Mo.) Washington University (Saint Louis.

A catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. online

. (page 67 of 70)
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18i)5-« 54 y5 An

1896-7 "'*^ l«[ \''

1897-S '**^ ^'* '"^

1898-9 <»J ^^ ^^

1899-1900 -*" *** ^"'

1900-1901 ^^ ♦'** *•**

1901-1902 5« t52

ADMISSION.

Applicants for admission to the school niubt havo »
preliminary education equivalent to a four years' High
School course.



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LAW SCHOOL. 151

A college diploma, proof of admission to college, or
certificate of graduation from a High School having a'
four years' course, will be received as evidence of fitness
to enter. Applicants not presenting such documentary
evidence may pass an examination to test tbeir substan-
tial compliance with the above requirement.

In the case of candidates for the Senior ('lass who have
previously been members of the Junior Class, the exami-
nations of that year will suffice, if creditably passed ; and
those who failed to pass, may upon further study, apply
again for examination in September, provided their rec-
ord is not too unsatisfactory. The regular examinations
for this purpose will begin on Tuesday, September 23rd,
li)01, at i) a. m. at the Law School, 1417 Locust Street.

New applicants for admission as Seniors will be exam-
ined at the same time, and upon the following subjects :
Commercial Paper, Sales, Bailments, Agency, Torts,
Criminal Law, and Common Law or Code Pleading.

Admission to the Junior Class may be had at any
time during the year ; to the Senior Class, after the
examination in September, it will be granted only upon
special examination, at a time fixed by the Dean upon
application, not later than the first week of school after
the Christmas holidays ; and no person will be admitted
a member of the Senior Class as a candidate for a degree
after that time ; nor at any time upon any certificate of
attainments, or previous study or attendance elsewhere.



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ibV' WASHINGTON UNIYEBSITY.

COURSE OF STUDY.

The course for the degree of LL.B. is two years of
thirty-six weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The recita-
tions are held at 8 :45 to 9 :45 a. m., and at 5 to 6 p. m..
with a few additional recitations at 4 p. m. Moot Court
on Saturday mornings. Written examinatioDS are at i
p. m., at intervals throughout the year upon the comple-
tion of each topic,

JUNIOR CLASS.

Elbmkntary Law. Hobinson and Blackstone. Forty reciu-

tions. Curtis.
Contracts. Bishop, and case-book. Thirty-five recitation^.

Nagel.
Agency. Iluffcut, Twenty-five recitations. Klrby.
Torts. Cooley. ^ „, . ,

NEGi.mKNOK. Barro,«. I Sl**y-"^° "'*=''•"«"*• ^^^^^
Sales. Benjamin. \

Bailments, /^^^e. ) ^^^^^'^^^ ^*^^^**^"«' ^-"^^•
Bills and Notes. Norton, Twenty recitations. Coste.
Criminal Law. .Vrty. Twenty recitations. Bishop. JohD^on.

f Common Law. Martin. \ Forty recitations,
1 LEADING. I ^^^ Pattison. ( Curtis.

Damages. Sedgwick. Fifteen recitations.

SENIOR CLASS.
iiKAL l*R<)i»ERTV. Tifdeman. ,

KiiiTiTY. Eaton. \ ^^^^^y ^^^itations. Thaier.

Corporations. Elliott. -i Forty-one recita-

Stati'tes of FRArDH AND LIMITATIONS. J Uoiis. Lioulieryref.
Domestic Relations. Sehonler. i Fifty recita-

CoNSTH L'TioNAL Law. CV>o/e^, and case-boolc. / tions*. Cartl.«*.
Evidence. Gr*»enleaf. Thirty recitations. Rol)ert.
Administration. Abbott. Twenty recitations. Maglnn.



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LAW SCHOOL. 153

Jurisdiction of Fbdbral Courts. Ten recitations. Rent.
International Law. Fifteen recitations. Finkelnburg.
Partnkrship. Mechemj and case-book. Twenty recitations.

