N. A. (Newton Allen) Strait.

Alphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl online

. (page 24 of 34)
Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 24 of 34)
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2
2


Sariago
Do

Sariago, near
Sedupin

Sevilla . .


Tayabas, near
Do


Feb. 5, 11, 1900.
Mar. 5, 1900




Taytay

Do ..,


Mar. 31, 1899 ..
Mav9.1900...









1 Embracing the actions at San Juan, El Caney, and Aguadores, July 1-3, and around Santiago,
July 10-12; 18,216 troops engaged.
a See summary of events.

3 And first week of June.

4 Lieut. R. P. Hobson and 7 men sunk the Merrimac in entrance of the harbor; all captured.
Great naval battle; destruction of Cervera s fleet. See summary of events.



TROUBLES IN CHINA.



181



List of battles, with dates, Spanish-American war and the Philippine insurrection, showing
number killed and ivounded Continued.



Name.


Date.


Losses.


Name.


Date.


Losses.


Killed.


W T ounded.


]B

3


Wounded.

,


Taytay


June 3,1899...
Nov 11 1899


2




Topaz, near
Tubur


Dec. 24, 1899...
Jan w 1900










Teres near


June 8 1900






Tuguegarao


May 20, 1900






Teresa

Tiaon


July 12, 1899...






Tuwedteelted Moun
tain.
Urdaneta near....


Dec. 12, 1899...

Feb. 24, 1900...
Mar 10 1900


2


1

i


Jan. 15,1900...




1


Do


Feb 5 1900






Mar. 23, 1900 . .
Feb. 27, 1900...
Dec 2 1899


"T

2


""a" 1

9

1 |


Valderrama


Tigaon, near


Do

Valdez


May 11, 1900...
July 27, 1899...
Nov. 17, 1899 . .




Tila Pa^s


Tinagava near


Apr. 29, 1900...
June 10 1900


Valle Hermoso






Tingalon near


Vigan


Dec. 4, 1899 .




3


Tinuba


Feb. 14, 1900...
Nov 24 1899


1





Villasis

Vintar


May 6, 1900....
Apr. 15, 1900...
Apr 16 1900





Toboatin Bridge


Toboatin River
Tolon near


Oct. 27, 1899 . . .
Julv20 1899




i"


Vintar, near. . .
Do

Zapote River.






Mavl5, 1900...
June 13, 1899 . .


s


""37


Tondo


Feb 22 1899




3
10


Do


Feb. 23, 1899...


1







The following shows the losses between May 1, 1898, and June 30, 1899:





Officers.


Enlisted
men.




41


458


Died of wounds


10


192


Died of disease


165


5,344




11


401








Total


227


6,395









There were wounded between May 1, 1898, and June 30, 1899:






Regular
Army.


Volunteer
service.


Total.


Officers


109


88


197


Enlisted men .


1,586


1,178


2, 764











The number of deaths from all causes between May 1 and September 30, 1898,
inclusive:





Killed.


Died of
wounds.


Died of
disease.


Total.


Officers


23


4


80


107


Enlisted men


257


61


2, 485


2,803













Being an aggregate of 2,910 out of a total force of 274,717 officers and men, or a
percentage of 1.059.

TROUBLES IN CHINA.

In the spring of 1900 the perilous situation of the members of the American lega
tion at Pekin and their complete isolation in the midst of an unruly and murderous
populace demanded prompt action for their relief. The commanding general, Divi
sion of the Philippines, was therefore instructed by cable, June 16, 1900, to send at
once a regiment of infantry to Taku, and six days later Maj. Gen. Adna K. Chaffee,
U. S. Volunteers, was selected to command the United States troops to compose the
China relief expedition.



182



TROUBLES IN CHINA.



SUMMARY OF EVENTS FROM JULY 3 TO AUGUST 28, 1900, WITH TABLE SHOWING

CASUALTIES.

The following events occurred in China subsequent to the firing by the Taku forts
on foreign war vessels which resulted in the surrender of the forts June 17, and to
the capture of the east arsenal at Tientsin by the allied forces on the 27th of the
same month:

July 3. Headquarters and eight troops of the Sixth Cavalry sailed from San
Francisco on the Grant for China.

