N. A. (Newton Allen) Strait.

Alphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl online

. (page 18 of 34)
Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 18 of 34)
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South Carolina Apr. 29, 1862.

South Carolina July 10, 1863.

Alabama Aug. 31, 1863.

Georgia



Geo:
Nort



| Jan. 26-28, 1862.

rolina June 20-25, 1864.



North Carolina July 3-7, 1863.

North Carolina | Feb. 22, 1865.

Tennessee , Dec. 12, 21, 25, 1862.

Missouri Aug. 10, 1861.

Tennessee June 10, 18, 1862.

Louisiana i May 2, 14, 1864.

Louisiana Apr. 7, 1864.

Louisiana May 4, 1864.

Virginia June 22-30, 1864.

Mar. 22-April 24,

1865.

Mar. 1, 1865.

Jan. 22, 1864.

May 24, 1864.

May 6, 1864.



South Carolina

Tennessee

Virginia

Virginia

Kentucky

Tennessee . .



Tennessee



22,



July 29, 1863.

May 22, 24, June 4,
10, 16, 1862.

Sept. 26, Nov.
1863.

Tennessee j July 3, 1863.

Tennessee ! May 10, 1864.

Tennessee > May 29, 1864.

Virginia ; Aug. 23, 1862.

Virginia < Mar. 11-12, 1862.



Virginia .
Virginia .
Virginia ,



Sept. 2, 1862.
Nov. 22, 1862.
Mar. 7, May 25, June
18-19, 1862.



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES.



141



Alphabetical list of the battles (with dates) of the war of the rebellion Continued.
[All places and dates starred are skirmishes, but all skirmishes may not be starred.]



PLACE.


STATE.


DATE.


Winchester and Kemstown . -


Virginia . .


Mar. 22-28, 1862.


Winchester at and near


IT

V irginia


Feb. 25*-26, Mar.


IVinchester


Virginia


19*, Apr. 8*, Nov.
13, 1863.
June 13-15 1863


Winchester, at and near


Virginia


Jan. 3 * Feb. 5, Mar.


Winchester or Kernstown


Virginia


22,* Apr. 8,* 26,*
Aug. 11,* 17, Sept.
7,* 13,* 24,* 1864.
July 24 1864


AVinchester, Opequon Creek*


Virginia


June 13, is<>3.


Winchester or Opequon


Virginia


Sept. 19, 1864.


Winchester Pike (see Opequon)


Virginia




Winchester expedition (see Camp Rus


Virginia . .




sell and Camp Averell).
Winchester expedition into Fauquier


Virginia


Nov. 28-Dec. 3, 1864.


and Loudoun counties.
Winchester, expedition to near Gordons-


Virginia


Dec. 19-28, 1864.


yille.

Winchester expedition to Moorefield


West Virginia


Feb. 4_^ 1865.


Winchester, expedition to front of Peters


Virginia


Feb. 27-Mar. 28,


burg.
Windsor


Virginia


1865.
Dec. 22, 1862.


Windsor


Virginia


Mar. 9, 1863.


Windsor *


North Carolina


Jan. 30, 1864.


Winneld *


North Carolina


Mar. 23, 1863.


Winfield


West Virginia


Oct. 26, 1864.


Winter s Gap*


Tennessee


Aug. 31, 1863.


Winton


North Carolina


Feb. 19, 1862.


Winton s Gap *


Alabama


Sept, 8, 1863.


Winy aw Bay, naval operations in


South Carolina


May 21-25 1862


Winyaw Bay, naval operations in


South Carolina


April 20-21 1864.


Wire Bridge .


West Virginia


Aug. 16, 1862.


Wire Bridge*


West Virginia .


June 26, 1864.


Wisconsin Ranch, near Valley Station*. .


Colorado


Jan. 15, 1865.


Wise s Cross Roads*


North Carolina


April 28 1863


Wise s Cross Roads*


North Carolina


Dec. 12 1862


Wist? s Forks, or Kinston


North Carolina


Mar. 8-10 1865.


