Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 65 of 70)
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mously adopted. The record of such action was then
siibnaitted to Mr. Shaw and approved by hiin.

On this foundation, the School of Botany was opened
in the autumn of 1885. In his will, admitted to probate
in 1889, Mr. Shaw further provided for the maintenance
of the income of the School up to a certain limit, and
took steps calculated to secure the proposed close co-
operation between the School of Botany and the Botanical
Garden.

The laboratory of the School of Botany is temporarily
located at 1724 Washington avenue, and a small library,
containing the usual laboratory manuals and class books,
which is kept at the laboratory for reference, is added to
as new books, needed for class use, appear. In addition
to alcoholic and imbedded material, a small herbarium is
being formed, which is intended to contain representa-
tives of the local flora. Advanced students, some of
whose work is done at the Garden, also have the priv-
ilege of consulting, under necessary restrictions, the ex-
cellent herbarium and library maintained there, and now
comprising about 365,000 sheets of specimens, about 36,-
000 books and pamphlets, and a large collection of wood
veneers and sections ; and no effort is spared to make
the Garden equipment as complete as possible in any line
of work taken up by competent investigators.

The instrumental equipment of the laboratory includes
one microscope by Zeiss, with the necessary objectives,
ranging from AA. to 1-18 in oil immersion, and acces-
sories for spectroscopic studies and work with polarized



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 107

light ; twenty microscopes by Leitz, with the objectives
needed for the best work (inchiding five 1-12 in. oil
immersion lenses, one 1-16 in. oil immersion, and one
1-20 in. oil immersion), polariscope, camera lucidas of
several patterns, etc. ; sixteen dissecting microscopes by
Bausch and Lomb ; two dissecting microscopes by Leitz,
one of them provided with camera lucida ; a projecting
apparatus for delineating objects under a low power of
enlargement ; a simple outfit comprising all that is neces-
sary for ordinary bacteriological investigation ; and good
microtomes and other apparatus needed for histo-
logical work and elementary physiological experimenta-
tion. Students are provided by the laboratory with all
necessary instruments and supplies (excepting razors or
other cutting instruments) without charge except for
breakage or other injury and for slides and cover glasses
used for permanent preparations ; but when alcohol or other
expensive substances are used in quantity, as in work on
bacteria, a special charge may be made for material used.
The working year of the School of Botany is of the
same extent as that of the Undergraduate Department of
the University, and is similarly divided, except for a few
special teachers' classes corresponding to the usual school
terms.

The work offered students is of two classes: under-
graduate studies, including at present eighteen stated
electives — the equivalent of nearly three full years'
work, — and post-graduate or special courses for advanced
students, planned in each case to meet the needs of the
student. For the convenience of students, nearly all ele-



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108 WASHINGTON DNIVEB8ITT.

mentary instruction is given at the laboratory, near the
other University buildings, where the principal instru-
mental equipment is kept, but the study of living plants,
and advanced herbarium and library work, are provided
for at the Garden. All courses capable of being so
taught are given in the laboratory, and supplemented by
lectures and quizzes by the teacher. The few lecture
courses offered are illustrated wherever possible by speci-
mens exhibiting the subject under consideration, and by
wall charts and the stereopticon.

A list of the undergraduate electives is given above
(p. 84), in the general information concerning the Under-
graduate Department. Under the advice of the Dean oi
the College and the Professor of botany, students who
wish to make a specialty of botany through their coarse
may arrange to take all of these electives and to follow
them by a piece of investigation on which a thesis is to be
based ; and regularly enrolled special students who are
not candidates for a degree may give the greater part of
their time to botanical study, subject to such regulation
as is prescribed by the Faculty.

Special classes for the benefit of teachers, and other
persons not in attendance at the University, are formed
from time to time, and such persons may be admitted to
any of the regular electives on the payment of a tuition
fee conformed to the general rates of the University,
namely, $15.00 for each full course (of three exercises
per week during a term), and $7.60 for each half course
(of less than three exercises per week for the same
of time).



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SCHOOL OF BOTANY. 109

Graduate students who arc eligible under the rules of
the Faculty to candidacy for a higher degree (p. 99), if
suitably prepared, may elect research work in botany as
their principal study for such degree.

Applications for the formation of special classes, and
all correspondence concerning the School of Botany,
should be addressed to

William Trelease,
Shaw School of Botany,

St. Louiiiy Mo.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

(art DKPARTMKNT of WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.)

19th and Locast Streets.

Ail communications in regard to tlie School should l)e
addressed

St. Louis School of Fink Arts.



