N. A. (Newton Allen) Strait.

Alphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl online

. (page 29 of 34)
Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 29 of 34)
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Active list: Officers of the line, medical and pay corps.
[Compiled from Naval Register of 1900.]



Rank.


On soa.


On shore.


Admiral


$13 500


$13 500


Rear-admirals:
Fir^t nine


7 500


d 375


Second nine


5 500


4 675


Chiefs of bureaus and brigadier-general Commandant of Marine Corps




5 500


Captains, Navy


3 500


2 975


Judge-advocate-general, and colonels Marine Corps line and staff


3 500


3 500


Commanders Navy


3 500


2 550


Lieutenant-colonel, Marine Corps, line and staff .


3 000


3 000


J,if>ntpnjint,-f omTTmndp>rs Na.yy


2 500


2 125


Majors, Marine Corps, line and staff


2, 500


2 500


Lieutenants, Navy .


1 800


1 530


Captains, Marine Corps:
Line


1 800


800


Staff


2 000


000


Lieutenants (junior grade) , Navy


1,500


,275


First lieutenants and leader of band, Marine Corps


1 500


500


Ensigns, Navy


1,400


,190


Second lieutenants, Marine Corps, chief boatswains, chief gunners, chief carpen
ters, and chief sailmakers


1 400


1 400









Officers and others who are paid, as officers.



Rank.



Naval cadets:

In other than practice ships (first five years)

At Naval Academy and elsewhere (first five years)

Chaplains (first five years)

Professors of mathematics and civil engineers (first five years)

Naval constructors (first five years)

Assistant naval constructors (first four years)

Warrant officers, boatswains, gunners, carpenters, sailmakers, pharmacists, and warrant ma
chinists (first three years)

Mates:

Those in service August 1, 1894

Those appointed since

Secretary to Naval Academy

Commandant s clerks:

At Mare Island Navy- Yard

At naval stations, and first clerks of navy-yards

Second clerks of navy-yards

Paymaster s clerks:

At navy-yards and on receiving ships at Mare Island

At navy-yards and to general storekeepers at Boston, New York, League Island, and
Washington, and on receiving ships at Boston, New York, and League Island

At navy-yards at Portsmouth, Norfolk, and Pensacola

At other stations, yards, and receiving ships; to other general storekeepers; to the gen
eral inspector of the Pay Corps; at the Naval Academy and Naval Home, and on ves
sels of the first rate

On vessels of the second rate and to fleet paymasters

On vessels of the third rate and supply vessels and storeships



At sea.



$950
500
2,500
2,400
3,200
2,000

1,200

1,200

900

1,800

1,800
1,500
1,200

1,800

1 , GOO
1,400



1,300
1,100
1,000



Petty officers, enlisted men.



Per

month.



CHIEF PETTY OFFKT.KS.



Chief masters-at-arms

Chief boatswains mates, chief gunners mates, chief gun captains, chief quartermasters, chief

carpenters mates, chief electricians

Chief machinists

Chief yeomen, hospital stewards

Bandmasters



$65

50
70
60
52



PAY TABLE OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY.

Petty officers, enlisted men Continued.



219



Pel-
month.



PETTY OFFICERS, FIRST CLASS.

Masters-at-arms, first class; boatswains mates, first class; gunners mates, first class; gun
captains, first class; quartermasters, first class; schoolmasters

Machinists, first class

Boilermakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ."..

Coppersmiths and blacksmiths

Plumbers and fitters . . . .. ..

Sailmakers mates; carpenters mates, first class; water tenders; electricians, first class; yeo
men, first class

First musicians

PETTY OFFICERS, SECOND CLASS.

Masters-at-arms, second class; boatswains mates, second class; gunners mates, second class;

gun captains, second class; quartermasters, second class

Machinists, second class

Oilers

Carpenters mates, second class; printers; electricians, second class; yeoinen, second class..

PETTY OFFICERS, THIRD CLASS.

Masters-at-arms, third class; coxswains; quartermasters, third class; gunners mates, third
class; carpenters mates, third class; painters; yeomen, third class; hospital apprentices,
first class ."

