Morton L. (Morton Luther) Montgomery.

Historical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. online

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Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 16 of 227)
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22. Hereford March 6, 1830

■23. Joanna Furnace Dec. 29, 1830

24. Sinking Spring June 25, 1831

25. Stouchsburg March 23, 1833

■26. Bernville Aug. 16, 1832

27. Shoemakersville Jan. 14, 1833

28. Pikeville March 12, 1834

■29. Pricetown Feb. 6, 1835

30. Lobachsville April 10,/ 1835

31. Baumstown Dec. 21, 1835

32. Mohrsville May 10, 1836

33. Gibraltar June 16, 1836

34. Tuckerton ". .Jan. 26, 1838

35. Earlville Aug. 2, 1838

36. MoUto-wn Aug. 30, 1839

37. Virginville Aug. 30, 1839

'38. Lo^wer Bern June 13, 1841

39. Albany Dec. 33, 1845

40. Moselem Springs Jan. 14, 1846

41. Stonersville Jan. 18, 1847

42. Monterey May 19, 1847

43. Strausstown Nov. 18, 1847

44. Robesonia Furnace Feb. 28, 1849

45. Crosskill Mills Oct. 16, 1849

46. Siesholtzville Nov. 8, 1849

47. Tulpehocken March 19, 1850

-48. Qayton June 21, 1850



49. Birdsboro Jan. 6, 1851

50. Leesport Jan. 21, 1851

51. Manata-wny March 19, 1851

53. Spangsville Sept. 19, 1851

■53. Fleetwood ■. Feb. 16, 1853

54. Leinbach's Feb. 16, 1852

55. Beckersville Feb. 18, 1853

56. Host April 32, 1852

57. Bechtelsvilk May 7,1852

58. Greshville Feb. 10, 1853

59. Dryville May 3, 1853

60. Wernersville ' May 3, 1853

61. Fredericksvilile Aug. 20, 1853

62. Landis' Store Aug. 30, 1853

63. Maxatawny Nov. 5, 1853

64. Mount Aetna Oct. 3, 1854

65. Lenhartsville Dec. 11, 1854

66. Gouglersvilk July 16, 1855

67. Monocacy Jan. 39, 1856

68. Knauer's March 3, 1856

69. Moselem July 8, 1856

70. South Evansville July 8, 1856

71. Windsor Castle July 18, 1856

73. Wintersville July 10, 1857

73. Temple , July 30,1857

74. Mohn's Store* Nov. 6, 1857

75. Mertztown Dec. 8, 1857

76. Cumru March 6„ 1858

77. Kirbyville Oct. 31, 185|9

78. Bower's Station June 35, 1860

79. Lyons Station Oct. 25, 1860

80. Topton Aug. 29, 1861

81. Exeter Dec. 25, 1861

83. Maiden Creek April 18, 1862

83. Eagle Point ' Aug. 14, 1862

84. Fritztown Nov. 12, 1862

85. Alsace Feb. 12, 1863

86. Upper Bern Aug. 28, 1863

87. Hill Church May 27, 1864

88. North Heidelberg > June 22, 1864

89. Lower Heidelberg July 1,1864

90. Krick's Mill Sept. 11, 1865

91. Hiester's Mill Dec. 2,1865

93. Yellow House May 9, 1866

93. Mountain Sept. 19, 1866

94. Shanesville May 3, 1867

95. Centreport June 11, 1868

96. Stony Run Jan. 11, 1869

97. Scarlet Mill Aug. 4, 1869

98. Hummel's Store Sept. 29, 1869

99. Griesemersville June 29, 1870

lOto. Lime-Kiln ■ June 29, 1870

101. Jacksonwald Nov. 11, 1870

102. Pine Iron Works Feb. 24, 1871

103. Little Oley April 21, 1871

104. Monocacy Station May 13, 1872

105. West Leesport Sept. 30, 1872

106. Huff's Church March 2, 1874

107. Trexler Nov. 9, 1874

108. East Berkley March 12, 1875

109. Bern May 23, 1878

110. Cacoosing June 6, 1878

111. Stony Creek Mills May 20, 1879

112. Meckville Dec. 17, 1879

113. Berks Dec. 23, 1879

114. Vinemont April 19, 1880

115. Garfield June 25, 1880

116. Kempton May 17, 1881

117. Barto March 16, 1882

118. Angelica May 22, 1882

119. Eckville Sept. 8, 1882

120. New Berlinville Feb. 23, 1883

121. Bally Aug. 7, 1883

132. Schweyers April 14, 1884

133. Shamrock Station May 14, 1884

134. Schubert r June 6, 1884

•Charged to Mohnton Aug. 0, 1906.



