Morton L. (Morton Luther) Montgomery.

Historical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. online

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Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 29 of 227)
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John S. M. Pratt, Reading, R Hahnemann, 1903

J. S. Rittenhouse, Reading Hahnemann, 18S.5

Charles M. Richards, Reading Hahnemann, 1899

J. C. Sanders, Reafling N. Y. Homoeopathic, 1900

Francis R. Schnnicker, Reading D

„ „ • ■, , ■ • N. Y. Homoeopathic, 1873

E. Z. Schmucker, Reading, D Hahnemann, 1870

T ■ V ■ ?*f Hf'' ,I"^"tztown Hahnemann, 1884

T -%■ Schollenberger, Reading Hahnemann, 1884

A. Cecil Stewart, Ridgewood, R

,. ■•■;■;-■,■■■; N. Y. Homeopathic, 1887

Horace J. Shmkle, Reading, R Hahnemann, ISSO

Henry F Schantz, Reading Hahnemann, 1891

Frank W. Seidel, Reading Hahnemann. 1S94

M. Hassler Schantz, Reading

Cleveland Homo. Med. Col., 1892'



MEDICAL PROFESSION



103



F. W. Sunandy, Hyde Park Hahnemann, 1897

William L. Vaughn, Stouchsburg Hahnemann, 189^

Paul B. Waldman, Reading Hahnemann, 1884

Robert L. Walter, Walter's Park ...Hahnemann, 1900

Robert Walter, WaUer's Park

.Hygeo-Therapeutic, N. Y., 1873. Hahnemann, 1888
Joseph M. Walborn, Fleetwood Hahnemann, 1907



OSTEOPATHY

A school of medical science whose therapeutic
system constitutes a practice of treating disease in
all forms without the aid of drugs was instituted
in 1874 by Dr. A. T. Still, of Baldwin, Kans., who
is known as the founder of the "School of Osteop-
athy."

The first college was started in 1894 in Kirksville,
Mo. Since that time other colleges have been es-
tablished in the principal centers of the United
States, and there are now osteopathic practitioners
in all the large cities and most of the larger towns
in the country.

The practice of osteopathy has been legally ac-
knowledged in thirty States; and in many States
there is an independent examining and licensing
board, or an osteopathic representative on the State
Board of Health.

A bill was laid before the Legislature of Penn-
sylvania at the session of 1904 for the purpose of
legalizing the practice in Pennsylvania, but it was
not passed. It was, however, recognized in 1909,
the Act regulating the practice having been ap-
proved March 9th.

The osteopaths have been organized into State
associations ; also one national, called "The Amer-
ican Osteopathic Association."

Osteopathy was first introduced into Reading in
February, 1899, by Dr. Anna C. Towle, but owing
to ill health after having practiced for nearly a
year, she disposed of her practice to Dr. H. H. Wal-
pole, and he continued it until 1908, when he left
the city. Four practitioners -are now at Reading,
namely :

Laura De Long

H. L. Maxwell and his wife

H. J. Vastine



DENTISTRY

The practice of dentistry was not carried on as a
distinct profession in Berks county until about 1850.
The first dental college was established at Balti-
more shortly before that time, and the next was at
Philadelphia in 1851. Theretofore regular physi-
cians extracted teeth. Previously the repair of
teeth and the supply of false teeth were rare, con-
fined almost entirely to great cities and indulged in
by people of means.

About that time and for twenty years afterward
the persons who were inclined to dentistry would
spend several months with a recognized dentist and
under him acquire some practical experience, then
start out for themselves. The first graduated dent-



al surgeons in Berks county from a college were
Dr. William H. Scholl and Dr. John W. Clemson,
both of Reading, who graduated from the Penn-
sylvania Dental College at Philadelphia in 1865.
Dr. Scholl has practised his profession at Reading
ever since, but Dr. Clemson never practised here,
having shortly afterward removed to Bordeaux,
France, and there carried on (until now) the manu-
facture of dental supplies.

The earliest recognized dentists at Reading were
John Piper, John Arnold, W. K. Breneizer, T.
Yardly Brown, and Frank Hickman, the last two
still surviving but residing out of the county.

In 1876, an Act was passed— on April 17th— by
the Legislature of Pennsylvania which required
dental surgeons who practised in the State to be
graduates of a reputable institution where this spe-
cialty was taught, and to register their diplomas
in the county where they resided. The diplomas
were to be registered within three months after the
passage of the Act. But the Act was not to apply
to any surgeon who had practised dentistry for
three years prior to its passage. The following
statement shows the registered practitioners in the
county, with college and year of graduation.
Where no college is given, the year shows the time
when the practitioner started.

