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Architect and engineer (Volume v.200-203 (1955)) online

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SAN FRANCISCO



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ARCHITECT

and
ENGINEER

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DI]VI¥IDDI£

COXSTRrCTIOIV

COMPANY



BUILDERS



CROCKER BUILDING
SAN FRANCISCO




HERRICK
IROX WORKS

STRUCTURAL STEEL
REINFORCING STEEL

I8TH AND CAMPBELL STS.

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Phone GL«ncourt 1-17*7



Phone GArfield I-Ili4

Thomas R. Hnnter

DESIGNER OF HEATING

AIR CONDITIONING
VENTILATING AND WIRING
SYSTEMS, MECHANICAL
AND ELECTRICAL EQUIP-
MENT OF BUILDINGS

41 SUTTER STREET

ROOM 710

Sao Francisco California



APRIL, 1955



cal and Petroleum Engineers.

Active in the A.I.M.E. since 1936, Mein
will represent the mining branch of the
Institute and will serve a three year term.

The organization has approximately 20,-
000 members throughout the world.



A BUILT IN
TELEVISION

Completely new television receiver en-
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TV as an integral part of modern living,
Both advanced electronic design and port-
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OlTering fully automatic operation, the
volume and channel selecting are operated
by a portable, hand size remote control.
This motor driven unit will automatically
lock-in the best balanced picture and
.sound from any part of the room. For
additional information on Built-in TV and
other high fidelity components write to
Walso Electronic Corpn, 3225 Exposition
Place, Los Angeles.



SMOOT-HOLMAN EXPANDS
ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

Bill Jones, M.S., EE., has been employ-
ed as a full time research engineer with
the Smoot-Holman Company, Los An-
geles, according to a recent announcement
by Gale Thomas, chief engineer of the
firm.

Jones operated a consulting service prior
to joining Smoot-Holman.

Thomas also announced the installation
of new equipment for stepped-up research
and development activities.



SWIMMING
POOL

Architect Adrian Malone of San Fran-
cisco is completing plans for construction
of a 30x75 ft. reinforced concrete swim-
ming pool, with showers and lockers, for
the Berkeley Tennis Club, Berkeley.

Estimated cost of the project is $50,000.



PITTSBURGH
TESTING LABORATORY

ENGINEERS AND CHEMISTS

Tcifing and Inspection of Concrete,
Steel end Other Structural Materials

Design of Concrete Mixes

Offices in all principal cities

651 Howard St., San Francisco 5
EXbrook 2-1747



FOR ADVANCE

INFORMATION

ON

BUILDERS

CONTRACTORS

ENGINEERS

Get

ARCHITECTS
REPORTS

68 Post St. Phone

Son Francisco DO 2-8311



REMILLARD-DAIINI Co.

Brick and
Masonry Products



400 MONTGOMERY STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



Scott Company

HEATING • PLUMBING
REFRIGERATION



San Francisco

Oakland

San Jose

Los Angeles




Index to Advertisers



ARCHITECTS Reports 46

BASALT Rocic Co., Inc 32

BAXTER. J. H.. Co •

CLAY Brick & Tile

Association *



CLASSIFIED Advertising 43

CLINTON Construction Company 37

COLUMBIA-GENEVA Steel 2

DILLON T;le Supply Co 36

DINWIDDIE Construction Company.. 47

ERSKINE. Geo. S. & Associates *

FORDERER Cornice Works 36

GENERAL Concrete Products, Inc.... *

GLADDING, McBean & Company *

GREENBERG'S, M., Sons... 33

HAAS & Haynle Const. Co 37

HANKS, Abbot A., Inc 47

HAWS Drinking Faucet Co 31

HERRICK Iron Works 47

HOGAN Lumber Co 37

HUNT, Robert W. Company 47

HUNTER, Thos. B 47

IDEAL Cement Co _ *

JOHNSTON, S. T. Co 27

JUDSON Pacific-Murphy Corp 37

KRAFTILE Company 26

MARBLE Institute of America *

MATTOCK Construction Co 47

MICHEL & Pfeffer

Iron Works, Inc Inside Front Cover

MULLEN Mfg. Co 46

PACIFIC Coast Aggregates 29

PACIFIC Manufacturing Co 38

PACIFIC Telephone & Telegraph Co. 45

PinSBURGH Testing Laboratory 48

POOR Richard Engraving Co 48

PORCELAIN Enamel (Architectural
Division) Publicity Bureau 34

REMILL^vRD-Dandinl Co 48

REPUBLIC Steel Corporation 38

SCOTT Company 48

SIMONDS Machinery Company 38

SMOOT-Holman Company I

STROM BERG-Carlson Co 44

SUMMERBELL Root Structures 28

UNITED STATES Steel Corpn 2

U. S. Bonds Inside Back Cover

VERMONT Marble Company 38

WEBBER Show Case Co 7

WEST Coast Screen Co 35

'Indicates Alternate Months



ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER






DINING ROOM . . . Mr. and Mrs. James Bush, Portland, Oregon




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MICHEL & PFEFFER IRON WORKS, INC. . 212 SHAW ROAD . SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA . PH. PLAZA 5-i



