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NEGRO YEAR BOOK



NEGRO YEAR BOOK



Annual
ENCYCLOPEDIA of THE NEGRO



MONROE N. WORK

Director Department of Records and Research

^uskegee Institute

EDITOR



NEGRO YEAR BOOK PUBLISHING CO.

Tuskegee Institute, Alabama



COPYRIGHT 1937
BY TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE



Composed, Printed and Bound by the

Tuskegee Institute Press
Tuskegee Institute, Alabama



PREFACE

The Negro Year Book for 1937-38 is the Ninth Edition. The com-
pleteness and paging of the table of contents and the comprehensive-
ness of the index makes the information on a particular subject
easily found. It continues to be a handbook which gives in a concise
but thorough-going form the information desired. It provides a
comprehensive and impartial view of the events affecting the Ne-
gro and the progress he is making throughout the world.

The Negro Year Book continues to be the standard work of refer-
ence on all matters relating to the Negro. It is the most extensively
used compendium of information on the Negro. Its circulation ex-
tends to every part of the United States, to Canada, the West Indies,
Central America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.

This edition, as was true of the previous one, is in a form suitable
to the needs of both the general reader and the student. The book
is specially adapted for use in schools and other places where his-
torical and sociological courses on the Negro are given.

Price per copy, postpaid, $2.00.

THE NEGRO YEAR BOOK COMPANY
TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE, ALABAMA



RACIAL DISTRIBUTION OF MANKIND

POPULATION OF THE EARTH BY RACES*

Races Number

Yellow 870,000,000

White 827,215,000

Black _ 302,785,000

Total _ 2,000,000,000

DISTRIBUTION AND NUMBER OF BLACK PEOPLE

(Black people are natives of Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands. The black
or Negro people of the world include true Negroes, those without admixtures
of other races, and Negroids, those with admixtures of other races.)

Continent Number

Africa 160,000,000

Southern Asia (Principally the Dravidians of India) 100,000,000

Pacific Islands (Melanesians, Papuans, Negritos) 3,000,000

North America _ 25,115,377

South America _ 14,670,000

Total '. _ 302,785,377

PROPORTION OF BLACK POPULATION TO WHITE IN
WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Total Negro Per Cent Negro of

Population Population Total Population

10,376,786 19,456 0.2

122,775,046 11,891,143 9.7

16,553,398 300,000 1.8

6,374,702 637,470 10.0

29,896 17,862 59.7

12,367,308 8,066,908 65.2

45,332,660 12,870,000 28.4

44,587,825 1,800,000 4.0

258,297,621 35,602,839 13.8



Country

Canada, Dominion of

United States

Mexico _

Central America

Bermuda ..

West Indies

Brazil ..........

Remainder of South America ...
Total .



Estimated



TABLE of CONTENTS

RACIAL DISTRIBUTION OF MANKIND vi

PART ONE: THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES 1-324
DIVISION

I. SOME ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE AMERICAN NEGRO 1-18

PROGRESS, 1: Property Owning, 1.
INTELLECTUAL ACHIEVEMENTS, 2-13; Number Ne-
groes Elected Membership Phi Beta Kappa, 1874-1936,
2; Number Negroes Received Degree Doctor of Philosophy,
1876-1936, 2; Negroes Who Made Phi Beta Kappa, 2-4; Ne-
groes Who Received Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 4-5;
Negroes Elected Honor Scholarship Societies, 1932-1935, 6;
William E. Harmon Awards, 6-9; Spingarn Awards, 9-11;
Negroes Listed in Who's Who in America, 11-12; Negroes
Listed in "American Men of Science," 12. INVENTIONS
BY NEGROES, 12-14. SPORTS, 14-18: Marble Champion,
1936, 14; Pugilism, 14; Baseball, 14-15; Football, 15-16;
Field and Track Events, 16-18.

II. THE NEGRO AND NATIONAL RECOVERY 19-30

THE NEGRO AND NATIONAL RELIEF, 19-25: Number
on Relief, 19; Color of Race Persons in Relief Families,
19-21; Youth on Relief, 21-22; Transient Unemployed,
22-23; Migrant Families, 23; The NRA and the Negro,
23-24; The Negro and the A A A, 24; The Negro and Soil
Conservation Act, 24-25. SLUM CLEARANCE Projects
for Negroes, 25-27. RESETTLEMENT PROJECTS for
Negroes, 27-28. LAND UTILIZATION PROJECTS for
Negro Families, 28-30.

