Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 64 of 70)
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UNDBB6BADUATE DEPARTMENT.



87



(a) Machines, — One fifteen horse-power bipolar
motor, one fifteen Kilowatt multipolar motor, one ten
Kilowatt three-phase alternator, one ten Kilowatt rotary
converter, one five horse-power three-phase induction
motor, and one five Kilowatt auto-transformer.

(b) Instruments, — Eleven indicating instruments, in-
cluding standard ammeters, voltmeters, and wattmeters,
provided with shunts and multipliers, a pair of Carhart-
Clark standard cells, two Reichsanstalt standard resist-
ances, and two tachometers.



IV. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.
FRESHMAN YEAR.



FIRST TERM.



English^ 1 (Composition).
German, 1 (Elementary

Course) or
French, 1 (Elementary

Course).
Mathematics, 1 (Higher

Algebra).



Mathematics, 2a (Plane
Trigonometry).

Chemistry, 1 (General De-
scriptive).

Drawing, 1 (Freehand).

Drawing, 2 (Instrumental
and Lettering).

Shop, 1 (Wood Worlclng).



SECOND TKRM.



English, 2 (Forms of Prose)
German, 2 (Elementary

Course) or
French, 2 (Elementary

Course).
Mathematics, 2b (Sphericai

Trigonometry).
Mathematics, 3 (Analytical

Geometry).



Physics, 1 (Elementary

Mechanics).
Chemistry, 2 (Descriptive

Chemistry).
Drawing, 8 < Geometrical

and Lettering).
Shop, 2 (Pattern Woric and

Molding).



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88



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



SOPHOMORE YEAR.



FIRST TRKH.



German, 2 (Ueading, Com-
position, etc.) or

French, 3 (Reading, Com-
position, etc.).

Mathematics,* 3 (Analytical
Geometry).

Mattiematics, 8 (Descriptive
Geometry).



Physics, 2 (Heat and Li^ht).
Chemistry, 3 (Qualitative

Analysis).
Drawing, 4 (Mechanical and

Lettering).
Shop, 8 (Forge and Machine

Worts).



8RCOND TKKM.



Chemistry, J 4.

Civil Engineering, 1 (Sur-
veying).

Mathematics, 4 (Differential
Calculus) .



Mathematics, 9 (Descriptive

Geometry).
Mechanics, 1 (Statics).
Physics, 3 (Electricity and

Magnetism).



JUNIOR YEAR.

yiKST TRRM.



Chemistry, 5.
Chemistry, 7.
Chemistry, 13.

Mechanical Eng., 2 (Machine
Designing).



Electrical Eng., 1 (Electric

Machinery),
t Mathematics, 5 (Integral

Calculus).
Mechanics, 2 (Statics and Dis-

tribation of Stress).



SRCOND TRRM.

Chemistry, G. Mechanical Eng. ,4 (Steam

Chemistry, 8. Engine).

Chemistry, 14. Mechanics, 3 (Action of Unbal-

Mechanlcal Eng., 3 (Machine anced Forces).

Designing and Mill Engineer- Geology, 1 (General Course).

ing).

• Mathematics ^ and 4 will occur one term earlier in 19aV4.

t Mathematics 5 will occur one term earlier in 1904-5

t For a full description of chemical courses of instruciioo see below.



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UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 85

SENIOR YEAK.

FIRST TERM.

Chemistry, y. Electrical Eng., 3 (Direct Cur-

Chemlstry, 11. rent Motors, etc.).

Chemistry, 15. Mechanics, 4 (Deflections and

Chemistry, 17. Torsion).

Civil Engineering, 13 Botany, 16 (Bacteriology).
(Hydraulics).

SECOND TERM.

Chemistry, 10. £lec. £ng., 4 (Design of Direct-
Chemistry, 12. Current Machinery).
Chemistry, 16. Mechanics, 5 (Kinematics and
Chemistry, 18. Mechanism).
Civil Eng., 9 (Engineering Botany, 17 (Bacteriology).
Materials).

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN
CHEMISTRY.

1-2. General Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures and laboratory
work upon the preparation and properties of the more
important elements and compounds. Qeneral laws and
principles of chemistry. Tvjo lectures and two hours oj
laboratory tvork a week.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Systematic methods of separating and

detecting the bases and acids. Laboratory work. Six
hours a week,

4. Quantitative Analysis. Methods of gravimetric and volu-

metric analysis. Laboratory work. >S'ix hours a week.
5-6. Organic Chemistry. Lectures upon the chemistry of the
carbon compounds. Preparation, properties and trans-
formations of typical compounds. Methods of determin-
ing chemical constitution ; relationships between classes
of compounds. General laws and theories. Three hours
a week.