42



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



125. Shillington July 14, 1884

126. Lorah Dec. 5, 1884

127. Athol Jan. 6,1885

128. Walter's Park March 3, 1885

129. Krumville July 7, 1885

130. Calcium July 7, 1885

131. Robesonia Jan. 15, 1886

132. Schofer Feb. 26, 1886

133. Obold April 20, 1886

134. Eshbach May 3,1886

135. Dreibelbis June 10, 1886

136. Scull Hill Aug. 30, 1887

137. Dengler's* Nov. 19, 1887

138. Hancock March 3, 1888

139. . Strause Aug. 28, 1900

140. Greenawalt March 20, 1903

Rural Free Delivery.' — The following 58 rural
free delivery routes were established in Berks coun-
ty from 1900 until Dec. 1, 1908, the first having
been established at Hamburg in the extreme north-
ern part of the county, Sept. 1, 1900, and their ar-
rangement being set forth in the order of priority:

Office Routes Established

Hamburg 2 Sept. 1, 1900

Reading 1 Oct. 1, 1901

Douglassville 4 Feb. 2, 1903

Fleetwood 1 July 1, 1903

Bechtelsville 2 July 1, 1903

Shoemakersville 1 July 1, 1903

Hamburg 2 Sept. 1, 1903

Boyertown 1 Oct. 15, 1903

Kutztown 1 April 1, 1904

Robesonia 2 April 1, 1904

Birdsboro 2 May 2, 1904

Sinking Spring 3 Sept. 1, 1904

Reading 1 Oct. 15, 1904

Geiger's Mills 1 Nov. 1, 1904

Blandon : 1 Nov. 15, 1904

Fleetwood 1 Nov. 15, 1904

Leesport 1 Nov. 15, 1904

Shoemakersville 1 Nov. 15, 1904

Temple 1 Nov. 15, 1904

Mertztov^Jn 1 Dec. 1, 1904

Boyertown 1 Jan. 2, 1905

Stouchsburg 1 Jan. 16, 1905

Wernersville 2 Jan. 15, 1905

Kutztown I Feb. 1, 1905

Barto 2 Feb. 15, 1905

JMertztoWn 1 Feb. 15, 1905

West Leesport 1 Feb. 15, 1905

Oley 3 April 15, 1905

Bernville 1 i\Iay 1, 1905

Kempton 3 May 1, 1905

JMohnsville 1 May 15, 1905

Oley 1 j\Iay 15, 1905

Geiger's Mills 1 May 23, 1905

Mohrsville 1 Aug. 1, 1905

Bernville 1 Oct. 16, 1905

Mohnsville 1 Nov. 1, 1905

Virginville 1 Nov. 15, 1905

Bethel 1 Dec. 1, 1905

Stony Creek Mills 1 Nov. 1, 1906

Lenhartsville 1 April 16, 1907

The following fifty offices have been discontinued
since 1900 as a direct result of introducing the rural
free deliver}' :

POST-OFFICES DISCONTINUED
Office Date

Alleghenyville Oct. 31, 1905

Alliance Oct. 13, 1905

* Changed to Mount Penn, December 11, 1903.



Angelica May 31^

Basket May 31

Baumstown April 30,

Beckersville Oct. 31;

Brewer Jan. 31,

Brumfieldville Aug. 15,

Cacoosing Oct. 31

Cross-kill Mills June 15,

Dale Dec. 14,

Dreibelbis Nov. 30,

Eagle Point March 31,

East Berkley April 30,

Eshbach Feb. 28

Freeman June 15

Gablesville Aug. 15

Garfield Jan. 31

Gouglersville Jan. 14,

Greenawalt April 29,

Greshvilk Aug. 15,

Grill Jan. 31,

Harlem Nov. 14,

Huffs Church .' Oct. 31,

KirbyviUe June 30,

Knauer's Oct. 31

Leinbach's Jan. 31,

Lesher Jan. 15,

Liscum Feb. 15

Lobachsville June 30,

Lorah Jan. 31,

Lower Heidelberg Jan. 31,

Moselem Dec. 14,

Moselem Springs . May 31

North Heidelberg Jan. 31,

Oakbrook Oct. 31

Obold Oct. 15

Passmore March 31,

Pikeville June 30,

Pricetown June 30,

Schubert Nov. 3o!