SEAMEN, FIRST CLASS.

Seamen gunners

Seamen

Apprentices, first class ,

Firemen, first class

Musicians, first class

SEAMEN, SECOND CLASS.

Ordinary seamen

Apprentices, second class

Firemen, second class

Shipwrights, sailmakers

Firemen, second class; musicians, second class; buglers

Hospital apprentices

SEAMEN, THIRD CLASS.

Landsmen

Apprentices, third class

Coal passers

MESSMEN BRANCH.

Stewards to commanders in chief, stewards to commandants

Cooks to commanders in chief, cooks to commandants

Cabin stewards, wardroom stewards

Cabin cooks, wardroom cooks

Steerage stewards

Steerage cooks

Warrant officers stewards

Warrant officers cooks; ships cooks, fourth class

Ships cooks, first class

Ships cooks, second class

Ships cooks, third class

Mess attendants . . .



Noncommissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the Marine Corps.



Rank.



First en
listment or
first 5
years.



Sergeant-major

Quartermaster-sergeant

Drum major

Gunnery sergeant

First sergeant

Sergeant

Corporal

Drummer and trumpeter. .

Private

Leader of the band

Second leader of band

Musician, first class

Musician, second class



$34 to $37

34 to 37
25 to 28

35 to 38
25 to 28
18 to 21
15 to 18
13 to 16
13 to 16

125
75
60
50



220



KELATIVE BANK AEMY AND NAVY.
RELATIVE BANK AEMY AND NAVY.



Army.



Navy.



General

Lieutenant-general. .

Major-general

Brigadier-general . . .

Colonel

Lieutenant-colonel. .

Major

Captain

First lieutenant ...



Second lieutenant.
Cadet...



Admiral.
Vice-admiral.
Rear-admiral.
Commodore.
Captain.
Commander.
Lieutenant-commander.
Lieutenant.

Navigator (lieutenant, jun
ior grade).
Ensign.
Cadet.



DIVISIONS OF THE AKMY.

Squad. A subdivision of a company, commanded by sergeant or corporal.
Platoon. Half of a company, commanded by a lieutenant.
Company. Not more than 100 men, commanded by a captain.
Battalion. Four companies, commanded by a major.
Regiment. Three battalions, commanded by a colonel.
Brigade. Two or more regiments, commanded by a brigadier-general.
Diriston. Two or more brigades, commanded by a major-general.
Corps. Two or more divisions, commanded by a lieutenant-general.

DIVISIONS OF THE NAVY.

/Squadron. A detachment of a fleet on particular service.

Flotilla. A fleet of small vessels.

Meet. A large number of war vessels under one commander.



WARS AND LOCAL DISTURBANCES, 1775-1899,

IN THE UNITED STATES OR IN WHICH THE UNITED STATES OE SOME ONE OF
THEM WAS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY INVOLVED. 1

[See list of battles for the wars that are printed in SMALL CAPITALS.]

WAR OF THE REVOLUTION (April 19, 1775, to April 11, 1783}. War for the inde
pendence of the United States, extending over the entire territory of the original
thirteen States.

Wyoming Valley war, Pennsylvania (1782-1787}. A local disturbance between set
tlers from Pennsylvania and Connecticut in said valley.

Shay s rebellion, Massachusetts (December, 1786, to January, 1787}. Local; grew out
of burdensome taxation, confined to, and suppressed by militia of, the State of Massa
chusetts.

Whisky insurrection, Pennsylvania (August to November, 1794} Local; arose in con
sequence of certain taxes on domestic spirits. Was suppressed by the authority of
the United States.

NORTHWESTERN INDIAN WAR, OHIO (1790 to August, 1795}. Local, but carried on
by the United States, with, first, an army under General Harmer in 1790; second, an
army under General St. Clair in 1791, and, third, an army under General Wayne in
1794-95.

WAR WITH FRANCE, NAVAL (July 9, 1798, to September 30, 1800} . Carried on by the
United States, through its Navy and privateersmen.

