Mrs. Belle McKinney Hays Swope.

History of the families of McKinney-Brady-Quigley online

. (page 22 of 28)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

of the board, and it characterized his missionary let-
ters, and his public addresses." In 1891 he was sent
to visit some of the important missions- of the board,
■especially those of India, but he went by way of
China and Japan, in which places he made brief visits.



213



As a pastor he was beloved. "He was faithful to
every trust, and had that sweetness of life which only
comes from the triumph of grace within the heart. I
do not think there ever lived a man to whom one
would more quickly, go in the hour of trouble, or at
whose hand one would receive a sweeter welcome or
more helpful comfort." He was also a man among
men, a friend in prosperity or adversity, who brought
cheer and light into every gathering where he met
with his people. The degree of D. D. was conferred
upon him by "Wooster University. He died Feb. 16,
1899, at Elizabeth, N. J., at the age of sixty years.
Services were held in Elizabeth, on the ISth.
and in the East Liberty Presbyterian church on the
20th, in comm.emoration of his life and work. He is
buried beside his wife and two infant children in the
Allegheny cemetery, Pittsburg, Penna. He was twice
married.
To Rev. John Gillespie, D. D., and Anna Mason Quigley
Gillespie were born four children:

i. LUCY HARTFORD GILLESPIE, b. July 2, 1866,

U. July 27, 1866.
ii. REV. GEORGE ELLIOTT GILLESPIE, b. Aug. 1,

1867, at Pittsburg, Penna., attended Washington
and Jefferson College one year, was graduated
from Princeton College in 1889, concluding his
theological education there in 1892. His first
charge was Cream Ridge, N. J., then the Bedford
Presbyterian church of Brooklyn, N. Y., from
which charge he went to Port Jervis, N. Y.; m.
Nov. 10, 1892, Lillian DeEtta Runyon, b. Sept. 18,
1873, at New Brunswick, N. J., daughter of
Jephthah Runyon and Ellen V. F^eld Runyon.
At this date they reside at C'oatesville, Penna.^
where Rev. Gillespie successfully ministers to
the Presbyterian congregation.

To Rev. George EJlliott Gillespie and Lillian De-
Eltta Runyon Gillespie were born three chil-
dren:

i. ELLEN LILLIAN GILLESPIE, b. July 11,

1894.
ii. JOHN RUNYON GILLESPIE, b. June 20,

1898.
iii. JANE GILLESPIE, b. Jan. .5, 1903.
iii. THOMAS HARTFORD GILLESPIE, b. Sept. 9,

1868, at Pittsburg, Penna. Educated in Pittsburg
and Elizabeth, N. J., he began his business
career at seventeen years of age, and is now
auditor of the Standard Steel Car Co., at Pitts-
burg, in faith a Presbyterian, in politics a Re-
publican; m. Apr. 20, 1897, Minnie Magoffin
Howard, b. July 29, 1869, at Allegheny, Penna.
daughter of William N. Howard and Katharine
Wotring Howard, reside at Allegheny.

To Thomas Hartford Gillespie and Minnie Ma-



244

goffin Howard Gillespie were bom two children:
i. KATHARINE HOWARD GILLESPIE, b.

July 27, 1900.
t \' ii. WILLIAM DONNER GILLESPIE, b. Oct.

' 24 1903.

iv. ROBERT QUIGLEY GILLESPIE, b. May 16, 1870,

d. Sept. 20, 1870.
Rev. Jobn. Gillespie, D. D., married secondly, Matilda
L. Paulson by whom he bad two children:

i. ELIZABETH PAULS'ON GILLESPIE; m. P. W.

CRANE.
ii. J. CHALMERS GILLESPIE,
ii. LUCY EVELINA QUIGLEY, b. May 2, 1843, d. Oct. 16,

1862, at Washington, D. C.
iii. MARY QUIGLEY, b. Nov. 14, 1846, d. young,
iv. ROBERT MASON QUIGLEY, twin, b. Apr. 17, 1849, d.

in infancy.
v. THOMAS' HARTFORD QUIGLEY,, twin, b. Apr. 17,
1849, d. in infancy.