Witcher s expedition into West Virginia




Sept. 17-18, 1864.


Wither s Swash, naval expedition to




Apr. 22, 1864.


South Carolina.
Wolf Creek*


Arkansas


Apr 2 1864


Wolf Creek


West Virginia


May 15 1862


Wolf Creek (see Osborn s)


Mississippi.


June 4, 1862.


Wolf Creek Bridge, near Memphis*


Tennessee


Sept. 23, 1862.


Wolf River*


Kentucky


May 18 1864


Wolf River


Tennessee


July 13 1862


Wolf River Bridge (see Moscow)


Tennessee




Wolf s Plantation *


South Carolina


Feb. 14, 1865.


Wolf town


Virginia


Aug. 7, 1862.


Woodall s Bridge *


Alabama


Apr. 7, 1864.


Woodburn, at and near*


Kentucky


Sept. 10 12 1862


Woodburn, near and at *


Kentucky


Apr. 27, May 13


Woodbury, at and near *


Kentucky


July 5, 1863.
Oct. 19, 1861.


Woodburv *


Tennessee


Jan 19 24 Mar 1


Woodburv*. .


Tennessee . .


Apr. 4, Mav 24,
25, 1863.
SeDt. 10. 1864.



142



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES.



Alphabetical Iwt of the battles (with dates) of the war of the rebellion Continued.
[All places and dates starred are skirmishes, but all skirmishes may not be starred.]



PLACE.


STATE.


DATE.


Woodburv Pike


Tennessee


Mar. 27, 1863.

Aug. 27, 1862.
Jan. 11, 1863.
July 16, 1864.
Sept. 23, 1862.

Nov. 26, 1863.
Apr. 17, 1862.
Dec. 17, 1861.
Sept. 14-17, 1862.
Aug. 7, 1862.
Apr. 1-2, 1862.
May 18, June 2, 1862.
Feb. 25, 26, Nov. 16,
1863.
Sept. 23, 1864.
Mar. 14, 1865.
June 4, Aug. 4, 1862.
Jan. 23, 1864.
Oct. 21, 1862.
Sept. 30, Nov. 24,
1863.
Apr. 27, 1862.

June 2, 1862,
Nov. 6, 1862.
Sept. 2, 1861.
June 5, 1864.
July 22, 1864.
June 28, 1863.
Oct. 13, 1863.

Feb. 22, 1864.
Aug. 5, 1862.
Dec. 16, 1864.
May 10, 1864.
Apr. 6, 1865.

Nov. 25, 30, 1863.
Dec. 27, 29, 1862.
Oct. 31, 1863.
July , 1863.
May 21, July 18, 1863.
Mar. 5, 6, 1864.

Feb. 28, 1864.
Apr. 21-22, 1864.
Feb. 1, Mar. 8, 1864.
Feb. 16, 19, 1863.
July 15, 1862.

Feb. 1-Mar. 8, 1864.
May 29, 1864.

Aug. 22, 1864.
July 22-Aug. 11,
1864.


Woodbury Pike (see Cripple Creek)
Woodbury, Round Mountain


Tennessee


Tennessee


Wood Creek *


Missouri.


Wood Grove *


Virginia


Wood Lake, near Yellow Medicine (In
dians) .
Woodson, near *


Minnesota


Missouri


Woodson s Gap


Tennessee


Woodson ville (see Hewlett s Station)
Woodsonville, siege of


Kentucky


Kentucky


Wood Springs, near Dyersburg


Tennessee


Woodstock, advance to


Virginia


Woodstock * .


Virginia


Woodstock * .


Virginia


Woodstock *


Virginia


Woodstock *


Virginia


Woodville, at and near


Alabama


Wood ville


Alabama


Woodville


Tennessee


Woodville*


Virginia . .


Woodville Island, naval


South Carolina


Woodville, expedition. (See Natchez. )
Wormley s Ferry, Pamunkey River
Worsham s Creek *


Virginia .