Schweyers Nov. 30,

Scull Hill Oct. 14

South Evansville Jan. 31

Stonetown April 1

Strausstown April 30,

Tuckerton June 15

Upper Bern Sept. 29

Windsor Castle May 31

Winters ville Jan. 14

MAIL OF DISCONTINUED OFFICES



1905
1905
1904
1906
1903
1906
1902
1905
1903
1905
1904
1908
1907
1905
1906
1907
1906
1905
1906
1907
1904
1906
1903
1905
1907
1906

loo's

1906
1907
1907
1907
1908
1907
1906
1907
1908
1906
1905
1905
1904
1905
1907
1904
1907
1905
1906
1906
1905



_ The mail formerly addressed to the following discon-
tinued post-offices, is sent as follows :

Alsace mail to Oley

Angelica mail to Mohnton

Baumstown mail to Birdsboro

Beckersville mail to Geiger's Mills

Brower mail to Douglassville

Brumfieldville mail to Douglassville

Cacoosing mail to Sinking Spring

Colebrookdale mail to Pottstown

Crosskill Mills mail to Myerstown

Cumru mail to ShilHngton

Dale mail to Barto

Eagle Point mail to Kutztown

East Berkley mail to Blandon

Eckville mail to Albany

Exeter mail to Lorane

Garfield mail to Bernville

Gouglersville mail to Reinholds

Greshville mail to Boyertown

Heidelberg Lower mail to Wernersville

Heidelberg North mail to Robesonia

Hiester's Mill mail to Robesonia

Kirbvville mail to Fleetwood



INDUSTRY OF COUNTY



43



Knauer's mail to Mohnton

Leinbach's mail to Reading R. F. D. No. 2

Lobachsville mail to Oley

Longswamp mail to Mertztown

Lo'rah mail to Sinking Spring

Lower Bern mail to Robesonia

Obold mail to Robesonia

Pikeville mail to Oley

Pricetown mail to Fleetwood

Schweyers mail to Mertztown

Siesholtzville mail to Alburtis

South Evansville mail to West Leesport

Stonetown mail to Birdsboro

Strause mail to West Leesport

Tuckerton mail to Reading R. F. D. No. 2

Upper Bern mail to Hamburg

Windsor Castle mail to Hamburg

Wintersville mail to Richland

OFFICES IN COUNTY

The following offices were in Berks county in January,
1909. The figures after post-offices denote number of rural
free delivery routes running from that office.



Albany

Athol

Bally

Barto — 2

Bechtelsville — 2

Berks

Berne

Bernharts

Bemville — 2

Bethel— 1

Birdsboro — 2

Blandon — 1

Bowers Station

Boyertown

Calcium

Centreport

Chapel

Clayton

Dauberville

Douglas sville — i

Dryville

Earlville

Esterly

Fleetwood — 2

Fredericksville

Fritztown

Geiger's Mills— 3

Gibraltar

Griesemersville

Grimville

Hamburg — t

Hancock

Hereford

Hill Church

Host

Hummel's Store

Jacksonwald

Joanna

Kempton — 2

Klinesville

Krick's Mill

Krumsville

Kutztown

Landis Store

Leesport — 1

Lenhartsville

Limekiln

Little Oley

Lorane

Lyons Station

Maiden-creek

Manatawny



Maxatawny

Meckville

Mertztown — 2

Mohnton — 2

Mohrsville — 1

Molltown

Monocacy

Monocacy Station

Montello

Monterey

Morgantown

Mount Aetna

Mountain

Mountain Sunset

Mount Penn

New Berlinville

New Jerusalem

Oley— 4

Pine Iron Works

Plowville

Reading — 2

Rehrersburg

Robesonia — 2

Ryeland

Scarletts Mill

Schofer

Siesholtzville

Shamrock Station

Shanesville

Shartlesville

Shillington

Shoemakersville — 2

Sinking Spring — 3

Spangsville

Stonersville

Stony Creek Mills— 1

Stony Run

Stouchsburg — 1

Strausstown

Temple — 1

Topton

Trexler

Vinemont

Virginville — 1

Walter's Park

Wernersville — 2

West Leesport — 1

West Reading

Womelsdorf

Wyomissing

Yellow House



TELEGRAPH

In 1844, the telegraph was successfully intro-
duced for the transmission of messages by elec-
tricity. The first message was sent through a wire
elevated on poles between Washington and- Balti-
more, May 37, 1844. Congress had (in March
previously) appropriated $30,000 to Prof. Morse
for experiments with his instrument, to demonstrate
the practicability of his invention.