Sale.
CoMPARATivB JuRisPRUDBNCB. Fifteen recitations. Judson.
Moot Court. Once a week for botli classes.

The above courses are subject to slight changes from year
to year.

GRADUATION.

Members of the Junior Class, in order to pass into the
Senior Class, must attain an average of 65 per cent in
the examinations of the Junior Year. Members of the
Senior Class in order to be admitted to the final exam-
ination for the degree of LL.B., must attain an average
of 65 per cent in all the examinations of both years.
The above examinations are all written and are conducted
by the Faculty.

The examination for the degree of LL.B., is prescribed
and conducted by a committee of the Advisoiy and Ex-
amining Board. This examination is also written and
occupies about one week. The Board is composed of
leading members of the judiciary and bar of St. Louis,
selected by the Directors of the University. Each senior
is required to present, on or before May 15, an original
thesis upon a legal topic selected by the Faculty. The
subject of the thesis for the class of 1901 was, ''The
Law of Mistal^e, in the Avoidance of Contracts."

The degree of LL.B., conferred by the University,
entitles the holder to admission to the Bar of Missouri
without further examination. No student will receive the
degree before the completion of his twenty-first year.



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154 WASHINGTON UNIVKBBITT.



MOOT-COURT.

A Moot-Coart is held weekly throughout seven months
of the year. It is conducted, as nearly as possible, with
the forms of an ordinary court of justice, and students
are expected to draw pleadings in the cases assigned to
them, and to conduct them through all the stages of a
legal or equitable suit before trying the issue in the
Moot-Court. Members of the Senior Class may l>e
ap|K>inted to sit as Associate Justices, and required to
write opinions. The cases will be selected to illustrate
the subjects studied by the classes and will be made, so
far as possible, means of instruction, not onl}^ in practice,
but in the doctrines of the law. Both classes will be
assigned to argue cases in these courts- The Moot-Court
Record is a weekly, published by the School, containing
the Statements of Facts, Briefs aud Opinions.



FEES AND EXPENSES.

The annual fee for attendance in either class is $^0,
payable in advance. There are no extra charges of
any kind. No reduction will be made from the term
fee, nor any part of it returned for absence from any
cause.

Good board and lodging can readily be obtained in
the city at from $4 to $5 per week. The expenses may be
lessened to students rooming together. The average
price paid for board with rooms during the last two or



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LAW SCHOOL. 166

three years by students in good houses near the Law
School is believed to have been not over $20 per month,
while some have obtained it as low as $16.

Those who find it necessary to earn a part of their liv-
ing in other pursuits while taking the course can do so by
lengthening that course from two to three years, taking
a proportionate part of the class-work (to be designated
by the Faculty according to circumstances of each case)
in each year. Every facility will be extended to them for
such an aiTaugement ; and the charge for tuition in such
cases will only be for two years ; but no other diminu-
tion of the daily requirements of attendance and study
will be sanctioned, except in the case of special students
not candidates for a degree.

The expense of text-books for the entire course, if pur-
chased new and of the latest editions, is about $75. This
sum may be materially reduced by the purchase of second-
hand books which may be usually had in considerable
variety. All the books used in recitation may be found
in the library and can be studied there free of charge,
but not taken from the room.



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES.

In pursuance of the terms of a donation of $0,000 here-
tofore made to the University for the beneQt of the Law
School, six free srkohirships are established in this de-
partment ; also an annual prize of $50 in money for the
best thesis upon some legal topic, to be publicly awarded
at Commencement. Competition for this prize is confined



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156 WASHINGTON UNIYBBfllTT.

to the r^ular members of the gradaating class in each
year under regalations duly announced.

The Alumni Association of the St. Louis Law School
offers a prize of $50.00 to that member of the present
senior class who shall attain the highest general average
in examinations, said '' general average" to be deter-
mined as follows: Take the average mark attained by
him in the Junior Faculty examinations ; also, his average
in the Senior Faculty examinations ; also, his avenge Id
the final examinations. Then find the average of those
three marks.