Mississippi


Worthingtoii


West Virginia


Worthington s Landing*


A rkansas


Wright County *


Missouri


W r rightsville*


Pennsylvania


Wyatt


Mississippi


Wyatt s (see Poplar Spring Church)
Wyerman s Mills, on Indian Creek *
Wyoming Court-House*


Virginia. .


Virginia


West Virginia


Wy the ville, capture of


Virginia


Wytheville, near


Virginia


Wytheville .


Virginia . .


Yankee, U. S. S. (see Potomac Creek) . . .
Yankeetown


Virginia


Tennessee


Yazoo Batteries


Mississippi


Yazoo City*


Mississippi


Yazoo City, capture of


Mississippi


Yazoo City, naval


Mississippi . .


Yazoo City, attack on, and abandoned by
Yazoo City, near * .


Mississippi


Mississippi


Yazoo City, naval


Mississippi


Yazoo expedition


Mississippi


Yazoo Pass, near *


Mississippi


Yazoo River, action of the U. S. S. Caron-
delete, Tyler, and Queen of the West
with the C. S. S. Arkansas (ironclad).
Yazoo River expedition up


Mississippi


Mississippi


Yazoo River*


Mississippi . .


Yazoo River (seeSnyder s Mill)


Mississippi . .


Yell County* . . .


Arkansas


Yell County scout and skirmish *


Arkansas







ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES.



143



Alphabetical list of the battles (with dates) of the war of the rebellion Continued.
[All places and dates starred are skirmishes, but all skirmishes may not be starred.]



PLACE.


STATE.


DATE.


Yellow Bayou. .


Louisiana


Mav 10,17,19,1864.


Yellow Bayou (Bayou de Gloize, Nor


Louisiana


May 18, 1864.


wood s plantation or Old Oaks).
Yellow Creek or Muscle Fork, Chariton


Missouri


Aug. 13 1862


River. *
Yellow Creek *


Tennessee .


May 22, July 5 1863.


Yellow House (see Weldon Railroad)


Virginia




Yellow Medicine (see Wood Lake)


Minnesota




Yellow Tavern .


Virginia


May 11 1864


Yellville, near *


Arkansas


Mar. 13-26, 1864


Yellville*


Arkansas


June 25, 1862.


Yeocomico River, naval


Virginia


Sept. 16, 1862.


Yocknapatalfa, near Mitchell s Cross


Mississippi


Dec. 1, 3, 1862.


Roads. *
Yocuni Creek *


Missouri


Nov. 15, 1862.


York, surrendered to the Confederates . .


Pennsylvania


June 27, 1863.


York, occupied bv Union troops


Pennsylvania .


June 30, 1863.


Yorktown, expedition from, to West


Virginia


Feb. 23-24, 1865.


Point.
Yorktown, naval ... .


Virginia


May 1, 1862


Yorktown, occupied by Union troops


Virginia


May 4, 1862.


Yorktown, redoubt before


Virginia .


Apr. 26, 1862.


Yorktown *


Virginia


Apr 11 1862


Yorktown Road, near


Virginia


Apr. 5, 1862.


Yorktown, siege of


Virginia


Apr. 5 May 4 1862


Y r orktown, expedition to South Anna


Virginia


June 23-28 1863


Bridge and skirmish.
Yorktown and Warwick roads, junction
of.*
Yorkville, near *


Virginia

Tennessee


Apr. 5, 1862.
Jan. 28 1863


Young s Branch (Bull Run)


Virginia


July 21 1861


Young s Cross Roads *


North Carolina


May 15, 16 July 27


Young s Mills, near Newport News


Virginia


1862.
Oct. 21, 1861.


Young s Point.


Louisiana


June 7 1863


Yreka Road, near Fort Crook *


California


Sept. 21, 1862.


Zapata s banditti, near Mier


New Mexico


Sept 2 1863


Zoar Church * /


Virginia


Mar 30 1863.


Zollicoffer


Tennessee


Sept 20-21, 24, Oct.


