing. To accompany Course 7, Nine hours
a week.

9. Engineering Materials. A review of the principles of

mechanics relating especially to the strength of materials,
both inside and beyond their elastic limits, together with
the description of the processes of manufacture and
methods of testing the strength of materials, and a dis-
cussion of the essential properties of the more common
materials of engineering construction. Three hours a
week.

10. Testing Laboratory Practice. Experimental tests made by

the students on the strength of various kinds of engineer-
ing materials. Six hours a week.

11. Testing Laboratory Practice. Experimental tests made by

the students on the strength of various kinds of engineer-
ing materials. For students in mechanical and electrical
engineering. Three hours a week.

12. Contracts and Specifications. The law of contracts as ap-

plied to engineering work, together with typical fonns of
specifications. One hour a tceek.

13. Hydraulics. Hydrostatic and hydraulic theory, with the

application of principles developed to the flow of water



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74 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

through orifices, pipes^ etc. ; the determination of water-
power; the measurement of velocities and discbarge.
Three hours a week.

14. The designing of Framed Structures. An analytical stadJ

of the principles involved in the designing of the general
and detail portions of the more common styles of bridges
and roofs. Three hours a week,

15. Structural Design. Work in the draughting room to ac-

company Course 14^ and involving complete details. Xine
hours a week,

16. Water and Sewerage Systems. The collection and distri-

bution of potable waters, as modified by various condi-
tions of supply and service. The practical designing of
systems of sewerage and drainage. Methods of sewage-
disposal. Outline of irrigation methods. Water rates
and special assessments. Three hours a week.

17. Railway Engineering. Reconnaisance, preliminary and lo-

cation surveys considered in detail; railway construction
and maintenance of way; standards of permanent con-
struction ; the economic theory of railway location. Three
lectures a week.

18. Road Engineering. The location, drainage coUvStruction and

maintenance of streets and roads; consideration of the
different paving materials in connection with their par-
ticular characteristics and their adaptability and adequacy
under various conditions of service ; the cost and life of
pavements. Three lectures a week.

19. Masonry Structures, Tunneling and Explosives. The

theory of design and the construction of foundations,
retaining walls, dams, arches, chimneys, bridge piers,
etc., together with the study of materials involved.
Methods of tunneling through different materials. The
nature and use of explosives. Three hours a week.

20. Water and Sewage Purification. A course of four weeks on

the sanitary analysis of water and sewage under Dr.
Keiser in the chemical laboratory, followed by a study in



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENQINKERING. 75

detail of methods and adequacy of different systems of
water and sewage parlflcation. Stadents intending to
elect this course must elect Bacteriology for the preceding
term. Three lectures a week.

21. Suspension^ Cantalever, Arch and Lift Bridges. Analytical

study of stresses, and principles governing the design and
erection of these styles of structures; consideration of
typical examples of such bridges. Three lectures a week,

22. (rt) Steel Framework of Buildings. The various systems

of construction for tall office buildings analytically con-
sidered, with ttie principles and details of design of this
increasingly important cla.ss of structures.
(b) Combination Construction. Tlie principles involved In
structures built of steel and concrete in combination; the
details of the most important systems of such construc-
tion. Three lectures a week.
28. Harbors, Rivers and Canals. The regimen of rivers; tides
and tidal currents; the application of hydraulic and
structural principles to the design, construction and
maintenance of harbors, rivers and canals. Three lectures
a week.

24. .Engineering Design. Draughting and design supplemen-

tary to Courses 12, 14, l«i, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23.
Xine hours a week.

25. Graduation Thesis. A complete study or design, involving

original investigation or experiment.

EQUIPMENT IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.

General Equipment. — During the Freshman and
Sophomore years students have the advantages of the
libraries and other apparatus of the several departments
in which their courses are given. For the shop work the
students make use of the excellent equipment of the
3Ianual Training School.



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76 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Library^ Models^ and Drawings. — There is a well-
selected working library accessible to students which they
consult freely on assigned topics. There is also a large
assortment of drawings of the most interesting engineer-
ing and architectural structures at home and abroad.
Many photographs and blue-prints have been collected
illustrating all the more common styles of bridges with
their details.