The Act of 1876 established a State Board of six
examiners, who were to be selected by the State
Dental Society, and this Board was to approve the
diplomas before registration. This Act was amend-
ed in 1897, and Dr. C. V. Kratzer, of Reading, was
one of the members of the first Board under this
amended Act, having been appointed by the Gov-
ernor, but he served only several months, until the
the appointment of a new Board by the succeeding
Governor in January, 1898.

Dr. Wilson D. Da Long, of Reading, was ap-
pointed as one of the State examiners in September,
1906, for the term of three years.

The thirty-fourth annual meeting of the Lebanon
Valley Dental Association was held at Reading, in
the Masonic Temple, May 11, 1909.

DENTAL PRACTITIONERS

Morris R. Adam, Reading Pa. University, 1903

Charles S. Bertolet, Reading Pa. University, 1900'

Abram L. Bower, Boyertown Pa. University, 1901

Samuel L. Bower, Boyertown Philadelphia, 1902-

John T. Bair, Reading Pa. University, 1903'

Joseph H. Borneman, Boyertown, D 1867

Daniel B. Bower, Boyertown 186T

N. S. Borneman, Boyertown, D 1881

Joel B. Bower, Boyertown 1882

Henry W. Bohn, Reading Pa. University,

Daniel L. Bower, Boyertown, D Philadelphia, 1893

Edward W. Bohn, Reading Pa. "University, 1897

Ha;-ry L. Cleaver, Reading Pa. University, 1896

Raymond S. De Long, Reading Pennsylvania, 1900

George F. De Long, Reading Pa. University, 1903

Frank L. DeGour, Reading Pennsylvania, 1870

Arthur B. Davis, Reading, R Philadelphia, 1896

Wilson D. DeLong, Reading Pa. University, 1897

William G. Dusto, Reading Medico-Chi., 1906

Charles S. Fry, Reading 1872

Charles E. Grim, Reading Philadelphia, 1901



104



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



Milton U. Gerhard, Reading Pa. University, 1903

Jacob M. Gartman, Reading Pennsylvania, 1903

Clarence B. Grim, Reading U. of Pa., 1907

Walter S. Herr, Reading Pennsylvania, 1897

Abram Herr, Reading 1869

H. B. Hamaker, Womelsdorf 1867

Kurtz D. Hill Pennsylvania, 1S84

Glyndeur Hickman, Reading Philadelphia, 1886

Ziba Hickman, Reading Philadelphia, 1888

H. J. Hickey, Reading, R Baltimore, 1884

Charles A. Hottenstein, Kutztown Pennsylvania, 1892

Edwin E. Howerter, Reading Medico-Chi„ 1903

Raymond L. Hamaker, Womelsdorf .. Pa. Dent. Col., 1908

Abraham B. Johnson, Kutztown 1880

Harry T. Johnson, Reading 1880

Harvev C. Johnson, Reading Philadelphia, 1889

J. F. Kinsey, Reading, D 1864

William H. Kalbach, Hamburg 1863

William H. Kilmer, Reading Pennsylvania, 1878

Henry D. Kurtz, Reading, R Baltimore, 1881

C. V. Kratzer, Reading Pennsylvania, 1897

Frank P. Lewis, Reading Baltimore, 1880

George M. Maxwell, Birdsboro Baltimore, 1898

William Meter, Reading Phila. Med.-Chi., 1900

Jonathan B. Miesse, Reading Philadelphia, 1872

Peter S. Mogel, Reading Pa. University, 1889

George S. Rothermel, Fleetwood Pa. University, 1900

J. L. Ritter, Reading, R 1873

G. H. P. Rabenhold, Hamburg Pennsylvania, 1890

Levi H. Reinhart. Birdsboro, D Philadelphia, 1894

George S. Schlegel, Reading Pa. University, 1900

Otto J. Specker, Reading Pa. University, 1903

Mvron B. Shuman, Reading Pa. University, 1903

U. of Pa., 1905

Eli Slegel, Reading, D 1855 ■

William PL Scholl, Reading Pennsylvania, 1865

Joel E. Slegel, Reading, D Philadelphia, 1868

Charles R. Scholl, Reading Philadelphia, 1888

Calvin G. Shomo, Hamburg Pennsylvania, 1889

Walter R. Slegel, Reading Philadelphia, 1891

Elton Stimmel, Reading Pennsylvania, 1893

D. Ambrose Stein. Reading, R Pa. University, 1894

Samuel E. Slegel, Reading Philadelphia, 1897

John F. Schoenberger, Reading Medico-Chi., 1905

George Stimmel, Kutztown Pa. Dental College, 1905

Carlos H. Thimme, Reading, R Philadelphia, 1870