Zuni, near and at .


Virginia


19, 1863.
May 30 Oct 3 25






Nov. 14, Dec. 8, 12,
1862.



144



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES.



GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN, JUNE 3 TO AUGUST 1, 1863.



Gettysburg, Pa. , is recognized by all to have been the greatest battle of the civil
war. What is known as the "Gettysburg Campaign," from June 3 to August 1,
1863, included sixty-six battles and skirmishes, which will be found in the following
list. The casualties are the aggregate loss of the Union forces, including killed,
wounded, and missing:



Location.



Aldie, Virginia June 17....

Aldie, near, Virginia June 22

Ashby s Gap, Virginia July 12

Do July 20

Battle Mountain, near Newby s Cross Roads, Virginia July 24

Beaver Creek. (See Benevola.)

Benevola, or Beaver Creek, Maryland July 9

Berry s Ferry, Virginia . July 20

Berry ville, Virginia June 13

Do June 14

Beverly Ford. (See Brandy Station.)

Boonsborough, Maryland July 8

Brandy Station ( Fleet wood) and Beverly Ford, Virginia June 9

Brandy Station, Virginia Aug. 1

Bunker Hill, West Virginia June 13 . . . .

Carlisle, Pennsylvania July 1

Catoctin Creek and Point of Rocks, Maryland June 17

Chester Gap, Virginia ". July 21-22 .

Cunningham s Cross Roads, Pennsylvania July 5

Deep Run. (See Franklin s Crossing.)

Downsville, Maryland July 7

Emmitsburg, Maryland July 4

Fairfax Court-House, near, Virginia June 27

Fairfax Gap, Pennsylvania July 4

Fairticld, near, Pennsylvania July 5

Falling Waters, Maryland July 14

Fayetteville, near, Virginia June 3

Fleetwood. (See Brandy Station.)

Franklin s Crossing, Deep Run, Virginia June 5-13 . .

Funkstown. Maryland July 7

Do July 10-13 .

Gaines Cross Roads, near, Virginia July 23

Gainesville, near, Virginia June 21

Gettysburg, near, Pennsylvania June 26

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania July 1-4 * . .

Greencastle, Pennsylvania June 22

Greencastle, near, Pennsylvania July 5

Hagerstown, Maryland July 6

Do July 10-13 .

Halltown, West Virginia July 15

Hanover, Pennsylvania June 30

Harpers Ferry, near, West Virginia July 14

Harrisburg, near, Pennsylvania. (See Sporting Hill. )
Hay Market. (See Thoroughfare Gap. )

Hedgesville and Martinsburg, West Virginia July 18-19 .

Jones Cross Roads, Maryland July 10-13 .

McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania June 25

Manassas Gap. (See Wapping Heights.)

Manassas Gap, Virginia July 21-22 .

Martinsburg. (See Hedgesville.)

Martinsburg, West Virginia June 14 . . . .

Middleburg, Virginia June 17-18 .

Do June 19

Monterey Gap, Pennsylvania July 4

Muddy Branch, Maryland June 29

Newby s Cross-Roads. (See Battle Mountain.)

Opequon Creek, Virginia June 13

Point of Rocks. (See Catoctin Creek.)

Rockviile, near, Maryland June 28 . . . .

Shepherdstown, West Virginia July 15

Do July 16 ....

Smithburg, Maryland July 5

Snicker s Gap, Virginia Jul y 17 . . . .

Snicker s Gap, near, Virginia July 23 . . . .

Sporting Hill, near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania June 30

Stevensburg, Virginia June 9

Thoroughfare Gap and Hay Market, Virginia June 21-25 .

Upperville, Virginia June 21 . . . .

Wapping Heights, Manassas Gap July 23

Westminster, Maryland June 29 . . . .

Williamsport, Maryland June 15

Do July 6

Williamsport, near, Maryland July 8

Do July 14....

Winchester, Virginia June 13-15 .

