Morton L. (Morton Luther) Montgomery.

Historical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. online

. (page 35 of 227)
Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 35 of 227)
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50


E


181


Wm. H. Diehl


50


H


177


Thos. S. Brenholtz


53


A&B


27


Wm. S. Potts



* Prepared by the compiler of this history for the Historical Society
of Berks County, and read at a regular meeting on Feb. 14, 1903.



Regt.


Co.


Men


Captain


55


B


191


John C. Shearer


59


K


33


Stephen H. Edgett


70


G


94


Geo. E. Clymer, 6th Cavalry


74


G


50


Wm. J. Bart (Berks and

Adams counties)'


80


L


64


C. C. McCormick (Berks and
Northumberland counties)


88


A


197


Geo. W. Knabb


88


B


192


Henry A. Myers


88


H


196


David A. Griffith


88


Band


20


E. Ermentrout, Leader (Ring-
gold)


93


B


185


John E. Arthur


93


G


183


A. C. Maitland


93


K


74


David C. Keller


96


G


31


Jas. M. Douden


104


B


50


Jacob W. Glase


104


H


195


Wm. F. Walter




D


297


Geo. W. Durrell, Ind. Battery-


152


K


25


Henry Ungerer


181


H


16


A. M. Halberstadt


182


H


76


Geo. F. Cooke, 21st Cavalry




A'


ine Months' Service — 1862-63


Regt.


Co.


Men


Captain


128


A


99


L. Heber Smith


128


B


93


Wm. McNall


128


E


98


Wm. H. Andrews


128


H


76


John Kennedy


128


I


89


Richard H. Jones


128


K


88


Geo. Newkirk


151


E


93


Jacob S. Graff


151


G


83


Levi M. Gerhart


151


H


83


Wm. K. Boltz


151


I


100


Wm. L. Gray.


151


K


101


Jas. W. Weida






Volunteei


- Militia of 1862


ReiTt,


Co.


Men


Captain


2


G


70


F. S. Bickley


11


E


104


Chas. H. Hunter


11


I


95


N. M. Eisenhower


20


G


70


Wm. Geiger


20


H


45


Samuel Harner


20


I


92


Frederick S. Boas


*




67


Samuel L. Young




Drafted Mi'itia of 1862— g nxis.


Rert.


Co.


Men


Captain


167


A


113


Jonathan See


167


B


105


Chas. Melcher


167


C


102


Peter Y. Edelman


167


D


113


Samuel A. Haines


167


E


101


H. H. Miller


167


F


100


Josiah Groh


167


G


114


William A. Schall


167


H


105


A. H. Schaeflfer


167


I


111


J. M. ShoUenberger


167


K


105


Edw. F. Reed


179


I


99


Amos Drenkel


179


K


95


John B. Wagoner






Emergency Troops — 1863


Regt.


Co.


Men


Captain


31


H


63


David A. Griffith


42


A


98


Wm. F. Walter


42


B


91


Samuel Harner


42


C


103


John E. Arthur


42


D


95


Wm. D. Smith


42


E


83


Jno. McKnight


42


F


79


Bently H. Smith


42


G


96


Samuel A. Haines


42


H


90


John Obold


42
*Ind.


I

Cavalry


91


Edw. Bailey



WAR PERIODS



129



Regt.


Co.


iten


Captain


42


K


b5


Jacob Deppen


48


G


95


Jos. G. Holmes


48


I


79


Aug. C. Greth


53


A


86


R. L. Jones


53


B


75


Jacob Lehman


*


■•


149


W. C Ermentrout




One Hundred


Days' Service — 1S64


Regt.


Co.


Men


Captain


194


I


84


H. E. Quimby


195


A


85


H. D. Markley


195


B


93


H. Maltzberger


196


I


95


G. S. Rowbotham






One Year\


J Service — 1864-6$


Regt.


Co.