III. THE NEGRO IN AGRICULTURE 31-57

TENANT FARMERS and Share Croppers Unions, 31-41:
Share Croppers Union Movement, 31-32; What is a "Fair
Wage in Agriculture in Alabama," 32-33; Southern Ten-
ant Farmers Union, 33-41. COTTON PICKING Machines,
41-42. SUCCESS Individual Negro Farmers, 42-43.
FAIRS, 43. AGRICULTURAL Extension Work, 43-45:
Smith-Lever Appropriations for Agricultural Extension
Education, 44-45. SMITH-HUGHES Appropriations for
Vocational Education, 45-47. APPROPRIATIONS for Ag-
ricultural Research (Purnell Act), 48. FARM TENURE,
48-55. SIZE FARMS, 55-56. FARM Population, 56-57.

IV. NEGRO LABOR 58-89

AMERICAN FEDERATION of Labor and the Negro,
58-61: ALL SOUTHERN CONFERENCE for Civil and
Trade Union Rights, 61-62. NEGRO and Craft Unions vs.
Industrial Unions, 62-63. LABOR and Negro Women,
63-65. NEGRO LABOR and Wage Differentials, 65-66.
COMMUNIST Party and the Negro, 66-78: Apprehension
Concerning Influence Communism Upon Negroes, 78.
HERNDON CASE, 78-80. PROPOSAL CREATE Ne-
gro Industrial Commission, 80-81. NATIONAL Negro
Congress, 81-89.

V. THE NEGRO IN BUSINESS - - - 90-95

NEGRO BUSINESS and the Depression, 90-92. NEGRO
BANKS, 92-93: The Freedmen's Savings Bank and Trust

vii



viii TABLE OF CONTENTS



PART ONE: THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES (Continued)

DIVISION

Company, 92-93; First Private Negro Banks, 93; Direc-
tory of Negro Banks, 93. INSURANCE, 93-94: List of
More Important Life Insurance Companies Operated by
Negroes, 94. NEGRO CHAMBERS of Commerce and
Boards of Trade, 94-95.

VI. THE NEGRO AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS 96-120

NEGRO POLICEMEN and Policewomen; 96: Negro Po-
licemen, 96; Negro Policewomen, 96; Negro Probation Of-
ficers, 96; NEGROES ELECTED to Political Offices, 96-
97: Negro Judges and Justices of the Peace, 96; Negro
Members of State Legislatures 1932-1936, 97. NEGRO
AND PARTY Politics, 97-120: Negro and Republican
Party, 97-101; Negro Delegates and Alternates at the 1932
Republican National Convention, 100; Negro Delegates
and Alternates at the 1936 Republican National Conven-
tion, 100-101; Negro and Democratic Party, 101-111: A
Negro Democrat in Congress, 101; Negro Divisions of
Democratic National Committee, 101-102; Delegates and
Alternates to Democratic National Conventions, 102;
Negro Delegates and Alternates at the 1936 Democratic
National Convention, 102; Senator Smith Takes a Walk,
102-104; Democratic Primary in South and the Negro,
104-106; Ruling Supreme Court in Texas Primary Case,
106-111. Political Appointments of Negroes, 111-114: De-
cline in Number Negro Presidential Appointments, 111-
112; New Deal Departmental Appointments, 112-114;
Negro and Communist Party, 114-115; Scottsboro Case,
115-117; Negro Vote in 1936 Presidential Election, 117-
118. NEGRO and Jury Service, 118-120.