Applicants for free scholarships should apply in person
or by letter to the Dean, on or before the fifteenth day of
September, furnishing written testimonials of at leasttwo
responsible persons, that the pecuniary circumstances of
the applicant are such as to make him deserving of this
assistance, that he is of good character and standing, and
that he has received a. good English education at least.
Other things being equal, preference will be shown to
candidates who have received a coU^ate education, and
especially to those who have done this wholly or partially
by their own efforts. Applicants not ()ersonally known
to any of the Faculty will do well to state fully and pre-
cisely their age, place of birth and residence, present occu-
pation, education (both general and legal), and any other
circumstances that may be of weight in making a selec-
tion. Such communications will be held strictly confi-
dential.

As the applicants for free scholarships are usually far
in excess of the number that can be given, no student will



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LAW SCHOOL. 157

hereafter have the benefit of such scholarship for' more
than one year. As far as practicable, the scholarships
will be equally divided between the two classes — depend-
ing upon the number and the success of the candidates
for scholarship in either class.

Two members of each class have an opportunity to earn
their tuition and a small salary in addition, by service as
librarians, and in other capacities connected with the
work of the School. Applications for such positions
must be made in person, on or before the fifteenth day of
September.

For further information, inquiries may be addressed to
Wm. S. Curtis, Law School Building, 1417 Locust
Street, St. Louis, Mo., or the Secretary of Washington
University.



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT



OF



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.



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CALENDAR.



1901-1902.



Session opkns Thursday, September 26.
Christmas Vacation, December 22 to Janaary 2, inclusive.
CoMMKNCEMENT (Graduating Exercises), Tliursklay, May 8, 1!»0?.
Holidays: Thursday of Fair week, ThanlcsRiving Day, Wash-
ington's Birthday.



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY.

BOARD OF OVERSEERS.

ELISUA U. GKK60RY, M.D., Chairman.

♦GEORGE E. LEIGHTON. G. B AUMGARTEN, M. I)., Sec\v.

♦HENRY HITCHCOCK. ISAAC W. MORTON.

♦JAMES E. YEATMAN. HERMAN TUHOLSKE, M.l).

HORATIO N. SPENCER, M.l).

WASHINGTON E. FISCHEL, M.D.

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS.

J. B. JOHNSON, M.D.,
Profeuor EmerUng of the Principles and Practice of Medicine.

P. QERVAIS ROBINSON, M.D.,LL.D.,
Pro/egBor Emeritus of the Principles and Practice of Medicine.

J. K. BAUDUY, M.D.,LL.D.,
Professor Emeritus of Pttychoiogicdl Medicine and IHseases of the Nervous

System.

WINFIELD 8. CHAPLIN, LL.D.,
Chancellor of the University.

KLI8HA H. GREGORY, M.D.,LL.D..

Professor of the Principles of Surgery.

O. BAUMGARTEN, M.D.,
Professor of the Practice of Medicine.

H. TUHOLSKE, M.D.,
Professor of the Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery.



• Deceased.

U



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1(52 WASHINGTON UNIVBttSITT.

T. F. PRE WITT, M.D.,
Pro/eMor of the PHnciples of Surfftry.

W. E. FISCHEL, M.D.,
Profeswr of Clinical Medicine.

ROBERT LUEDEKING, M.D.,
Professor of the DUetueaof Children,

JOHN P. BRYSON, M.D.,
Professor of GenUo- Urinary Surgery. Trea».

JUSTIN STEER, M.D.,
Profe$8or of Clinical Medicine,

W. A. HARDAWAY,M.D.,LL.D.,

Professor of Diseases of the Skin and Syphilns.

H. N. SPENCER, A.M.,M.D.,LL.D.,
Professor of Otology.

W. C. GLASGOW, A.B.jM.D.,
Professor of Clinical Medicine and laryngology.

HENRY SCHWARZ, M.D.,
Professor of Obstetrics.

