Mrs. Belle McKinney Hays Swope.

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of the Revolution, serving as a private in Captain Mac'.ay's
Company Association.

The Wills family traces its ancestry to the sixteenth cen-
tury when they went from Wales to Carrickfergus in the
north of Ireland. Nicholas Wills was mayor of Carrick-
fergus in 1578-81 or 93. Robert Wills was sheriff of Car-
rickfergus ill) 1594. Members of the family are mentioned
as paying taxes, acting as executors, etc., in 1600, 1606,
1674, 1709, 1 73 1, etc. David Wills came to America from
County Monoyhan, Ireland, in 1730 and settled in Chester
Co., Penna. He had three sons, of whom David
Wills, Jr., was the eldest and removed to Hopewell town-
ship, Cumberland Co., Penna., in 1750, died in
1792. Of his four sons and two daughters, David Wills
married Mary Strahan, Janet, Andrew, James, John and
Grizzel. David and Mary Strahan Wills had three sons,
James married Hannah Jack, David married
and John married Jean McKinney. John and Jean McKin-
ney Wills were members of the Middle Spring Presby-
terian church, as were also the parents and grandparents



60

of each. David Wills, Sr., and David Wills, Jr., are listed
among the subscribers to the old stone church built in 1781.
After the death of the' parents their children continued to
live in the old home until 1835 when they scattered to the
south and west. They became prominent in various line>
of achievement, and their descendants have served our
country in war, in peace, at the bar, in the highest rank of
commercial enterprise, and have given to the world much
that is great and good, with culture and talents to make
society and professional life better for their association and
influence.

Issue :

i. MARY WILLS, d. young, buried in Hanna's graveyard,
ii. SAMUEL WILLS, b. 1796, near Newburg, Cumber-
land Co., Penna., d. 1869, at Mt. Carroll, 111.
m. 1824, Julia Comfort, who d. Sept. 1864, at
Mt. Carroll, III., and is buried beside her husband
at that place. After his marriage he' lived near Welsh
Hun, Franklin Co., Penna., and afterwards removed
to Washington, D. C, where he held a position in the
Treasury Department under President Lincoln. Later
he pushed westward and settled at Lanark, 111.,
in the northwestern part of the state. Sometime pre-
vivous to his death he changed his place of residence
to Mt. Carroll. They were members of thePresby-
terian church, public benefactors, as well as kind and
generous to those in nee'd. They hospitably enter-
tained, and were generally beloved for their christian
virtues and intelligence. To Samuel Wills and Julia
Comfort Wills were born two children:

i. DAVID COMFORT WiLLS, b. Oct. 3, 1825, near
Welsh Run, Penna., d. June 16, 1903, at Shenan-
doah, Iowa, and is buried there: m. Dec. 20,
1855, Anna Wolfe, b. Nov. 4, 1829, in Lancaster
Co. , Penna., daughter of Governor Wolfe of
Pennsylvania. He learned the carpenter trade
and assisted in building many of the dwellings
In the Shenandoah Valley, afterwards devas-
tated during the War of the Rebellion. A few
years later he removed to Mt. Carroll, 111.
He became a noted architect, skillful, inventive,
and contracted for many private and public
buildings in Minneapolis, Omaha and other wes-
tern cities. Twenty-five years previous to his
death he went to Iowa and bought a farm
near the town of Shenandoah, on which he
lived until 1889, when he removed into the
town. His real estate increased until he was
the owner of several valuable properties. He
was skillful in the use of tools, and won na-
tional fame by his mammoth ear of corn at the



bl



world's fair, the workmanship of his hands.
He was nobly generouo, full of beautiful senti-
ment, and loved nature. He was fond of fishing
and one June day while enjoying the sport he
succumbed to a weakness of the heart, sank on
the bank of the steam and expired. He is bur-
ied at Shenandoah, Iowa. To David Comfort
Wills and Anna Wolfe Wills were born eight
children:

i. WILLIAM LIVINGSTON WILLS, b. Nov.