P. R. & P. T. Co. — A company was incorporated
under the name of Philadelphia, Reading & Potts-
ville Telegraph Company, by an Act passed March
15, 1847, for the purpose of making, using and
maintaining telegraph lines between Philadelphia,
Reading and Pottsville, and commissioners were ap-
pointed to effect its organization. This company was
organized in April, and the telegraph line was suc-
cessfully established shortly afterward. Communi-
cation was completed between Philadelphia and
Reading on May 10, 1847 ; and the first message for-
warded to Reading related to the Mexican war.
The line has been maintained successfully ever
since.

Upon the construction and operation of the sev-
eral railroads running from Reading, telegraph
lines were extended to Harrisburg, Allentown, Col-
umbia, Lancaster, Slatington, and Wilmington.

Western Union. — The American Telegraph
Company introduced a line of telegraph here in
1863; and, in 1865, the Western Union Telegraph
Company. These two then formed a union; and
the lines have been operated since under the latter
name. In 1879, this company and the Philadelphia,
Reading & Pottsville Telegraph Company effected
an arrangement for co-operation; since then they
have conducted their lines together.

Lehigh. — The Lehigh Telegraph Company was
organized at Allentown, and opened an office at
Reading in September, 1880. It 'formed a connec-
tion with the principal cities in the United States
through the American Union Telegraph Company,
but this connection was continued only for a year
and a half, when it was changed to the "Mutual
Union" for an equal period, and it was operated
under this name till January, 1884, when its lines^
etc., were transferred to the Bankers' & Merchants'
Telegraph Company. This company has been op-
erating the lines under the name of the United
Lines Telegraph Company, by which it is known
throughout the country. At Reading it is known
as the "Postal."

TELEPHONE

Pennsylvania. — The telephone was introduced
at Reading by Henry W. Spang, in October, 1879.
He organized a system of communication in the
city and carried it on successfully until November,
1880, when he formed a stock company for main-
taining lines and exchanges in Berks, Montgomery,
Schuylkill and Lebanon counties, under the name



44



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



of East Pennsylvania Telephone Company. This
company then extended the system, making con-
nection with Pottstown, Pottsville, and Lebanon;
set up an increased number of instruments, and
operated it successfully until Jan 1, 1883, when the
entire business, including wires and instruments,
was transferred to the Pennsylvania Telephone
Company, a similar organization, which had ex-
tended its lines to Lebanon from Harrisburg. The
latter company has since conducted the business
very successfully. The extent of its system in the
county until March, 1909, is shown in the following
particulars :

Miles of wire in county, 7,720 (of which 6,200 are in
Reading) .

Instruments in county, 3,776 (of which 3,332 are in
Reading).

Operators, 45 ; employees, 115.

Estimated daily calls, 35,000.

Consolidated. — The Consolidated Telephone
Companies of Pennsylvania was organized under
the laws of Pennsylvania in August, 1901, and by
June, 1902, the plant was established in Berks coun-
ty with a "central exchange" at Reading. In Feb-
ruary, 1909, lines radiated from the exchange for
a distance of forty miles from Reading, touching
all the small towns and villages in the county; and
the toll system had connections covering a radius
of several hundred miles to all points in Pennsyl-
vania, New Jersey, Maryland and West Virginia,
and also to many points in New York and Ohio.
The subscribers in Berks county numbered 3,200.



In the system at Reading, there were then 1,161
miles of wire; underground in multiple duct con-
duits, more especially in the central parts ot the
city, 34 miles.

OIL PIPE LINES

The National Transit Company constructed a
pipe line, for the purpose of conveying petro-
leum, in the fall of 1897 from Millway, in Lancaster
county, through the lower end of Berks county
by way of Maple-Grove school-house, White-Bear
Station, Douglassville Station, and Maxatawny Sta-
tion, to a place called Centre Bridge on the east-
bank of the Delaware river in Bucks county, fifteen
miles north of Trenton. The line was constructed
from the oil fields of northern Pennsylvania, which
connected with lines conveying oil from West Vir-
ginia.