Vol. 201 No. 2



EDWIN H. WILDER
Editor

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS:

Education

Sidney W. Little, Dean, School of
Architecture, University of Ore-
gon, Eugene, Oregon

City Planning

Corwin R. Mocinc, City Planning
Engineer, Oakland, California

Urban Planning 8C

Shopping Centers

Frank Emory Cox, Sales Research
& Business Development Analyst,
Berkeley, California

Realty Development

Roy P. Drachman, Subdivider
and Realty Developer, Tucson,
Arizona

School Planning

Dr. J. D. McConnell, Stanford
School Planning Dept., Palo
Alto, California ,

Residential Planning
Jedd Jones, Architect,
Boise, Idaho

General Architecture
Robert Field, Architect,
Los Angeles, California

Engineering

John A. Blume, Consulting and
Structural Engineer, San Fran-
cisco, California



COVER PICTURE

DINING
ROOMS

There is a reawakened interest in
"dining rooms", and this view of Arch-
itect Walter Gordon's dining room
for Mr. & Mrs. James Bush, Portland,
Oregon, is keynoted by informality,
accessibility, and exclusiveness. See
page 14 for complete details.



ARCHIITECTS' REPORTS—

Published Daily

Vernon S. Yallop, Manager
Telephone DOuglas 2-8311





ARCHITECT



AND



-ARCHITECT & ENGINEER is indexed regularly by ENGINEERING INDEX, INC.; and ART INDEX-



Contents for

mnv

EDITORIAL NOTES 4

NEWS & COMMENT ON ART 6

TECHNICALLY SPEAKING— Building Wifh The West-
Woodwork Insfi+ute of California ........ 8

By RUSSELL BJORN, Managing Director.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON— School of Archifec+ure and Allied Arts-

Conducts Collaborative Connnnercial Problem. ..... 9

By SIDNEY W. LIHLE, Dean.

OBSOLETE DESIGN HELPS PROVOKE PRISON RIOTS. Modern Architectural

Design Essentia! in Solution of this National Problem . . . . 12

By CLARENCE B. LITCHFIELD, A.I.A., Architect. Part I.

A RENEWED INTEREST IN DINING ROOMS 14

By ARTHUR W.PRIAULX.

A CALIFORNIA HORSE RANCH, LAGUNA-SECA— Monterey County, Calif. 22

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Bishop, Owners. John McWilliams, Designer.

NEW BARRACKS BUILDING— U. S. Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado, Calif. 25

Austin, Field & Fry, A.I.A., Architects and Engineers.

A.I.A. ACTIVITIES 26

WITH THE ENGINEERS 28

PRODUCERS COUNCIL PAGE 30

Edited by ANDRE E. ROEGIERS, Arcadia Metal Products.

PERSONALITIES 32

G. A. SEDGWICK, Engineer, San Francisco, California.

BOOK REVIEWS, Pamphlets and Catalogues 37

ESTIMATOR'S GUIDE, Building and Construction Materials .... 39

ESTIMATOR'S DIRECTORY, Building and Construction Materials ... 41

CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED and Miscellaneous Data . . 42

BUILDING TRADES WAGE SCALES, Northern. Central & Southern California . 43

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 43

IN THE NEWS 45

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 48

THE OLDEST PROFESSIONAL MONTHLY BUSINESS MAGAZINE OF THE ELEVEN WESTERN (TATBS

ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER (Established 1905) is published on the ISth of the month by The Architect and
Engineer, Inc., 68 Post St., San Francisco 4; Telephone EXbrook 2-7182. President, K. P. KieruIH; Vice-
President and Manager, L. B. Penhorwood; Treasurer, E. N. Kierulff. — Los Angeles Ofiice: Wentworth F.
Green, 439 So. Western Ave., Los Angeles 5; Telephone DUnkirk 7-8135. — Entered as second class matter,
November 2, 1905, at the Post Ofiice in San Francisco, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Sub-
scriptions United States and Pan America, $3.00 a year; $5.00 two years; foreign countries $5.00 a year;
single copy 50c.