\VAR WITH TRIPOLI, NORTHERN COAST OF AFRICA (June 10, 1801, to June 4, 1805}.
Carried on by the authority of the United States, through its Navy.

Burr s insurrection, Southern Mississippi Valley (November 27, 1806, to February 19,
1807}. Local; troops called out by authority of the General Government. No
fighting.

Chesapeake war, naval (July 9, 1807, to August 5, 1807} . Disturbance growing out of
attack of the British frigate Leopard on the American frigate Chesapeake, as the result
of the British claim to the right of search. The attack occurred at sea off Hampton
Roads, Virginia. The militia were called out by authority of the President.

NORTHWESTERN INDIAN WAR, INDIANA (September 21 to November 18, 1811}. Local,
but carried on by the United States, by an army under General Harrison, who vir
tually ended the war by the battle of Tippecanoe.

Naval engagement (1811}. A naval engagement between the British sloop of war
Little Belt and the American ship President^ on the Atlantic, off southern coast of
United States, resulting from the British claim of right to search.

Florida Seminole Indian war, Florida (August 15 to October, 1812}. Local, conducted
by Georgia volunteers against the Latchaway and Alligator Indians.

WAR OF 1812, WITH GREAT BRITAIN (June. 18, 1812, to February 17, 1815}. Gen
eral; covering nearly entire territory of the United States, especially the seaboard.

Peoria Indian war, Illinois (September 19 to October 21, 1813} . An expedition against
Indians, in which the Illinois and Missouri volunteers and some regulars participated.

CREEK INDIAN WAR, GEORGIA, ALABAMA, MISSISSIPPI, AND TENNESSEE (July 27, 1813,
to August 9, 1814}. Local, but conducted by the authority of the United States.

Lqfttte s pirates, Commodore Patterson s expedition against (1814} Local, but con
ducted by the authority of the United States.

War with the Barbary powers, naval (March 3, 1815, to August 9, 1815}. Conducted
by the authority of the United States, through its Navy, on the northern coast of
Africa.

Seminole Indian war, Florida and Georgia (November 20, 1817, to October 31, 1818}.
Local, but conducted by the authority of the United States.

Lafitte 1 s pirates, Lieutenant Kearney s naval expedition against, at Galveston (1821},
Local, but conducted by the authority of the United States.

1 It is not claimed that this list includes all the minor Indian troubles and expeditions or all local
disturbances.

221



222 WARS AND LOCAL DISTURBANCES, 1775-1899.

Arickarce or Rickarce Indian war, Missouri River, Dakota Territory (August, 1823} .
Local; conducted by the United States.

Fever River expedition against the Indians, Illinois (1827}. Local; under the author
ity of the State of Illinois.

Winnebago Indian disturbances, Wisconsin (June 28 to September 27, 1827}. Local;
not recognized as a war.

Sac and, Fox Indian, war, Illinois (June and July, 1831}. Local; not recognized as



approximating to actual warfare. No fighting.
BLACK HAWK INDIAN WAR, IL



ILLINOIS AND WISCONSIN (April 26, 1832, to September
30, 1832}. Local; carried on by the United States.

Toledo war, Ohio and Michigan (1835-1836}. Local; disturbance arising over dis
putes in regard to boundary line between Ohio and Michigan. Settled by States.

TEXAN WARS PRIOR TO HER ANNEXATION (1835, 1836}. Wars conducted by Texas
as an independent State before its admission into the Union.

Indian Stream war, New Hampshire (November, 1835, to February, 1836}. Local;
disturbance over boundary line between New Hampshire and Canada. Not a United
States war.

Creek Indian war, Georgia and Alabama, (February, 1836, to summer, 1837}. Local,
but conducted by the United States.

FLORIDA OR SEMINOLE INDIAN WAR, FLORIDA, GEORGIA, AND ALABAMA (December
28, 1835, to August 14, 1842}. Local; conducted by authority of the United States.

Sabine or Southwestern Indian disturbance, Louisiana (April, 1836, to April, 1837}.
Local, but conducted by authority of the United States.