Jacob F. Thomas, Reading, R 1882

Elwood Tate, Reading ; Pennsylvania, 1891

S. Edmund Tate, Reading Pennsylvania, 1897

Caleb D. Thomas. Reading Pa. Dental College, 1906

Herman G. Wotherspoon, Reading U. of Pa., 1907

Kensie N. Yoder, Wernersville Pa. University, 1903

WiUiam L. Yocum, Reading, R Philadelphia, 1891

Levi Zimmerman, Bethel, R Boston, 1877



A'ETERINARY
From the beginning of the first settlements nntil
the year 1889, the practice of medicine and surgery
in connection with domestic animals was carried on
without any legal restrictions. Farmers and men
of experience, who had become faniihar, through
long observation, with animal sicknesses and dis-
eases, prescribed and administered the necessary
remedies, and in every section of the county there
came to be men who were recognized for their skill
in curing domestic animals of their various ail-
ments. Then (April 11th) an Act of Assembly
was passed by the Legislature of Pennsylvania
which related to the practice of veterinary medicine
and surgery, and every practitioner of this particu-
lar branch of the profession was obliged to be a
graduate of a regularly chartered veterinary col-



lege, and to register his qualifications in the pro-
thonotary's office of the county where he practised ;
but all those who had practised for five years before
were allowed to register by filing the necessary
affidavits, within six months after the passage of
the Act. This legislation was brought about by
the efforts of the Pennsylvania State Veterinary
Association, which had been organized in 1883.
The first president was James W. Sallade, then of
Pottsville, but formerly of Berks county. In 1904
and 1905 Dr. Otto G. Noack, of Reading, was the
president. ]\Iembership in 1909 was two hundred;
from Berks county, five.

In 1895, a State Board of Veterinary Examiners
was established by an Act passed on May 16th, and
all practitioners after that date not theretofore reg-
istered were obliged to secure a certificate from
this State Board, which had to be filed in the pro-
thonotary's office of the county where the practi-
tioner resided ; but this Act was amended in 1905,
which authorized the secretary of State to issue a
license on the Board's certificate, and this license
qualified the practitioner to practise anywhere in
the State.

This Board was created for the purpose of look-
ing after the sanitary condition of the live stock
in Pennsylvania. In 1907, Dr. Noack was appoint-
ed agent for the entire State. Since the creation of
this Board over four hundred cows in Berks county
have been killed on account of tuberculosis.

In 1908 there were five veterinary surgeons in
Reading and thirty-four in Berks county.

The following .statement shows the registered
veterinarians of Berks county, with college and year
of graduation. Where no college is given, an "affi-
davit was filed without specifying thetime of start-
ing practice. [D after name "incHcates deceased: C.
ceased to practice; R, removed out of county.]

Emanuel Althouse, Reading

John Albright. Ontelaunee

William Appel, Kutztown. R Xe^v York

Joel Biehl. Moselem Springs

John K. Biehl. Molltovv'n

."".^"'s S Eorneman, Boyertown. ...■.■.■.■.'.'.'. ■.Ontario,

William B, Blatt. Centreport. D

Jonathan Blatt, Centre, D [']

Christian Baum. Hamburg

Daniel L. Badgenstos, Strausstown

Charles W. Brossman, Womelsdorf. ... " " Ontario'

Samuel K. Biehl, Reading, C ....." .' ^"^^"°'

Ulysses G. Bieber. Kutztown .'\merican (NY)

A. F. Baver, Krumsville Chinc^n

William U. Custer, Reading, D Pa.' Vet Assm:

Owen E. Colhns, Mt. Pleasant D

Charles 0_ Collins, West LeesportV. '.'.■.■.■.■.■.'. Ontario,

Kilburn H. Cleaver. Reading Ontario

Benjamin S.Clauser, Upper Tulpehocken...'.' ' '