Men


Captain


83


I


84


R. W. McCartney (Berks and
Dauphin counties)


192


F


97


John Teed


195


A


96


H. D. Markley


198


D


98


Isaac Schroeder


198


G


99


Wm. L. Guinther


205


B


104


Jos. G. Holmes


205


E


104


Wm. F. Walter


205


H


111


F. Schmehl


313


D


102


J. W. Kennedy



patch announcing the attack on Fort Sumter found
the company at drill at some distance from the
city.* The effect was electrical, and all were impa-
tient to move at once to the defense of the flag-.



Surgeons from County in Civil War
The following medical practitioners of Berks county
were engaged in the Civil war, and the statement shows
the regiment with which they were connected and the
district of the county where they resided.
33d Regt. — Dr. Johnt B. Griesemer, Exeter, Surgeon
34th Regt.— Dr. Harrison T. Witman, Reading, Asst.

Surgeon ,

47th Regt. — Dr. John H. Sheetz, Reading, Asst. Surgeon
48th Regt. — Dr. Charles T. Reber, Reading, Asst. Sur-
geon
73d Regt. — Dr. Jeremiah S. Trexler, Kutztown, Asst.

Surgeon
75th Regt. — Dr. Manoah S. Long, Longswamp, Asst.

Surgeon
76th Regt. — Dr. Erasmus R. Scholl, Reading, Surgeon
108th Regt. — Dr. Hiester M. Nagle, Reading, Surgeon
141st Regt. — Dr. Wellington G. Byerle, Bernville, Asst.

Surgeon
154th Regt. — Dr. John M. Hoffman, Spring, Surgeon
154th Regt. — Dr. Elias C. Kitchen, Amity, Surgeon
166th Regt.— Dr. Alexander H. Witman, Reading, Asst.

Surgeon
167th Regt.— Dr. Daniel T. Batdorf, Bethel, Asst. Surgeon
U. S. Navy — Dr. Jonathan Bertolette, Surgeon



THREE MONTHS' SERVICE— 1861
Ringgold Light Artillery. — The first troops
to respond to the President's call were the Ring-
gold Light Artillery of Reading ; the Logan Guards
of Lewistown ; the Washington Artillery and the
National Light Infantry of PottsvilJe; and the
Allen Rifles of Allentown.

On Jan. 21, 1861, Maj.-Gen. William H. Keim
(then Surveyor-General of Pennsylvania, from
Reading) ,. with characteristic sagacity, had advised
Captain McKnight that the services of his company
would probably soon be needed, and counseled him
to hold them in readiness for immediate service.
From that time till April 16th, almost daily drills
were practised. On the 22d of February, they were
in- readiness to obey marching orders. The dis-

*Ind. Artillery
9




CAPT. JAMES MCKNIGHT

On the morning of the 16th of April, marching
orders were received from Governor Curtin; and,
on the afternoon of that day, the company was
taken on the Lebanon Valley railroad to Harris-
burg, where it arrived at 8 o'clock in the evening.
The company numbered 108 men, fully armed and
equipped as light artillery. On reporting at the
Executive Office, the Secretary of War telegraphed
that the company be forwarded by the earliest
train, but this order was countermanded by the Sec-
retary of the Commonwealth later in the day.

The five companies named were mustered into
the service of the United States at Harrisburg for
three months, and departed for Washington by rail-
road on the 18th of April, at 9 o'clock a. m. They
arrived at Baltimore at 1 o'clock p. m., being under
the necessity of marching two miles through the
city, from Bolton to Camden station. On leaving
the cars, a battalion was formed in the following
order: 4th Artillery (regulars); Logan Guards;
Allen Rifles, of Allentown ; Washington Artillery
and National Light Infantry, of Pottsville ; with
the Ringgold Artillery bringing up the rear. As
the column was forming near Bolton station, the
police of Baltimore appeared in large force, headed
by Marshal Kane, and followed by a mob which
at once commenced an attack upon the volunteers,
countenanced by a portion of the police, who had
been sent to give safe conduct through the city.
Orders were given to the men to preserve their
temper and make no reply to anything that should
be said to them. At the command "forward," the
mob commenced hooting, jeering and yelling, and
proclaimed, with oaths, that the troops should not
pass through their city to fight the South.

* Poor-house Farm in Sliillington.