VII. RACE RELATIONS _ 121-146

BETTERMENT RACE Relations, 121-134: Study of the
Negro, 121-128; Bureau for Education in Human Rela-
tions, 121-122; American Friends Institute Race Rela-
tions, 122; Cooperation Education and Race Relations,
122; Department Race Relations Federal Council
Churches Promotes Studies Local Conditions, 122-123;
Educational Program Commission on Interracial Coopera-
tion, 123; Catholic Textbook for Study Negro, 124-125;
Council of Women for Home Missions and Missionary
Education Movement Cooperate in the S'tudy of the Ne-
gro, 125-126; Prizes and Awards, 126-127; A Little Lea-
ven, 127-128; Interracial Cooperation in South Between
White and Negro Christian Women, 128-129; Southern
Baptist Women Their Program, 129-130 ; Church and Race
Relations, 130-131; Race Relatipns Sunday, 130-131; Young
People's Meetings, 131-132; New Plan Interracial Coopera-
tion in Education, 132-133 ; Different Levels on which Race
Relations Operate, 133-134. DISCRIMINATIONS Against
Negroes, 134-144: Some Examples of Discriminations, 134-
135; Civil Rights Bills, 135-137; Discriminations in Public
Conveyances, 137-138; Residential Segregation, 138-139;
Discriminations in Use Libraries, 139; Chinese Pupils
Barred from White Schools in Mississippi Refuse to go to
Negro Schools, 139-140; Law Suits to Compel State Uni-
versities in South to Admit Negroes, 140-143; Proposed
Solutions Problems Graduate Work for Negroes, 143-144.



TABLE OF CONTENTS j x

PART ONE: THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES (Continued)
DIVISION

RACE DIFFERENCES, 144-146: Definition of a Negro
According to Statutes Various States, 144; Scientific Point
of View With Reference to Race Differences, 145; Intelli-
gence Test Methods Examined, 146.

VIII. THE NEGRO AND CRIME _ 147-152

PLACING CRIMES Whites on Negroes, 147-148. POLICE
Brutality, 148-149. PERSONS in Prisons, 149-150. JUVE-
NILE Delinquency, 151-152.

IX. THE NEGRO AND LYNCHING 153-159

LYNCHINGS Before the Civil War, 153. SOUTHERN
Women and Lynching, 153-155. LYNCHINGS, 1882 to
1936, 156-157. LYNCHINGS, Whites and Negroes, 1882
to 1936, 156; Lynchings by States, 156; Lynchings by
Periods, 156; Causes Lynchings Classified, 157. LYNCH-
INGS and Preventions Compared, 157. THREE-FOURTH
Lynchings Crimes Other Than Rape, 157-158. ANTI-
LYNCHING Legislation, 158. LEGISLATIVE Enact-
ments Against Lynching, 158-159.

X. EDUCATION _ * 160-212

EDUCATION Before Civil War, 160; EDUCATION Dur-
ing Civil War and Reconstruction, 161; ILLITERACY,
161-163; FUNDAMENTALS in Education of Negroes, 163-
165; PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 165-171: Date Establishment
Public School System in Southern States, 165; Negroes
in Northern Public Schools, 165; Enrollment in Public
Schools, 165-167; Attendance and Term Lengths, 167-171;
Salaries, 171. SUPERVISORS, National and State, Negro
Schools, 172. BOOKER- T. WASHINGTON, 172. SECON-
DARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION, 172-173; BOARDS
White Denominations Carrying on Educational and Re-
ligious Work Among Negroes in United States, 173-175;
NATIONAL YOUTH Administration Division Negro Af-
fairs, 175-178. LIBRARIES for Negroes, 178-179; EDU-
CATIONAL Funds, 179-196: John F. Slater Fund, 179-
180; Anna T. Jeanes Foundation, 180; Phelps Stokes Fund,
180-183; Carnegie Corporation of New York, 183; Julius
Rosenwald Fund, 183-192; General Education Board, 192-
196; LAND GRANT Colleges, 197; STATE and City Nor-
mal Schools, 198-199; PRIVATE Universities and Col-
leges, 200-204; PROFESSIONAL Schools, 205; PRI-
VATE HIGH Schools and Academies, 206-209; AP-
PROVED List of Colleges and Universities for Negro
Youth, 210; ACCREDITED High Schools, 211-212.