X. Joseph Ouigley^ (James Quigley^, Robert Ouigley^,
James Quigley") second son of James Quigley and Grizelda
McKinney Quigley, was born 1799 near Shippensburg,
Cumberland Co., Penna., died 1865 at Austin, Texas; mar-
ried Eleanor Bunton who died at Bowling Green, Ky.,
daughter of John Bunton and Desha Bunton. After the
death of their mother, her children were taken by their
grandmother on the maternal side, to Franklyn, Ky., and
made their home with her, at that place and in Texas.
Joseph Quigley remained with his brother in Louisville,
Ky. until after the close of the Civil War, when he joined
his children in Texas, and died soon after he reached them.
He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church.
He is buried at Austin, Texas.



iBSoie:



ELIZA BUNTON QUIGLEY, b. Feb. 17, 1837, d. Aug.
30, 1884, at Kansas City, Mo., buried at Austin, Tex.;
no. Aug. 18, 1855, Seth Mabry, b. July 10, 1831, at Jack-
son, Tenn., son of Evans Mabry and Sarah Trigg Ma-
bry. He served through the Civil War, on the Confel-
erate side, and was promoted to the rank of captain.
To Seth Mabry and Eliza Bunton Quigley Mabry were
born three children:
i. EVANS MABRY, d. in infancy, buried at Austin,

Tex.
ii. ELLA MABRY, b. July 2, 1859; m. Sept. 24, 1879,
Walter Gallatin Mellier, b. Jan. 12, 1859, at
St. Louis, Mo., attended Princeton University,
and is interested in the real estate business in



245

Kansas City, Mo., where lie lias resided siac©
1881. In politics he is a Democrat, and in faith
he and his family are members of the Episcopal
church.
To Walter Gallatin Mellier and Ella Mabry Mel-
lier were born two children:

i. MABRY MELLIER, b. July 28, 1880; m.
Oct. 21, 1903, Jessie Lathrop, b. Mar. 30,
1882, daughter of Gardiner Lathrop and
Eva Grant Lathrop, of Kansas City, Mo.
He is manager for the Armour Packing
Company at Los Angeles, Cal.
ii. WALTER GALLATIN MELLIER, b. Oct.
24, 1887, d. Feb. 24, 1888.
•ii. JOSEPH MABRY, d. in infancy, buried at Austin,
Tex.
ii. BETTIB QUIGLEY, d. young,
iii. JAMES QUIGLEY, d. young.

XL Thomas Quigley ^ (James Quig•ley^ Robert Qui^-
ley2, James Quigley^) third son of James Quigley and Gri-
zelda McKinney Quigley, was born December 14, 1800 near
Shippensburg, Cumberland Co., Penna., died January 3,
1864 at Louisville, Ky., married January 2. 1827 Eliza M.
Graham, born June 26, 1806, at Versailes, Ky., died July 29,
1885 at Louisville, Ky., daughter of Alexander Graham and
Anne Graham.

At the age of ten years he removed with his parents to
Warren. Ohio, thence to Pittsburg in 1813. in 1821 to Ken-
tucky, Hopkersville, Russelville, Bowling Green, and m
1854 to Louisville, where he spent the remainder of his life.
He made the trip from Pittsburg to Louisville on a flat
boat, even that tedious mode of transit, preferable to the
journey by horse and wagon. _ _

He became identified with almost every enterprise in the
city His superior judgment and financial ability won for
him the admiration of his fellow men. and by those with
whom he was associated in the banking business, he was
considered one of the best financiers in the state. His
benevolent spirit enabled him to use his wealth to great
advantage. He was especially helpful to young men, to
whom he extended the most courteous kindness, and g^ve
the conscientious advice of one who was alive to all public
endeavors. Mild and gentlemanly in bearing, with a per-
sonal magnetism and charm of manner, he was ennaied
with the sincere affection of the poor in his city, as well as



246

those in more influential walks of life. He was zealous in
ail good works, and the purity of his career and christian
living, were sources of inspiration to all with whom he came
in contact. His financial aid was appreciated in the building
and managemenit of the Nashville railroad. All beneficiary
objects received his substantial support.