. EDITORIAL WDTES .



GARAGES COST MORE

One of the seldom considered reasons why costs
of a new home are higher, and particularly a two-
car garage home, is because the material used in the
construction of a garage has increased during the
past few years in quantity as well as price,

A few years ago a garage with an 8-foot width was
ample for any automobile, but new cars have been
getting wider and longer, until today a garage width
which provides ample room for the housewife to
get in and out of the car with a bundle of groceries,
to maneuver the car in and out with less danger of
banging-up fenders and a large repair bill requires
a lot more building material and ground space.

Just in case you are planning on a new home,
plus a one or two-car garage, or might even be only
interested out of curiosity, here are the dimensions
of some of the new 1955 model automobiles:

The new Chevrolet is 105.6" long by 74" wide.

The new Ford is 198.5" long by 75.9" wide.

The new Cadillac is up to 237" long by 79.7" wide

The new Chrysler is 218.6" long by 79.1" wide.

The new automobiles themselves cost more, but
facilities for keeping them properly protected at
home is also costing more.

* * *

Oil heating offers the homeowner fully automatic serv-
ice — juel oil is available at money saving cost, and, mod-
ern equipment requires little upkeep.

={: * *

DIRE NEED FOR SAFEGUARDS

The results arising from lack of safeguards over
employee welfare funds were never more graphically
illustrated than in two cases brought to light in
public testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on
Pension and Welfare Funds.

A National union with 50,000 members hired an
insurance consultant at a dollar a year. Testimony
indicated he was not content with collecting $335,000
in commissions but used various methods over a
period of years to retain almost a million dollars.

When asked about the disposition of this large
sum, the consultant pleaded the Fifth Amendment.
But other witnesses testified that the money went to
the secretary-treasurer of the international union. It
was brought out that the latter individual also was
the recipient of more than $160,000 additional in
welfare money.

Appearing before the Senate Subcommittee, the
secretary-treasurer refused to answer questions, in-
voking the Fifth Amendment a total of 90 times and
bringing upon himself a recommendation for a con-
tempr -,f ,ti,in Senate investigators, after examining



the books of the international, said none of the money
reached the union treasury.

In the second case, testimony disclosed how a local
union president was the sole control of funds into
which 800 employees paid $123,681 and their
employers $213,800 during a period of four years,
although there had been no collective bargaining
agreement since 1942 nor authorization to check con-
tributions from the employees' wages.

Senate investigators found only $23,000 left in
the fund's account. A total of $245,000 could not be
accounted for in any way. Expenditures were un-
covered for expensive automobiles, union convention
expenses, salaries for union business agents, personal
traveling expenses, political contributions and others.

The testimony in both cases makes it evident that
present laws have not been adequately enforced.
All persons with interests in these particular funds
appear to have neglected their responsibilities. There
has been no enforcement of either federal or state
statutes. State insurance commissions have not given
adequate attention to policing the funds. Management
abdicated its responsibility, while the union leader-
ship involved failed to protect the members from
schemes defrauding them of their rightful benefits.

Obviously, unless the present trend is corrected,

Pension and Welfare Funds are in for some rough

going in the future.

* # #

Socialism has never been initiated by the masses — it is
a dream of the planner and certain intellectuals.

ECONOMY AT WORK

Defenders of big government budgets invariably
argue that a reduction in government expenditures
would hurt essential services.

But economy-minded businessmen now in the Fed-
eral government are demonstrating that there's plenty
of waste which can be eliminated without injuring
important services.

The Department of Defense recently offered a new
example. In a directive, Secretary Wilson ordered the
four military services to share in the use of the de-
partment's vast, world-wide storage facilities.

A unit in need of storage space can now use unfilled
facilities of other units in its area. It will reimburse
the lending units for the costs.

The order undoubtedly wil make unnecessary the
erection of many warehouses.

The directive stipulates that a unit will "be re-
quired" to use another unit's facilities when it cannot
"more economically provide for its requirements
through the use of services under the Department's
Commercial Warehouse Service Plan or within its
own facilities."



ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER




STORAGE TANKS

for Oregon grain
completed this year.

Architect & Engineer: Mentor C. Addicks for Cargill, Incorporated
Chief Engineer: H. M. Anundson, Portland Commission of Public Docks
Fabricating & Erection: American Pipe and Construction Company,
Northwest Division



Storehouses of steel.