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90 WASHINGTON UNIVBR8ITY.

7-8. Laboratory Work in Organic Chemistry. Preparation and
study of the transformation of^typical compounds. A'lx
or txcelve hours a week.

U-10. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory Work.
Analysis of commercial and industrial materials and
products. Assaying. Sanitary examinations of foods,
water, etc. Gas analysis. Six or twelve hours a i^eek.

11. Laboratory work in Physical Methods. Determination of

molecular weights by the f rieeziug point and boiling point
methods. One hour a tceek.

12, Chemical Semiuary. Advanced workers and Instructors

meet to report upon and discuss articles In current
cnemical journals. One hour a week,

18. Mineralogy. Crystallography and the determination of
minerals by means of the blowpipe. Three hours a week,

14. Descriptive mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work.
Three hours a week.

15-16. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Lectures and
Laboratory Work. Two hours a ireek.

17-18. Uesearch work in Theoretical or Applied Chemistrv.
Investigation of some subject in pure or applied Chem-
istry. Laboratory work and reading of original papers
and memoirs. Preparation of a thesis.

EQUIPMENT IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with six analytical
balances and with all the necessary graduated glass ap-
paratus such as burettes, pipettes, thermometers, barom-
eters, etc., for work in inorganic and organic chemistry.
A full supply of the ordinary chemical apparatus, glass
and metal ware, and inorganic and organic chemicals is
constantly kept on hand.

A collection of organic specimens to be used in illus-
trating the course of lectures on carbon compounds has
been formed and is constantly increasing.



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rNDKRGBADrATK DKPARTMKNT. Dl

The reference library contains a number of the more
important treatises and text-books on tlie subject.

V. SCIENCE AND LITERATURE.

FRKSilMAN AND SOPUO&fOKK YKARS,

(See pages 09 aud 70).

JUNIOR YEAR.
The work of the Junior year consists of nine Courses
of Instruction, all elective. The choice of studies must
be approved by the Dean at the beginning of each term.

SENIOR YEAR.
The work of the Senior year consists of nine Courses
of Instruction, all elective. The choice of studies must
be approved by the Dean at the beginning of each term.
A Thesis of literary or scientific character acceptable to
the Faculty will be required as one condition of grad-
uation.

VI. COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE.

The Course in Architecture which may be entered upon
in September, 11)02, can only be outlined in general
terms. A full and detailed statement will be published
by itself during the year. However, during thejb^resh-
man Year the Course will in no respect differ from that of
all other Courses in the School of Engineering, and the
work during the Sophomore Year will differ but slightly
from that of the Civil Engineering Course. Accordingly
the work as laid down on pages 09 and 70 for the Fresh-
man and Sophomore Years may be accepted as substan-
tially the work of two years in the Course in Architecture,



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92 WASHINGTON UN1VEU8ITT.

FOB THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS.

The ari-angement for these two years according to
semesters has yet to be made, but the folio wiDg state-
ment of the Courses of Instruction embraces substan-
tially all except what is included under the head of
Mathematics and Mechanics. The study of Framed
Structures and of Steel Construction is included under
Course 1 3 given below.

1. Advanced Free-hand Drawing. Drawing In Charcoal from

casts of architectural ornament^ and from casts of parts
of the haman form. Drawing from the Antiqae.

2. Water-Color Drawing. Drawing in water-ccHor from still-life

and from nature.

3. History of Ancient Architecture : — Egyptian, Assyrian^ Per-

sian/ Greek^ Roman.

4. History of Mediaeval Architecture: — Byzantine^ Roman

esque, Gothic.

5. History of Renaissance and Modem Architecture. The Ke-

naissance^ Modern Revivals^ Oriental and American
Architecture.

6. The Elements of Architecture. Analysis of the Five Orders

of Classic Architectni-e and exercises in drawing and ren-
dering them.

7. The Elements of Architecture. Analysis of the elements

employed in Classic and Renaissance Design, and exer-
cises in drawing and rendering tliem. Mouldings, pedes-
tals, pilasters, pediments, inter-col umniations, arches and
vaults, imposts, doors, windows, roofs, spires, steps,
stairs, domes.