PAUL Y. TUPPER, M.D.,
Professor of Applied Anatomy and Operative Surgen*.

K. W. SAUNDERS, M.D.,
Professor of Diseases of Children and ainieal Midtrifrrn

N. B. CARSON, M.D.,
Professor of CUnieal Surgery.

J. B. SHAPLEIGH, M.D.,
Professor of Otology, I^an,

SIDNEY P. BUDGETT, M.D.,
Professor of Physiology, Registrar.

W. H. WARREN, A.M.,Ph.D.,

Professor of Chemistry, Secretary.



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MEDICAL DRPARTinCKT. 168

R. J. TERRY, A.B.,M.D.,
Profeuor of AniUamp.

JOHN GREEN, M.D.,
Special Pro/es9or of Ophthalmology.

FRANK R. FRY, M.D.,
Profeuor of Diaeaaes of the Nervous System.

F. A. GLASGOW, M.D.,
Professor of Clinical Gynecology.

H. G. MUDD, M.D.,

Professor of Fractures and Disloc€Uions, and Clinical Surgery.

E. M. SENSENEY, M.D.,
Professor of Diseases of the Throat, Nose^ and Chest.

A. J. STEELE, M.D.,

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery,

JOSEPH GRINDON, M.D.,
Professor of Clinical Dermatology and Syphilis.

A. V. L. BROKAW, M.D.,
Professor of Clinical Gynecology.

AMAND RAVOLD, M.D.,
Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene.

CHARLES NAGEL, LL.B.,
Professor of Metlical Jurisprudence.

ELSWORTH SMITH, Jr., M.D.,
Clinical Professor of Medicine.

D. C. GAMBLE, M.D.,
Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Ear.

H. M. WHELPLEY, Pii.G.,M.D.,
Professor of Materia Mediea and Pharmacy.

H. S. CROSSEN, M.n.,
Clinical Professor of Gynecology.



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164 WASHINGTON ITNIVERSITT.

CHARLES H. DIXON, M.D.,
CHnieal Lecturer on Surgery.

HENRY L. WOLFNER, M.D.,
CHnieal Lecturer on IHgeates of the Bffe,

GREENFIELD SLUDER, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Dieeaseg of the Xoee, Throat and Chett.

EDWIN C. BURNETT, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Spphiiit.

VILRAY P. BLAIR, M.D.,
Lecturer on Detcriptive Anatomy.

A. E. EWING, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on IHaeases of the Kpe,

LOUIS H. BEHRENS, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on DieeaaeM of the Chett.

ALBERT E. TAUSSIG, M.D..
Clinical Lecturer on Medicine,

E. F. TIEDEMANN, M.D.,
Lecturer on Pathology ^ and Cur€a<M' of the Atuaemm.

HENRY C- HARTMAN, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgerft.

E. C. RUNGE, M.D.,
Lecturer on Menial Diaeaset.

GIVEN CAMPBELL, Jr., M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Diseasea of the Nerrous Sgatem.

GEORGE M. TUTTLB, M.D.,
Lecturer on Therapeutics.

WILLIS HALL, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Venereal Diseases of iromrn.

JOHN ZAHORSKY, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Diteaaee of ChUdrtn.



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 166

H. A. GEITZ, M.D.,

Instructor in Minor Surgery and Bandaging.

PHIL. HOFFMAN, M.D.,

Clinical Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery.

HENRY S. BROOKES, M.D.,
Clinical Lecturer on Medicine.

JESSE S. MYER, M.D.,
Imtructor in Clinical Chemistry and Microscopy.

WILLARl) BARTLETT, M.D.,
Demonstrator iii Surgical Pathology.

A. D. GHISELIN, M.D.,
Instructor in Anatomy.



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166 WASHINGTON UNITBBSnT.



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.

SESSION 1901-1902.

Early in the year 1899 the respective Facalties of the
St. Louis Medical College and of the Missouri Medical
Collie took certain preUminary steps looking to the union
of these two institutions. With this end in view both
faculties resigned, and in due course combined to form
the Medical Department of Washington University, of
which the present session of 1901-1902 is the third since
the union of the two older schools in 1899.