•-tfWm



Taken inside a bin (before roof installation), photograph illustrates wall construction and "sway-
back" dipping eave line. This unique feature gives roofs a shorter reach to bins' oval ends.

New on the Portland waterfront, built by the city's Commission of Public

Docks, are eight huge, oval-shaped bins, each measuring 190 feet in length, 135

feet across. Filled to capacity, these steel storage bins hold 5,400,000 bushels

of grain (in terms of wheat, for example, that is enough to make 350 million loaves

of bread). To save erection costs, American Pipe & Construction Co.

laid roof plates one over another, shingle-like, then welded them in place.

The siding construction of the 60' high bins is made up of three

separate courses of graduated thicknesses: the bottom plates are 7/16" gauge,

middle 5/16", and the top courses Vi" gauge. Flooring is steel, too . . .

and all this steel came from the mills of United States Steel.



®



USS Products for Heavy Construction

United States Steel Corporation • Columbia-Geneva Steel Division



UNITED STATES STEEL



MAY, 19 5 5



NEWS and
COMMENT ON ART



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE
LEGION OF HONOR

The California Palace of the Legion of Honor,
Lincohi Park, San Francisco, under the direction of
Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., will exhibit the following
schedule during May:

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS: Paintings by Henry
Koerncr; High Style and Chinese Art; Jewelry by
Peter Macchiarini; Masterpieces of Drawings from the
Museum of Besancon, France; Old Master Drawings
and Contemporary Drawings from the museum collec-
tions, augmented with notable works from local pri-
vate collections; Paintings in Black and White by Van
Day Truex; and Paintings by Hanna Kali.

Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts is showing
a Retrospective Exhibition of the work of Ernest Has-
kell at the museum, and on loan exhibition at the San
Francisco Public Library is an exhibition of Regional-
ism in American Prints of the Thirties.

SPECIAL EVENTS: Organ recital each Saturday
and Sunday at 3:00 p.m.; Art Classes for children are
held each Saturday morning at 10 o'clock — ages 6-14.
The Motion Picture Series, Saturdays, has been tem-
porarily discontinued.

The museum is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., holi-
days 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.



GRETE WILLIAMS
OPENS STUDIO

Opening presentation of the Grete Williams Studio,
2095 Union Street, San Francisco, was a showing of
Watercolors by the young American artist Robert
Kensinger. Born in Santa Cruz in 1926, he attended
Hartnell College in Salinas and won his first awards in
1948-49, which permitted continuation of art study
and stage design at the Chouinard Art Institute of Los
Angeles.

Kensinger is now a resident of San Francisco.



SAN FRANCISCO
MUSEUM OF ART

The San Francisco Museum of Art, War Memorial
Building, Civic Center, under the direction of Dr.
Grace L. McCann Morley, has arranged a program of
special exhibitions and events for May which includes
the following:

EXHIBITIONS: Bay Region Painting and Sculp-
ture, selected by the Boards of the San Francisco Mu-
seum of Art; Canadian Eskimo Sculpture; Three Con-
temporary Sculptors, Reg Butler representing the
United Kingdom; Berto Lardera of Italy, and David
'=-iiith of the United States; Art in America; 74th
Am, u'J Painting and Sculpture Exhibition of the San



Francisco Art Association; San Francisco Bay Region
Architecture; and the Neuberger Collection.

SPECIAL EVENTS: Concerts and Special Film
Showings; Lecture Tours of the museum each Sunday
at 3 o'clock; Gallery Tours on each Wednesday eve'
ning at 8 p.m.; and Adventure in Drawing and Paint'
ing, Friday evenings at 7:30; Studio of Art for the
Layman; and Children's Saturday morning art classes.

Museum open daily.



CITY OF PARIS

The Rotunda Gallery of the City of Paris, San Fran-
cisco, under the direction of Beatrice Judd Ryan, is
presenting the Fourteenth Annual Pacific Coast Cc
ramie Exhibition and Sale of Sculpture and Pottery — •
Jury Selection and Awards.



M. H. deYOUNG
MEMORIAL MUSEUM

The M. H. deYoung Memorial Museum, Golden
Gate Park, San Francisco, under the direction of Wal'
ter Heil, is presenting the following special exhibitions
and events for May:

EXHIBITIONS: Buildings in the Netherlands;
Contemporary Industrial Arts of Thirteen Countries;
Contemporary Swedish Paintings; Ancient Peruvian
Art, from the Nathan Cummings Collection; and 19th
and 20th Century French Paintings, from the Nathan
Cummings Collection. A documentary film, "Modern
Architecture in the Netherlands," will be shown in
conjunction with the exhibition Sunday afternoon
May 15 at 3 and 4 o'clock and Tuesday afternoon,
May 24, at 3 and 4 o'clock, admission free.