24, 1856. resides at Sheridan, Wyo.
ii. CHARLES ANDREW V/ILLS, b. Apr. 2.

1858, resides at Shenadoah, Iowa,
ill. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WILLS, b. Sept.
13, 1859; m. June 12, 1889, Laura Alice
Boswell, b. Dec. 28, 1870,near Fort Worth,
Texas, daughter of William Edward
Boswell and Rebecca Ann Blocker Bos-
well. He has lived in Texas since 1887,
and occupies the position of passenger,
freight, and express agent for the Texas
and Pacific Railroad Company at Big
Springs. To Benjamin Franklin Wills
and Laura Alice Boswell Wills were born
five children:

i. OLIVER BOSWELL WILLS, b. Apr.

27, 1890, d. Oct. 1890.
ii. GLADYS WILLS, b. Nov. 22, 1891.
iii. VERA LUCILE WILLS', b. May 30,

iv. MAGGIE WILLS, b. Nov. 11. 1895.
V. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WILLS, b.
Sept. 13. 1903.
iv. MARY LOVENA WILLS, b. Jan. 9, 1861;
m. Apr. 16, 1884, George Henry Park, b.
Dec. 20, 1862, at Prairie City, 111., son
of Frank Marton Park and Eliza Jane
Morris Park. He is a merchant and re-
sides at C'offeyville, Kan. To George
Henry Park and Mary Lovena Wills Park
were born five children:

i. OPAL BELLE PARK, b. Feb. 10,

1885.
ii. RALPH FRANK PARK, b. Feb. 27,

1888
iii. ANNA MARIE PARK, b. Mar. 15,

1890.
iv. ETHYL LEONE PARK, b. Apr. 17,

1893.

V. GBRROLD CRESTON PARK, b.

Aug. 25 1902.

V. JAMES ALBERT WILLS, b. Feb. 18, 1864;

m. Nov. 22. 1891, Ruth Olive Poole, b.

Feb. 19, 1872, in Fremont Co., Iowa,

daughter of Thomas J. Poole and Mariam

M. Poole. He resides at Sheridan, Wyo.,



where he has spent nine years. To James
Albert Wills and Ruth Olive Poole Wills
were born six children:

i. HA'ZBiL FERN WILLS, b. Nov. 18,
1892
ii. PEARL ELSIE WILLS, b. July 24,

1894.
iii. ADDIE BELLE WILLS', b. Sept. IS,

1895.
iv. ANNA MARIA WILLS, b. June 2,

1898.
V. FRANK WESTON WILLS, b. Aug.

22 1899
vi. WINNIE RUTH WILLS, b. Sept. 5,
1903.
vi. EMMA BELLE WILLS, b. Jan. 6, 1866; m.
Oct. 6, 1888, Frank A. DeClark, b. Mar.
13, 1863, son of James B. Declark and
Amelia DeClark. He is extensively in-
terested in the Idaho Improvement Com-
pany, and the locating of homes in the
west, resides at Emmett, Idaho. To
Frank A. DeCIark and Emma Belle Wills
DeClark were born four children:
i. MARY JUNE DeCLARK, b. June 30,

1891.
ii. ELVAH RUTH DeCLARK, b. Apr. 30

1897.
iii. DAVID JAMES DeCLARK, b. Sept. 6,

1899.
iv. CHARLES FOREST DeCLARK, b.
Apr. 13, 1904.
vii. EDWARD WBOT'ON WILLS, b. Aug. 11,

1868.

viii. BRVIN DAVID WILLS, b. Jan. 28, 1874,

resides at Shenandoah, Iowa.

ii. JAMBS ANDREW WILLS', b. 1827, near Welsh

Run, Franklin Co., Penna., served his 'coun-

try during the entire struggle between the

north and the south,was with General Sherman

on his march to the sea, and was fatally

wounded during the last battle of the war. He

died from its effects at thirty-eight years of age

11. THOMAS WILLS', b. 1798, near Newburg, Otimberland

Co., Penna., d. May 16, 1854; m. 1833, Nancy J.