He was a staunch friend of the union, and worked with
untiring zeal for her cause during the War of the Rebellion.
He had slaves, the last one tenderly cared for by his family,
until her death im 1900. During the entire struggle, he had
charge of many soldiers and regiments of both armies in
Louisville. He was warmly attached to his family, and
made frequent visits to his relatives in Pennsylvania and
Ohio. His wife lived from the age of six months at Bowling
Green, until the time of her removal with her husband and
family at Louisville. At Bowling Green Thomas Quigley
was engaged in the tobaccO' business, and was in early man-
hood, as in later life, genial and rich in the qualities which
contributed to make him useful, and gave him a strong un-
wavering affection for the people of his state, which was
reciprocated, and in whose loyalty he had every reason to
believe was truth and sincerity.

Lie v/as not only a public benefactor and pro-
moter of education, but a firm believer in the beauty and
comfort of a happy home life, the welfare and happiness of
the members of his household his constant aim and consid-
eration.

He was connected with many industries, political and
social institutions.

He was a valued, philanthropic business man, in whom
was reposed implicit confidence and faith.

He died suddenly of paralysis. The day of his death a
Louisville paper contained the following : — "Mr. Quigley
was one of the best citizens of Kentucky. He was quiet,
unassuming, yet one of the most public minded men in the
st'ate. He was always alive to everything that could pro-
mote prosperity or the welfare of the people. The}^ owed to
him a large portion of the gratitude that is due to the build-
ing and running of the Nashville railroad. In all financial
matters he wss a tov,'er of strength. He was ore of the best
financiers that Kentucky has produced. Throughout the



247

struggle against the Rebellion he was one of the most
zealous friends of the' union. The state and the city deeply,
profoundly feel this irreparable loss. Time, the consoler,
only can assuage this private and public sorrow."

He was a member of the United States Christian Com-
mission and the Executive Committee of the Kentucky
Branch, held a meeting on the ninth of January 1864, six
days after his death, adopted and published the, following
resolutions. He was Treasurer of this Branch.

"Whereas, in the providence of God, our beloved brother
and fellow laborer, Thomas Quigley, Esq., fell asleep in
Jesus on the third day of January, leaving a large place
vacant in his family circle, the church of which he was a
member, and the very wide circle of his acquaintance; and
whereas in his death the country has lost one of its most
loyal friends and supporters, (whose very name was a tower
of strength in all financial matters), and as this loss has
come upon us at a time when we were just on the point of
reaping a rich harvest from his iniluence; therefore.

Resolved, first. That we bow in deep sorrow and humble
submission to that iricvitable Providence that has removed
from us such an efficient co-laborer.

Second, That we recognize in this great and untimely
loss to the country, arid especially to the Christian Com-
mission, a call from on high to redouble our energies in
pushing forward this great v/ave of humanity and religion;
and we do- earnestly implore divine guidance in selecting
one who may be a worthy successor of our beloved brother.

Third. We tender cv>t heart felt sympathy to the family
and re]:itives cf the deceased in this visitation of Providence
upon them, and we ean-estly commend them to that rich
grace of oiir merciful heave^dy Father, which alone can
bestow upon them an equivalent for the loss they have
sustained.

Fourth. Th?t copies cf these i-e>olutiors be sent to the
bere?.ved family and also to the secular and religious papers
of this city for publication.

S. EDWARD HARDY. Chairman.
ISAAC RUSSELL. Secretary."

His death orcurred during the Civil War. Although his
life in Louisville covered a period of only ten years, he was



248

respected and beloved as few men have been, and his place
was difficult to fill. The evidences of his charitable spirit
and tokens of his generosity remain as memorials to him.