Sfirceyintj LtstrumenUi. — The equipment includes three
transits for ordinary field work, one altazimuth instrument
for triangulation and astronomical work, reading to ten
seconds of arc on both horizontal and vertical circles, two
engineers' levels, two needle compasses, one sextant, one
plane table, one 300-foot steel tape standardized, and all
the necessary accompanying apparatus for field and office
work, such as stadia rods, level rods, stadia slide rules,
chains, tapes, signals, protractors, parallel rules, etc.
There is also a complete mining transit, adapted to the
use of the stadia, which may be used for topographical
work if required.

The Testing Laboratortf. — The facilities in the test-
ing laboratory are very complete. A floor space of about
1,500 square feet is occupied by the following appliances:
For testing the strength of engineering materials there are
two Riehle universal testing machines with a capacity of
100,000 lbs. and 20,000 lbs. respectively, both having
extension columns to accommodate long test specimens;
ft beam-testing machine, with a capacity of 100,000 lbs.
on a length of 24 feet ; two beam-testing machines witli
a capacity of 6,000 lbs. on a length of five feet, with



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 77

micrometer deflection measuring apparatus; a column-
testing machine with capacity of 1,000,000 lbs. on a
length of 36 feet or less ; a 60,000 inch-pound torsion
machine; one five-horse-power dynamo; a hydraulic
pump ; an extensometer apparatus reading to ten-thou-
sandths of an inch, and extensometers measuring strains
with less precision ; drying ovens, saws, lathes, and other
apparatus for preparing specimens ; standard gauges,
scales, thermometers, etc. For cement-testing there are
machines of the Fairbanks, the Riehle, and the Olsen
types ; a Riehle screw press and a Boehme hammer for
standardizing the making of briquettes ; boiling and
steaming apparatus for acceleration tests ; a Le Chatelier
specific gravity apparatus ; a temperature apparatus ; a
volumenometer ; a Riehle-Vicat apparatus ; a large as-
sortment of briquette molds : a jig and a machine mixer ;
concrete molds; sieves, stamps and other appliances
necessary to complete the working equipment.

II. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
FRESHMAN YEAR.

FIUST TKRM.

EngliRh; 1 (Composition). Mathematics, 2a (Plane
German, 1 (Elementary Trigonometry).

Course) or Chemistry, 1 (General De-

scriptive).

French, 1 (Elementary Drawing, 1 (Free-hand).

Course). Drawing, 2 (Instrumental and
Mathematics, 1 (Hipher Al- Lettering).

gebra). Shop, 1 (Wood-workint?).



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78



WASHINGTON UNIVBRSlXr.



BRCOND TRRM.



Eoglish^ 2 (Forms of Prose).
German, 2 (Elementary

Course), or
French, 2 (Elementary

Course).
Mathematics, 2b (Spherical

Trigonometry).
Mathematics, 3 (Analytical

Moulding).



Physics, 1 (Elementary Me-
chanics).

Chemistry, 2 (Descriptive
Chemistry).

Drawing, 3 (Geometrical and
Lettering).

Shop, 2 (Pattern W^ork and
Geometry).



SOPHOMORE YEAR.



FIRST TRRM.



German, 3 (Reading, Com-
position^ etc.), or

French, 3 (Reading Compo-
tion, etc.),

* Mathematics, 3 (Analytical
Geometry).

Mathematics, 8 (Descrip-
tive Geometry).



Physics, 2 (Heat and Light).
Chemistry, 3 (Qualitative

Analysis).
Drawing, 4 (Mechanical and

Lettering).
Shop, 3 (Forge and Machine

Work).



SKCOND TRRM.



Mechanics, 1 (Statics).
Physics, 3 (Electricity and

Magnetism) .
Shop, 4 (Machine Work).



Civil Engineering, 1 (Ele-
mentary Surveying).

♦Mathematics, 4 (Differ-
ential Calculus).