Stephens, members of the Presbyterian 'ohurch and

are buried at Canton, 111. To Thomas Wills and Nancy

J. Stephens Wills were born four children-

i. JOHN STEPHENS WILLS, b. Nov 3 1834 re-
sides at Chicago, 111.
ii. JAMES QUIGLEY WILLS, twin, b. Oct 25 1835

resides at Chicago, 111
iii. WASHINGTON McKINNEY WILLS twin b

Oct. 25, 1835, d. 1899, at Chicago III
IV. AMANDA JANE WILLS', b. Jan ' 25 1837" m
1866, John C. Parker, of Chicago, 111'. To John



63

C. Parker and Amanda Jane Wills Parker was
born one child:

i. AGNEiS PARKER, b. July 3, 1877.
iv. JANE WILLS, b. May 21. 1801, near Newburg, Cumber-
land Co., Penna., d. Aug. 26. 1882, at Canton, Ohio,
where she is buried. She was unmarried.
V. DR. DAVID WILLS, b. 1803, near Newburg, Cumber-
land Co., Penna., studied medicine and practiced at
Memphis, Tenn., went to Canton, 111., to make
a visit and died ten days after he reached there, Sept.
15, 1851, buried at Canton. He was unmarried.
vi. WILLIAM WILLS, b. 1803, near Newburg, Cumberland
Co., Penna., d. 1885, at Canton, Ohio, where he
lived for fifty years. He is buried there, and he was
unmarried,
vii. JAMES WILLS, twin, born Nov. 11. 1806, near Newburg,
y Cumberland Co., Penna.. d. Jan. 10, 1870, at Can-

ton, III.; m. Dec. 6, 1841, Charlotte Smith, b. Jan.
17, ' 1821, at South Barrie, Vt., moved to Canton
in 1834, where she lived until her death Feb. 8, 1882.
She was a member of the Universalist church, and is
buried beside her husband at Canton. He went west
in 1835 and settled at Canton, where he was engaged
in the business of tanner and currier. He served as
school director and alderman for a number of years.
He descended from sturdy Scotch-Irish parentage and
transmitted to his children their inherent virtues. To
James Wills and Charlotte Smith Wills were born ten
children:

i. EMILY DIANA WILLS, b. Feb. 27, 1843, at Can-
ton, III.: m. June 18, 1866, Albert Lester
Bollinger, b. May 14, 1839, at Lancaster, 111.,
son of Samuel Fahnestock Bollinger and Cath-
arine Bauman Bollinger. After marriage he
went to Geneseo, 111., where he conducted
carriage works. In September, 1873, he took
his family to Davenport, lowa.where he became
connected with- the Sieg Iron Company, for-
merly known as the Sieg & Williams Company,
of which he is president. In church relations the
family is Unitarian, in social life they are cu'
tured leaders. To Albert Lester Bollinger and
Emily Diana Wills Bollinger were born three
children:

i. JAMES WILLS BOLLINGER, b. Apr. 10,
1867, at Geneseo, 111.; m. Nov. 1, 1899,
Mary Elizabeth Oilman. He received
his early education in the public schools
of Davenport, Iowa. In /1888 he was
graduated from the collegiate department
of the State University, and from the
law department of the same institution
in 1889, having in the meantime read
law with Cook and Dodge. Three years
later he returned to the University and
received the degree of M. A. His post