July 6. Ninth Infantry landed at Taku.

July 11. Two battalions Ninth Infantry reached Tientsin.

July 13. Severe engagement at Tientsin between the allied forces and the Chinese.
The Ninth Infantry suffered heavily, losing Colonel Liscum and 17 men killed and 5
< Iticers and 72 men wounded.

July 14. Tientsin captured by the allies; Third Battalion, Ninth Infantry, reached
that place.

July 15. Light Battery F, Fifth Artillery, and two battalions Fourteenth Infantry
sailed from Manila for China.

July 17. Headquarters and four companies Fifteenth Infantry sailed from San
Francisco on the Sumner for China.

July 26. Two battalions Fourteenth Infantry, on the Indiana, arrived at Taku.

July 27. Light Battery F, Fifth Artillery, on the Flintshire, arrived at Taku.

July 28. General Chaff ee, with headquarters and eight troops Sixth Cavalry,
arrived at Taku.

July 29. Four batteries Third Artillery sailed from San Francisco on the Hancock
for China,

August 5. Pietsang captured by the allied forces. No casualties to the United
States troops.

August 6. Light Battery F, Fifth Artillery, Ninth and Fourteenth Infantry, par
ticipated in battle of Yangtsuiig, sustaining a loss of 7 men killed and 1 officer and 62
men wounded.

August 9. Japanese, British, Russian, and American troops advanced to Ho-si-wu,
the Chinese flying after firing first shots.

August 14. Pekin entered at 5 p. m. by the allied forces.

August 14-15. Capture of Pekin by the allied forces, in which Light Battery F,
Fifth Artillery, and the Ninth and Fourteenth Infantry sustained a loss of Capt.
Henry J. Reilly and 5 men killed and 30 men wounded.

August 16. Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Barry, U. S. Volunteers, and four companies
Fifteenth Infantry arrived at Taku.

August 19. Action near Tientsin, in which Sixth Cavalry had 6 men wounded.

August 21. Four batteries Third Artillery, on the Hancock, arrived at Taku

August 28. The allied forces formally entered the palace grounds at Pekin.

The relief of the American legation, following the capture of the Chinese capital,
transferred to the domain of diplomacy the settlement of the proper redress for the
outrages to the representatives of the American B,epublic and to its citizens residing in
that country. It was therefore determined to withdraw the United States troops,
leaving only a legation guard, to consist of four troops of cavalry, one light battery,
and one regiment of infantry, under command of Major-General Chaffee, U. S. V.,
lie being instructed to send the remainder of his force to Manila.

The casualties in the several actions in China between July 1 and October 1, 1900,
were as follows:



Organization.


Killed.


Wounded. Total.


Aggre
gate.


Officers.


Enlisted
men.


Officers.


Enlisted
men.


Officers.


Enlisted
men.






|


1
(I
3
81

79




1

6
3
100

90


1

6
4

108

90


Sixth United Stairs Cavalry
Fifth United States Artillery
Ninth United States Infantry ...
Fourteenth United States In
fantry


i
i








1

8


19
11


7


Total


o


60


7


170


9


200


209



SUMMARY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAK. 183
1898-1900.

SUMMARY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR.

[Began April 21, 1898, and ended, by the signing of the peace protocol, August 12, 1898. The ratifica
tions were exchanged and the treaty proclaimed April 11, 1899.]

1898.
JANUARY.

1-12. The assembling in the Gulf of Mexico, near Dry Tortugas, of the North

Atlantic Squadron.
15-20. The Governor-General established a guard around the United States consulate

on account of the hostilities of Spanish volunteers against the Americans at

Ilabana.

18. An attempt to force a recognition of Cuban belligerency is defeated in the House

of Representatives.

24. The U. S. S. Maine is ordered to the harbor of Habana.

25. The U. S. S. Maine arrived in the harbor of Ilabana.

FEBRUARY.

9. De Lome, Spanish minister at Washington, wrote a letter in which he spoke dis
paragingly of President McKinley, and on its publication on the 9th or 10th of
February he tendered his resignation to his Government.