George W. DeHard, Stonersville. D

James B. Dry, Bowers, D

Samuel DeW'ees, Fleetwood, D

?7''^ . ■^;. Dreibelhis, Greenwich. '. '. '. '. '. '. ". '. " " ' Ontario

John A. Dorward, Reading C Ontario,

William Deck, Bethel ['.',

James Dubson, Ruscombmanor

George W. Dunlap, Birdsboro, R .".■;■.'. '. '. ' Ontario

Martm D. DeTurk, Olev Chica-o Vet Co le^e"

Daniel H. DeTurck, Birdsboro. .Chicago Vet. Colle|e;



1889
1889
1889
1889
1889
1882
1889
1889
1889
1889
1891
1891
1892
1904
1885
18S9
1887
1879
1889
1889
1889
1889
1S85
1889
1889
1891
1893
1908
1908




BERKS COUNTY PRISON IN PENN COMMON




STATE ASYLUM AT WERNERSVILLE



PUBLIC CHARITIES



105



Reuben Ebert, Trexlers 1889

Arthur C. Foos, Reading, R Ontario, 1887

Elias GrofF, Jeflferson 1889

William D. Gross, Kutztown Ontario, 1885

Henry L. Gilbert, Colebrookdale 1889

Samuel Goldsmithj Reading, R 1889

Charles D. Gruber, Bernville Ontario, 1888

Solomon K. Hoffman, Hamburg, C 1889

Abraham Henrich, Colebrookdale 1889

Benjamin Y. Heffner, Richmond 1889

Frederick B. Hassler, Tilden 1889

Walter G. Huyett, Wernersville Chicago, 1899

William Jacoby, Lenhartsville 1889

Jacob Kerchner, Windsor Castle _ 1889

Peter I. Kershner, Fleetwood Ontario, 1891

Allen Z. Keelor, Boyertown Ontario, 1891

Elmer G. Kriebel, Hereford 1892

Daniel R. Kohler, Boyertown Ontario, 1893

John Lutz, Klopp's Store; D 1889

Tobias E. Landis, Npjiierlinville 1889

Nathaniel F. Lutz.-Jefferson 1889

Henry R. Lutz, Jefferson, D 1889

David B. Levan, Kutztown Chicago Vet. College, 1908

Franklin W. Miller, Gouglersville 1889

Pierce M. Miller. Gouglersville 1889

Jared Miller, Jefferson 1889

Henry B. Meyer, Hereford 1889

Emendon Mogel,' Bernville 1889

Henry A. Miller, Ruscombmanor 1889

William H. Moyer, Womelsdorf, R Ontario, 1891



Rudolf Mertz, Reading, R Ohio, 1894

James W. McNeil, Reading Boston, 1894

John P. Miller, Reading Pa. University, 1899

Adam F. Noll, Reading 1889

Otto G. Noack, Reading Berlin (Germany), 1890

Walter S. Phillips, Reading Pa. Vet. Assn., 1886

Samuel M. Petersheim, Caernarvon 1889

Charles Phillips, Womelsdorf, D 1889

John M. Richards, Reading, D 1889

John L. Richards, Yellow House (Birdsboro) 1889

Amos B. Roberts, Blandon, D 1889

Jonathan Reber, Hiester's Mill 1889

Owen B. Roberts, Blandon ' 1889-

Henry K. Rentschler, Shartlesville 1889

Robert O. Rothermel, Reading Pa. University, 1902

John H. Shaffer, Mt. Aetna 1889

William H. Seitzinger, Wernersville 1889

William Schaeffer, Jefferson 1889

George B. Sebastian, Rehrersburg 1889

James D. Schaeffer, Fleetwood 1889

Jared Spengler, Penn, D 1891

Howard L. Stein, Friedensburg, D Ontario, 1893

Albert H. Schmoyer, Boyertown Chicago, 1903

Nicholas L. Schaeffer, Fleetwood Chicago, 1906

Elias Troutman, Tulpehocken 1889

Amos G. Weidenhammer, Richmond 1889

Kerby D. Werley, Virginville Chicago, 1908

Henry S. Yoder, Pleasantville ; . 1889

Edwin C. Yoder, Kutztown Ontario, 1893



CHAPTER VII-PUBLIC CHARITIES



From 1824 to 1869, all matters relating to the
poor inhabitants of Berks county, who needed pub-
lic assistance, were referred to the poor directors
of the county; but by 1869 the institutions of a
charitable, reformatory or correctional character in
the State had assumed such proportions, and the
number of inmates had become so large that the
Legislature passed an Act of Assembly, establishing
a State Board of Public Charities for the purpose
of inquiring into the methods of instruction, gov-
ernment of inmates, conduct of managers, condition
of buildings, and all other matters pertaining to
their usefulness and good management.