14



graduate course was a course in the
German classics. In September, 1889,
h€ opened a law oflBce in Davenpon,
where he has succeeded admirably in his
chosen legal profession. In 1894 he was
elected alderman on the Republican tick-
et. He was appointed District Judge
December 21, 1897, to fill the vacancy
caused by the presiding judge's election
to the Supreme Court. In November,
1898, he was re-elected to the same office
until January 1, 1907. He has filled
the position with dignity and efficiency.
As a political speaker he has few super-
iors, and he excels in tactful expressions
and oratorical magnetism. His talents
are great and he is universally popular.
He resides at Davenport, Iowa. To
James Wills Bollinger and Mary Eliza-
beth Gilman Bollinger were born two
children:

i. SUSAN BOLLINGER, b. Nov. 14,

1900; d. Aug. 24, 1901.
ii. STEPHEN ALBERT BOLLINGER,

b. Jan. 26, 1904.
ii. CORA JOSEPHINE BOLLINGER, b. Sept.
14, 1868, at Canton, 111.; m.. June 27,
1893, Louis Block, b. June 30, 1869, at
Davenport, Iowa, son of Herman Block
and Rebecca Veder Van Epps-Block. He
was graduated from the Davenport High
School, and in 1893 from the Law School
at Iowa City, Iowa. Since that time he
has been successfully engaged in the
practice of his profession, and has been
admitted to practice in the Supreme
Court of the United States. He is sec-
retary of the Iowa State Board of Law
Examiners. He is a Mason of the 32d
degree of the Ancient and Accepted
Scottish Rites, Knight Commander of
the Court of Honor, Past Master of Trin-
ity Lodge 208, A. F. A. M. Past High
Priest of Davenport Chapter No. 16, R.
A. M., and he is at present Wise Master
of St. John's Chapter of Rose Croix.
In politics he votes the Republican tick-
et. He and his family are members of
the Unitarian Church, and reside at Dav-
enport, Iowa. To Louis Block and Cora
Josephine Bollinger Block were bom
three children:

i. ALBERT FREDERICK BLOCK, b.

May 31, 1894.
ii. LAWRENCE AUGUST BLOCK h.

Mar. 1, 1898. *



65

iii. ROBERT LESTER BLOCK, b.
June 27, 1900.
iii. MARY KELLOGG BOLLINGER, b. Aug.
22, 1873, at Canton, 111.; m. Apr. 30,
1896, Waldo Becker, b. Aug. 23, 1863, at
LeClaire, Iowa, son of William Becker
and Lina Scbildt Becker. His childhood
was spent at LeClaire, and later removed
to Davenport, Iowa, where he received
his early education and completed his
course of study at Iowa City, Iowa. He
studied law, and since he was admitted
to the bar, he has been in continuous
practice of his profession. He is a prom-
inent, progresive citizen, and was elected
to the office of Mayor of Davenport, Iowa,
in April, 1902, which responsible position
he dignified for two years. He is inter-
ested in various business pursuits, and
all that tends to the advancement and
improvement of his city. In politics he
is a Democrat. He and his family reside
a;t Davenport, Iowa. To Waldo Becker
and Mary Kellogg Bollinger Becker were
born two children:

i. FLORENCE BECKER, b. Mar. 16,

1897.
ii. WILLIAM BECKER, b. Sept. 20,
1898.
ii. HARRIETT JOSEPHINE WILLS, b. Mar. 21,

1844, d. Aug. 18, 1848, buried at Canton, 111.
iii. JAMBS FENNIMORE WILLS, b. Nov. 9, 1846,
d. at the age of nine months, buried at Canton,
111.
iv. GEORGE FILLMORE WILLS, b. July 16, 1848, d.

twenty months later, buried at Canton, 111.
iv. CHARLES GRAHAM WILLS, b. June 30, 1849,
telegraph operator, d. Jan. 30, 1873, buried at
Canton, 111.
vi. HENRY SMITH WILLS, b. Mar. 26, 1851, resides
at Dayton, Ohio,
vii. CORA MAY WILLS, b. Nov. 21, 1852, d. Feb. 1«,