Members of his family reside at Louisville still, and the
most pleasing courtesy is extended in his home, and the
breach made by his death is felt alike by young and old in
his circle of friends. He and his family were members of
the Presbyterian Church, he a ruling elder for many years.
On his children has fallen his mantle of generosity, and the
graces which nature and gentle birth l^equeath to de-
scendants.

Is&ue :

i. JAMES ALEXANDER QUIGLEY, b. Apr. 24, 1828, d.

Aug. 15, 183a.
ii. MARY AMANDA QUIGLEY, b. May 6, 1830, d. Apr. 1,
1891, at Louisville, Ky.; m. Oct. 9, 1849, Henry Clay
Morton, b. Jan. 18, 1819, at Lexington, Ky., where he
spent his boyhood. He was a prominent banker, in-
terested in all public enterprises, resided at Louis-
ville during the years of his active career, and d. July
25, 1892, at Lexington.
To Henry Clay Morton and Mary Amanda Quigley Mor-
ton were born seven children:

i. ELIZA QUIGLEY MORTON, b. Aug. 12, 1850,
d. Jan. 23, 1903, in New York City; m. Oct. 26,
1875, Edward Stanley Bowman, b. at Harrods
burg, Ky., lived after marriage at Louisville, Ky.
where he was engaged in the wholesale coffee
business, and continues the same as a wholesale
broker at Indianapolis, Ind.
To Edward Stanley Bowman and Eliza Quigley
Morton Bowman were born four children:
i. BELL QUIGLEY BOWMAN, b. Sept. 27,
1876; m. June 21, 1899, John Ralph Em-
ery, b. July 9, 1876, in Baltimore, Md.,
educated at the New York Military Acad-
emy and Johns Hopkins University. He
is a wholesale chemist in Baltimore.
To John Ralph Emery and Bell Quigley
Bowman Emery were born two children:
i. ELISE BOWMAN EMERY, b. Mar.

22. 1900.
ii. JOHN MORTON EMERY, b. July 25,
1901.
.i. JOHN MORTON BOWMAN, b. Jan., 1879,

d. 1880.
iii. EDWARD STANLEY BOWMAN, b. Oct.
23, 1882; m. Sept. 21, 1902, Marion Ze\l,
of Baltimore, reside at Detroit, Mich.
To EJdward Stanley Bowman and Marion
Zell Bowman was born one child:



219

i. MARION LUCTYLLE BOWMAN, b
July 31, 1903.
iv. HENRY MORTON BOWMAN, b. Mar. 11,
1886. ^ ^ ,

ii. JOHN HITE MORTON, b. Sept. 4, 1852, d. July

31 1879
iii. THOMAS QUIGLEY MORTON, b. Oct., 1855, d.

Oct.. 1866. „^„ ^ ^ ,

iv. HENRY CLAY MORTON, b. May 4, 1857, d. July

16, 1857.
V HARRIETT QUIGLEY MORTON, b. Nov. 22..
1859, d. June 23, 1897; m. Aug. 28, 1879. James
Speed, a lawyer, son of James Speed. Attorney
General under President Lincoln.
To James Speed and Harriett Quigley Morton
Speed v/ere born three children:

i. NELLIE MORTON SPEED, b. June 24,

1880.
ii HARRIETT QUIGLEY S'PEED, b. Mar. 12.
1883; m. June 29, 1904, Charles Wesley
Spaulding, reside at Caro, Mich.
To Charles Wesley Spaulding and Harriett
Quigley Speed Spaulding was bom one
child:

i. AMY HARLAN SPAULDING, b.
June 9, 1905.
iii. JACK McCOMB SPEED, b. Aug., 1885, d.
Sept.. 1885.
V'- ELLEN CHURCHILL MORTON, b. Oct. 12, 1861,
d. June 30, 1896; m. Dec. 23, 1883, Henry Har-
lan, resided at Louisville, Ky.
To Henry Harlan and Ellen Churchill Morton
Harlan was born one child:

i. AMY LANE HARLAN, b. Mar. 13, 1884;

m. Feb. 16, 1895. Grey Haynes, reside at

Owensboro, Ky.

vii. LEWIS RODGERS MORTON, b. Oct. 4. 1866, d.