XI. THE CHURCH AMONG NEGROES - 213-243

CHURCH in Action, 213-219: Address to the Country,
213-215; Joint Meeting Northern and Southern Baptist
Conventions, 215-216; Unification Three Branches Meth-
odist Episcopal Church, 216-217; Negro Synod in South
Lutheran Church Refused, 217; Religious Sects Among
Negroes, 217-219. FIRST NEGRO Churches Organized,
219-220. DATES ORGANIZATION Negro Denominations,
220-221. STATISTICS Negro Churches Urban and Rural,
221-225. DENOMINATIONS and Sects Among Negroes
Not Listed in 1926 Census Religious Bodies, 226. IMPOR-



TABLE OF CONTENTS



PART ONE: THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES (Continued)

DIVISION

TANT Conclusions, American Churches, 226-228. NEGRO
and Catholic Church, 228-234: Negro Priests in Catholic
Church, 228-229; Religious Sisterhoods and Brotherhoods,
229-230; Catholic Negro Work, 230-231; Negro May be
Made Saint, 231-232; Pope Urges United States Catholics
to Work for Negroes, 232; St. Joseph's Society of the
Sacred Heart, 232-233; The Society of the Divine Word,
233 ; Congregation of the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament
for Indians and Colored People, 233-234. Y. M.C. A. Work
Among Negroes, 234-238: Rosenwald Aid to Negro Y. M.
C. A. Work, 234-236; Negro Members National Council Y.
M. C. A., 236; Secretaries National Council, 236; Local
Association Executive Secretaries Y. M. C. A., 236-238;
Secretaries International Committee Y. M. C. A., 236-238;
BOY SCOUTS of America, 238. Y. .W. C. A. Among Negro
Girls and Women, 238-241: National Board Members, 240;
National Secretaries, 240; Y. W. C. A. Branches Among
Negro Women, 240-241. WORK American Baptist Publi-
cation Society, 241. SALVATION Army and the Negro,
241. AMERICAN BIBLE Society Work Among Negroes,
241-242. AMERICAN Sunday School Union Work Among
Negroes, 242. BOARD National Missions Presbyterian
Church in U. S. A. Work Among Negroes, 242-243.

XII. POPULATION IN THE UNITED STATES 244-259

FREE AND SLAVE Negro Population, 244-245. BLACK
AND MULATTO Population, 1850-1920, 245-247; Total
and Negro Population by States and Divisions, 248-250;
MIGRATION of Negroes, 250-252 : Number and Per Cent
Living Outside States of Birth, 250-252. BLACK BELT
Areas, 252-254. URBANIZATION, 255-256: Negroes in
Metropolitan Districts, 255-256. HOMES' of Negro Fami-
lies, 256-257. STATES, Counties and Cities Having the
Largest Number and Percentage of Negroes, 257. TOWNS
and Settlements, 257-259.

XIII. OCCUPATIONS OF NEGROES 260-282

OCCUPATION Trends of Negroes, 1890-1930, 260-278:
Primary Activities of the Negro Population, 260-261; Ne-
groes in Main Classes of Occupations, 262-263; Domestic
and Personal Service, 264; Manufacturing and Mechani-
cal Industries, 264; Transportation, 266; Trade (Including
Clerical Occupations), 266; Professional Service, 266-267;
Comparison Trends in Occupations of Total Population
and of Negro Population, 267-268; Trends of Persons in
the Whole Population and of Negroes in the Hand Trades,
267-268; Occupational Trends and Economic Status, 269;
Details Occupations Negroes 1930, 269-278. LICENSED
Negro Aviators, 279-282.

XIV. MORTALITY STATISTICS 283-292

REGISTRATION Area 1933, 283-284. DEATHS and Death
Rates, 283; Causes, 284; Rates of Foreign Countries, 285.
MORTALITY of Negroes Prior to the Civil War, 285.
SOME DEATH Rates Decline; Others Increase, 286. EX-
PECTATION of Life for Negro and White Males and Fe-
males in Continental United States, 286-288. BIRTH STA-
TISTICS, 288-290: Comparison of Birth and Death Rates,
288-289; Stillbirths by Legitimacy, 289-290. HOSPITALS
and Nurse Training Schools, 290-292.



TABLE OF CONTENTS xi

PART ONE: THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES (Continued)
DIVISION

XV. NEGRO SLAVERY IN AMERICA 293-315

WHERE SLAVES Came From in Africa, 293. NEGRO'S
Part in Discovery of America, _ 293-294. SLAVERY in
United States, 295-315: First Africans Brought to Vir-
ginia not Slaves, 295; White Servitude Legal Basis for
Negro Slavery, 295-296; Original Heathenism Becomes
Test for Slavery, 296; Chronology Legislative and Judi-
dicial Enactments Concerning Slavery, 296-300; Slave as
Property, 300-301; Free Negro, 301-305; Slave Insurrec-
tions, 305-307; Abolition Agitation, 307-309; Under-
ground Railroad, 309-310; Negroes Connected with Aboli-
tion and Underground Railroad, 310-313; Negro Anti-Sla-
very Newspapers, 313-314; Slavery and Religious Denomi-
nations, 314-315; Date Abolition Slavery in American
Countries, 315.