130



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



Arriving near the center of the city, certain reg-
ular troops filed off toward Fort McHenry, leaving
the volunteers to pursue their way through
the city as well as they could. At this juncture,
the mob were excited to a perfect frenzy, breaking
the line of the police, and pushing through the files
of men, in an attempt to break the column. Every
insult that could be heaped upon the troops was
offered, but no word of reply was elicited. The
officers and men marched steadily on toward Cam-
den station. At every step, the mob increased till
it numbered thousands of most determined and des-
perate men.

As the volunteers were boarding the train at the
station, the angry mob hurled a shower of bricks,
stones and clubs into their disorganized ranks, for-
tunately, however, inflicting only slight injuries. In
the midst of the confusion, an attempt was made
to detach the engine from the train and run it
away, but this was prevented by the determined
character of the engineer and his assistants, who
drew revolvers and threatened to shoot any who
dared to do so. At length, amidst the demoniac yells
of the crowd, the train moved off, carrying the vol-
unteers safely beyond the reach of their desperate
assailants. They arrived in Washington at 7 o'clock
in the evening. Arms, ammunition and equipments
were furnished and the work of barricading the
Capitol was commenced immediately. Squads of
the Rebel soldiers were then drilling on the opposite
. side of the Potomac river in full view of the Capi-
tol. It having been ascertained on the 33d of April
that an attempt would be made to capture Wash-
ington by way of the arsenal and the navy-yard,
the "Ringgold Artillerists" were ordered to report
to Captain Dahlgreen at the navy-yard, and three
twelve-pound howitzers were assigned to them.
Excepting a detachment of twelve men, detailed to
guard the "Short Bridge," the entire command was
required to man these guns. On the 25th, a ser-
geant and six men were detailed to serve as a
guard on the steamer "Powhatan," which was dis-
patched to make a reconnoissance down the Poto-
mac for the purpose of searching for obstructions
and of ascertaining if forts were being erected along
the river. On the 36th, the company were ordered
to duty at the Capitol ; and on the 15th of May, the
Secretary of War assigned them to duty at the
Washington Arsenal, where they remained till the
expiration of their term of service, excepting a
short interval, when they were detailed to mount
guns in the forts about Washington. They were
mustered out at Harrisburg. They had been class-
ified as Company A, of the 35th Regiment. Edward
P. Pearson, Esq., of Reading, was Adjutant of the
Regiment ; he subsequently became an officer in the
regular army and served for many years with
great distinction.

Col. A. C. Buell, in his book, entitled "The Can-
noneer, Recollections of Service in the Army of the
Potomac by a detached volunteer in the Regular



Army," published the following interesting infor-
mation about this distinguished company:

Speaking of the "Stolidity of the Pennsylvania Dutch,"
history records some manifestations of it that are admir-
able. For example, there was a battery in the Civil war
which entered the Union service as "The Ringgold Artil-
lery of Reading" and its commander was Capt. James
McKnight. It was the first volunteer artillery organiza-
tion to reach Washington in April, 1861. At the end of
its three months' service, it re-enlisted in a body for
three years and was mustered into the regular army as
Battery M, 5th U. S. Artillery, being the only volunteer
organization transferred bodily to the regular army in
all our history. Its composition may be inferred from
the names of its sergeants in 1864 when I was personally
acquainted with it. They were as follows : Daniel Yoder,
Philip Weidner, William Beckhardt, Joseph Gerhardt and
Frederick Volkman. Of its 107 enlisted men in the Valley
Campaign of 1864, 84 were Pennsylvania Dutchrnen from
Berks, Schuylkill and Lehigh — all native Americans — 12
Americans of Enghsh descent, and 11 Irishmen, one of
whom, Patrick Flynn Hunt, late of Templemore, County
Tipperary, was acting sergeant on temporary detail from
Battery E. Battery M served all through the war in the
6th Corps. At Cedar Creek it was in line with Getty's
(2d) Division of that Corps and took the butt end of the
Confederate attack in the first attempt of the Union forces
to stop the rout in the early stages of that dramatic battle.
In its first position it lost one gun, a lieutenant and 9
men, the gun however being retaken by the 10th Vermont
Infantry. In its second position the whole battery was
taken by Kershaw's South Carolina Brigade and almost
instantly retaken by part of the Old Vermont Brigade in
a rough-and-tumble, which resulted among other things
in the killing or disabling of 19 men with the bayonet
alone, few shots being fired. Out of this last motion,
Battery M emerged with 2 guns and 27 men fit for duty
who at once resumed their fire with double canister. This
remnant was commanded by Sergeant Daniel Yoder, Cap-
tain McKnight being at that moment acting Chief of Ar-
tillery of the Corps, and the remaining lieutenant (Henry
M. Baldwin) having been killed in the previous struggle.
After the battle, Gen. Horatio Wright complimented Cap-
tain McKnight on the behavior of his battery in the pres-
ence of the few men that remaitied. Said he, "Your Penn-
sylvania Dutchmen don't seem to know when they are
whipped." To which the Captain replied, "Don't know
when they are whipped? By God, General, most of them
don't know when they are killed."