1870, buried at Canton, 111.
viii. CLARENCE McKINNEY WILLS, b. Feb. 21, 1854,
d. Apr. 9, 18C0, buried at Canton, 111.
ix. MARY LOULA WILLS, b. Feb. 7, 1857, resides

at Dayton, Ohio.
X. FRANK LINCOLN WILLS, b. Dec. 2, 1860, re-
sides at Dayton, Ohio,
viii. ANDREW WILLS, twin, b. Nov. 11, 1806, near Newburg,
Cumberland Co., Penna., d. June 21, 1882, at Can-
ton, 111., where he lived for many years; m. May 3,
1835, Eliza Brady, b. Sept. 24, 1812, and lived' at
Greencastle, Penna., d. Sept. 17, 1887, at Canton,
111., daughter of Thomas Brady and Mary Long
Brady, buried beside her husband at Canton. To An-



66



drew Wills and Eliza Brady Wills were born three

children:

i. MARY ELLEN WILLS, b. Feb. 9, 1836; m. June
6, 1865, William Pitt Kellogg, b. Dec. 8, 1830, in
Vermont, studied law and practiced in Canton,
111. In 1861 he was appointed by President
Lincoln to the office of Chief Justice of Ne-
braska Territory, where he held his quarterly
courts, but made his home at Canton. Shortly
after the breaking out of the Civil War, he rais-
ed a cavalry company in Illinois, was appointed
colonel, and served in that rank. He resigned
his position of Chief Justice, and was again
given an appointment by Lincoln in 1865, as
Collector of the Port of New Orleans. In 1868
he was elected to the United States Senate,
served two terms, and in 1872 was elected Gov-
ernor of Louisiana. After a successful term,
he resumed his seat in the United States Sen-
ate in 1877, and in 1883 was elected to the
House of Representatives. He has had few su-
periors in public life. As an orator he is bril-
liant, and commands the most profound admira-
tion and esteem, resides at Washington, D. C.
ii. WILLIAM HENRY WILLS, b. Dec. 18, 1838, d.
May 17, 1895; m. Dec, 1873, Katherine Hun-
ter. He was in the South at the time of the
breaking out of the War of the Rebellion, and
enlisted in the Confederate Army, had a finger
shot off at Shiloh. He was extensively engaged in
the sugar trade, and resided near New Orleans.
He had large interests in various business en-
terprises. His widow and family live at New
Orleans. He is buried at Canton, 111. To
William Henry Wills and Katherine Hunter
Wills were born three children:
1. MARY KELLOGG WILLS, b. Nov. 2, 1874.
ii. CHARLES BRADY WILLS, b. Mar. 24,

1876.
iii. HENRY MARTIN WILLS, b. Oct. 1878.

iii. CHARLEiS WRIGHT WILLS, b. April 17, 1840, d.
Mar. 24, 1883; m. June 12, 1872, Katherine
McCauliffe. He enlisted as a private in
the service of the northern army during the
War of the Rebellion, served three years, and
was mustered out lieutenant colonel of the
103d Illinois Infantry, was with General Sher-
man during the entire struggle, and came out
without a scar. He and his brother were at
Shiloh on opposite sides, but each was unaware
of the presence of the other. He was interested
in the production of sugar on his plantation
near New Orleans. He is buried at Canton,
111. No issue,
ix, LAVINIA WILLS, b. Feb. 22, 1810, near Newburg, Cum-
berland Co., Penna., d. Nov. 24, 1893, at Washington,



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67

D .C, buried at Canton, 111.; m. Alexander Menkens.
X. JOHN WILLS, b. 1812, near Newburg, Cumberland
Co., Penna., d. 1886, at Baltimore, Md.; m. Rebecca
Ley, and was a prominent lawyer. To John Wills and
Rebecca Loy Wills was born one daughter:

i. HELEN WILLS, b. 1850; m. Admiral J. N. Miller
of the United States Navy. To Admiral J. N.
Miller and Helen Wills Miller was born one
child:

i. HELEN MILLER,
xi. LYDIA WILLS, b. Feb. 10, 1815, near Newburg, Cum-
berland Co., Penna., d. Mar. 30, 1886; m. Nov. 20,
1843, John Gleason Graham, b. Nov. 17, 1817, near
Saratoga, N. Y., d. Jan. 24, 1869, a civil engineer
in early manhood, and later in life a merchant in
Canton, 111., where he and his wife spent their
married lives. They attended the Congregational
church and are buried at Canton. To John Gleason
Graham and Lydia Wills Graham were born five chil-
dren:

i. CHARLES HIRAM GRAHAM.
ii. ELLA JEANETTE GRAHAM.
iii. CAROLINE JANE GRAHAM,
iv. JOHN WILLS GRAHAM.
V. ALICE LYDIA GRAHAM.