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CALENDAR.

1901-1902.

F1K8T Term, Day School, begins Monday^ September 23^ 1901.
First Trrm, Day School, ends Saturday, December 14, 1901.
First Term, Niqht School, begins Monday, NoYember4, 1901.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, Febmary 1, 1903.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 16,

1901.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March 15, 1902.
Second Term, Niqht School, begins Monday, February 3,

1902.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 26, 1902.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 17, 1902.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 7, 1902.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 10-12, 1902.

1902-1903.

First Term, Day School, begins Monday, September 22, 19<te .
First Term, Day School, ends Saturday, December 13, 1902.
First Term, Night School, begins Monday, Noveml)er 3, 1902.
First Term, Night School, ends Saturday, January 31, 1903.
Second Term, Day School, begins Monday, December 15,

1902.
Second Term, Day School, ends Saturday, March li, 1903.
Second Term, Night School, begins Monday, February 2,

1903.
Second Term, Night School, ends Saturday, April 25, 1903.
Third Term, Day School, begins Monday, March 16, 1903.
Third Term, Day School, ends Saturday, June 6, 1903.
Exhibition of Students' Work, June 9-11, 1903.



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ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS.

RBORGANIZED MAY 22, 1879.



The establishment of the Art School upon a broad and
permanent foundation has always been part of the plan
of Washington University. For nearly twenty-five years
Art instruction has been embodied in the course of study.
In 1876, special students were admitted to the Drawing
Department, and class and public lectures were given on
Art History. The same year an evening school was
opened.

On May 22, 1879, the Directors of the University
adopted an ordinance establishing a Department of Art
in Washington University, from which the following
extracts are taken : —

'* A Department of Art is hereby established as a
special Department of Washington University, to be
known as The St. Louis School of Fine Arts.

*' The objects of said Department shall be : Instruction
in Fine Arts; the collection^ and exhibition of pictures,
statuary, and other works of art, and of whatever else
may be of artistic interest and appropriate for a Public
Gallery or Art Museum ; and, in general, the promotion
by all proper means of aesthetic or artistic education.'*



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114 WASHINGTON rNIVEKSITY.



BOARD OF CONTROL.

ELLIS WAINWRIGHT, Prksidknt,

VVINFIELD S. CHAPLIN, Chanckllor, ey officio.

HARRISON I. DRUMMOND.

ALFRED L. SHAPLEIGH.

CHARLES PARSONS.

CHARLES NAGEL.

GEORGE D. BARNARD.

EDWARD R. HOYT.

WM. K. BIXBY.

HALSEY C. IVES, Dirkctor, ex officio.

INSTRUCTORS AND LECTURERS.

HALSEY C. IVES, Director.
Lecturer on the fliftorical Development of Art.
Pupil of Alexander Piatowski.

ROBERT P. BRINGHURST,

Moileling ami Sculpture.
St. Louis School of Fine Arts — Atelier Dumont, PEcole des Beaux Arts.



Ih'avHng and Paintinff from Still Life.
St. Louis School of Fine Arts —Pupil of Roulanger and I^febvn*.

CHARLES WARD RHODES,

Perftjyective, Shades and Shadows.
K|fl. Acadcinie, Munich, and K. K. Kunstgewerbe Schnle, Berlin.

EDMUND H. WUERPEL,

Drawing and Painting from Life, and Composition.

Pupil of St. T.ouis School of Fine Arts, Bouguereau, Ferrier, Aman-

Jean, and I'Kcole des Beaux Arts.

CHARLES P. DAVIS,

Antique.

Pupil of N. Y. Art Students' League, Bouguereau, Ferrier, and Fleury.



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SCHOOL OP FINE ABTS. 116

GRACE HAZARD,

Saturday Claaae$.

Pupil of St. Loais School of Fine Arts.

ALICE M. G. PATTISON,

Lecturer on Engraving, Etching, and Allied Arts.

Pupil of lioss Turner, Wm. M. Chase, and S. R. Koehler.

ELISE BLATTNER,

Lecturer on the History of Art.

University of Berlin.

OSCAR W. RAEDER,

Mechanical and Architecturtil Drawing.

Pupil of St. I^uis School of Fine Arts and Washington University.

RICHARD E. MILLER,

Drawing and Painting from Life, and Composition.

Pupil of St. Louis School of Fine Arts and I^urens. Constant and Julian

Academy.

HENRIETTA ORD JONES,

Ceramic Painting.

Pupil of St. Louis School of Fine Arts and Franz Kischoif and Otto

Punsch.