8. Elementary Architectural Drawing. Elementary problems in

design, involving the use of the orders and the elements
of design. Theory of the composition of line drawings.
Rendering of architectural drawings In pen-and-ink
freehand. Elementary application of India ink and
color washes to architectural drawings.



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UNDBRGKADUATB DBPARTlfENT. 93

9. Sketch Design. Problems to be rendered in the form of

sketch designs in limited tiipe of one or two days. Alter-
nating with Course 8; Regular problems in design.

10. Design. The development of the principles of composition

and planning by the working out of problems In design.
Alternating with Course 7.

11. Sketch Design. Advanced problems to be rendered In the

form of sketch designs^ in limited time of one or two
days. Alternating with regular problems in design.

12. Advanced Design. Application of the principles of preceding

courses to advanced problems In planning and composi-
tion.

13. Building Construction. The nature and use of materials

employed in architectural construction. Approved
methods of modem building. Specifications and work-
ing drawings. Lectures. Drawing-room work and visits
of inspection.

14. History of Sculpture and Painting. A course of lectures on

the history of sculpture and painting and their relation to
architecture, with research and use of text-book.

15. Thesis. An extended problem^ involving original i*esearch

and study in advanced planning and composition, with
memoir and essay on materials and construction.

LECTURE FOUNDATIONS.

A Lecture Endowment Fund, amounting to $2^7,000,
was created in 1876, by one of the early friends of the
University, Mr. William Henry Smith. It was given
without any restrictions', except that the fund should be
increased, if practicable, by accruing interest, to $30,000,
which has been accomplished, and that no part of the
principal should be expended.



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94 WASHINaxON UNIVERSITY.

The beginning of a fund for the encouragement of
the study of American History has been made by a
gift of $15,000 by Mrs, Mary Hemenway of Boston,
Massachusetts.

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.

Necessary books of reference are provided, and also
a good selection of periodical literature. No attempt is
made at present to gather a general library. During the
year 1880 a gift of about three thousand volumes was
received from the family of the late Joseph Coolidge, of
Boston. The collection, known as the Coolidge LibrarA',
is especially rich in excellent editions of Italian and
French authors, and is a very material addition to the
usefulness of the library.

Through the liberality of a number of citizens of St.
Louis an arrangement has been made by which the
privilege of using the Mercantile Library has been ex-
tended, under prescribed conditions, to such members of
the University as may be designated by the Chancellor.

PHYSICAL CULTURE.

Ample provision is made for gymnastics and field sports
generally in the plans for the new University. The Gym-
nasium and Athletic Field stand side by side at the
western end of " Broad Walk," just one-half mile from
the clock face on University Tower, and about 1,000 feet
west of the Dormitories. The Athletic Field affords
oi)portunity for base ball, foot ball, and every variety of



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UNDERORADLATE DEPARTMENT.



95




FIRST FLOOR.



field athletics. The ruiiuing track is finished in the most
approved manner, and is unusually large, having only three
laps to the mile. The heavy excavation required to re-
duce the field to a level has left a broad amphitheater
extending nearly half the circumference, affording un-
equaled opportunity for spectators. The ground plan is
well shown on the map attached to the cover of this
catalogue.

The Gymnasium is shown by the first floor plan. The
complete establishment will cost fully $150,000, and will
be finished early in 1908. The building is three stories
high with a high and well-lighted basement. Lockers,
shower baths, and lavatories are on four floors, with
accommodations for 2,000 men. The Gymnasium Hall
is 70 ft. X 105 ft. and when the apparatus is drawn aside



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96 WASHINGTON UNIVER8ITT.

or up out of the way, there is a very superior court for
hand ball and basket ball, two athletic indoor game^
w^orthy of the approval and support of all students. The
proximity of the Gymnasium to the Athletic Field renders
special dressing rooms for the Field teams unnecessary.
A unique feature of the Gymnasium is a special dressing
room with baths for the use of visiting clubs. It is
intended to make every club, which comes to play with a
University team, the guest of the University for the time
being, and everything which can add to its comfort and
convenience will be provided.

The Athletic Field will be used more or less by the
University during the Fall of 1902 and until the Fair is
opened. After the Fair it will come into immediate pos-
session and constant use.

The Gymnasium and Field will be placed in charge
of a Professor of Physical Culture, who will supervise all
exercises and games. He will carefully examine every
student and prescribe for him a scheme of culture. No
student will be allowed to play foot ball, or to run races,
without the written permission of the Professor in charge.
Systematic gymnastics must precede severe athletics.