Mathematics, 9 (Descrip-
tive Geometry).

In addition to the shop-worlc named above, mechanical engi-
neering students will take six days of six hours each in shop-
work during Commencement week and the week following.

* Mathematics 3 and 4 will occur one term earlier in 1903>-l.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 79

JUNIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

^Mechanical Engineering, 1. Matliematics^ 5 (Integral Cal-

Meclianical Engineering, 2. cuius).

Mechanical Engineering, 5. Mechanics, 2 (Statics, Distribu-
Mechanical Engineering, 7. tion of stress).
Electrical Eng., 1 (Electric Physics, 4 (Electrical Measure-
Machinery), ments).

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, 3. Electrical Eng., 2 (Electric

Mechanical Engineering, 4. Machinery).

Mechanical Engineering, 6. Electrical Eng., 3 (Laboratory).

Mechanical Engineering, 8. Mechanics, 3 (Action of Unbal-
(^Ivil Eng., 11 (Testing Labora- anced Forces).

tory). Physics, 6 (Electrical Measure-
Civil Eng., 12 (Contracts). ments).

SENIOR YEAR.

FIRST TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, 9. Electrical Eng., 10 (Transmis-

Mechanical Engineering, 10. slon).

Mechanical Engineering, 14. Mechanics, 4 (Deflection and

Mechanical Engineering, IG. Torsion).

Civil Eng., 13 (Hydraulics).

SECOND TERM.

Mechanical Engineering, U. Mechanical Engineering, 17.

Mechanical Engineering, 12. Mechanical Engineering, 18.

Mechanical Engineering, 13. Mechanics, 5 (Kinematics and

Mechanical Engineering, 15. Mechanisms).



* For a full description of the courses of instruction in Mechanical
Engineering see below.



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80 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN
MECHANICAL ENGINEENING.

1. Kinematics of Machinery. The principles of mechanism,

rolling curves, cams, teeth of wheels. Unit work and trains
of mechanism. Three hours a tceek,

2. Machine Designing. Study of the principles. Three hottrs

. a week.
8. Machine Designing and Mill Engineering. Shafting, gearing,
belts and ropes, mill and factory construction. Three
hours a loeek.

4. Elementary Steam Engineering. Elements of thermodynam-

ics and the theory of the steam engine ; types of engines;
valves and valve diagrams ; indicator cards ; boilers and
chimneys. Three hours a week.

5. Machinery Drawing. Wori? in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 1. Three hours a week.
(i. Machinery Drawing. Details of the steam engine; link mo-
tions and valve diagrams. Three hours a week.

7. Mechanical Laboratory. Standardization of instruments;

oil testing. Three hours a week,

8. Mechanical Laboratory. Lining up and adjusting the steam

engine; use of the indicator; valve setting; tests of the
steam engine. Three hours a week.
i). Advanced Steam Engineering. Thermodynamics; applica-
tion of thermodynamics to steam and other heat engines.
Three hours a loeek,

10. Steam Engine Designing, l^hree hours a week.

11. Boiler and Chimney Designing. Three hours a week.

12. Heating and Ventilation. Three hours a week.

13. Pumps, Cooling Towers, Air Compressors, Refrigeration

Machinery, etc. Three hours a iceek.

14. Engine Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 10. ^'ix hours a week.

15. Boiler Designing. Work in the drawing-room to accom-

pany Course 11. Three hours a week.



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STUDIKS IX TUK SCHOOL OF -KNaiNEKRINiJ. 81

16. Mechanical Laboratory. Tests of the steam and gas engines.

/Six hours a week,

17. Mechanical Laboratory. Boiler tests: visits to mauufac-

turiug establishments. Six hours a week.

18. Thesis. A complete study or design, involving original

investigations or experiments.