All the losses of Battery M at Cedar Creek were
either killed or wounded, none were missing. Buell
was a private when this happened, but he became
a colonel afterward.

1st Regiment. — The 1st Regiment was organ-
ized at Harrisburg on April 20th. In pursuance of
orders, it performed duty at several places in Penn-
sylvania, Maryland and Virginia till July 23d, when
it returned to Harrisburg, and was there honorably
discharged on the 37th. During its service it did
not participate in any battles; but it accomplished
much good by checking any movement on the part
of the Rebels in arms along the borders. It in-
cluded Company G, which was recruited at Read-
ing, and mustered into service on April 20, 1861.

5th Regiment.— The 5th Regiment was organ-
ized at Camp Curtin (Harrisburg) on April 21st.
It performed guard duty mostly at Baltimore,
Washington and Alexandria. It was at the latter
place during the disastrous battle of Bull Run, in
which the brigade (to which it had been trans-



WAR PERIODS



131



ferred) participated. It was discharged at Harris-
burg on July 25th.

Company H was recruited at Reading. It was
mustered into service on April 20, 1861. Dr. E. R.
Scholl, of Reading, was the regimental surgeon.

Reading City Band was attached to this regi-
ment. It comprised sixteen men (six from Leb-
anon), with Emanuel Ermentrout as leader. Left
Reading on May 22, 1861, for Washington, via Har-
risburg and Baltimore, and was mustered in there
on the 23d. Remained there until the 29th and
then went to Alexandria, where it was in active
service until July 21st. Then it was ordered to
Harrisburg and there mustered out on July 26th.
The members from Reading returned home.

7th Regiment. — The Tth Regiment was organ-
ized and mustered into service at Camp Cur-
tin on April 22d. It was encamped over a
month at Chambersburg. On June 8th it moved
southwardly. It was stationed at Williams-
port on the 19th. On July 2d, it began the march
to Martinsburg. On the way, it confiscated the
contents of an extensive flour-mill (a large amount
of grain and flour and one hundred and fifty barrels
of whiskey), the owner having been a captain in
the Rebel army. Shortly afterward, it was en-
camped at Charlestown, where it remained until
ordered to Harrisburg, and it was mustered out of
service on July 29th. Three companies were re-
cruited in Berks county, C, G, and D; the first at
Friedensburg; the second at Pleasantville ; and the
third at Reading.

14th Regiment. — The 14th Regiment was or-
ganized at Camp Curtin on April 30th. Richards
McMichael was elected lieutenant-colonel, and
Joseph A. McLean major. Both were from Read-
ing. It was encamped at Camp Johnston, in Lan-
caster, till June 3d, and subsequently it marched
to Chambersburg, Hagerstown, Sharpsburg, Mar-
tinsburg, Bunker's Hill and Harper's Ferry, doing
picket and guard duty, and making various expedi-
tions to encounter the enemy. Whilst at the latter
place, the term of enlistment expired and it was
ordered to Harrisburg. On its way, it encamped
and remained two weeks at Carlisle, where it was
mustered out of service Aug. 7th. It included two
companies from Berks county: A, recruited at
Reading and mustered in on April 27th; and E,
recruited at Womelsdorf, and mustered in on
April 24th.