IV. Major Joseph McKinney^ (Thomas McKinney^,
Joseph McKenzie^) sixth child of Thomas McKinney and
Jane Bigham jMcKinney, was born September 2i, 1773,
near Newburg, in Hopewell township. Cumberland Co.,
Penna.: married Dinah Ouigley, born February 16, 1776,
near Ouigley 's Bridge, Cumberland Co., Penna., died Sep-
tember 30, 1823, daughter of Robert Ouigley and Mary
Jacob Ouigley.

After marriage he and his family lived at Shippensburg,
Penna., and were members of the Middle Spring Pres-
byterian church. He was a merchant and a soldier from
his youth. According to family tradition he rose to the
rank of major during the War of 18 12 and bore the title
through life. His granddaughter, Mrs. Kate A. Moore,
of Martinsburg, has his commission, which entitled him to
the rank of captain in the U. S. Army, 1799, signed by
John Adams. President. It reads as follows : "John Adams,
President of the United States of America, know ye, that
reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism,
valor, fidelity and abilities of Joseph McKinney, I have
nominated and by and with the advice and consent of the
Senate, do appoint him a captain in the Tenth Regiment of



68



Infantry, in the service of the United States, to take rank as
such, from the tenth day of February, one thousand, seven
hundred and ninety-nine. He is therefore carefully and dil-
igently to discharge the duty of captain, by doing and per-
forming all manner of things thereunto belonging. And I
do strictly charge and require all officers and soldiers under
his command to be obedient to his orders as captain. And
he is to observe and follow such orders and directions from
time to time, as he shall receive from me, or the future
President of the Unitd States of America, or the general
or other superior officers set over him, according to the
rules and discipline of war. This commission to continue
in force during the pleasure of the President of the United
States for this time being."

His characteristics were strikingly forcible and noble.
With determined effort he allowed no petty obstacle to
hinder his progressive spirit, and amidst the most trying cir-
cumstances he was always a true hearted gentleman. Their
children were baptized by Rev. John Moody, D. D., pavor
of the Middle Spring Presbyterian church.



Issue:



i. DR. THOMAS McKINNEY, studied medicine, and ac-
cording to an obituary notice published by tlie "Vir-
ginia Free Press" we find be was a man of prominence
in the state. It reads as follows: "On the 19th of July
last, Dr. Thomas McKinney, of Darkesville, Berkeley
Co., Va. He was a Pennsylvanian by birth —
'a son of Major Joseph McKinney of Shippensburg,
formerly of the U. S. Army. He commenced the
practice of medicine in Darkesville in 1827, since
which he was so fortunate as to lose only one patient.
He had an extensive practice and was much esteemed
by the people of Darkesville and its vicinity, both as
a physician and a man. Their kind treatment of him
was a full manifestation of their respect for him. He
was visited by four physicians, and regularly and ju-
diciously attended by Dr. Page, assisted by Dr. Gaery.
He died without a struggle or a moan, and apparently
death was no terror to him — as if the arm of the Lord
was about him, as the mountains about Jerusalem
and his abiding place was to be God's house forever."

ii. ROBERT McKINNEY left his home at Shippensburg,
Penna., when quite young, and went to Shepherds-
town, W. Va.; m. Catherine Baker and d. May
1876. To Robert McKinney and Catherine Baker
McKinney Ege were horn three children:
i. KATE A. McKINNEY; m. Cyrus W. Moore. To



69

Cyrus W. Moore and Kate A. McKinney Moore
were born seven children:
i. ROBERT MOORE, twin,
ii. WILLIAM MOORE, twin,
iii. JAMES DRADEN MOORE; m. Edith L.