The Missouri Medical CoUege was founded in 1840,
and with the exception of the years of the Civil War had
given continuous instruction up to 1899.

The St. Louis Medical Collie was founded in 1842,
and had just completed its 58th consecutive annual
course. Under an ordinance enacted in 1891, it was
created the Medical Faculty of the Washington Univer-
sity, and has continued in that relation since that time.

This union of the two oldest and most representative
of the medical colleges in the West was undertaken and
successfully consummated solely in behalf of a broader
and more thorough training, and we firmly believe that
this object has been accomplished.

As will be seen in another place, there has been a con-
siderable increase in the size and effectiveness of the
teaching force. The University has at its disposal two new
and finely equipped colI^c buildings, and the facilities
for clinical work have been greatly multiplied.



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 167

The graded course of study now some time established
has been elaborated and extended as experience has dic-
tated, and always in the direction of higher standards and
broader teaching. Now that four years of attendance
prior to graduation have been adopted and required from
all candidates, it has become possible to introduce new
features in the plan of instruction, by which the student
will gain greater leisure for his work and more liberty in
the selection of his studies.

A distinctive feature of the Medical Department of the
Washington University is the requirement of and full
provision for extended laboratory work, by every student,
in all the fundamental subjects of medical study. The
extent and scope of the required practical work in Anat-
omy and in Chemistry have been greatly enlarged, and
full laboratory courses are given in Histology, in Medical
Chemistry, in Pathological Anatomy, and in Bacteriology.
The actual making of post-mortem examinations by the
student himself will be made a feature of the instruction.

In general the method of teaching pursued in this insti-
tution will be, so far as practicable, that of direct personal
instruction of each student. In addition to the usual
methods of lectures, didactic and clinical, there will be
recitations from the text-books, and clinical conferences,
in which the student examines the patient and submits
a written report of his diagnosis for criticism and dis-
cussion.

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

Especial attention is called to the unusual clinical
advantages offered the student in connection with the



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168 WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY.

large number of Hospitals and Dispensaries directly under
the i-outrol of the Medical Department of the Washington
University.

ST. LOCIS MULLANPHT HaSPITAL.

This is the oldest and most widely-known general hospi-
tal in the West. Its extensive general and special clinics
are conducted by members of this Faculty, and are de-
voteti wholly to the instruction of its students.

SAI^-T John's hospital.

Saint John's Hospital, recently enlarged by new build-
ings, is in ehaige of the Sisters of Mercy. Its medical
and surgical management is entirely controlled by the
Faculty. This institution is situated within a few blocks
of the Medical Department. In addition to the hospital
proper there is a lai^ out-door attendance of patients in
the several dispensaries.

policlinic hospital and dispensaries.

The Policlinic Hospital, which adjoins one of the main
buildings of the Medical Department, contains a number
of wards and rooms that are especially maintained for the
reception of patients treated in the Medical Department
clinics, a matter of great convenience and utility in teach-
ing. The dispensaries in connection with the Hospital
are unusufdly largely attended, and are so organized iD
general and special clinics that the greatest abundance of
material for instruction can always be utilized. In addi-
tion to the usual reception and consultation rooms, phar-
mai*y. etc.. there is a handsome sui^ical amphitheater
ra(Mible of seating over four hundred students.



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 169



BKTHESDA HOSPITAL.



The Betheiida Hospital, with its maternity and found-
ling departments, is under the direct supervision of Pro-
fessor E. W. Saunders, and is accessible to the senior
students of this School only. Opportunity is here
afforded for exercises in obstetrical diagnosis, and in
acquiring practical experience in midwifery. At the
Foundling Hospital the student is made familiar with
infantile diseases and artificial feeding.

O' FALLON DISPENSAKY.

The O' Fallon Dispensary is a special clinical depart-
ment of the School with general medical and surgical
clinics and the various special clinics fully represented.