XVI. NEGRO SOLDIERS _ 316-324

REVOLUTIONARY War, 316. WAR of 1812, 317. CIVIL
War, 317-319: Negro Volunteer Troops by States, 317-318;
Negro Soldiers in Confederate Army, 318-319. NEGRO
SOLDIERS in Regular Army, 319-320: Carrizal Incident,
319-320. NEGRO Soldiers in Spanish- American War, 320:
Negro Volunteer Regiments in Spanish- American War, 320.
AMERICAN Negro in World War, 320-322: Number Negro
Soldiers -Mobilized, 320; Negro Army Units in France, 321;
Citations Individual Gallantry in Action, 321-322; Four
Regiments and a Battalion Decorated by French for Brav-
ery in Action, 322. NEGRO National Guard Units in 1937,
322. NEGROES at West Point, 323. NEGROES at Annapo-
lis, 323. NEGRO Officers in the Regular Army of the United
States, 323 : Active List, 323 ; Chaplains, 323 ; Retired List,
323; Former Retired Officers, (Deceased), 323; Negro War-
rant Officers United States Army, 323-324.

PART TWO: THE NEGRO IN LATIN AMERICA 325-346

XVII. PROBLEMS OF RACE AND COLOR ....... 327-335

POPULATION, 327: Population Latin America, 327; Popula-
tion West Indies, 327. IMMIGRATION Restrictions Against
Negro Laborers, 327-328. NEGRO in Nicaragua, 328-329.
BRAZIL and the Color Problem, 330. WEST INDIAN Agi-
tation Dominion Status, 330-331. COMPARISON Race Re-
lations Hawaii and Jamaica, 331-335.

XVIII. VIRGIN ISLANDS S - 336-338

HISTORY, 336. INHABITANTS, 336-338: Economic Con-
ditions, 337; Permanent Form of Government, 337-338.

XIX. REPUBLIC OF SANTO DOMINGO -....- 339-340

GOVERNMENT, 339. UNITED STATES Occupation and
Withdrawal, 339-340.

YY PP'PTTRT ir np HATTT 341-346

ToUVERTURE DESSALINE^ CHRISTOPHE 341-

342: Toussaint L'Ouverture, 341-342; Jean Jacques Dessa-
lines, 342; Henri Christophe, 342. UNITED STATES Occu-
pation Haiti, 342-345. President's Commission Study Con-
ditions in Haiti, 344-345; Self -Rule Granted to Haiti 345.
NEWSPAPERS and Magazines Published in West Indies
by Negroes, 346: Haiti, Bermuda, British Guiana, British
West Indies, 346.



Xll



TABLE OF CONTENTS



DIVISION
XXI.



XXII.



XXIII.



XXIV.



PART THREE: THE NEGRO IN EUROPE 347-355



COLOUR BAR IN ENGLAND 349-351

DISCRIMINATIONS, 349-350: Reasons for Classifying
Coloured Colonial Seamen as Aliens, 350. THE LEAGUE
of Coloured Peoples, 350-351.

GERMANY AND THE NEGRO 352-353

CITIZENSHIP, 352. AGRICULTURE, 352. COMMERCE
and Industry, 352. MIXED MARRIAGES Banned, 352-
353.

NEGRO IN FRENCH MILITARY AND POLITICAL SERVICE 354

NEGRO MEMBERS of French National Assembly, 354.
NEGRO MEMBERS of French Cabinets, 354. NEGRO in
French Military Service, 354.

THE NEGRO IN RUSSIA . 355



PART FOUR: THE NEGRO IN AFRICA 356-470

XXV. REPUBLIC OF LIBERIA _ 359-362

AREA and Population, 359. RELIGION, Education and
Justice, 360. FINANCE, 360-361. COMMERCE, 361.
PRESIDENTS Liberia, 361-362.