Wrightsville, Pennsylvania - June 28 . . . .

Miscellaneous affairs en route

* In Rebellion Record as July 1-3.



Date.



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES. 145

The grand total of casualties in the above-named engagements was as follows:





Officers.


Enlisted
men.


Total.


Killed .


288


3,271


3,559




1,288


15, 256


16,544


Captured or missing


406


11,488


11,894










Total


1,982


30, 015


31,997











From a document compiled under direction of Gen. R. C. Drum, Adjutant-General U. S. A., 1888.
CASUALTIES OF THE UNION ARMIES, 1861-1865.

The following is the total casualties of the armies of the United States during the
war of the rebellion, 1861-1865 (prepared by the Adjutant-General s Office):

Killed in battle .. 67,058

Died of wounds 43, 012

Died of disease 199, 720

Died of other causes 40, 154



Total died 349,944

Deserted. 199, 105

Captured 212, 608

Paroled on the field 16, 431

Died while prisoners 30, 156

CASUALTIES OF THE CONFEDERATE ARMY.

Killed in battle Number not given.

Died of wounds or disease (partial statement) 133, 821

Deserted (partial statement) 104, 428

Captured 476,169

Paroled on the field 248, 599

Died while prisoners 30, 152

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE NUMBER OF MEN FURNISHED, AND OF THE

DEATHS IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY DURING THE WAR OF THE REBEL
LION.*

[Number of deaths in the Navy and Marine Corps not included.]



States, Territories, &c.


Men furnished.


Aggre
gate
num
ber of
deaths.


White
troops.


Sailors
and ma
rines.


Colored
troops.


Indians.


Total.


Alabama


2,576








2,576
8, 289
15, 725
4,903
55, 864
206
12, 284
16, 534
1,290


345
1,713
573
323
5,354
6
882
290
215
15
34,834
26, 672
13,001
2, 630
10, 774
945
9,398
2, 982
13, 942
14, 753
2,584
78


Arkansas


8,289
15, 725








California








Colorado


4,903








Connecticut


51, 937
206
11,236


2,163


1,764




Dakota




Delaware


94
1,353


954
3,269




District of Columbia


11,912
1,290




Florida

Georgia








Illinois

Indiana


255, 057
193, 748
75, 797
18, 069
51,743
5,224
64,973
33, 995
122, 781
85, 479
23,913
545


2, 224
1,078
5


1,811
1, 537
440
2 080




259, 092
196, 363
76, 242
20, 149
75, 760
5, 224
70, 107
46, 638
146, 730
87, 364
24, 020
545


Iowa


Kansas ....


Kentucky


314


23, 703




Louisiana


Maine


5, 030
3, 925
19, 983
498
3


104
8,718
3,966
1,387
104




Maryland


Massachusetts


Michigan ...


Minnesota




Mississippi..,



*From a statement prepared in the Adjutant-General s Office, July 15,1885.

696800 10



146



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BATTLES.



Com})(U <ttire statement of the number of men furnished, and of the deaths in the United
States Army during the war of the rebellion Continued.

[Number of deaths in the Navy and Marine Corps not included.]



States, Territories, &c.


Men furnished.


Aggre
gate
num
ber of
deaths.


White
troops.


Sailors
and ma
rines.


Colored
troops.


Indians.


Total.




100. 616
3i 157
1,080


151


8,344




109,111
3,157
1,080
33, 937
76,814
6,561
448, 850
3, 156
313, 180
1,810
337, 936
23, 236
31,092
1,965
33, 288


13, 885
239
33
4,882
5,754
277
46, 534
360
35, 475
45
33, 183
1,321
6, 777
141
5, 224
42
22
4,017
12, 301
1,018
f36,847
1,672
106

552
243

239

232
z. TOB






Nevada










32, 930
67, 500
6, 561
409, 561
3, 156


882
8,129


125
1,185




\e\v Jersev . .