EVENTS: Art and Ideas, a study of the changing
picture of reality; Seminars in the history of art; paint'
ing and workshop for amateurs; classes in the enjoy-
ment of art for adults; and picture making, art and
nature and the art club for children.

Museum open daily.



74th ANNUAL PAINTING AND
SCULPTURE EXHIBITION

The 74th Annual Painting and Sculpture Exhibition
of the San Francisco Art Association containing 76
works is now on exhibition at the San Francisco Mu-
seum of Art.

The Jury of Selection for Painting was composed
of Dr. Jermayne MacAgy, Chairman, Esteban Vicente,
Ernest Born, Ann O'Hanlon, and Roger Barr. The
Jury of Awards for Painting consisted of Dr. Jermayne
MacAgy, Chairman, Esteban Vicente and Ernest
Born. For sculpture, the Jury of Selection and Awards
was Keith Monroe, Chairman, Mario Ciampi and Da-
vid Lemon.



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BUILDING WITH THE WEST



Technically Speaking

WOODWORK INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA



NON-TECHNICALLY SPEAKING

By RUSSELL BJORN, Managing Director, WIC



Assuming that you, as a regular reader of this
puhhcation, have noticed, or read, the "TECHNI-
CALLY SPEAKING" articles which have appeared
herein since the first of the year, then you are on
"speaking terms" with the activities of the Woodwork
Institute of California. Each of these articles had to
do with technical material; but, I being a non-techni-
cal person, can only write about our activities in keep-
ing with that definition.

While none of us expects to live long enough to
see the day when "spec" writing, detailing and mill-
work procedure, will come to us as they should, we
must at least admit that
there has been consider-
able improvement in the
mechanical side of our
jobs. In the past — as I
review it — our most fre-
quent bottlenecks were
caused by mechanical
problems, and to a certain
degree they still are a fac-
tor. By "mechanical prob-
lems" I mean detailing,
"spec" writing, architec-
ture, engineering, ma-
chine skill, tooling and
the like. In saying that, I can quickly realize that Til
be taken to task for classifying "architecture and engi-
neering" as a bit of mechanics, however, that is not
my intention, other than to compliment that profes-
sion for its versatility features.

Today, however, I think we all agree that most
of our bottlenecks are caused by the human element,
and not by mechanical elements, so much. Conse-
quently, conditions beyond our control, as individuals,
have compelled us to concentrate upon group rela-
tionships with our component colleagues for the satis-
factory solution to our mutual problems. But, sad to
relate, the practice of such relationships has been at
the expense of our person-to-person contacts, or rela-
tionships. As a result, we have seen our friends, as-




RUSSELL BJORN
Managing Director



sociates and those who depend upon each other for
mutual benefit, gather into groups and separate from
each other in units of their own. This is fine and per-
fectly desirable and is the right of any group with
common problems to exercise. Yet, we have been so
busy with group problems, procedures, etc., that we
have lost sight of one all-important elementary fact:
No two individuals in these groups are alike; no two
have the same needs, wants and ambitions; each has
his own personal peculiarities, likes and dislikes, feel-
ings and shortcomings.

This being the case, the Woodwork Institute of
California, in addition to making technical services
for millwork, standards and that sort of thing a pri-
mary function of the W.I.C. to the architectural and
engineering professions, also realizes the practical
value of friendly relationships among various as-
sociations who are tied in with the building industry
as well as within the members of W.I.C. In short,
we desire to cooperate with the A. I. A. Chapters of
California, the Construction Specification Institute,
the Producers Council, the California Council of
Architects, and others identified with the building
business to the end that the human elements of our
jobs may be lessened as a deterent to production.

For example, our Technical Consultant, who spends
all his time in the field, is not instructed to render a
"cut-and-dried" service but to make his services as
personal as possible for each one upon whom he calls.
Our reference library compiled and gathered at our
headquarters at 681 Market in San Francisco, is de-
signed with the same goal in mind. We believe this
so thoroughly — this is, about the human element in
our relationships — that we wish to make the services



Online LibraryMontana.Public Assistance BureauArchitect and engineer (Volume v.200-203 (1955)) → online text (page 28 of 86)