15. The U. S. S. Maine was blown up in the harbor of Habana and 260 American
sailors were killed. The destruction of this battle ship was supposed to have
been caused by a floating mine.

20. A naval court of inquiry had been appointed by the President to investigate the
cause of the destruction of the Maine, and its first session is held at Habana.

2;>. Several United States war ships assemble at Key West, Fla.

MARCH.

7. An emergency appropriation of $50,000,000 was introduced in the House of

Representatives.

8. The above bill passed the House.

9. The above bill passed the Senate and was signed by the President.

11. The mobilization of the Army is commenced by the War Department.
14. The Spanish fleet leaves Cadiz, bound for the Canary Islands.

19. Report of the court of inquiry into the destruction of the Maine completed.

25. The command of the flying squadron at Hampton Roads, Virginia, is given to
Commodore Schley.

28. The court of inquiry "submits to Congress its report in regard to the destruction

of the U. S. S. Maine.

29. Resolutions declaring war with Spain and recognizing the independence of Cuba

introduced in both Houses of Congress.

APRIL.

5. Recall of the United States consuls in Cuba.

7. The President receives the diplomatic representatives of the great powers of

Europe, who call with a plea for peace.

1 1 . The President submits to Congress a message, in which he outlines the situation,
asks recognition of Cuba, and requests action by Congress.

19. Resolutions are adopted in Congress declaring Cuba independent, and requesting

the President to put an end to Spanish authority in Cuba by the forces of the
United States.

20. The above resolution was approved.

21. The United States minister to Spain, Mr. Woodford, is given his passport by the

Spanish Government, thus beginning the Spanish-American war; an act is
passed in Congress increasing the military establishment of the United States.

22. The North Atlantic Squadron begins blockade of Cuba; the Spanish war ship

Buena J>///ara, in the Gulf of Mexico, is captured by the U. S. S. Nashville; the
first gun in the war fired; the President issues a proclamation, under resolu
tion of Congress approved April 20, demanding that Spain at once relinquish
her authority and government over the island of Cuba.



184 SUMMARY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAR.

1898.

23. The President calls for 125,000 volunteers.

24. Spain declares that war exists with the United States; the U. S. S. Wilmington,

Dupont, Detroit, and Winona capture, in the Gulf of Mexico, the following
Spanish ships: Sofia, Candita, Catalina, and La Camina.

25. Congress declares that war with Spain has existed since April 21; Commodore

Dewey s fleet left Hongkong for the Philippine Islands.

26. An act increasing the Regular Army to 63,106 men is passed by Congress.

27. The New York (flagship), Puritan, and Cincinnati, Sampson s fleet, engage the

enemy s fortifications at Matanzas, Cuba. No casualties.

30. The Spanish fleet, under command of Admiral Cervera, left the Cape de Verde
Islands for Cuba.

MAY.

1. Spanish fleet at Manila is completely destroyed by Commodore Dewey, the only
casualties on the American side being 6 men slightly wounded.

11. Commodore Dewey made rear-admiral; Ensign Bagley and four men on the

torpedo boat Winslow were killed in an attack on Cienfuegos and Cardenas;
Ensign Willard, of the U. S. S. Machias, during the engagement at Cardenas,
captures the first Spanish flag of the war; first American flag erected over the
enemy s works in Cuba.

12. SpanistTgunboat Callao, in attempting to run the blockade at Manila, captured by

Admiral Dewey; the United States vessels Manning, Dolphin, and Gussie reach
Mariel, on the Cuban coast; Admiral Sampson, with his 9 warships, arrived
at San Juan, Porto Rico, and bombarded the fortifications, doing immense
damage and sustaining small loss; Admiral Dewey telegraphs that 2 more ships
than first reported were destroyed in Manila Harbor El Correo, Argos, and
probably El Cano; Point Arbolitos, Cuba, Companies E and G, First United
States (?) Infantry engaged, no casualties.

14. The cruiser Wilmington bombards the Spanish works at Cardenas and demolishes

them without sustaining loss or injury; 4 boats crews from the cruiser Marble-
head and the gunboat Nashville cut the cables at Cienfuegos, losing 1 man killed
and several officers and men wounded; 500 Indians enlisted under Douglas
Dorland, of the Cheyenne Agency, and offered their services to the War
Department.