In the fall of 1908 a similar line was constructed
by A. C. Bedford across the central section of
Berks county from the pumping station near Myers-
town to a pumping station located at Barto, near
the railroad station, private persons purchasing the
right of way presumably in behalf of the Standard
Oil Company. The capacity of this line is about
20,000 gallons a day. It is a continuation of the
line from the oil fields in Illinois, which enters Penn-
sylvania near Negley, in Ohio, and passes a point
south of Altoona and Duncannon to Myerstown,
and from Barto by way of Quakertown to Centre
Bridge ; from which point it is pumped by way of
other pipe lines to the seaboard, where it is refined.



CHAPTER III - EDUCATION IN COUNTY



RELIGION

The spirit of religion was manifested by the first
inhabitants from the very beginning of their set-
tlements in this section of Pennsylvania. They did
not erect churches immediately because they were
obliged to look after the erection of homes for them-
selves and barns for their stock and products, and
to get the soil in proper condition for .cultivation.
Naturally, this required some years and until they
secured churches of their own, they traveled long
distances toward Philadelphia for the purpose
of attending worship. Funerals were necessarily
condiicted in their homes, and burials were made
in small lots of ground set apart in the far corner
of an adjoining field.

By studying the tim« of the erection of the
churches in the several sections of the county, it
is apparent that the subject of religion occupied a
great deal of public attention, and that the feeling
was general. Members of the Lutheran denomina-
tion erected the first church in the county, a small
church in the southerly end. of Amity township
near the Schuylkill river, about 1703, having been
Swedes; and members of the Friends' Society es-
tablished the next church, locating it in the ex-
treme upper end of the township, about 1735.



During the next twenty-five years, thirty-five
additional churches were established by different de-
nominations. So that by the time the county was
erected, in 1753, there were altogether thirty-eight
churches within its borders, south of the Blue
Mountain. There was also one beyond the moun-
tain (the "Red Church"), settlers having ventured
into that region of territory. Their distribution
in the several sections was as follows :




FIRST CHURCH IN COUNTY

The territory lying between" the South Mountain
and North (or Blue) Mountain ranges was not
yet released by the Indians. Nevertheless, the set-
tlers in' the Tulpehocken section, being Lutherans
from the Palatinate, established a church along the
Tulpehocken creek at the western end of the main
thoroughfare. This was also about 1735. Accord-
ingly, three churches were established in this part
of the Province until 1735.









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Manatawny


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2
3


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4


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Schuylkill








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This table reveals the fact that the religious in-
fluence in this large area of territory, about thirty
miles square, was mostly directed by the Lutheran
and Reformed denominations ; and this was so in
all the sections in about the same proportions ex-
cepting the Schuylkill section, where th*-e was no
Lutheran nor Reformed congregation at all until
1765. This controlling influence has been continued '
throughout the county from that time until now,
not only in the country districts but also in the city
of Reading and the boroughs.

In the next twenty-five years, until the Revolu-
tion broke out in 1775, fifteen additional churches
were established as follows :

East of the Schuylkill river, 3 Lutheran, 4 Re-
formed, 4 Union, and 1 Episcopal (at Reading) ;
and west of the river, 1 Lutheran and 3 Union.

The Molatton Lutheran Church in Amity had
become Episcopal in 1765.

At that time, there were in the county 53
churches. i

DENOMINATIONS DESCRIBED

Lutheran. — Immediately after Penn had arrived
m Pennsylvania, a number of Germans immigrated
to the province and among them there were Luth-
erans. The tide of their immigration began in ear-
nest in 1710. Then about three thousand immi-
grants, chiefly Lutherans, settled in New York, hav-
ing been encouraged to do so by Queen Anne, after
leaving the Palatinate on account of religious intol-
erance, and arriving in England. In 1713, one hun-
dred and fifty families settled in Schoharie, New
York, some of which ten years afterward came to
Tulpehocken, Pennsylvania. In 1737, a large num-
ber of them came into Pennsylvania from various



46



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY. PENNSYLVANIA



parts of Germany, chiefly from the Palatinate; and
it is beheved that many of these settled in this sec-
tion of territory, along the Manatawny and Tulpe-
hocken creeks.