FREDERICK L. STODDARD,

Demgn and Water Color.

Pupil of St. Louis School of Fine Arts, RouKuereau, Ferrier, Laurens,

and Constant.

EMILY S. HUTCHINGS, Librarian,

Lecturer on History of Art.

Pupil of the Karolinum, Altenburg, Germany, and Missouri State

University.

In addition to the regular staff of instructors, pupil teachers arc added
from time to time from the advanced students working in the school.



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116 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



GENERAL INFORMATION.

There are three terms in the year.

fStudenta will be admitted at any time; ape cial arrange-
ments being made for those enrolling before or after the
term begins.

The school furnishes instruction in Drawing, Modeling,
Painting, Artistic Anatomy, Perspective, Composition,
Design and Applied Art, Architectural and Mechanical
Drawing.

The rooms are open for the study of drawing, painting and
modeling, every day during each term from 9 a. m. to 4
p. m. and for the study of drawing from the Antique and
Life, mechanical drawing and modeling three evenings in
the week, from November to May.

Students may enter any class upon submitting examples
of work showing the necessary skill. Applicants for
admission to the evening Life Class must submit a draw-
ing of a full length figure from the Antique or Life.

Students who can pass the necessary examination may
study Modern Languages, History and Literature in
classes of the Undergraduate Department of the University,

The school is fully equipped with models, casts from
the Antique, et cetera.

The class rooms are adjacent to the galleries of tlie
Museum. The building erected during the past years was
especially designed to meet the needs of the various
classes of the school and, in its appointments, art students
will find every convenience for study.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 117

The artists connected with the school as teachers
have received their training in the schools of our own
country and in the Art Schools of Europe,

All finished work imM he left in the school or if re-
moved by special permission, must be returned before the
close of the school year for final examination by the com-
mittee appointed for that purpose.

Instruction in all classes of the school is individual.
Advancement of each student depends on the degree of
proficiency only.

An admission fee of $2.00 is charged each student on
enrolling in the classes of the day school.

TUITION FEES.

Tuition Fkeh are due and payable to the Treasurer of
Washiugtou University, in advance, on enrollment,
and on the first of each term. For convenience, the
Secretary of the school will receive the fee and trans-
mit it to the Treasurer.

Enrollmbnt Fee Each student pays this fee once . 62 00
The income from enrollment fees is used in ll])rary
extension work. Students withdrawing before the
end of the year in which tlie fee is paid may continue
the use of the library to the close of the year.

Ratks of Tuition. Antique, Life and Portrait Classes,

either or all classes, per term 25 00

Ratks of Tuition. Saturday Class, Antique or Sketch

Class, per term 5 00

Students will be admitted to the Day School, per
monthj with the privilege of one or more classes per
day, first month 12 60

Each following month during the term or the year . . 10 00



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118 WASHINGTON UNIVKB8ITT.

Evening Life Class. Drawing or Modeling, three times

per week, for term of twelve weeks $7 50

Evening Class. Antique (drawins^ from casts), three

times per week, for term of twelve weeks .... 5 tK)
Evening Class. Elementary (free hand), three times

per week, for term of twelve weeks 5 00

Evening Class. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing,

three times per week, for term of twelve weeks . . 5 00
Evening Class. Modeling, three times per week, for

term of twelve weeks 5 00

CLASSES IN DESIGN AND CERAMIC DECORATION.

Regularly enrolled Apt Students will receive instruction
in Design without extra charge.

For Instruction in Ceramic Decoration an additional fee,
per term, of ^7.00 will be charged.

Special students wil) be admitted to these classes per

term of twelve weeks $25 00

Students enrolled for one mouthy first month .... 12 50

Each succeeding month 10 00

For a period less than one month, including frcedom of

Museum and Library, per week 5 00

For those desiring to work three days each week, every
other day, the privilege will l>e given to work half
the day in Ceramic Decoration and the otlier half of
the same day in one of the other classes of the
School, per term 25 00



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trs?



SCHOOL OF FINB ARTS. Ill)



d' ARRANGEMENT OF CLASSES.

MORNING.

CLASHES IN TUK ANTIQUE.

' ' Drawing from the Cast, elementary and advanced^ daily^ 9 to

12 a. m. Charles P. Davis, Instructor.

LIFE CLASS, NUDE AND DKAPED.

Drawing and Painting from the Xude and Costumed Model in
Charcoal, Pastel and Oil Color, dally, except Saturday, 9 to
12 a. m. Edmund U. Wuerpel, Instructor.

CERAMICS PAINTING.