Jan. 21, 1871.

iii. WILLIAM EUGENE QUIGLEY, b. Oct. 25, 1832, d.

June 14, 1841.
iv. LAURA BELL QUIGLEY, b. Nov. 26. 1834, resides at

Louisville, Ky.
v EDWARD PAYSON QUIGLEY, b. Jan. 21, 1837, d. Sept.
8 1865, in New York Ciy; m. Dec. 1, 1858, Frances
Inglis Elston. b. Feb. 28. 1841, d. June 15. 1902, at
Louisville. Ky. He entered Yale College at an early
age, and completed his education at the University
of Virginia. He was in the banking house of his
father, and after his death was deeply interested in
the settlement of his vast estate. For more than a
year he labored to judiciously adjust the affairs of his
extensive business, and his absence in New York for
a few days previous to his death, was the first relaxa-
tion from his arduous duties. He wag just and mag-
nanimous, a positive character, yet so mildly conoid-



2o0



erate in tiie enforcement of his opinions, that his
friends cherished the most affectionate devotion for
him. V\^arm hearted and impulsive in his attachments,
he lost no opportunity to praise and commend the
pleasing qualities and achievements of those in whom
he was interested. He claimed and was shown the
most profound respect for one so young, and his
career foretold success, when at the age of twenty-
eight years he suddenly died. His wife was left an
orphan, was reared in the home of an aunt and uncle.
Dr. and Mrs. Humphrey, of Danville, Ky., and was
married there.
To Edward Payson Quigley and Frances Inglis Elston
Quigley were born four children:

i. MARTHA POPE HUMPHREY QUIGLEY, b. Oct.
15, 1S59; m. Sept. 9, 1879, Dr. Andrew Leight
Monroe, ta. Apr. 4, 1856 at Louisville, Ky., son of
Judge Andrew Monroe and Julia Bull Monroe.
He was educated at Gambler, Ohio, received his
medical course at Hahneman College, Philadel-
phia, Penna., and began the practice of medicine
in Danville, Ky., in Apr., 1879. In 1882 he re-
moved to Birmingham, Ala., where he resided
until October, 1885, since then he and his
family, have made Louisville their home. Dr.
Monroe has been dean of the Southwestern
Homeopathic College ever since its organization,
and is at the head of the profession in his state,
To Dr. Andrew Leight Monroe and Martha Pope
Humphrey Quigley Monroe were born six chil-
dren:
i. FANNIE QUIGLEY MONROE, b. June 13,

1880, d. Nov. 7, 1889.
ii. JULIA BULL MONROE, b. Mar. 23, 1882.
iii. EDWARD HUMPHREY MONROE, b. Oct.

26, 1883.
iv. ANDREW LEIGHT MONROE, b. Jan 27,
1S86, d. Nov. 2, 1889.
V. MARY WINSTON MONROE, b. Oct. 29.

1890, d. Nov. 19, 1892.
vi. PATTIE MAY MONROE, b. Mar. 20, 1896.
ii. ELIZA GRAHAM QUIGLEY, b. Nov. 5, 1860; m.
Oct .22, 1885, Bethel B. Veech, b. Apr. 12, 1861,
son of Richard Veech and Mary Nichols Veech,
the latter a direct descendant of Priscilla and
.John Alden. He was educated at Centre Col-
lege, Danville, Ky. He and his family reside
en a beautiful blue grass farm called Greyholt,
two miles from the city limits of Louisville.
Around the spring on tbe place was an
old fort in which his great-grandfather was
born. He formerly raised fine horses, and for
some years has been vice president of the
United States Trust Company.