The Lutheran religion existed in the county, both
with the Swedes and Germans to the east of the
Schuylkill and also with the Germans to the west.
Many of the Germans were adherents of the Re-
formed religion. The churches built by these de-
nominations were mostly ''union" churches. In
nearly every instance the members of the two de-
nominations united in bearing the cost jointly, —
having appointed separate committees to co-operate
in conducting the building operations. And the
church services alternated every two Sundays.

The harmony between these denominations in
such a peculiar and jealous matter as religion dis-
played the singular excellence and liberality of the
Germans. These people were alike in general af-
fairs, dress, speech, labor, mantiers and customs ;
and a difference in their religious notions did not
develop any antagonism between them. Indeed, the
one denomination frequently visited the church
services of the other denomination.

The earliest Lutheran ministers who preached in
this territory before the Revolution were Gerhart
Henckel, Van Dueren, Casper Stoever, Cas-
per Leutbecker, J. Philip Meurer, Gottlob Buett-
ner, Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg, John Nicholas
Kurtz, Tobias Wagner, Valentine Kraft, Peter
Mishler, Emanuel Schuize and Frederick A. C.
Muhlenberg.

Rev. Plenry Melchoir Muhlenberg is generally
regarded as the father of the Lutheran Church in
America in respect to making it an organized re-
ligious body. He was stationed at the Trappe in
1743, whence he visited different Lutheran organi-
zations as far north as the Blue Mountain, and as
far west as the Tulpehocken settlement. During
his ministerial journeys he made the acquaintance
of Conrad Weiser and shortly afterward, 1743,
married his daughter, Maria.

Reformed.- — As mentioned in the previous sec-
tion, persons attached to the Reformed faith were
also amongst the early settlers, but they were known
as "German Calvinists," or "Dutch Reformed."
Their first churches were in Oley, in Greenwich,
and in Heidelberg. In meeting-houses, however,
they were mostly connected with the Lutherans.
The early Reformed ministers in Pennsylvania
were assisted by the church in Holland. In 1741, a
number of German Bibles (1,300) were sent here
for their use. In 1746, Rev. Michael Schlatter, the
great Reformed missionary from Switzerland, ar-
rived, and he preached in Oley and Tulpehocken.

The active ministers of the Reformed congrega-
tions in the several sections of the county before
ISOO were the following:



Michael Schlatter
WiUiam H. Stoy
John Waldschmid
Thomas H. Leinbach
John C. Guldin
John Zuilch
John J. Zufall
Andrew J. Loretz



Daniel Wagner
F. J. Berger
John W. Boos
J. Conrad Bucher
L. F. Herman
Chas. G. Herman
Philip Pauli



Those in the county about 1840 were :



J. Conrad Bucher

Thos. H. Leinbach

Chas. G. Herman

L. C. Herman

A. L. Herman

J. Sassaman -Herman

William Hendel



Augustus Pauli
William Pauli
Isaac Miesse
David Bossier
David Hassinger
Philip Moyer
Chas. Schiiltz '



Samuel Guldin
John Pliilip Boehm
Geo. Mich'l Weiss
John Peter Miller



John Henry Helffrich
J. Wm. Hendel.Sr.
William Otterbein
Philip J. Michael



Friends. — The Friends were the third sect of
people who settled in the county. They erected a
meeting-house in 173.5 near the Monocacy creek,
along the western line of the Swedes' settlement,
then known as Amity township. Within the next
score of years, they erected two more meeting-
houses, one in Maiden-creek townsihip and the
other in Robeson township. They built a fourth
at Reading, supposed to have been in 1751, three
years after the town had been laid out and just as
the building improvements began to be active. They
were most active about that time when the county
was erected and for fifty years afterward. They
then exerted the most political influence in the
county through the recognition of the proprietaries
of the government, who were also Friends. And
their religious influence was large and wide in the
several localities mentioned. But they remained
where they first settled. They did not extend be-
yond Oley and Exeter along the 2\Ianatawny and
Monocacy creeks, j\Iaiden-creek and Richmond
along the Ontelaunee, and Robeson along the Hay
and Allegheny creeks. And yet their families were
numerous and their population was considerable. In
this time it was estimated that they numbered about
two thousand. Their moral principles were superior
and their habits and customs admirable. Simple,



Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 16 of 227)