XXVI. ITALY ANNEXES EMPIRE OF ABYSSINIA 363-364

XXVII. POSSESSIONS OF EUROPEAN POWERS IN NEGRO AFRICA 365-372

GREAT BRITAIN, 365-366. FRANCE, 366-367. FORMER
GERMAN Colonies, 367-368. ITALY, 368. ABYSSINIA
(Ethiopia), 368. PORTUGAL, 368. SPAIN, 368. AREA and
Population Possessions European Powers in Negro Africa,
369. GERMANY'S Claim for Return to Her of Mandated
Colonies. 369-372.

XXVIII. PROBLEMS COLONIAL RULE IN AFRICA 373-377

INDIECT Rule, 373-376: Indirect Rule From a Native's
Point of View, 376-377.

XXIX. NATIVE LABOUR IN VARIOUS PARTS OF AFRICA 378-404

PROBLEMS Crafts and Industries in Native Life, 378.
FUTURE of. Native in Industry, 378-379. REGULATIONS
Governing Native Labour, 379-389: Belgian Congo, 379;
British Colonies, Protectorates and Mandated Territories,
380-387; French Colonies, 387-388; Italian Somaliland and
Eritrea, 388; Portugese Colonies, 388-389; Spanish Colo-
nies, 389. MIGRATION of Native Labour, 389-390. RA-
CIAL Aspects of the Union of South Africa's Industrial
Policy, 390-397: Industrial Situation, 390-396; Rural Deve-
lopment, 396-397. SOUTH AFRICA'S Civilised Labour
Policy and the Displacement of Non-European Labour,
397-404.

XXX. EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND THE NATIVE 405-420

EDUCATION, 405-420: African Thought on African Edu-
cation, 405-406, Education and African Tradition, 406;
Education and the Economic Needs of Africa, 406-407; Na-
tive Education Recommendations of the Inter-Departmen-
tal Committee of the Union of South Africa, 407-418; Jeanes
Conference on Village Education, 418; Carnegie Non-Euro-
pean Library, 419; Natives Object to European Principals
in African Schools, 419-420. HEALTH, 420.



TABLE OF CONTENTS



xiii



DIVISION
XXXI.



XXXII.



PART
XXXIII.



XXXIV.



XXXV.
XXXVI.



PART FOUR: THE NEGRO IN AFRICA (Continued)

THE NATIVE AND TAXATION 421-423

TAXATION Riots in Northern Rhodesia, 421. NATIVE
Taxation in the Union of South Africa, 421-423: Changed
Conditions, 422; Urban Dwellers, 422; Mine Workers, 422-
The Unfits, 422; The Truly Rurals, 422-423; One Taxation
Principal for All, 423.

PROBLEMS OF RACE IN THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA 424-469

WHITE Supremacy in South Africa, 424-429; White Su-
premacy Must be Maintained at any Cost, 424-425; Dutch
Reformed Church Defines its Native Policy, 425-426; The
Element of Fear Said to Cause Passage of Representation
of Natives Bill, 426; Mixed Marriages and the Immorality
Act, 426-427; Some Expressions of the Native Point of
View Relative to White Supremacy, 427-429; Are Africans
Physically Inferior, 429. NATIVE Newspapers, 429-430.
PROPOSED Native Bills, 430; Native Trust and Land
Bill, 430; Representation of Natives Bill, 430; Natives (Ur-
ban Areas) Act Amendment Bill, 430. OPPOSITION of
Natives to the Proposed Bills, 430-443; Resolutions 1935
Executive Committee of the African National Congress,
430-431; Government Calls Meeting at Pretoria of Native
Chiefs and Leaders to Discuss Bills, 431-432; Government
Calls Meeting at Kingwilliamstown of Native Chiefs and
Leaders to Discuss Native Franchise, 433-435; Resolu-
tions of the All-African Convention Held at Bloemfontein,
Orange Free State in December, 1935, 435-437; National
European-Bantu Conference, 437; Statement, February
14, 1936, Executive Committee All-African Convention,
437-438; Natal Congress on the Franchise and the Land
Bill, 438; Supreme Court of Cape Town Declares Native
Representation Bill Valid, 439-440; Representation of Af-
ricans in Parliament, 440-441; Native Laws Amendment
Bill, 442-443. TRANSFER of Protectorates Proposed,
443. ASIATIC and South African Coloured Land Tenure
in the Transvaal, 444-445. HOUSING of Natives, 445-447.
RACE RELATIONS in the Union of South Africa, 447-
469: The South African Institute of Race Relations, 447-
448; Aspects of Race Relations in South Africa, 448-453;
Race Relations in 1936, 453-468; The Christian Council of
South Africa, 468-469; A Native View of Race Relations,
469.
FIVE: THE NEGRO IN POETRY AND FINE ARTS 471-498