Decoration of China, Porcelain, and Glass, Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays, 9 to 12 a. m. Henrietta Ord Jones,
Instructor.

COMPOSITION IN COLOR.

Wednesdays, 11: 30 to 12 : 30. Edmund U. Wuerpel, Instructor.

COMPOSITION AND ILLUSTRATION IN BLACK AND WHITE.

Wednesdays, 11 : 30 to 12 : 30. Charles P. Davis, Instructor.

ARTISTIC ANATOMY.

Fridays, 12 : 15 to 1 : 00. Edmund H. Wuerpel, Instructor.

SKETCH CLASS IN BLACK AND WHITE.

Dally, 12 : 30 to 1 p. m. Free to all students.

PERSPECTIVE.

Mechanical and Freehand Perspective, Shades and Shadows.
Winter term, Tuesdays and Fridays, 12 to 12:30 p. m.
Charles Ward Rhodes, Instructor.



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120 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

AFTERNOON.

PAINTING FROM THE HEAD.

Drawing and Painting from the Head in Charcoal^ Pastel and
Oil Color, dally, except Saturday, 1 to 4 p. m. Richard K.
Miller, Instructor.

PAINTING FROM STILL LIFE.

Oil and Water Color, dally except Saturday, I to 4 p. m. Ed-
ward M. Campbell, Instructor.

CERAMIC PAINTING.

Decoration of China, Porcelain and Glass, Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays, I to 4 p. m. Henrietta Ord Jones,
Instructor.

CLASSES IN DESIGN AND APPLIED ART.

Book Cover Designing, Drawing for Illustration, Decoration of
Wood and Leather by means of Pyrography (wood burning)
and the Application of Color, Stained Glass Designing,
Designing for Posters and Advertising Purposes, Decorative
Composition, and Surface Decoration as applied to China,
Embroidery and other surfaces, dally, except Saturday, I
to 4 p. m. Frederick L. Stoddard, Instructor.

MODELING.

From Architectural Ornament, the Antique, and Life, daily
except Saturday, 1 to 4 p. m. Robert P. Bringhurst, In-
structor.

teachers' COURSE.

Free-hand Drawing from Model, Object, Antique, and Life.
Mechanical and Geometrical Drawing. Graphical Solution
of Problems in Plane Geometry. Plans, Sections and Eleva-
tions. Perspective, Shades and Shadows. Color — Simple
Forms in Wash and Water Color. Sketching from Simple
Forms in Still Life. Oil Color, StlULife; Sketching from



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 121

Nature^ Landscape and Llfe^ in Oil, Water Color, and Black
and White. Decoration of Various Forms, Porcelain,
Pottery, etc.
Modeling — Simple Forms from Nature and Cast; Life. Appli-
cation of Modeling to Various Forms of Decoration.

EVENING CLASSES.

ANTIQUKj ELRMBKTARY, AND ADVANCED.

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7: 30 to 9: 30 p. m. Charles
P. Davis and Edward M. Campbell, Instructors.

LIFE CLASS FROM THE NUDE.

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 p. m. Richard
E. Miller, Instructor.

MODELING.

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 p. m. Robert
P. Bringhurstj Instructor.

MECHANICAL DRAWING.

Geometrical Solids and Machine Details, etc. Monday, Tues-
day, and Thursday, 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 p. m. Oscar W. Raeder,
Instructor.

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.

Plans, Elevations and Assembled Drawings, Perspective,
Orthographic Projection, etc. Monday, Tuesday, and
Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. Oscar W. Raeder, In-
structor.

[SATURDAY CLASSES.

JUVENILE CLASS.

Drawing from the Cast and Still Life. SIcetching in Water
Color, 9 to 12 a. m. Grace Hazard, Instructor.



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122 WASHINGTON UNIYBRSITY.

CLASS IN ILLCrSTRATION IN BLACK AND WHITE.

9 to 12 a. m. Edmund H. Wuerpel, Instructor.

ABVANCKD CLASS.

Drawing from Antique. 9 to 12 a. m. Charles P. Davis^ Supt.

CLASS IN ILLUSTRATION AND SKETCHING IN COLOR.

9 to 12 a. m. Richard £. Miller^ Instructor.

TEACHERS' COURSE.

9 to 12 a. m. Frederick L. Stoddard, Instructor.

OUT-OF-DOOR SKETCHING, LANDSCAPE AND FIGURE.

Upon recommendations from their teachers classes will be
formed from among the advanced students during the mouth of
May, dally, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Criticisms by the various
Instructors.



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 123



NOTES ON COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.

I.