25th Regiment. — Company C of Reading was
also in the 25th Regiment, in the three months'
service with Company A. It was recruited at Read-
ing out of the surplus men of the Ringgold Light
Artillery and seventeen men of the National Light
Infantry of Pottsville, and mustered into service
on April 18, 1861. The regiment had been organ-
ized at Harrisburg. It was mustered out of service
on Aug. 1st.

Regimental Band. — The regimental band of the
25th Regiment was engaged in the three months'
service, having been mustered in at Washington,



in April, 1861, and mustered out at Harrisburg,
in July, 1861. It comprised sixteen members
under the leadership of John A. Hoch, fourteen
of them taken from the Ringgold Band. The other
two were from Pottstown.



THREE YEARS' SERVICE— 1861-64

The insurrection having become too powerful to
be suppressed by the first display of military au-
thority, the President issued a second proclamation,
calling upon the States to furnish two hundred
thousand men who were to be enlisted for three
years. The quota of men from Pennsylvania was
soon filled by the patriotic impulses of her people.
Companies from Berks county were in the follow-
ing regiments :

26th Regiment. — The Bernville Band with
Henry Grime as leader, and numbering thirteen
men, was mustered into the service at Bladens-
burg, Md., on Sept. 16, 1861, as regimen-
tal band of the 26th Regiment of Peain-
sylvania Volunteers, and attached to Hooker's 1st
Brigade. It remained in camp at Bladensburg
about two months; then it moved to Budd's Ferry,
in Lower Potomac, on Maryland Shore, and con-
tinued there all winter. During the latter part of
April, it joined McClellan's army at Fortress Mon-
roe, and was engaged in the Penmsular campaign,
commencing at Yorktown and ending at Harrison's
Landing. It was mustered out of service at Har-
rison's Landing on Aug. 8, 1862, by reason of an
Act of Congress passed to disp-ense with regimen-
tal bands. The men returned to Philadelphia,
where they were paid off and sent home.

32d Regiment.- — The 32d Regiment included
companies A, D and F from Berks county, and
was mustered into service at Harrisburg on July
27, 1861, after having remained at Easton in camp
for two months. The regiment was at Washington,
Tennallytown, and Langley until March 10, 1862,
when it joined the Army of the Potomac. It par-
ticipated in its marches to and from Richmond until
February, 1863, having been engaged in the battles
of Gaines' Mill, Hall's Hill, Antietam and Freder-
icksburg.

Then it was transferred to the defenses of Wash-
ington and became a part of the 22d Army Corps,
where it remained until January, 1864, when it was
ordered to duty in West Virginia under General
Sickd. Afterward it was at Martinsburg and
Harper's Ferry until April, then proceeded to the
Kanawha Valley and participated in the engage-
ments at Princetown and Meadow Bluff. On May
22d, it marched to Millville. While there its term
of service expired, and then it proceeded to Phila-
delphia, via Pittsburg, where it was mustered out
of service on June 17, 1864.

36th Regiment. — The 36th Regiment was com-
posed of companies recruited in several counties
east of the Alleghany Mountains. Company I was
made up of men recruited in Berks and Lebanon
counties. The men from Berks county numbered



133



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA



thirty-three, and were recruited at Reading. The
regiment was mustered into service July '27, 1861.
It was not in any fighting until the latter part of
June, 1862, when it was engaged in the battle of
Gaines' Mill, occupying the left of the line. Its
next engagement was at Charles City Cross Roads,
June 30, 1862. It passed through seven days of
fighting, and upon mustering the regiment only
two hundred men were present to answer to their
names. It was also engaged in the battles of An-
tietam, Fredericksburg and the Wilderness. Nearly
the entire regiment was captured in the last battle,
and the men were imprisoned at Andersonville.
The regiment was mustered out of service June 16,
1864, at Philadelphia.