EQUIPMENT IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

Students have access to a small but modern and care-
fully selected technical library and to a number of the
best technical journals which are kept bound and up to
date. In addition to the library the department has also
a number of drawings illustrating modern methods of
designing and constructing engines, boilers and machines
of different kinds. Special attention has been given,
however, in the selection of the drawings to those which
refer to steam engineering, and especially to engine and
boiler work, and heating and ventilating. Among the
drawings are a number of working drawings of the machin-
ery of ships for the United States Navy. A large number
of photographs and pictures which were donated to the de-
partment by manufacturers of different machines are kept
on hand for reference by the students. Catalogues of
machines of different kind are kept filed away in special
drawers provided for them, and to these the students have
access. The students use the library, the drawings and
the catalogues when studying or working up special sub-
jects. Reference is also constantly made to the drawings
and the catalogues in the course of the lectures.

The laboratory contains at present a plain slide valve
engine which is fitted up with a Prony brake and which

6



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82 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

has three separate valves. This engine is used by the
students in their practice work when learning to set
valves and to take indicator cards. There is also a gas
engine, a steam calorimeter, a pair of Crosby indicators,
a Thompson coal calorimeter, a pyrometer, a complete
set of apparatus for testing lubricators, a standard gas
meter ; and a number of smaller instruments such as a
standard gauge, a planimeter, a tachometer, thermometers,
revolution counters, etc., etc. During the summer of
1902, a cross compound automatic engine of about fifty
horse-power, fully equipped with an Alden brake and a
condenser and other appliances necessary for laboratory
work, will be set up. A complete fuel-testing outfit will
be bought, and a blower fan arranged with heating coi!s
for testing purposes will be fitted up. One or more
pumps will be set up and arranged so that they may be
used, with or without the condenser, for pumping water
against various heads. The present equipment with the
apparatus which will be installed during the coining
summer will make a small but very complete laboratory
for testing purposes, especially for work in connection
with steam and steam using machinery.

The students now use the boilers of the central heating
plant of the University for experimental purposes. In
this plant they make boiler tests and sometimes make
tests to determine the value of coals of different grades.

For their shop work the students go to the shops of the
St. Louis Manual Training School, where they receive a
training in the use and care of metal and wood working
machinery.



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STUDIES IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEKEING.



83



III. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.



FKESHMAN YEAR.



FIRST TKRM.



Mathematics, 1 (Higher Alge-
bra).

Mathematics, 2a (Plane Trigo-
nometry).

French, 1
or

German,

Shop, 1 (Woodwork).



■'}

[1,1 J



(Elementary
Course).



English, 1 (Composition).
Chemistry, 1 (General

Course. ,
Drawing, 1 (Freehand).
Drawing, 2 (Lettering and

Instrumental).



SKCONI> tkkM.



Mathematics, 2b (Spherical

Trigonometry).
Mathematics, 3 (Analytic

Geometry).
French, 2 *|^ ^Klementarv

German,2j ^^"^''^•)
Shop, 2 (Pattern Work and
Molding).



English, 2 (Forms of i*rosc).

Chemistry, 2 (Descriptive).

Physics, 1 (Elementary Me-
chanics).

Drawing, 3 (Geometrical and
Lettering).



SOPHOMORE YEAR.



FIRST TKRM.



,3 ^

0,3 J



(Reading an(^
Composition.)



French, 3

or
German
^Mathematics, 3 (Analytical

Geometry).
Physics, 2 (Heat and Light).
Mathematics, 8 (Descriptive

Geometry).



; Chemistry, 3 (Qualitative

Analysis).
i Drawing, 4 (Mechanical and
I Lettering).

I Shop, 3 (Forge and Machine
I Work).



* Mathematics 3 and 4 will occur one term earlier in 1908-4.



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84



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



SECOND TERM.



Mechanics, 1 (Statics).
Shop, 4 (Machine Work).
Mathematics, 9 (Descriptive
Geometry).



Physics, 8 (Electricity and
Magnetism).

Civil Engineering, 1 (Survey-
ing).

* Mathematics, 4 (Differential
Calculus). ^ '

In addition to the shop work named above electrical engi-
neering students will take six days of six hours each in shop-
work during Commencement week and the week following.

JUNIOR YEAR.



FIRST TERM.