Cherokee Indian disturbance and removal (1836 to 1838}. Local; removal of Cherokee
tribe of Indians by the United States. Not recognized as a war.

Osage Indian ivar, Missouri (fall of 1837}. Local, and carried on by the State of
Missouri.

Patriot war, New York and Vermont (1838, 1839}. Not recognized as a war. It was
owing to an attempted rebellion in Canada against the British Government. Troops
were called out in New York and Vermont to prevent any invasion of the United
States territory.

Heatherly disturbance, Missouri (July to November, 1836}. Local; a disturbance by
the Indians near the Iowa and Missouri line; conducted entirely by Missouri vol
unteers.

Mormon war, Missouri (1838}. Local disturbance, which was suppressed by State
authority.

Aroostook war, Maine (1839}. Local disturbance, growing out of disputes as to
boundary between the United States and Canada. Not recognized as a war.

Dorr s rebellion, Rhode Island (May 3 to June 28, 1842}. Local; was an attempt of
the suffrage party, under Governor T. W. Dorr, to seize the State government. Was
suppressed by State authority.

Mormon war, Illinois (1844}. Local disturbance; suppressed by State authority.

MEXICAN WAR (April 24, 1846, to May 30, 1848}. Carried on by the General Govern
ment, and confined to the enemy s country.

Cayuse Indian war, Oregon (December, 1847, to July, 1848}. Conducted by the
United States.

Cuban troubles (1849-1851}. Neither the United States Government nor any partic
ular State was in any way involved in these troubles, except in attempts to prevent
the fitting out and departure from the United States of expeditions against the Spanish
authorities.

Texas and New Mexico Indian war (1849, 1850-1855}. Carried on by the United
States and mainly with the regulars.

Calif ornia Indian disturbance (1851, 1852}. Local, but under authority of the United
States.

Utah Indian disturbances (1850-1853}. Local, but under authority of the United
States.

Rogue River Indian war, Oregon (June 17 to July 3, 1851, August 8 to September, 1853,
March to June, 1856}. Local, but conducted by the United States.

Naval expedition to Japan, Commodore Pernfs (1853, 1854}. Not recognized as a
war. Made by authority of the United States through its Navy.

China disturbances (1854}. Engagements by a vessel of the United States Navy
with some Chinese vessels at Shanghai, China.

Oregon Indian war, Oregon (August and September, 1854}. Local, but under author
ity of the United States.

Nicaraguan troubles (1854-1858}. A naval attack on Greytown in 1854 and naval
operations for the purpose of suppressing filibustering expeditions, especially
Walker s.



WAKS ATSD LOCAL DISTURBANCES, 1775-1899. 223

Kansas troubles (1854-1859}. Local disturbances between the early settlers in the
Territory of Kansas, in which the United States was not involved.

Cuban troubles (February, 1854). Eemarks on Cuban troubles of 1849-1851 apply
also to this period-.

Yakima Indian war (October and November, 1855}. Local, but under authority of
the United States.

Klainath and Salmon Hirer Indian war, Oregon and Idaho (January to March, 1855}.
Local, but under the authority of the United States.

Florida Indian war, Florida (December 15, 1855, to May, 1858}. Local, but under
the authority of the United States.

John Brown s raid, Virginia (October, 1859}. Local disturbance, suppressed by the
State authorities, assisted by some United States troops.

WAR OF THE REBELLION (April 15, 1861, to August SO, 1866}. The last-named
date is held by the Supreme Court as the legal termination of the war. On that date
President Johnson issued a proclamation stating that the war was at an end, the
proclamation being necessary, as the State of Texas was not finally subdued until that

It is held by the Pension Bureau and Secretary of the Interior that enlistments in
loyal States after April 13, 1865, will not be deemed as rebellion service for pension
able purposes. Enlistments in any other States, Territories, or District of Columbia
after June 1, 1865, will not be deemed as enlistments for the war of the rebellion.

It is held that enlistments in the United States Navy after July 1, 1865, were not
in or for the war of the rebellion. To overcome this the burden of proof is upon the
claimant.