43d Regiment. — In Battery F, of the 43d Regi-
ment of Pennsylvania Volunteers (1st Artillery),
recruited in Schuylkill county, there were included
thirty-eight men from Berks county. It was organ-
ized at Philadelphia in June, 18G1, for three years'
service, and mustered out at Harrisburg on
June 9, 1865.

The Battery participated in the following battles :
Winchester, second Bull Run, Chantilly, Antietam,
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Bris-
toe Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania,
North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Peters-
burg, and Deep Bottom.

44th Regiment. — The 44th Regiment (1st Cav-
alry) was recruited in a numher of counties, Com-
pany L from men of Berks, Lebanon and Lancaster
counties, and Company M from men of Berks coun-
ty. Both were recruited at Reading.

Company L was mustered into service as an inde-
pendent company on July 30, 1861, and stationed at
Baltimore for five months ; and Company M on Aug.
5, 1861, and stationed at same place until Oct. 3d.
On Jan. 7th, these companies joined their regiment
and moved with the army toward Manassas. They
were eng'aged in the battles of Strasburg, Wood-
stock, Harrisonburg and Fredericksburg during the
year 1862; and in 1863, in the battle's of Brandy
Station, Beverly Ford and Aldie. They were con-
cerned in Sheridan's raid upon Richmond, during
the spring of 1864, in which they encountered the
enemy in a number of engagements, and in the fol -
lowing summer they were engaged in fighting the
enemy at Saint Mary's Church, Malvern Hill,
Gravel Hill, and Ream's Station. On Aug. 29th
they were encamped on the Jerusalem Plank Road,
near the left of the army. Their term of service
having expired, they withdrew from the front on
Sept. 1st, and proceeded to Philadelphia where they
were mustered out of service Sept. 9, 1864.

46th Regiment. — The 46th Regiment was or-
ganized at Harrisburg on Sept. 1, ISfil, and in-
cluded Company E, recruited at Reading. It was
ordered to Plarper's Ferry and placed under the
command of General Banks. Its first conflict was
at Winchester, where for five hours it held its po-
sition with great coolness and bravery whilst re-
treating toward the Potomac before Gen. Stonewall



Jackson. On Aug. 8, 1862, it was in the battle of
Cedar i\Iountain, and on Sept. 17th in the battle of
Antietam. In May, 1863, it participated in a fierce
engagement near Chancellorsville; and in July it
took a prominent part in the 'battle of Gettysburg,,
occupying the extreme right of the line on the 3d.

After the withdrawal of Lee from Pennsylvania,
the regiment was attached to the Army of the Ten-
nessee under General Rosecrans. In January, 1864,.
it proceeded to Pennsylvania on a veteran furlough,-
and the greater part of the officers and men re-
enlisted for three years.

Among the re-enlisted men in the regiment, there
was a young man, Henry Weidensaul, a native of
Morgantown, in Berks county. He entered the
regiment when fourteen years old and participated'
in the battles of Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Chan-
cellorsville, Gettysburg, Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw
Mountain and Peach Tree Creek. He was wounded
at Cedar Mountain, taken prisoner, and confined
in Libby Prison for five weeks. He was also-
wounded at Peach Tree Creek and Atlanta. On.
July 1, 1863, he was seventeen years old, and the
Keystone State claimed him to be the youngest
veteran soldier in the service.

Upon recruiting its ranks, the regiment rejoined
the army at Chattanooga, and participated in the
Atlanta campaign under General Sherman in his
great march to the sea. After nearly four years of
faithful service, it was mustered out on July 16,
1865, near Alexandria, Virginia.

Birdsboro' Band. — This band was mustered into-
service for three years on Aug. 27, ,1861, as the
regimental band of the regiment ; but discharged on
Aug. 16, 1SG2, in pursuance of an order dispensing
with regimental bands.

48th Regiment — Company D of this regiment



Online LibraryMorton L. (Morton Luther) MontgomeryHistorical and biographical annals of Berks County, Pennsylvania, embracing a concise history of the county and a genealogical and biographical record of representative families, comp. by Morton L. Montgomery .. → online text (page 35 of 227)