New Mexico




"Vow York


35, 164


4, 125




North Carolina




Ohio


304,814
1,810
315,017
19, 521
31 . 092


3,274


5, 092








Pennsylvania


14,307

1,878


8, 612
1,837








Tennessee




Texas 1, 9G5






Vermont 32, 549
Virginia


619


120








964
31,872
91,029






964
32, 068
91,327
3, 530
* 99, 337


West Virginia


196
133 165




Wisconsin


"~3~536"


Indian nations


Colored troops




99, 337










U. S. Veteran Volunteers (Hancock s Corps)
U. S. Volunteer Engineers and Sharp-


































General and general staff officers, U. S.












Miscellaneous U. S. Volunteers (brigade
bands, &c. )













Grand aggregate


2,494,592


101,207


178, 975


3,530


2,778,304 | 359,528



* Number not credited upon the quotas of any State.

f Includes losses in all colored organizations excepting three regiments from Massachusetts.

EXPLANATORY NOTES.

With the exception of three Massachusetts regiments (organized and officered
exclusively by the State authorities) whose casualties are included with those of the
white troops from that State, all losses in the 178,975 colored troops are reported sep
arately, irrespective of any credits allowed upon the quotas of the States. The deaths
in the exeepted regiments aggregated 574.

In all other cases the figures in the column of deaths represent only such as occurred
among the white troops and Indians. Information relative to the number of deaths
in the Navy and Marine Corps belongs to the Navy Department.

The colored soldiers organized under the direct authority of the General Govern
ment and not credited to any State were recruited as follows:

In Alabama, 4,060; Arkansas, 5,526; Colorado, 95; Florida, 1,044; Georgia, 3,486;
Louisiana, 24,052; Mississippi, 17,869; North Carolina, 5,035; South Carolina, 5,462;
Tennessee, 20,133; Texas, 47; Virginia, 5,723.

There were also 5,806 negro soldiers enlisted at large, or whose credits are not
specifically expressed by the records.

Of the number of colored troops credited to the States, 5,052 were obtained under
the provisions of section 3, act of Congress approved July 4, 1864, from the States that
had seceded.

The number of officers and men of the Regular Army among whom the casualties
herein noted occurred is estimated at 67,000; the number in the Veteran Reserve
Corps was 60,508; and in Hancock s Veteran Corps, 10,883.

The other organizations of white volunteers organized directly by the United States
authorities numbered about 11,000.



CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF THE REBELLION, 1860-1865.

I860.
MAY.

9. Nomination of John Bell, of Tennessee, for President, and Edward Everett, of
Massachusetts, for Vice-President, at Baltimore, Md., by the Union convention.

NOVEMBER.

6. Lincoln and Hamlin chosen President and Vice-President by the electoral votes

of seventeen States.

9. An attempt to seize the arms in Fort Moultrie.
11. Senator Hammond, of South Carolina, resigned.

18. Georgia legislature appropriated $1,000,000 to arm the State; Major Anderson
sent to Fort Moultrie to relieve Colonel Gardner.

DECEMBEE.

1. Great secession meeting in Memphis.

3. Congress met. President Buchanan denied the right of a State to secede.
10. Howell Cobb, Secretary of the Treasury, resigned; Senator Clay, of Alabama,
resigned.

13. An extra session of the Cabinet was held to consider the question of reenforcing

Fort Moultrie; President Buchanan opposed it, and reenforcements were not
sent.

14. Lewis Cass, Secretary of State, resigned because President Buchanan refused to

reenforce Fort Moultrie.

18. The Crittenden compromise introduced in the United States Senate.
20. South Carolina convention adopted a secession ordinance by a unanimous vote.
24. South Carolina members of Congress resigned.

26. Major Anderson left Fort Moultrie and took possession of Fort Sumter.

27. The State troops of South Carolina seized the Government property in Charles

ton and took possession of Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie.

29. John B. Floyd, Secretary of War, resigned because the President refused to with

draw the troops from Fort Sumter.

30. United States arsenal at Charleston seized by State troops.

1861.

JANUARY.

2. Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, took possession of Fort Macon.

3. Georgia State troops seized Fort Pulaski.

4. United States arsenal at Mount Vernon, Ala., seized by State troops.

5. Forts Morgan and Gaines, Ala., seized by State troops.

6. United States arsenal at Apalachicola, Fla., seized by State troops.

7. Fort Marion, Fla, , seized by State troops.

8. Jacob B. Thompson, Secretary of the Interior, resigned because the Star of the

West was sent to Charleston with troops.

9. Steamer Star of the West, with supplies for Fort Sumter, fired on by Confederate

batteries in Charleston Harbor and driven back; Fort Johnston, N. C., seized
by the citizens of Smith ville; Mississippi adopted the ordinance of secession.

147



148 CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF THE REBELLION, 3860-1865.

1861.

10. Florida adopted the ordinance of secession; United States troops transferred

from Fort Barrancas to Fort Pickens, Fla. ; Fort Caswell, N. C. , seized by the
citizens of Smithville and Wilmington.

11. P. B. Thomas, Secretary of the Treasury, resigned, and was succeeded by John A.

Dix, of New York; governor of Louisiana seized Forts Philip, Jackson, Pike,
and Macomb, and the United States arsenal at Baton Rouge; governor of South
Carolina demanded the surrender of Fort Sumter, which Major Anderson
refused; Alabama adopted the ordinance of secession.

12. Florida State troops took possession of Pensacola Navy- Yard and Forts Barran

cas and McRee; surrender of Fort Pickens demanded.

13. Lieutenant Slemmer, in command of Fort Pickens, refused to obey Commodore

Armstrong s order to surrender the fort to the Florida troops.

16. Colonel Hayne, of South Carolina, demanded of President Buchanan the surren
der of Fort Sumter, which was refused.

18. Virginia appropriated $1,000,000 for the defense of the State.

19. Georgia passed the act of secession.

20. Forts on Ship Island, Mississippi, seized by State troops.

21. Jefferson Davis resigned his seat in the United States Senate; members of Con

gress from Alabama resigned.

23. Members of Congress from Georgia resigned.

24. The Confederates seized the United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga.

26. Oglethorpe Barracks, at Savannah, Ga., and Fort Jackson seized by State troops.

27. John B. Floyd, late Secretary of War, indicted by the grand jury at Washington,

D. C. , for maladministration of office and for conspiracy.

29. Kansas admitted into the Union.

30. The North Carolina legislature submitted the convention question to the people.

This was the first instance of the will of the people being consulted in regard
to the question of secession.

FEBRUARY.

1. Texas passed an ordinance of secession to be submitted to the will of the people;
Louisiana seized the United States mint and custom-house at New Orleans.

4. Delegates from the seceded States met at Montgomery, Ala., to organize a Con
federate government; peace congress met at Washington, D. C., ex-President



Tyler being chosen president.
tie Choctaw Nation declared il



7. The Choctaw Nation declared its adherence to the Southern Confederacy.

8. United States arsenal at Little Rock, Ark., seized.

9. Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stephens were elected provisional president and vice-

president of the Confederate States.

13. Lincoln and Hamlin declared elected after the official count.
16. United States arsenal and barracks at San Antonio, Tex., seized by Confederates.

18. General Twiggs surrendered United States Government property in Texas, valued

at $1,200,000, to the Confederacy.

19. General Twiggs superseded by Colonel Waite, U. S. A.; Fort Kearny, Nebr.,

seized.

23. Unexpected arrival of Lincoln in Washington, having traveled from Illinois
secretly because of a plot to assassinate him while passing through Baltimore,
Md.

MARCH.

1. General Twiggs expelled from the United States Army; the peace congress
adjourned; the Confederate government assumed control of military affairs at
Charleston, S. C.

3. General Beauregard took command of Confederate troops at Charleston, S. C.

4. Inauguration of Lincoln and Hamlin; the ordinance of secession was passed by

the Texas convention after having been submitted to the people.



Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 18 of 34)