In another decision it is held by the Assistant Secretary of the Interior that the
technical legal termination of the war was August 20, 1866. Service rendered after
July, 1865, will be presumed not to have been in said war, and that burden of proof
will be upon the claimant.

Service rendered after April 2, 1866, must be shown to have been rendered in some
connection with the war as existing in the State of Texas.

Service rendered in the State of Tennessee after June 13, 1865, will be presumed
not to have been in said w r ar.

President Johnson issued a peace proclamation May 9, 1865.

Recruiting for the war ceased immediately after General Lee s surrender April 9,
1865, and muster-out began April 29, 1865. " The last battle or skirmish is reported
to have been fought May 13, 1865, and the last Confederate forces surrendered May
26, 1865.

The blockade was raised by proclamation June 23, 1865, and General Grant s final
official report of military operations is dated July 22, 1865. J

Sioux INDIAN WAR, MINNESOTA (August, 1862 to 1863}. Local, but under the au
thority of the United States.

Campaign against the Cheyenne Indians (1861-1864}. Local, but under the author
ity of the United States.

Campaign against Indians, Oregon, Idaho, and California (1865-1868}. Local, but
under the authority of the United States.

Fenian invasion of Canada (May and June, 1866}. Neither the General Govern
ment nor any particular State was in any manner involved in this affair, except that
the expedition was fitted out in and set out from the territory of the United States.

Campaign against the Indians, Kansas, Colorado, and Indian Territory (1867-1869}.
Local, but under the authority of the United States.

Cuban troubles the Republic (1867-1878} .Remarks on Cuban troubles of 1849-1851
apply also to this period.

Modoc Indian war, Oregon (1872,1873}. Local, but under the authority of the
United States.

Campaign against the Apaches, Arizona (1873}. Local, but under the authority of
the United States.

Arkansas, war for possession of State government of (February to May, 1874}. A
local attempt to overthrow the State government.

Campaign against the Indians, Kansas, Colorado, Texas, Indian Territory, and New
Mexico (1874-1875}. Local, but under the authority of the United States.

Louisiana, war for possession of State government of (September, 1874}, A local
attempt to overthrow the State government. United States troops not directly
engaged.

Campaign against Cheyenne and Sioux Indians, Dakota (1876-1877}. Local, but
under the authority of the United States.

1 From decision of the Assistant Secretary of the Interior, May 5, 1894.



224 WARS AND LOCAL DISTURBANCES, 1775-1899.

Railroad strike, Pennsylvania and Maryland (1877).

Nez Perce Indian war, Utah (1877). Local, but under the authority of the United
States.

Bannock Indian war, Idaho, Washington Territory, and Wyoming -Territory (1878).
Local, but under the authority of the United States.

Campaign against the Cheyenne Indians, Dakota and Montana (1878-1879). Local,
but under the authority of the United States.

White River campaign against the Ute Indians, Utah and Colorado (September 29 to
October 5, 1879). Local, but under the authority of the United States.

THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAR.

From April 21, 1898, to April 11, 1899. (The protocol was signed August 12, 1898. )

For a period of ten years, from 1868 to 1878, the inhabitants of Cuba were engaged
in a struggle to free themselves from the yoke of Spanish tyranny, but were defeated.
The Spanish Government made most liberal promises, but failed to keep them.

Hostilities were renewed which lasted for three years, from 1895 to 1898. The inhabi
tants were in a most deplorable condition; the reconcen trades men, women, and
children, noncombatants were by edict of the Spanish captain-general, Weyler,
driven from their homes, crowded together without proper food or shelter, and died
by thousands of disease and starvation.

The attention and sympathy of the American people had for several years been
attracted to this miserable condition of the Cubans, and many attempts had been
made to relieve their distress.

At the beginning of 1898 about 40 per cent of the inhabitants had perished. At
this juncture two events happened which increased the tension in the United States.
One was the exposure of a letter written by Senor de Lome, the Spanish minister to
the United States, to a friend, grossly reflecting upon the President; the other was
a demand by the Spanish Government for the recall from Cuba of Consul-General
Lee, which was refused.