. To James Draden Moore and

Edith L Moore were born six

children:

i. JAMES DRADEN MOORE,
ii. EDITH L. MOORE,
iii. BOYD QUIGLEY MOORE,
iv. LILLIAN LOUISE MOORE.
V. VIOLET VIRGINIA MOORE.
vi. JOHN MOORE.
iv. HOWARD MOORE.
V. MARY MOORE,
v/ CLIFFORD MOORE.
viJ JOSEPHINE DELAPHAINE MOORE.
iii. JANE LOUISA McKINNEY", b. 1813, d. Nov. 9, 1853,
at Newville, Penna., and is buried beside her husband
in the Big Spring Presbyterian graveyard at Newville;
m. Nov. 20, 1833, Michael Peter Ege, b. Feb. 10, 1803,
at Pine Grove, Cumberland Co., Penna., d. Mar. 29,
1853, at Philadelphia, Penna., son of Peter Ege, who
owned the extensive furnaces at Pine Grove, and a
grandson of Michael Ege, who was proprietor of the
furnaces at Mount Holly, Boiling Springs and Pine
Grove. Michael Peter Ege was married by the Rev.
Henry Wilson, at the home of his wife in Shippens-
burg, Penna. She was a woman of fine appearance
and attainments, cultured and dignified, cordial and
sincere. Her husband was engaged in the iron busi-
ness at Pine Grove and Laurel Forge, and at that place
he and his family resided for ten years. Quite a little
settlement was established in that section of the
valley, and life was pleasantly spent. Within a few
miles of Carlisle, they had social advantages, and were
not isolated, as many were, who lived in the country
districts. In 1843 they removed to Philadelphia, where
Mr. Ege was appointed Surveyor of Ports in the cus-
tom house, which position he held until his death.
They were Presbyterian in faith, brought up their
children in their belief, were both eminently fitted for
usefulness, full of kindness and sympathy, warm
hearted and hospitable, and died within six months
of each other. To Michael Peter Ege and Jane Louisa
McKinney Ege were born three children:
i. JOSEPH McKINNBY EGE, b. July 10, 1835, d.

Jan. 18, 1837. at Pine Grove, Penna.
ii. MARY BLACKFORD EGE, b. Oct. 21, 1836; m.
July 24, 1860, William Robertson Smith, b. Dec.
19, 1829, at East Kilbride, near Glasgow, Scot-
land, came to America in 1849 and located at
Brockville, Canada, where he remained a few
years and removed to Sandusky, Ohio, and



70



later to Springfield, Ohio, where lie resided un-
til his death Jan. 12, 1899, where his widow has
since lived. In 1881 he became connected with
the Springfield Water Company, holding the
position of superintendent and secretary. His
wife went to Springfield from Pennsylvania in
1854. She and her family are members of the
Presbyterian church. To William Robertson
Smith and Mary Blackford Ege Smith were
born four children:

i. ARTHUR EGE SMITH, b. Apr. 28, 1861;
m. Oct. 29, 1901, Julia T. Foley. He re-
sides at Colorado Springs, Col., where he
is connected with the Colorado Springs
and Cripple Creek Railway Company,
ii. ISABBLLE WALLACE SMITH, b. Nov. 1,
1863; m. Sept, 1, 1887, Edward Charles
Guyn, b. Aug. 12, 1851, at Springfield,
Ohio, where he has since resided, and is
engaged in the Safety Emery Wheel Man-
ufacturing business. To Edward Charles
Guyn and Isabelle Wallace Smith Guyn
'were born two children:

1. CHARLES WILLIAM GUYN, b. July

6, 1888.
ii. MARY ISABELLE GUYN b. Oct. 22,
1892.
iii. MARY WARD SMITH, b. July 5, 1866.