THE NEGRO IN Music * 473-487

ACHIEVEMENTS in Music, 473-474. SINGERS of Promi-
nence, 474-475. INSTRUMENTALISTS, 476-477. COM-
POSERS of Music, 477-480. FUTURE of Negro Music, 480.
NEGRO'S Creative Genius, 480. ORIGIN of "Ragtime"
Music, 480. ORIGIN of Jazz Music, 480-481. ORIGIN of
Tango, 481. THE RUMBA, 481-482. NEGRO Folk Songs in
America, 482-484: How Some Folk Songs Originated, 483-
484. FOLK Music in Africa, 484-487.

THE NEGRO IN THE FIELD OF PAINTING AND SCULPTURE 488-491
PRIZES in Art, 488. PAINTERS of Distinction, 488-489.
SOME Sculptors of Note, 489-490. AFRICAN Art, 490-491.

THE NEGRO AS A POET _ - 492-494



THE NEGRO AND THE STAGE

ACTORS of Distinction, 495-497.



495-497



XIV



TABLE OF CONTENTS



DIVISION
XXXVII.



PART SIX: LITERATURE ON THE NEGRO 499-548



A REVIEW OF BOOKS ON OR RELATING TO THE NEGRO 501-502

DISCUSSIONS on the Negro in Literature, 501-502.
POETRY, 502-503. DRAMA, 503-504. MUSIC, 504-505.
ART 505. FOLKLORE, 505-506. CHILDREN'S Stories,
506-507. NOVELS and Stories Dealing with Civil War
and Reconstruction, 507-508. NOVELS and Stories Deal-
ing with Race Mixture, 508-510. NOVELS of African Life,
510-512. NOVELS and Stories of the Present Dealing with
Lower Class Negroes, 512-514. NOVELS Concerning Lower
Class Whites of the South, 514-515. HISTORY, Biography,
and Autobiography, 515-524. ECONOMIC and Social Con-
ditions, 524-533. EDUCATION, 533-536. BOOKS Discuss-
ing Races and Peoples, 536-538. BOOKS Discussing Race
Differences and Race Characteristics, 538-539. BOOKS
Discussing Race Problems in America, 539-544. BOOKS
Discussing Problems in Africa, 544-548.



PART SEVEN : DIRECTORY NEWSPAPERS, ORGANIZATIONS AND
SOCIAL SERVICE CENTERS 549-564

XXXVIII. NEWSPAPER DIRECTORY 551-555

MONTHLIES, Bi-Monthlies and Quarterlies, 551. WEEK-
LIES, 551-555. NEWS AGENCIES, 555.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS . ... 556-558



XXXIX.



XL.
XLI.



EDUCATIONAL Organizations, 556. School Fraternities,
556; School Sororities, 556. ORGANIZATIONS for Econom-
ic Advancement, 556-557. ORGANIZATIONS for Profes-
sional Advancement, 557. ORGANIZATIONS in Interests
of Women, 557. ORGANIZATIONS for General Advance-
ment of Negro, 557-558.

SOCIAL SERVICE CENTERS FOR NEGROES 559-561

LOCATION of Centers, 559-560. NATIONAL Urban League
Social Service Among Negroes, 560-561.

SECRET FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS 562-564

OLD LINE SOCIETIES, 562: Masons, 562; Odd Fellows,
562; Knights of Pythias, 562. BENEVOLENT SECRET
Societies, 562-564.



PART ONE

THE NEGRO IN THE
UNITED STATES



DIVISION I

SOME ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE
AMERICAN NEGRO



PROGRESS OF THE NEGRO

If one took into account only what
has happened to Negroes in the re-
cent depression years, he could easily
present facts to indicate, at least from



Online LibraryMonroe Nathan WorkNegro year book : an annual encyclopedia of the Negro 1937-1938 → online text (page 1 of 89)