15. Information obtainable to this date shows that the Spanish losses during the

Manila engagement were 321 killed and 700 wounded.

1(>. Fire rages for half a day in the coal bunkers of the cruiser St. Paul, while lying
in Key West Harbor, but is extinguished without material damage to the vessel.

17. The U. S. S. New York captures the Carlos F. Rosas, a Spanish vessel of 750 tons,
off Habana.

19. The German consul at Manila tries to land provisions from a German ship, and,
when forbidden by Admiral Dewey, threatens to force a landing by the aid of
2 German cruisers, whereupon the Admiral informs him that the vessels mak
ing the attempt will be fired upon, but the attempt is not pressed; estimated
cost to United States of the previous twenty-nine days of the Spanish war,
$80, 000,, 000; Colonel Cortijo and Surgeon Julian, 2 of the 22 Spanish prisoners
confined at Fort McPherson, Atlanta, are started to Habana, to be exchanged



for the newspaper correspondents Thrall and Jones.
L the United States prize court



21. In the United States prize court the Spanish prizes Mathilde, Candilo, Sofia, and

Argonauta (no one appearing to claim them) were formally condemned and
ordered to be sold. The rifles and ammunition found in a secret chamber on
the Argonauta were valued at $5,600. They were condemned and ordered sold.
Major-General Shafter assumes command of the Fifth Army Corps, General
Wade being transferred.

22. The census of Spanish troops in the Philippines, just made public, is as follows:

7,000 in Manila, 2,000 in Cebu, 1,500 in Iloilo, 1,000 in Mindanao, and 800 in
Layte; Spanish gunboat Isabel II fires a shot into the hull of the British
steamer Roth in the harbor of San Juan de Porto Rico; the commander of the
Isabel alleges that it was accidental; cruiser Charleston leaves San Francisco
with munitions of war and supplies for Admiral Dewey s fleet at Manila.



SUMMARY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAR. 185



1898.

23. Commander Hemphill, at "Washington, in charge of naval enlistment, reports
that to date recent recruiting has added new men to the navy from various
States, as follows:



Maine 99

New Hampshire 22

Massachusetts 1, 474

Rhode Island 150

New York 1, 780

New Jersey 318

Pennsylvania 406

Maryland 444

District of Columbia 401

Ohio 67

Michigan 304

Illinois . . 182



Wisconsin 32

Minnesota 154

Missouri 54

Virginia 255

North Carolina 95

South Carolina 115

Georgia 17

Tennessee 8

Louisiana 151

Texas 81

California 605

Florida . . 113



24



A special train on the Florida Central and Peninsular Railway, carrying North
Carolina troops to the coast, collided with a north-bound vegetable train, and
in the smashup one private soldier of the First Norfh Carolina Infantry is killed
and another fatally injured. Red Cross ship State of Texas, with Miss Clara
Barton, representative of the Red Cross Society of America, and a corps of
surgeons and trained nurses, arrives at Port Tampa, prepared to follow the
army of invasion to Cuba.

Adjutant-General Corbin reports that at this date 122,000 men have been mus
tered into the Volunteer Army. Two hundred naval reserves leave Chicago for
Key West to serve in Sampson s fleet.

25. The President issues a call for 75,000 additional volunteers. The first expedition
to reenforce Admiral Dewey at Manila sails from San Francisco; the Australia,
City of Pekin, and City of Sydney sail, with arms, ammunition, supplies, and
2,500 men.

2(>. The U. S. S. Oregon arrives at Key West, Fla., having made the voyage from San
Francisco since March 19, a distance of more than 13,000 miles, which was
covered in sixty-five days of actual travel. Post-Ofiice Department rules that
hereafter second and third class mail will be forwarded to soldiers in the same
manner as letters, papers and packages being sent from place to place to reach
soldiers on the move.