^Electrical Engineering, 1.
Mechanical Engineering, 1

(Kinematics).
Mechanical Engineering, 2

(Machine Designing).
Mechanical Engineering, 5

(Drawing).



♦♦Mathematics, 5 (Integral Cal-
culus).

Mechanics, 2 (Statics, Distribu-
tion of Stress).

Physics, 4 (Electrical Measure-
ments).

Mechanical Engineering, 7 (La-
boratory).



SECOND TERM.



Electrical Engineering, 2.
Electrical Engineering, S.
Mechanical Engineering, 3

(Machine Designing) and

(Mill Engineering).
Mechanical Engineering, 4

(Steam Engine).
Mechanical Engineering, 6

(Drawing).



Civil Engineering, 11 (Testing
Laboratory).

Civil Engineering, 18 (Specifi-
cations and Contracts).

Mechanics, 3 (Unbalanced
Forces).

Physics, 5 (Electrical Measure-
ments).

Mechanical Engineering, 8
(Laboratory).

* For a full description of the courses of instmction in Electrical
Engineering see below.
** Mathematics 5 will occur one term earlier in 1904^5.



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STUDIKS IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING. 85

SENIOR YEAR.

VIR8T TERM.

Electrical Englaeering, 4. Mechanics^ 4 (Deflections and
Electrical Engineering, 6. Torsion).

Electrical Engineering^ 8. Physics, 6 (Mathematical The-
Eiectricai Engineering, 10. ory of Electricity and Mag-

Civil Engineering, 13 (Hy- netism).

draulics).

SECOND TERM.

Electrical Engineering, 5. Electrical Engineering, 12.

Electrical Engineering, 7. Mechanics, 5 (Kinematics and

Electrical Engineering, 9. Mechanism).

Electrical Engineering, 11. Thesis.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

1. General introduction to the stady of electrical machinery.

Electrical units, and the characteristics of dynamo-electric
machinery. This course is especially designed for stu-
dents in Civil Engineering. Three hours,

2. Extension of course 1. Treatment of the subject in greater

detail, and an introduction to the elements of alternating
currents. Three hours.

3. Laboratory work with direct current machinery. Determi-

nation of characteristics of direct current generators and
motors. Three hours,

4. lectures and recitations on the design of direct current ma-

chinery; generators, motors, and electro-magnets. Three
hours.

5. Lectures and recitations on the design of alternating current

machinery. Three hours.
fi. Worlj in drawing room to accompany course 4; detail de-
sign of machine of specified performance. Hix hours.



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86 WASHINGTON UNIVEKSITY.

7. Work iQ drawing room to accompany course 5; detail design

of a polyphase generator^ motor, or transformer. Six honrn.

8. Laboratory work; efficiency and core loss tesus, determina-

tions of wave forms, etc. Six hours.
{). Laboratory work with alternating currents; special investi-
gations. Nine hours.

10. Lectures on methods of electrical testing, and calculation of

sizes of wires for distributing networks. Ttco honr».

11. Lectures on street-railway working. Generation, distribu-

tion, and utilization of power. Two hours,

12. Detailed treatment of some engineering project, involving

the preparation of estimates and specifications, together
with the presentation of an argument supporting the so-
lution adopted. Two hours.

EQUIPMENT IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
The laboratory equipment at the present time consists
of the following apparatus : —

(a) Machines, — A high speed Buckeye engine of
twenty horse-power, a Wagner single-phase induction
motor of five horse-power, a small Wood shunt- wound
generator, a Wood series- wound, cradle mounted gen-
erator, and a small multipolar motor.

(b) liistruDients, — Two Kelvin current balances of
one, and five hundred, amperes capacity, respectively, a
Siemen's dynamometer, a Thomson quadrant electro-
meter, and a number of Weston and Thomson portable
ammeters, voltmeters, and wattmeters. There are also
^wo Wheatstone bridges, a Leed's potentiometer of high
accuracy, Eilliott and Stanley condensers, and auxiliary
galvanometers, etc.

This e(iuipmont will be largely increased by the fall
term of 1902 by the addition of the following appar-



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 63 of 70)