In 1874, the Act of 1869 was amended, author-
izing the State Board to appoint three or more per-
sons in any county to act as visitors of the poor-
houses and other institutions in such county as an
aid to the State Board ; and to cause the removal
of insane persons in the county almshouses to State
Hospitals for proper treatment. The State Board
appointed Sydenham E. Ancona, Charles Breneiser
and George D. Stitzel as its representatives in Berks
county and they have served (excepting Stitzel,
who died Dec. 13, 1905, E. R. Gerber being ap-
pointed in his place) gratuitously ever since,
visiting the several institutions, penal and chari-
table, and reporting to the State Board.

A large three-story brick building was erected on
the poor-house property from 1871 to 1874 for
an "Insane Hospital" and the indigent insane peo-
ple of the county have been cared for there, unless
removed to the State Hospital at Harrisburg.



The particulars relating to the poor-house and
the prison are mentioned in connection with the
county buildings in Chapter IV.

STATE INSTITUTIONS
Wernersville State Asylum. — In 1891, an Act
was passed for the establishment of an Asylum for
the Chronic Insane of Pennsylvania, and in this
behalf, a commission was appointed by the Governor
to select a site and erect the asylum. After exam-
ining thirty-one sites, in nineteen counties of the
State, they selected a site in Lower Heidelberg
township, Berks county, a short distance west of
Wernersville, as the one best adapted for the pur-
pose designated. Several tracts of land, embracing
540 acres, were purchased, and a superior, com-
modious building was erected at a total cost of
$500,000. The institution was dedicated in a for-
mal manner on Sept. 5, 1894, with the Governor
presiding over the exercises. Since 1905, two new
buildings have been erected : an infirmary building,
costing $30,000, and a building costing $35,000, the
first floor to be used as an additional dining-room,
the second floor as a sitting-room for women. Until
the end of 1894 the total number admitted was 662;
in 1895, 357; in 1896, 114; in 1897, 146; from 1898
to 1900, 167; and from 1901 to 1904, 169.

The average weekly cost of each patient has been
less than $3. On Sept. 30, 1908, the total number
of patients was 859; men, 652; women, 207.

From the opening of the Asylum until Sept. 30,
1905, there were 70 inmates from Berks county, 50



106



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



men and 20 women. During the first year (Sept. 30,
1893, to Sept. 30, 1894) there were 46 entered, 31
men and 15 women. On Sept. 30, 1905, there were
20 men and 9 women from Berks county ; Sept. 30,
1906, 21 men and 9 women; Sept. 30, 1907, 28 men
and 9 women; Sept. 30, 1908, 27 men and 10
women.

Henry M. Dechert, Esq. (formerly of Reading,
but for nearly sixty years at Philadelphia) , has offi-
ciated as president of the board of trustees since
the opening of the Asylum, in a most creditable
manner.

The following trustees from Reading have served
on the board: George F. Baer, 1894 to 1897;
Thomas P. Merritt, 1894 to 1899 (officiating as
treasurer), and since 1903 ; William H. Schick, 1894
to 1895; Thomas C. Zimmerman, since 1899.

State Hospital. — Complete statement of the
patients in the State Hospital at Harrisburg, from
Berks county, from the time it was opened and the
cost of their maintenance, which was paid by the
county.



Year


Patients


Cost


Year


Patients


Cost


1851







1880


33


$2,636.96


1852


3


$335.40


1881


26


3,088.53


1853


4


447.20


1883


33


3,479.43


1854


9


1,006.20


1883


36


3,547.82


1855


7


783.60


1884


29


2,969.99


1856


11


1,329,80


1885


36


3,955.28


1857


13


1,341.60


L886


60


4,690.29


1858


6


670.80


1887


82


5,794.85


1859


8


■894.40


1888


133


8,493.37


1860


11


1,329.80


1889


159


12,577.88


1861


10


1,118.00


1890


165


12,265;.09


1863


13


1,453.40


1891


178


12,860.83


1863


16


1,788.80


1893


166


12,444.00


1864


17


1,900.60


1893


165


13,501.02


1865


16


1,788.80


1894


187


12,317.01


1866


22


2,459.60


1895


151


10,649.11


1867


23


2,571.40


1896


163'