251

(To Bethel B. Veech and Eliza Graham Quigley
Veecn were born three children:
i. ELSTON VEECH, b. Oct. 8, 1886.
ii. ELEANOR DUPEE VEECH, b. Aug. 19,

1891, d. June 28, 1903.
iii. MARY NICHOLS VEECH, b. Apr. 16, 1896,
d. Apr. 17, 1896.
Li. MARIA ELSTON QUIGLEY, b. Aug. 21, 1863; m.
Sept. 16, 1887, Hector Lewis Johnson, b. Oct. 23,
1853, at Lexington, Ky. They have lived suc-
cessively at Birmingham, Ala., Kansas City,
Mo., where three of their children were born,
in Birmingham a second time, and New York
City, where Mr. Johnson has a position with
the Standard Oil Company at Newark, N. J.,
and is extensively engaged in its interests.
To Hector Lewis Johnson and Maria Elston Quig-
ley Johnson v/ere born four children:
i. LEIGHT MONROE JOHNSON,
ii. FANNIE INGLIS JOHNSON,
iii. ADDIS'ON IRWIN JOHNSON.
iv. PATTY QUIGLEY JOHNSON.
iv. EDWARD PAYSON QUIGLEY, b. Aug. 31, 1865;
m. June 11, 1890, Fannie Cullom, b. Dec. 21,
1868, at Mobile, Ala., daughter of Smith Cullom
and Sallie Robinson Cullom. Her girlhood days
A^ere spent in Montgomery, Ala., the birth place
of her mother, who was the daughter of Daniel
Robinson, one* of the pioneer merchants of the
capital city. Her father was a banker in Mont-
gomery, whither he removed from Tennessee,
the place of his birth. Edward Payson Quigley
was educated at Petersburgh, Va., and the
School of Technology, at Boston, Mass. On Nov.
17, 1886, he removed from' Louisville, Ky., where
he was born and spent his early life, to Birming-
ham, Ala., where he is a title examiner in the
Land Department of the Tennessee Coal, Iron
and Railroad Company, and a noble representa-
tive of the house of Quigley.
Vi. HARRIETT ELIZA QUIGLEY, b. Apr. 16, 1839, resides

at Louisville, Ky.
vii. EUGENIA THOMAS QUIGLEY, b. Oct. 27, 1841, d.
Sept. 17, 1904, at Louisvile, Ky., at the home of her
sisters on Fourth avenue, with whom she made her
home; m. Nov. 2, 1865, Rev. John Critten-
den Young, b. Feb. 14, 1841, at Danville, Ky., d. July
29, 1885, near the home of his birth and childhood.
He was a grandson of John J. Crittenden, state sen-
ator and governor of Kentucky, educated at Centre
College, Ky., of which his father was president for
xwenty-seven years. After his graduation he went to
Louisville and filled the pulpit of the Second Presby-
terian church, whose pastor, a celebrated southern
clergyman, removed to Canada during the war. At



252



its close he returned, and Rev. Young accepted a call
to the Hancock Street Presbyterian church. Later in
life he went hack to Danville and labored as an evan-
gelist, without a regular charge. He was also a lec-
turer and writer, well known throughout the state as
a man of literary talents and achievements. His
death took place nineteen years previous to that of
his wife.
To Rev. John Crittenden Young and Eugenia Thomas
Quigley Young were born two children:
1. HALLIE QUIGLEY YOUNG, b. Mar. 29, 1867, d.
Oct. 8, 1903; m. Oct. 9, 1894, Lieutenant H. S.
Whipple, U. S. A.
ii. CRITTENDEN CLARKE YOUNG, b. Apr. 11,
1872, was educated at Danville, Ky., engaged in
the newspaper business, and is at present inter-
ested in the coffee, sugar and tea trad© at
Louisville, Ky., where he resides.
Tiii. ELLEN QUIGLEY, b. Mar. 18, 1844, d. Feb. 21, 1868;
m. Dec. 6, 1867, E. H. Semple, of S't. Louis, Mo. No
issue.
ix. CORINNE ADELE QUIGLEY, b. July 7, 1846; m. Dec
6, 1871, George Crittenden Watson, b. Aug. 28, 1846,
at Frankfort, Ky., son of Dr. Edward Howe Watson
and Sarah Lee Crittenden Watson. After his mar-
riage his family resided at Frankfort until 1879 whett
they removed to Chicago, 111., and eleven years later
to Caro, Mich. The 'three winters following they
spent in Washington, D. C. He was well established
in the railroad business and influential in its enter-
prises. After many years' of successful interest in
and promotion of railwayi traffic, he retired from that
field of commerce to engage in the real estate busi-
ness, in which he enjoys the good fellowshiiv of his
patrons, and is esteemed and worthy of the confi-
dence reposed in him.
To George Crittenden Watson and Corinne Adele Quig-
ley Watson were born seven children :