On the north side of Broad Walk there is ground for a
large number of tennis courts for such clubs as may be
formed among the students. Each club will be assigned
ground for one or more courts which they can fit up and
control.

The high ground, pure air, and perfect sanitation of
the University Campus are a guarantee for conditions
healthful and pleasant.



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CNDBBORADUATE DEPARTMENT. 97

Before and during the Louisiana Purchase Fair, in ad-
dition to the Gymnasium and some hand-ball and basket-
ball courts on the lot at Beaumont and Locust streets,
the students will have the use of a rented field for athletic
practice, field sports, and match games with visiting clubs.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

One perpetual scholarship, founded by the payment of
$5,000 and entitling the holder to all the advantages of
all the departments of the University forever, has been
placed at the disposal of the Mercantile Library Associa-
tion, with the recommendation " that when the applicants
for scholarship are of equal merit, the preference shall be
given to one for some mechanical pursuit."

Two scholarships are also held by the St. Louis High
School, one of which is given to the student graduating
from the school in June with the highest record, and the
other to the student graduating in January with the highest
record. The scholarships entitle the holders to free
tuition in the Undergraduate Department.

One scholarship is also held by the School Board of
Kansas City for the benefit of the gi'aduates of the Kan-
sas City High School. This scholarship entitles the
holder (who is to be selected by the School Board) to
free tuition in the College or the School of Engineering.
Reports of the standing of the student will be made to
said Board annually by the Dean.

A trust fund of $30,000 has been accepted by the
University from the Western Sanitary Commission, for
the establishment of twenty free scholarships in the

7



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98 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

Undergraduate Department, to be filled by children or
descendants of Union soldiers who served in the late
civil war. In default of such applicants, candidates wiU
be appointed by the Chancellor of the University with
the advice of the Faculty. Preference is given to those
in straitened circumstances, aiid 710 studefU is accepted or
cojitinued icho is not of good moral character, who does
not sustain satisfactory examinatio}is or who fails to com-
ply with the rules of the University.

From the same source a Sustentation Fund of $10,-
000 has been accepted, the income of which is expended
in aid of students in straitened circumstances, giving
preference always to the descendants of Union soldiers,
as above.

EXAMINATIONS.

The examinations in the Undergraduate Department
are frequent and rigid. No promotions to higher classes
are made except upon conclusive evidence that the ante-
cedent subjects have been well mastered. Reports of the
standing of individual students will be made by the
Deans to parents or guardians, if such are requested.



DEGREES IN THE UNDERGRADUATE
DEPARTMENT.

I, IN THE COLLEGE.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon the
satisfactory completion of thirty-eight courses.



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UNDBRGBADUATE DEPAETKENT. 99

II. IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING.

1. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred on
the satisfactory completion of four years' work.

2. The prof esdional degrees of Civil Engineer y Mechan-
ical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Chemical Engineer,
and Architect are conferred only after three or more
years of actual and successful practice, one year of which
must have been spent in responsible charge of engineering
architectural work, and the presentation of an acceptable
thesis ; both the thesis and the experience should be such
as to show an ability to design and execute high grade
work.

No student xoill he recommended for a degree tvho has
not passed all his examinations and handed in such
projects or theses as may be required.

The diploma fee is three dollars, payable in advance.

ADVANCED DEGREES.

The degree of Master of Arts, which is granted after
not less than one year of residence and study, is open to
all who have received from this University the degree of
Bachelor of Arts.

The degree of Master of Science, which is granted after
not less than one year of residence and study, is open to
all who have received from this University the degree of
Bachelor of Science, of Civil Engineer, of Mechanical
Engineer, of Electrical Engineer, of Engineer of Mines
of Chemist or Chemical Engineer, or Architect.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy, which is granted
after not less than two years of residence and study (the



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100 WASHINGTON DNIVKB8ITT.

two years of residence and study may include the year of
preparation for the Master's degree), is open to all who
have received the degree of Master from this University.

The degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, and
Doctor of Philosophy are open to graduates of other
institutions who shall have satisfied the Committee on
Advanced Degrees of their fitness.

Applications for candidacy for the degree of Master of
Arts, Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy are
referred to a committee of five members of the Faculty
of the Undergraduate Department, annually appointed,
known as the Committee on Advanced Degrees.

The Committee decides upon the admission of the can-
didate ; determines the course of study which the candi-
date is to pursue ; determines by examination, thesis, or
both, whether a candidate is suitably prepared for the
degree ; and recommends the granting of the d^ree to
the Faculty of the Undergraduate Department.

REQUIBEMBNTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE.

a. At least one year of residence and study.

b. Every candidate must pass such written examina-
tions as the Committee on Advanced Degrees may see fit
to prescribe.

c. In addition to the work specified in each case, every
candidate shall present a satisfactory thesis, which must
be submitted not later than May 1 of the year in which
the degree is to be conferred.



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UNDEBGBADUATE DBPABTMENT. 101

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE.

a. Two years of residence and study.

h. Every candidate must satisfy the Committee on
Advanced Degrees that he has a reading knowledge of
French and German.

e. Every candidate shall present an acceptable thesis,
which shall be the result of original investigation. This
thesis must be presented not later than April 1 of the
year in which the degree is to be conferred ; and every
candidate must furnish the Committee on Advanced
Degrees with 200 printed copies of his thesis, after its
acceptance, before he can be recommended for the degree.

FEES.

Every candidate for the Master's degree is required to
pay fifty dollars, and every candidate for the Doctor's
degree one hundred dollars ; one-half to be paid as a con-
dition of admission to candidacy, and the remainder
before the conferring of the degree.

The diploma fee is five dollars, payable in advance.

COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED DEGREES FOR 1901-1902.

The following members of the Faculty constitute the
Committee for 1901-1902 : Professors Snow (chairman),
Nipher (secretary), Heller, Keiser and Shipley.

TUITION.

Tuition in the Undergraduate Department for students
in full standing is $160 a year, payable semi-annually,
in advance if required, and always before the middle of
the term.



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102 WASHINGTON UNIVBE8ITT.

A matriculation fee of five dollars, payable in advaDce,
is required of all candidates for degrees.

Tuition for special students is $15.00 for each course.

BOARD AND LODGING.

Students living at a distance from the University have
no difficulty in securing rooms and board at reasonable
rates. The yearly expenses may range between the fol-
lowing estimates, according to taste and habits of
economy : —

Tuitiou ^160 00— $150 00

Board, lodging, and washing, 9 months 200 00 to 300 00

Books and instniments 10 00 " 20 00

Incidentals 15 00 *• 30 00

Total for one year $375 00 to $500 00

Books and instruments may be obtained at cost from
the Co-operative Association, organized and managed by
the students of this Department.



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.



(a DKPAllTMKNT OF WASHINGTON UNIVKRSITY.)



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HENRY SHAW SCHOOL OF BOTANY.

' KSTABLISUED JUNK S, 1885.



ADVISORY COMMirrEE.

THE CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVEUSITY, ex ojRcio,
WILLIAM G. FARLOW, M.l>.
GEO. J. ENGELMANN, M.l>.

INSTRUCTORS.
WILLIAM TRELEASE,

DIRKCTOR AND
KNGELMANN PKOFBSSOR OF BOTANT.

HERMANN VON SCURENK,

INSTRUCTOR IN CRYPTOGAMIC BOTANY.

SAMUEL M0ND8 COULTER,

GENERAL INSTRUCTOR.

ELLEN C. CLARK,

ASSISTANT AT THE MART INSTITUTK.



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 106



GENERAL INFORMATION.

Id June, 1885, Mr. Henry Shaw, of St. Louis, author-
ized the Chancellor of the University to place before the
Board of Directors a plan of action for the establishment
of a School of Botany, as follows : —

That he proposed, with the concurrence of the Direct-
ors, to endow a School of Botany as a department of
Washington University, by donation of improved real
estate, yielding over $5,000 revenue, and to place it in
such relation with the largely endowed Missouri Botanical
Garden and Arboretum as would practically secure their
best uses, for scientific study and investigation, to the
professor and students of the said School of Botany, in
all time to come.

At a meeting of the Board of Directors held June 8 ,
1885, the following resolutions were, therefore, offered, in
grateful acceptance of Mr. Shaw's proposal: —

1. That a School of Botany be established as a special depart-
ment of Washington University, to be known as the Henry
Shaw School of Botany.

2. That a professorship of Botany be therein established^ to
be known as the Engelmann Professorship.

3. That Professor Wm. Trelease, of the University of Wis-
consin, be invited to fill the same; his duties to begin at the
commencement of the next academic year, September 17.

4. That said School of Botany be placed under the special
care and direction of an advisory committee, to consist of five
members, of whom two shall be members of this Board, and
two shall be selected outside of the Board — the Chancellor of
the University being a member ex officio.



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106 WASHINGTON UNIVEK8ITT.

This report was accepted and the resolution unani-



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 64 of 70)