11,132.60


1868


19


2,223.00


1897


183


12,352.60


1869


17


3,100.60


1898


176


12,673.66


1870


19


2,224.20


1899


193


13,285.02


1871


21


2,347.80


1900


210


14,521.19


1873


22


2,459.60


1901


225


16,119.13


1873


27


2,610.44


1903


232


16,646.35


1874


24


2,850.65


1903


253


16,919.98


1875


23


3,839.90


1904


260


18,432.86


1876


25


3,220.50


1905


264


19,318.72


1877


24


2,555.21


1906


289


19,476.93


1878


25


2,719.06


1907


275


18,948.63


1879


26


2,651.57


1908


394


20,644.70



$370,677.49

Glen Mills Reformatory. — A reformatory for
boys and girls was established at Glen Mills in Dela-
ware county in 1827. The first inmate from Berks
county was entered in 1842. Until 1850 there were
altogether 6 ; and from 1851 to 1900, 190. In 1901,
there were 7 ; in 1902, 11 ; in 1903, 21 ; and in 1904,
9. The total admitted until Jan. 1, 1909, was 302 ;
and the average cost per diem has been from 20
to 25 cents. The cost for the county of this institu-
tion from 1901 to Jan. 1, 1909, was about $11,000 to
Oct. 1, 1905, and $11,337.62 from then until Jan. 1,
1909, but only one-half was paid by the county, the



other half being paid by the State. Previous to
1901 the State paid the entire cost.

Eastern State Penitentiary. — Previous to the
year 1850, no data on the subject can be obtained.
From 1850 to 1869 inclusive, 46 prisoners were re-
ceived from Berks county. From 1870 to 1894 no
prisoners from the county, were confined here. The
following table shows the number from the county
here each year from 1895 to 1908 inclusive. The
average cost of each per diem was about 21 cents.

Year No. of prisoners Year No. of prisoners

1895 1 1903 32

1896 11 1903 38

1897 33 1904 43

1898 53 1905 32

1899 42 1906 36

1900 31 1907 37

1901 30 1908 68

Huntingdon Reformatory. — This institution
for the reformation of boys was established by the
State of Pennsylvania and opened in 1889 ; and the
first boy from Berks county was entered in 1894,
who continued to be the only one during 1895 and
1896; there was none received in 1897 and 1898;
then the number began to increase as follows: 8
in 1899; 11 in 1900; 17 in 1901; 24 in 1902; 43
in 1903; 54 in 1904; 52 in 1905; 55 in 1906; 56
in 1907; and 60 in 1908.

The cost for 1904 to the county was $3,838.73;
and the total cost for all the years named was
$25,879.52.

COUNTY INSTITUTIONS

There are a number of charitable institutions in
the county, partly supported by appropriations from
the public funds; which reflect the humane senti-
ment and generous nature of our people in a most
commendable manner. They are classified as Hos-
pitals, Schools, and Widows' Home.

Hospitals. — Three hospitals have been estab-
lished at Reading, described with the Associations
of Reading in Chapter X., namely: Reading, St.
Joseph's and Homoeopathic.

Homes. — The homes number seven: Bethany
Orphans' Home, founded in 1867, in Heidelberg
township, by the Reformed church.

Topton Orphans' Home, founded in 1897, in
Longswamp township, by the Lutheran church.

St. Catharine's Female Orphans' Asylum, found-
ed in 1871, at Reading, by Mrs. Catharine Madary,
and devised by her to the Roman Catholic church ;
by which it has since been enlarged, improved and
successfully maintained.

St. Paul's Orphans' Asylum for Boys, founded
in 1889 at Reading, by the St. Paul's Roman Cath-
olic church. It has been enlarged several times,
evidencing its successful management.

House of Good Shepherd, founded in 1889, at
Reading, by the Roman Catholic church, and re-
moved to Bern township in 1900.

Home for Friendless Children, founded in 1888,
at Reading, under the auspices of the Bureau of
Employment (having been started in 1884) ; in



WAR PERIODS



107



which William D. Smith has shown special inter-
est toward its enlargement and success.

Widows' Home, founded in 1875 at Reading, by
the Society of the "Home for Widows and Single
Women" which became an incorporated body in
1876. A superior, commodious structure was es-



tablished by the society in 1886, at Sixteenth and
Haak streets.

The three hospitals, and Home for Friendless
Children, and the Widows' Home have been aided
and encouraged by State appropriations.

The foregoing institutions are also mentioned in
Chapter X., under the head of Associations.



Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 29 of 227)