i. THOMAS QUIOLEY WATSON, h. Oct. 12, 1872;
m. Mar. 18, 1901, Minerva Bell Patton, of Saa
Francisco, Cal., where they reside,
ii. EDWARD HOWE WATSON, b. Sept, 28, 1874.
iii. BELL QUIGLEY WATSON, b. Mar. 29, 1876;
m. Mar. 4, 1903, Thomas Allen Boteler, b. Aug.
5, 1875, at Taylorsville, Ky., descended from
the Allen and Owen families of Kentucky and
Virginia, and of the Boteler family of Virginia,
who are direct descendants of Charles Wilson
Peale. They reside on their beautiful farm
called Venture, near EJminence, Ky., which. i&
ideal in its situation and surroundings, a
charming southern home.
To Thomas Allen Boteler and Bell Quigley Wat-
son Boteler was born one child.



253

i. HENRY WATSON BOTELER, b. Oct. 2o,
1904.
i/. WILLIAM PHYTHIAN WATSON, b. Aug. 11,

187S
V GEORGE CRITTENDEN WATSON, b. May 20,

1880, practicing law at Port Huron, Micb.; m.

Feb. 4, 1905, Irene Watson,
vi. ELEANOR QUIGLEY WATSON, b. Nov. 4 1881.
vii. ROBERT ALEXANDER WALLER WATSON, b.

Feb. 19. 1884. ^ ^ ,

X LUCIEN GRAHAM QUIGLEY, b. July 7, 1 8 oO, removed
with his parents to Louisville, Ky., in 1854 was
graduated from the male high school m 1867, and
traveled extensively in European countries; m. Sept.
5 1871 Mary Brent Haggin, of Louisville, b. Jan. 15,
1854. Ke is engaged in the banking business in that

city
To Lucien Graham Quigley and Mary Brent Haggin
Quigley were born six children:

1 SUE BRENT QUIGLEY, b. June 21, 1872; m.
Aug 20, 1891, Archibald Kelly Bates, a resident
of LDuisville, Ky., and manager of the National
Casket Company. ^ • ,„.„

To Archibald Kelly Bates and Sue Brent Quigley
Bates were born three children:

i MARY BRENT BATES, b. Sept. 5, 1892.
ii' ARCHIBALD KELLY BATES, b. Apr. 5,

1894, d. Nov. 10, 1895.
iii. HELEN MAY BATES, b. June 13, 1896.
li. EVA QUIGLEY, b. Nov. 8, 1873. ^ .c-rc ^

lii. MARY MORTON QUIGLEY, b. Apr. 5, 1875, d.
June 10, 1875. , ,

iv THOMAS QUIGLEY, b. July 8, 1879, was educated
at 1x>ui«ville, Ky., a graduate of the Manual
Training School; m. June 19, 1901, Sarah In-
gram daughter of Frank Ingram, descended
from one of the oldest Louisville families ; held
a position with the Stewart Dry Goods Com-
pany in that city until 1902, when he accepj^^
a position with the Columbus Dry Goods Com-
pany at Columbus, Ohio, where he resides
V. BRENT HAGGIN QUIGLEY, b.S^ept 30, 1881,
a graduate of the Male High School at.Lo^i«-
ville Ky., studied civil engineering and is with
the Illinois Central Railroad Company in the
engineering department. v xi ^ i isa^


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 27 28