27. Orders reach Charleston, S. C., to release the passengers and crew of the Spanish

prize Rita, the Spaniards on board not to be held as prisoners of war. Maj.
Gen. Fitzhugh Lee announces the members of his personal and corps staff, as
follows: Aids, Lieut. Algernon Sartoris, Lieut. Fitzhugh Lee, jr., and Lieut.
Carlos Carbonal, formerly a Habana banker. The corps staff includes Lieut.
Col. Joseph H. Dorst, Capt. R. E. L. Michie, assistant adjutant-general; Lieut.
Col. W. R. Livermore, chief engineer, and Lieut. Col. Curtis Gould, inspector-
general ; in Habana, Cortijo, and Julian Spanish prisoners are exchanged for
Charles Thrall and Haydon Jones, newspaper correspondents.

28. The U. S. tugs Uncas and Leyden demolished a Spanish blockhouse 5 miles east

of Cardenas.

31. The Massachusetts, Iowa, New Orleans, and Vixen exchange shots with land bat
teries in the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, and with such of Cervera s vessels as
appeared.

JUNE.

2. Of the 125,000 volunteers called for by the President 124,000 have been mus

tered in.

3. Santiago Harbor fortifications bombarded by the United States fleet under com

mand of Sampson and Schley ; Merrimac sunk in channel of Santiago Harbor
by Lieut. Richmond P. Hobson and a crew of seven men, who were all taken
prisoners.

4. Letter written by Lieutenant Carranza, formerly an attache of the Spanish lega

tion, to the Spanish minister of marine in Madrid, is made public, disclosing
the fact that a Spanish spy system is operated from Montreal, Canada.
6. Hon. William Jennings Bryan Is appointed colonel of Third Nebraska Infantry;
resolution introduced in Congress appropriating $500 and authorizing the Sec
retary of the Navy to have suitable medals of honor prepared for Lieutenant
Hobson and his crew for heroic service in sinking the Merrimac to obstruct the
Santiago harbor.



186 SUMMARY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAR.

1898.

7,8. Five of Sampson s vessels bombard shore batteries and force their way into
the bay at Fishers Point, where the first United States troops landed on the
10th. The St. Louis cut gulf cable near shore.

10. The war-revenue bill is passed by the Senate; 600 United States marines land at

Caimanera, Guantanamo Bay.

11. The invasion of Cuba begins, 800 marines landing at Guantanamo; there is fight

ing, during which the Americans lose 4 men killed and 1 wounded. U. S. S.
Monterey and collier Brutus sail from San Diego, Cal. , for Honolulu, en route
to Manila.

12. United States marines encamped at Guantanamo are again attacked; 2 Ameri

cans are killed and 7 wounded.

14. General Fitzhugh Lee ordered to prepare an army of 40,000 to move on Habana.

Last of the transports, with about 18,000 men on board, sails from Tampa,
Fla., to Cuba.

14, 15. Guantanamo Bay and fort at Caimanera bombarded by war ships; also fight
ing between marines and Spaniards.

15. Second Manila expedition sails from San Francisco. Vesuvius fires her dynamite

guns for the first time at Santiago. Spaniards routed from Guantanamo.

17. Report of Admiral Dewey, under date of June 12, received, stating that the
insurgents under Aguinaldo have practically surrounded Manila and captured
2,500 Spaniards. Congress provided for a hospital corps for the Navy.

20. Congress amends the volunteer-army act of April 22, 1898, concerning officers
assigned to staff duty. The Ladrone Islands taken by the United States
squadron bound for Manila. General Shafter s army arrives off the Cuban
coast near Daiquiri.

22. Captain Sigsbee sinks Spanish destroyer Terror with the St. Paul, near San Juan,

Porto Rico; no casualties. General Shafter s army begins landing at Daiquiri.

23. Landing of Shafter s army shifted to Siboney and continued through the night

by aid of the searchlights on the St. Louis.

24. Train carrying the Torrey Cowboy regiment from Fort D. A. Russell to Jackson

ville, Fla., is derailed at St. Joseph, Mo., killing the engineer and badly
scalding the fireman.

24. 1,114 United States troops defeat 3,000 Spaniards, at La Quasima, Cuba. About

64 Americans killed and wounded, including Capt. Allen K. Capron and
Sergt. Hamiltion Fish, jr., of the Rough Riders. Spain lost about 200 killed
and wounded.