On the 25th of January, 1898, the United States battleship Maine was ordered to
Habana Harbor, on a peaceful mission, by the authority of the United States, and
on the 15th of February, 1898, between 9 and 10 o clock p. m., the vessel was blown
up by a submarine mine, 266 sailors loosing their lives. A searching investigation
followed without fixing the responsibility. Congress immediately appropriated
$50,000,000 "for the national defense and for each and every purpose connected
therewith, to be expended at the discretion of the President."

After fruitless effort to bring about an amicable settlement, on April 11, 1898, the
President asked Congress to intervene to stop the Cuban war, and by force to estab
lish a stable government on the island. On April 19, 1898, Congress passed resolu
tions, which were signed by the President at 11.24 a. m. the following day, declaring
"that the people of the island of Cuba are, and by right ought to be, free and inde
pendent," and demanding that Spain at once relinquish its authority in the island,
etc. It also authorized the President to use the entire military force of the United
States to carry the resolution into effect.

The diplomatic relations between the two countries ceased April 21, 1898, and it
was held that a state of war existed from that date. Blockade of the principal Cuban
ports was declared April 22, and on the 23d the President called for 125,000 volun
teers to serve two years, and on May 24 the Spanish Government announced that a
state of war between that country and the United States existed.

The protocol of agreement between the United States and Spain was signed at
Washington, D. C., August 12, 1898, by William K. Day and Jules Cambon.

The treaty of peace was signed at Paris December 10, 1898, by William R. Day,
Cushman K. Davis, William P. Frye, George Gray, and Whitelaw Reid, for the
United States, and by Eugenio Montero Rios, B. de Abarzuza, J. de Garnica, W. R.
de Villa Urrutia, and Rafael Cerero, for the Kingdom of Spain.

Signed at Paris, December 10, 1898; ratification advised by the Senate February
6, 1899; ratified by the President February 6, 1899; ratified by Her Majesty the
Queen Regent of Spain March 19, 1899; ratifications exchanged at Washington April
11, 1899; proclaimed, Washington, April 11, 1899.



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848,

ALPHABETICALLY AKEANGED, INCLUDING CHRONOLOGICAL SUMMARY OF EVENTS

OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR, 1754-1 7t>3.

The French and Indian war was carried on between the English and French colo
nies in America for the possession of North America. France claimed the whole
region west of the Alleghanies as a part of the basins of the St. Lawrence and Missis
sippi. England claimed the country west of its Atlantic settlements. The French
numbered about 80,000 whites assisted by the Indians; the English more than
1,100,000, but were divided into 13 discordant governments. The war ended in
1763, on the signing of the treaty of peace in Paris. France resigned to England all
her possessions east of the Mississippi, and Spain, New Orleans, and her possessions
west of that river.
Abraham, Plains of, near Quebec, Canada Sept, 12-13, 1759.

Under Gens. James Wolfe and Louis J. M. Montcalm.
Wolfe captured Quebec on the 12th. Both generals fell.
Loss: English, 664; French, 640.

Allegheny Mountains, Pennsylvania Sept. 21 , 1758.

Bloody Pond (near Lake George), New York Sept. 8, 1 755.

Fort Beau Sejour, Nova Scotia (Canada) June 16, 1755.

Fort Frontenac, Canada Aug. 27, 1 758.

Fort Gaspereaux, Nova Scotia (Canada) June 17, 1755.

Fort Necessity, on Great Meadows, about 50 miles from

Cumberland, Pa July 4, 1754.

Fort Niagara (east side of Niagara River, near mouth), New

York July 25, 1759.

Fort William Henry, Lake George, New York (hotel of same

name now stands on the spot) July 6, 1757.

Great Meadows (first bloodshed) , Pennsylvania May 28, 1754.

Lake George, head of, New York Aug. 26, 1755.

Louisburg, Cape Breton Island (Canada) July 26, 1758.



Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 29 of 34)