An Obstetrical Out-clinic attached to the Dispensary
affords the senior students special opportunities for prac-
tical work in this important branch of medicine.

At the City Hospital, the Female Hospital, the Insane
Asylum, and the Poor House, the Medical Department
stands on equal terms with others in the privilege of
visiting and clinical instruction.

The attention of students is called to the fact that a
corps of assistant physicians to the various municipal
hospitals is appointed each year after competitive exam-
ination, to which all members of the graduating class are
eligible.

We beg to direct attention to the fact that hitherto
four-fifths of the positions in the city hospitals have been
filled by the graduates of the Saint Louis and Missouri
Medical Colleges.



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170 WASlllNGTOX UXIVKUSITY.

THE COURSE OF STUDY.

The curriculum is based upon the amount and kind of
work required to be done by candidates for the degree.
The courses to be followed are graded in such a manner
that all the fundamental studies and general courses are
required to be taken before special courses and advanced
work can be pursued. Of the latter a certain part is
elective ; and of the large amount of clinical work a con-
siderable part is made elective in order that the student
may enjoy some liberty in the pursuit of the higher studies
and specialties. In addition, a few optional courses are
given. Thus the greater part of the work required for
the degree shall consist of obligatory courses and the
remainder may be chosen out of a large assoitment of
electives.

The various courses consisting in nearly every instance
of both didactic and practical work, are obligatory, except
where otherwise specified. Throughout the four years
the classes are instructed separately in the clinics and
laboratories as well as in the lecture rooms. Sectional
teaching and individual instruction form part of the re-
quired work of the third and fourth years.

^ ELECTIVE COURSES.

No student may elect practical work in a subject unless
attending or having attended the course of lectures on
that subject. Every candidate for the degree must choose
two specialties out of the number given below, and fol-
low all courses indicated for each ; and he is advised to



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 171

do all available work in the specialties chosen, besides
what is actually required.

Diseases of the Chesty Nose and Throat.

Pediatrics.

Diseases of the Nervous System.

Orthopedic Surgery.

Genito-Urinary Surgery.

Gynecology.

Dermatology.

Ophthalmology.

Otology.

OPTIONAL STUDY.

Students in the third and fourth years may choose,
under advisement, courses of the first and second years.
No student will be permitted to undertake optional work
who.has not completed satisfactorily all work required of
him in past semesters.

Certain special courses in the following subjects are
also offered as optional studies : —

Pathology and Bacteriology.
Clinical Medicine.
Surgery.

ORDEH OF OBLIGATORY COURSES.

The following table exhibits the distribution of obli-
gatory courses by semesters. The number of hours per
week for each course will be found to the right of the
name.



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172 WASHINGTON 1


JNIVEBSITT.


I.KCTURKS.




PRACTICA


First Year. 1st Semester:






Chemistry


4


Chemistry


Anatomy


6


Anatomy
Histology


2d Semester:






Chemistry


1


Chemistry


Auatomy


7


Anatomy


PhysiQlogy


a


Histology


Second Year. 3d Semester:






Chemistry


3




Anatomy


3




Physiology


3




Mat. Med. & Ther.


4




Pathology


3


Pathology
Medicine


Second Year. 4th Semester:






Cliemistry


1


Physiolog}'


Mat. Med. & Ther.


2


Mat. Med. & Ther


Pathology


4


Pathology


Medicine


2


Medicine


Third Year. 5th Semester :






Medicine


5


Medicine


Pediatrics


2


Pediatrics


Pis. Nerv. Syst.


2


DIs. Nerv. Sysi.


Surgery


5


Surgery


Obstetrics


2




Dermatology


1




6th Semester:






Medicine


3


Medicine


Pediatrics


2


Pediatrics
Dis. Nerv. Syst.


Surgery


2


Surgery


Orthopedic Surgery


1




Obstetrics



Online LibraryMo.) Washington University (Saint LouisA catalogue of the officers and students of Washington University, for the academic year .. → online text (page 67 of 70)