25. General Chaffee takes Sevilla.

20. The first section of the train bearing the Torrey regiment of Rough Riders is run
into, at Tupelo, Miss., by the second, and 5 men are instantly killed and 15
injured. General Shafter occupies Sevilla.

27. General Shafter advances upon Santiago.

28. The third Philippine expedition sails from San Francisco. President proclaims

a blockade of southern Cuba, from Cape Frances to Cape Cruz; also of Porto
Rico.

29. The first Philippine expedition lands at Manila, having captured the Spanish

garrison of the Ladrone Islands en route. General Merritt sails from. San
Francisco to take command of land forces at Manila.

30. Santiago s water supply is cut off from the city.

JULY.

1. Assault on Santiago outworks. General Lawton s division carries El Caney, and
the Roosevelt Rough Riders, with the First, Sixth, and Teritlu Regular
Infantry, take San Juan, after desperate fighting and considerable loss. Ves
sels of the American fleet bombard the harbor defenses. (See Santiago
alphabetical list. ) The Spaniards make an unsuccessful effort to retake San
Juan. Sampson s fleet continues to shell Morro Castle and other forts.

3. Admiral Cervera s squadron makes a dash from Santiago harbor, but is. sighted;
Sampson s fleet promptly attacks, and all the Spanish vessels are sunk or
destroyed; practically the entire naval force of Cervera is killed or captured.
Spain s losses were 300 killed, 150 wounded, and 1,600 captured. The surren
der of Santiago is demanded.

5. Congress passes an act to increase the strength of the Engineer Corps of the Army.

6. The Spanish cruiser, Alphonso XII, attempts to escape from Habana harbor and

is sunk. Lieutenant Hobson and his men are exchanged.



SUMMAEY OF EVENTS OF THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAK. 187

1898.

7. An act of Congress supplying deficiencies in appropriations carries war appropri

ations, to be expended under the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy,
and the Secretary of Agriculture, to the total amount of $226,604,261. Major-
General Miles leaves Washington for Santiago. Dewey takes Isla Grande and
1,300 Spanish prisoners.

8. Congress passes the following acts: (1) To increase the number of quartermaster-

sergeants; (2) to authorize the assignment of a staff signal officer, with the
rank of lieutenant-colonel, to each army corps; (3) to fix the pay and allow
ance of regimental chaplains of volunteers; (4) to reimburse governors of
States and Territories for expenses incurred in aiding the United States to
raise and equip men for the volunteer army.
10. General Linares refuses to surrender Santiago.

13. The U. S. S. St. Louis reaches Portsmouth, N. H.,with 692 Spanish prisoners,

taken when Cervera s fleet was destroyed, among whom are the admiral and
Captain Eulate of the Vizcaya.

14. Santiago surrendered to the United States.

17. The Spanish army under General Toral having marched out and laid down its

arms, the United States flag is raised over Santiago at noon. Losses to Spain,
about 25,000 men, 23,892 rifles, 1,247 carbines, 97 cannon, and large quantities
of small arms and ammunition.

18. Manzanillo is shelled and Spanish vessels destroyed.

20. United States troops land at Gurinica, Porto Kico, the town having surrendered

after a few shots from a war vessel. No casualties. General Miles sails for Porto
Rico. The Government awards a Spanish company the contract for transport
ing to Spain the soldiers surrendered in Cuba.

21. General Wood becomes military governor of Santiago. The report reaches

Washington that the second Philippine expedition has arrived at Cavite.

22. General N. A. Miles reports progress of the Porto Rico expedition from Mole St.

Nicholas, Haiti. General Anderson, at Manila, reports that Aguinaldo has
declared himself dictator of the Philippines.

23. Another expedition for the Philippine Islands sails from San Francisco.

25. General Miles, with 3,500 soldiers, begins landing on Porto Rican soil, near

Ponce, Guanica road, Porto Rico. (See alphabetical list.)

26. Spain, through the French ambassador at Washington, asks President McKinley to



Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 24 of 34)