In the Antique Classes the method of instruction aims
to teach the students to construct their drawings in a
simple and correct manner. By the use of antique and
modern forms as models from which to draw, the student
is trained to perceive planes and values, light and shade,
and is taught to economize time and effort when striving
to produce an effect. By this means a foundation is laid
for the further training of the draughtsman, modeler and
painter in the more advanced classes.

II. STILL LIFE PAINTING CLASS.

Students begin the study of color in this class. They
are first taught to observe and represent simple masses
of form and color such as are found in fruits and vege-
tables. They are then given more difficult combinations,
reflected light's and values such as are found in objects
made in richly colored metals or other materials. They
are also encouraged to make careful studies of drapery.
The student may work in oil or water color, but whatever
medium may be used, a truthfulness in form, color and
value, simplicity^of treatment, and close study of texture
are required.

III. MODELING CLASS.

The work of the modeling class is of a threefold naturef.
First, there are a small number of students who study
modeling with the intention of becoming sculptors ; these



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124 WASHINGTON UNIVEK8ITT.

students have every opportunity to study from the living
model and also receive instruction in anatomy. Second,
a large proportion of students study modeling in order
to gain a more accurate knowledge of form and propor-
tion to aid them in their drawing and painting. These
students work from the cast as well as from the living
model, both nude and draped. The third class is com-
posed largely of artisans working to acquire a knowledge
of decorative form and ornament as used in architecture.
To this end they work chiefly from casts of ornaments and
figures from the antique and renaissance periods.

IV. HEAD AND PORTRAIT CLASS.

The purpose of study in the Head and Portrait Class
is to accustom the student to grasp the essentia] char-
acter of the model.

Firm construction in drawing is insisted upon ; also
attention to the salient characteristics in fonn and color.

Students are taught to sacrifice unimportant and un-
necessary details in form and in color, by this means
gaining simplicity and strength in their work. Freedom
of conception and execution is encouraged. The study
of color values is insisted upon as more important than
brush work and technique.

V. LIFE CLASS.

The last step in the academic training of the art student
is the study from the living model. In the study from
the nude, facility in construction, observation of char-
acter, correctness of proportions and values and a fear-
lessness of execution are essential. In painting from the



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SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 125

nude, simplicity of form, value and color, must follow
good drawing. Method of execution is entirely individual
whether in black and white or in color. The placing of
the figure or object on canvas, with a view to composition,
is demanded. In the advanced studies, the background
is called for, and atmospheric relief expected.

VI. DRAWING FOR ILLUSTRATION.

The purpose of this class is to give the student a
knowledge of drawing and pictorial composition and to
apply this knowledge to the production of illustrations in
various forms. At first the work is from casts, natural
forms an(\ drapery and later drawings are made from the
living figure draped and nude. Constant effort is directed
to the cultivation of a quickness of observation, the
ability to draw correctly, the selection and arrangement
of the material within the picture aud an absolute sim-
plicity of expression.

The various methods used are: The Poixt, the pencil,
pen, and chalk — The Brush, in gouache and wash ; and
Color, in oil, aquarelle, and pastel.

In black and white the student is urged to search for
indicative rather than an absolute or real method of expres-
sion. Freedom of individual execution is encouraged.

In color the value and coiTectness of tone are consid-
ered above finish and execution.

In addition the student is impressed with the limita-
tions imposed by the processes through which his drawing
is transferred to the printed page. The aim is to famil-
iarize the student with the requirements of these processes



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126 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

as well as to develop artistic feeling and the technical
capacity to express it.

VII. CLASS IN APPLIED ART.

CBRAMIC DECORATION.'

The aim of this class is to give the students a practical
knowledge of painting on china, glass, etc. Particular
attention is given to the development of originality in
design and simplicity in treatment. The student is first
taught to make a careful and intelligent study of the
shape to be decorated and the space to be covered.
Special attention is given to the application of conven-
tional ornament as well as realistic forms. All firing is
done in the building of the school so that a thorough
knowledge may be obtained in the use of the Kiln.

The students of this class will have the privilege of
studying the large collections of decorated porcelain in
the galleries of the Museum, comprehending examples of
Doulton, Royal Worcester, Crown Derby, Danish, and
Swedish ware. There are also collections of Old Chinese,
Wedge wood and Rosenberg potteries.

VIII.

In accordance with the announcement made some time
ago arrangements have been completed for the organiza-
tion of classes in Design and Applied Art. Instruction
will be given in the following subjects: Book Cover
Designing, Drawing for Illustration, Decoration of Wood



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 65 of 70)